Endless Innovation


 

Bruce Lee: How to live successfully in a world with no rules

Bruce Lee would have turned 80 years old on November 27, 2020. The legendary actor and martial artist's daughter, Shannon Lee, shares some of his wisdom and his philosophy on self help in a new book titled "Be Water, My Friend: The Teachings of Bruce Lee."In this video, Shannon shares a story of the fight that led to her father beginning a deeper philosophical journey, and how that informed his unique expression of martial arts called Jeet Kune Do.One lesson passed down from Bruce Lee was his us...
Tags: Life, Personality, Innovation, Extreme Sports, Philosophy, Emotions, Bruce Lee, Personal Growth, Shannon, Shannon Lee


3 reasons for information exhaustion – and what to do about it

An endless flow of information is coming at us constantly: It might be an article a friend shared on Facebook with a sensational headline or wrong information about the spread of the coronavirus. It could even be a call from a relative wanting to talk about a political issue. All this information may leave many of us feeling as though we have no energy to engage. As a philosopher who studies knowledge-sharing practices, I call this experience “epistemic exhaustion." The term “epistemic" comes fr...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, News, Learning, Knowledge, Social Media, Mental Health, United States, Innovation, American Psychological Association, Garry Kasparov, Lilliana Mason, James Owen Weatherall, Kevin Vallier, Cailin O Connor, Michael Hannon


Top 5 theories on the enigmatic monolith found in Utah desert

A monolithic object found in a remote part of Utah caused worldwide speculation about its origins.The object is very similar to the famous monolith from Stanley Kubrick's "2001: Space Odyssey".The object could be work of an artist or even have extraterrestrial origins. An enigmatic "monolith" found in a Utah desert on November 18th has become the source of worldwide attention and speculation, with Internet denizens looking for something more light-hearted to talk about as the tumultuous 2020 dr...
Tags: Art, Utah, Space, Movies, Innovation, Evolution, Arthur C Clarke, Stanley Kubrick, New Mexico, Mars, Kubrick, Alien, Extraterrestrial Life, Art History, Utah Department of Public Safety, DPS


Lonely? Hungry? The same part of the brain worries about both

A new study demonstrates that our brains crave social interaction with the same areas used to crave food. Hungry test subjects also reported a lack of desire to socialize, proving the existence of "hanger." Other studies have suggested that failure to socialize can lead to stress eating in rodents. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic started, an epidemic of loneliness existed. This is not only unpleasant for those involved but has measurably adverse effects on their mental and physical health. Th...
Tags: Food, Neuroscience, Mit, Brain, Hunger, Innovation, Emotions, Loneliness, Sulk Institute


Diamonds have been created at room temperature in a lab

Diamonds aren't just beautiful, they're also excellent at cutting through most anything.Researchers have worked out how to create the gems without the high temperatures that accompany their natural formation.The researchers were able to create two different types of diamonds that also occur naturally. It may not always be cool to admit you were a fan of Superman as a kid, but one thing about Supe that was inarguably cool was that he could close his hands around coal—chunks of carbon—squeeze, an...
Tags: Superman, Earth, Diamond, Materials, Geology, Innovation, Invention, Melbourne, Natural Resources, McCulloch, RMIT, RMIT University, Australian National University ANU, Bradby, Jodie Bradby, Lonsdaleite


A Chinese plant has evolved to hide from humans

A plant coveted in China for its medicinal properties has developed camouflage that makes it less likely to be spotted and pulled up from the ground.In areas where the plant isn't often picked, it's bright green. In harvested areas, it's now a gray that blends into its rocky surroundings.Herbalists in China have been picking the Fritillaria dealvayi plant for 2,000 years. There are a growing number of examples of animals' evolutionary path diverting around humans and human encroachment. From th...
Tags: England, China, Nature, Innovation, Agriculture, Plants, Anthropocene, Evolution, Biodiversity, University of Exeter, Liu, Stevens, Martin Stevens, Fritillaria, NIU, Biosphere


MIT breakthrough in deep learning could help reduce errors

MIT researchers claim that deep learning neural networks need better uncertainty analysis to reduce errors. "Deep evidential regression" reduces uncertainty after only one pass on a network, greatly reducing time and memory. This could help mitigate problems in medical diagnoses, autonomous driving, and much more. We've all seen the movies: a mad genius creates breakthrough artificial intelligence only to have it turn on them—and humanity. Midway through the film, the robots are taking over. B...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, Technology, Russia, Mit, Artificial Intelligence, Medical Research, Engineering, Innovation, Oxford, Machine Learning, Clarke, Ai, Derek, Mckinsey, Eddy


Vegans are more likely to suffer broken bones, study finds

The study found that vegans were 43% more likely to suffer fractures than meat eaters.Similar results were observed for vegetarians and fish eaters, though to a lesser extent.It's possible to be healthy on a vegan diet, though it takes some strategic planning to compensate for the nutrients that a plant-based diet can't easily provide. Non-meat diets may help you maintain healthy cholesterol, body weight, and blood-sugar levels. But these diets, particularly veganism, may also boost your risk o...
Tags: Health, Food, Diet, Medical Research, Innovation, Oxford, Vegan, Bmc, Vegetarian, Bones


Skyborne whales: The rise (and fall) of the airship

Large airships were too sensitive to wind gusts and too sluggish to win against aeroplanes. But today, they have a chance to make a spectacular return.For decades, die-hard fans of airships have had to accept the fact that their beloved airborne vessels had no chance of making their way back to air travel routes. The ever more technologically advanced aeroplanes are more comfortable and practical than these sluggish giants. Yet the situation changed over a year ago when people in Sweden started ...
Tags: Europe, England, London, Sweden, Navy, France, Germany, Environment, US, European Union, Flight, Cologne, Dusseldorf, Atlantic, Pollution, Paris


How long does turkey take to thaw? There’s a calculator for that

This year, many people will be making a Thanksgiving dinner for the first time. It's often harder than it looks. Luckily, an online calculator website has one just for thawing turkey, and can explain why you need to wait so long. The website has other calculators as well, for needs you didn't know you had. This year, with the Center for Disease Control advising Americans to stay home for Thanksgiving, many people will be faced with the prospect of preparing dinner for a smaller table or cooking...
Tags: Food, Technology, Thanksgiving, Diet, Turkey, Physics, Innovation, Poland, Food Safety, Food Science, Center for Disease Control, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Jagiellonian University, Omni Calculator, Maria Kluziak, Wojciech Sas


Zebrafish give new insight to sound sensitivity in autism

Fragile X syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by changes in a gene that scientists call the "fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)" gene. People who have FXS or autism often struggle with sensitivity to sound. According to the research team, FXS is caused by the disruption of a gene. By disrupting that same gene in zebrafish larvae, they can examine the effects and begin to understand more about this disrupted gene in the human brain.Using the zebrafish, Dr. Constantin and the team were able t...
Tags: Health, Dna, Neuroscience, Intelligence, Fish, Brain, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Mind, Sound, Senses, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Constantin, Cognitive Science, Ethan Scott


Kind by nature: Have faith in humanity

Optimism is what runs the world, and cynicism only serves as an excuse for the lazy. Evil is not inherent to our nature. We have achieved so much because we are friendly and decent. The radical thinker Rutger Bregman paints a new, more beautiful portrait of humanity.Try standing in front of the mirror and remember the worst things ever done – by you personally, and by Homo sapiens as a whole. And smile, because history shows that we are doing much better than you think. This subversive idea belo...
Tags: New York, London, Happiness, Compassion, Sociology, New York Times, Innovation, Brazil, Community, Venezuela, Hitler, World Trade Center, William Golding, Humanity, Dresden, Malcolm Gladwell


How psychedelics help you "die before you die"

The concept of "dying before you die" lies at the heart of religious tradition, argues Brian Muraresku.This secret ritual connects the Eleusinian Mysteries with the origins of Christianity. In "The Immortality Key," Muraresku speculates that psychedelic wine could have been the original Christian Eucharist. After a 20-year ban on clinical psychedelics research, the U.S. government approved trials on DMT in 1990. At first, Rick Strassman, a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the Univ...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Death, Drugs, Religion, David, Christianity, Innovation, Storytelling, Catholic, Damascus, Johns Hopkins, Hopkins, Derek, Peter, Mdma


The 3 keys to solving complex global problems

What does it actually take to drive large-scale change? Co-Impact founder and CEO Olivia Leland argues that it takes more than money, voting in elections, and supporting your favorite nonprofit. Solving complex global issues takes philanthropy in concert with community advocacy, support from businesses, innovation, an organized vision, and a plan to execute it. Leland has identified three areas that need to be addressed before real and meaningful change can happen. To effectively provide support...
Tags: Education, Entrepreneur, Society, Teaching, Innovation, Global development, Collaboration, Philanthropy, Cooperation, Social Change, Pratham, Leland, Global Issues, Olivia Leland, Right Level model Co Impact


Water can become two different liquids, prove researchers

Water can be in two liquid states under cold temperatures, shows new research.The scientists used x-ray lasers and computer simulations.The discovery has applications across a variety of fields due to water's ubiquity. Water is an essential life force for humanity and our planet. But despite it's omnipresence, there's much we have still to learn about the fateful combination of hydrogen and oxygen atoms that comprises this near-magical substance. Now a new study proves water can have two diffe...
Tags: Sweden, California, Water, Discovery, Chemistry, Physics, Canada, Innovation, Korea, Nilsson, Anders Nilsson, Stockholm University, CUNY, St Francis Xavier University, Kate the Chemist, Nicolas Giovambattista He


Hyperbaric chambers used to reverse aging in "Holy Grail" study

Israeli scientists reversed two major processes involved in aging.Their new therapy counteracted the shortening of telomeres and the accumulation of old and dying cells.The study participants underwent oxygen treatments in hyperbaric chambers. Amid all the turmoil 2020 has brought us (and it's not over yet), is there suddenly news that human aging has been reversed? Scientists from Israel carried out a study that might prove groundbreaking in the human quest to slow the biological march of time...
Tags: Israel, Innovation, Tel Aviv University, Efrati, Shamir Medical Center, Shai Efrati, Sagol Center of Hyperbaric Medicine, Amir Hadanny, Hadanny


Researchers 3D bioprint realistic human heart model for the first time

3D bioprinting involves using printers loaded with biocompatible materials to manufacture living or lifelike structures.In a recent paper, a team of engineers from Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering developed a new way to 3D bioprint a realistic model of the human heart.The model is flexible and strong enough to be sutured, meaning it could improve the ways surgeons train for cardiac surgeries. A team of engineers has created a new method for 3D bioprinting realistic, full-size...
Tags: Health, Biology, Medical Research, Engineering, Innovation, Carnegie Mellon University, Synthetic Biology, Feinberg, Adam Feinberg, ACS Biomaterials Science Engineering, Bioprinting, Eman Mirdamadi


Nicaragua is the most triangular country in the world

Sierra Leone is the world's roundest country and Egypt the squarest. But you knew that.Bet you didn't know which is the world's most triangle-shaped country.That is until now, because someone's figured out that it's... Nicaragua! Circles, squares and triangles So you like triangles. And you know how to hold a tune. Then, like Alt-J, you could write a song about how "triangles are (your) favorite shape". But what if you're left-brained rather than right-brained, and prefer maps and maths over no...
Tags: Maps, Mexico, Turkey, United States, Egypt, Sierra Leone, Innovation, Vatican, South America, Alps, Vietnam, Nicaragua, Laos, Geography, Lesotho, Tom


Newly discovered mineral petrovite could revolutionize batteries

Russian scientists discover a new mineral in the volcanic area of Kamchatka in the country's far east.The mineral dubbed "petrovite" can be utilized to power sodium-ion batteries.Batteries based on salt would be cheaper to produce than lithium-ion batteries. Researchers from St. Petersburg University in Russia found a beautiful new mineral species called "petrovite," created in the volcanos of the remote region of Kamchatka in the country's far east.The research team that found petrovite was he...
Tags: Travel, Energy, Technology, Russia, Discovery, University, Chemistry, Geology, Innovation, St Petersburg, Kamchatka, Peter, Russian Academy of Sciences, St Petersburg University, Filatov, Far Eastern Branch


New study argues that migrating from cities, not travel bans, slows spread of disease

Moving from densely-populated urban regions is more effective in stopping the spreading of disease than closing borders.Two researchers from Spain and Italy ran 10,000 simulations to discover that travel bans are ultimately ineffective. Smaller cities might suffer high rates of infection, but the nation overall could benefit from this model. As the holiday season approaches, tens of millions of Americans will not be seeing their families or loved ones this year. On the flip side, tens of milli...
Tags: Facebook, Government, New York City, Immigration, Americas, America, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Spain, Infrastructure, Migration, Italy, Innovation, Derek, Papo, United States Italy


Are humans cruel by nature?

How have humans managed to accomplish significantly more than any other species on the planet? Historian Rutger Bregman believes the quality that makes us special is that we "evolved to work together and to cooperate on a scale that no other species in the whole animal kingdom has been able to do."Pushing back against the millennia-old idea that humans are inherently evil beneath their civilized surface, which is known as 'veneer theory', Bregman says that it's humanity's cooperative spirit and ...
Tags: Psychology, Animals, Friendship, Society, War, Sociology, Innovation, Collaboration, Philosophy, Evolution, Morality, Humanity, Bregman, Rutger Bregman


Adult language-learning changes how the brain’s hemispheres function

Language processing has long been thought to occur primarily in the left hemisphere of the brain.A new study used fMRI on groups of adults to examine how the brain's left and right hemispheres contribute to learning a new language.The results showed that, as the participants progressed, they began to use more of their right hemisphere, but only for some aspects of language processing. Learning a new language as an adult changes how the brain's hemispheres contribute to language processing, acco...
Tags: Learning, Neuroscience, Brain, Language, Innovation, Mind, Broca, Steve Kaufmann, Wernicke


Zircon in a meteorite opens the door on Mars’ past

A meteorite from Mars unexpectedly contains zircons that reveal the planets history. The rock likely comes from one of the solar system's tallest volcanoes. Analyzing the zirconium required smashing some very expensive rock. Just last week, we wrote about one lab's conclusion that water may be a common byproduct in the formation of rocky planets. This week, the same lab has announced that the very same Martian meteorite that led to that earlier finding has yet another secret to reveal: It co...
Tags: Space, Earth, Discovery, Geology, Innovation, Planets, Mars, Extraterrestrial Life, University of Copenhagen, northwest Africa, Tharsis, Cosmos, Zircon, Bizzarro, Globe Institute, Martin Bizzarro


The universe works like a huge human brain, discover scientists

A new study finds similarities between the structures and processes of the human brain and the cosmic web.The research was carried out by an astrophysicist and a neurosurgeon.The two systems are vastly different in size but resemble each other in several key areas. Scientists found similarities in the workings of two systems completely different in scale – the network of neuronal cells in the human brain and the cosmic web of galaxies. Researchers studied the two systems from a variety of angle...
Tags: Astronomy, Biology, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Universe, Mind, Galaxy, Astrophysics, University of Bologna, Cosmos, Michio Kaku, Human body, University of Verona, Franco Vazza, Alberto Feletti


Experts fear Thanksgiving COVID spikes—Can you have your turkey and stay healthy too ?

Holiday travel and family gatherings will bolster America's already growing number of coronavirus cases, experts warn.The CDC recommends families celebrating with people outside their quarantine households follow extra precautions.For families staying physically distant, there remain many ways to connect with each other this Thanksgiving. Like any holiday, Thanksgiving has always had challenges mixed in with the fun. There are maddening travel logistics, crafting a dinner to meet everyone's die...
Tags: Health, Family, Cdc, Relationships, America, Communication, Society, Cnn, Public Health, Netflix, United States, Innovation, Cbs, Associated Press, Friendships, Tripadvisor


Study finds matriarchal societies are good for women's health

An isolated ethnic group in China maintains a matriarchal society, much to the benefit of their health. The Mosuo women were not only healthier than women living under patriarchy, but were healthier than the men too. The findings support the idea that having a degree of autonomy and resource control is good for your health Every debate about what is innate to humans and what is learned from society runs into the problem of having to rely on humans who live in some kind of society for reference. ...
Tags: Gender, China, Women, Innovation, Sichuan, University of New Mexico, CRP, Yunnan, Adam Reynolds, Gender Roles, Gende equality, Tibet Long, National Academy of Sciences Levels of C, Siobhán Mary Mattison


COVID-19 amplified America’s devastating health gap. Can we bridge it?

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated America's health disparities, widening the divide between the haves and have nots.Studies show disparities in wealth, race, and online access have disproportionately harmed underserved U.S. communities during the pandemic.To begin curing this social aliment, health systems like Northwell Health are establishing relationships of trust in these communities so that the post-COVID world looks different than the pre-COVID one. In the last 100 years, we've made i...
Tags: Health, Usa, New York, Race, US, America, Poverty, Mental Health, Public Health, United States, Innovation, Health Care, OECD, Inequality, Stanford University, American Medical Association


New bed, no sleep? First night blues

Have you ever woken up in a new place and noted with disappointment that you are still tired? I am thinking, for example, of the first night in a hotel at the start of your holidays, a night staying with friends, or the first night of a business trip. We aren't talking here about the first night with a new lover, because then there are other variables at play that might give false results in the study we want to conduct.The phenomenon of FNE, or 'first night effect', has been known of for a long...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Sleep, Brain, Innovation, Consciousness, Human body, Masako Tamaki, Yuki Sasaki, Annie JaroszewiczReprinted


'Muscular bonding': The strange psychological effects of moving together

Muscular bonding, a term coined by the veteran and historian William McNeill, describes how individuals engaged in synchronous movement often experience feelings of euphoria and connection to the group.Psychologists have proposed that muscular bonding, or interpersonal entrainment, is a group-level adaptation that helped early human groups outcompete other groups.Muscular bonding can help people form cohesive groups, but it could come at cost. Humans have a penchant for moving together in uniso...
Tags: Psychology, Sociology, Innovation, Evolution, Morality, Humanity, McNeill, Jonathan Haidt, Haidt, IPE, William McNeill


Isolated island group is now one of the world's largest animal sanctuaries

The small island group of Tristan da Cunha has created one of the world's largest ocean sanctuaries. Neither fishing nor extractive activities will be allowed in the area, which is three times the size of the United Kingdom. Animals protected by this zone include penguins, sharks, and many seabirds. Tristan da Cunha, a group of volcanic islands with a mere 245 permanent residents situated between South Africa and Argentina in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, has recently become one of the larg...
Tags: UK, Animals, Environment, Fish, Birds, Atlantic, South Africa, Conservation, Oceans, United Kingdom, Innovation, Cape Town, Argentina, RSPB, Atlantic Ocean, Tristan Da Cunha