Art


 

IRS: Executors Undervalued Prince’s Estate By $80 Million

The IRS determined that Prince’s estate is worth $163.2m, overshadowing the $82.3m valuation submitted by Comerica Bank & Trust, the estate’s administrator. The discrepancy primarily involves Prince’s music publishing and recording interests, according to court documents. – The Guardian
Tags: Art, People, Prince, Irs, Comerica Bank Trust, 01.04.20


The TikTok Musical That’s Already Earned $1 Million

At a running time of 51 minutes, and with perhaps only half the numbers required for a full adaptation of the 2007 animated Oscar-winner, this “Ratatouille” is a mere appetizer. But with a winning Tituss Burgess as the human embodiment of Remy, the Parisian rodent who can stir up a mean beef bourguignon, it is a promising first course. And the harbinger of a future property on the school circuit or maybe even in some professional incarnation. (Another leading indicator: The Actors Fund announce...
Tags: Art, Theatre, Tituss Burgess, 01.02.21


The Institutions That Used To Support creative Work

“Artists in the middle of the twentieth century flourished not because the economy was inherently favorable to them, but as a result of powerful economic winds and the groups that joined in an attempt to harness them. Together, creative class groups wielded the crowbar of politics in an attempt to pry some autonomy out of consumer capitalism. If these standards of living were sharply eroded over the last 50 years, it is partly because the institutions that once upheld them had also fallen away....
Tags: Art, Issues, 01.04.21


Frida Kahlo Has Become An Icon – At The Expense Of Her Art?

Her claims to eminence were those of someone who as a woman of her time, and disabled too, needed to find ways to make herself heard. It is Kahlo’s supporters, trumpeting her — rather than name-checking her — as a martyr or mater dolorosa to everything from feminism, racial and sexual fluidity to anti-colonialism and anti-capitalism, that do her a great disservice. – The Critic
Tags: Art, People, Frida Kahlo, Kahlo, 01.21


Metropolitan Opera Orchestra Musicians Protest Met Tactics

“Every other major orchestra has been compensated since the very beginning of the pandemic. Met management is using the pandemic opportunistically. They are not seeking a short-term crisis-plan to balance out pandemic circumstances. They are seeking permanent cuts. The cuts they seek are so deep that the orchestra would need unrealistic salary gains over the next quarter-century just to get back to current salaries,” says the statement. – OperaWire
Tags: Art, Music, 12.31.20


25 Dancers, Choreographers And Companies To Watch In 2021

Want to know where dance is going in 2021 as the world (hopefully) comes out of COVID lockdown? Here are 25 bright lights to follow. – Dance Magazine
Tags: Art, Dance, 01.01.21


Lessons For Classical Music After The Lockdown

“Yes, musical organizations will talk about learning pragmatic lessons from this pandemic. But as the industry begins the long march back toward some semblance of normalcy, let’s hope the lessons internalized also include keeping sight of the art form’s unique modes of immediacy, of intimacy, of direct expression, and of vulnerability. These qualities carried classical music through 2020 — and many of the rest of us too.” – Boston Globe
Tags: Art, Music, 12.16.20


Congress Passes New Controls On Antiquities In The Defense Authorization Bill

Regulators have long worried that the opacity of the antiquities trade, where buyers and sellers are seldom identified, even to the parties in a transaction, made it an easy way to shroud illicit transfers of money. The new legislation empowers federal regulators to design measures that would remove secrecy from transactions. – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Visual, 01.01.21, Congress Passes New Controls On Antiquities


Study: Was Stone Henge Built As A Giant Amplifier?

The study found that people who spoke or played music inside the monument would have heard clear reverberations against the massive standing stones. Testing on the model also suggests that the stones increased the volume on interior sound, kept exterior sound out, and made it hard for anyone outside the structure to hear what was going on inside. – Artnet
Tags: Art, Visual, 12.09.03


Study: Was Stonehenge Built As A Giant Amplifier?

The study found that people who spoke or played music inside the monument would have heard clear reverberations against the massive standing stones. Testing on the model also suggests that the stones increased the volume on interior sound, kept exterior sound out, and made it hard for anyone outside the structure to hear what was going on inside. – Artnet
Tags: Art, Visual, 12.09.03


Star Museum Directors Talk The Future Of Museums

As the Ford Foundation’s president, Darren Walker, recently told me, “museums are in a crisis because America is in a crisis.” Museums shape narratives that matter, so it’s no surprise young people are passionate about pushing for change. It’s time now to do better—a lot better. That means looking at ourselves honestly and fixing a whole lot about the way we work as we make authentic commitments toward equity, inclusion, access, and anti-racism. – Artnet
Tags: Art, America, Visual, Ford Foundation, Darren Walker, 01.01.21


Quibi Didn’t Last, But Its Shows May Move To Roku

The short-form site crashed and burned mere months after rolling out millions of dollars worth of shows, but Roku is already offering ad-supported free content through its own channel on its own devices. – Variety
Tags: Art, Media, Roku, 01.04.21


John Outterbridge, Sculptor Of Cast-Offs And Inspirational Arts Mentor, 87

Outterbridge, also an influential (and “magical”) arts administrator and educator, was a master of the assemblage, using the sculptures to tell stories about history and culture. “In castoffs there are profound treasures. … That’s what soul food is about. Chitterlings and pig feet are all about the notion that, as a people, we’ve taken the scraps, the castoffs, and made them into something so tasty that one can’t help but suck right down to the bones.” – The New York Times
Tags: Art, People, 01.01.21, John Outterbridge, Outterbridge


The Return Of The (High School) Radio Play

The teen actors couldn’t perform outside because it was too cold, and they couldn’t film because their school went virtual partway through the term. So voice recording and mixing, original music writing, sound creation, and general learning about radio drama it was. One senior actress: “You really have to concentrate on how you use different pitches and tones to convey to the audience what the scene is about. And that takes a lot of focus.” – Colorado Public Radio
Tags: Art, Theatre, 12.30.20


Painting In Apocalyptic Times

The Canadian artist painting 2020 for a spot across from Salvador Dalí’s Santiago El Grande, which includes a nuclear bomb going off: “I wanted the apocalypse I was creating to be different — different from traditional ending-of-the-world scenes where some people are being elevated and some people are being damned to hell.” – CBC
Tags: Art, Salvador Dalí, Visual, 12.30.20, Santiago El Grande


The Acts Of Art And Creativity Censored In 2020

The year was terrible for global pandemic reasons, but also for brutality against artists, journalists, writers, playwrights, cinematographers, and more. How bad was it? “Civil rights were found to have deteriorated in nearly every country.” – Hyperallergic
Tags: Art, Issues, 01.01.21


A 33-Meter Hillside Vagina Sculpture Is Highlighting Brazil’s Cultural And Political Rifts

The artist, Juliana Notori, “said the scarlet hillside vulva was intended to ‘question the relationship between nature and culture in our phallocentric and anthropocentric western society’ and provoke debate over the ‘problematisation of gender.'” Brazil’s alarmingly right-wing government, and its supporters, seem to be provoked. – The Guardian (UK)
Tags: Art, Brazil, Visual, 01.03.21, Juliana Notori


The Writer Who Wants Readers To Feel Like Voyeurs

After all, why should we have access to the characters’ sex lives? Raven Leilani, author of Luster, says “I try to portray it in the way that moves me when I see it, when it is awkward and silly, which it often is. To depict it that way is to make it tender; what it looks like when two bodies, especially two bodies that are very different, get to know each other. … For me that is the most enjoyable kind of sex to watch and to read.” – The Guardian (UK)
Tags: Art, Words, Raven Leilani, 01.02.21


In Many Countries, Losing Restaurants Means Losing Community

Diego Salazar, former chair of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, has had a longer quarantine than many people. Sure, he and his wife order takeout – and it tastes great, but “I’d realize I was still missing everything about what once made me love food: the people who create it and the ‘sobremesa’ — the limitless chat after desserts, the reluctance to leave the table, the delight in shared experience.” – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Ideas, Best Restaurants, Diego Salazar, 12.31.20


Uncovering – Literally – The Forgotten And Hidden Work Of Italy’s Women Artists

In Italy, for centuries, women weren’t allowed to work as artists, but many did anyway. The group Advancing Women Artists has been working its detective magic to change the history. The group “has shed light on a forgotten part of the art world, identifying some 2,000 works by women artists that had been gathering dust in Italy’s public museums and in damp churches. It has also financed the restoration of 70 works spanning the 16th to the 20th centuries.” – NPR
Tags: Art, Italy, Visual, Advancing Women Artists, 01.02.21


For Independent Bookstores, The Long 2020 Nightmare Is Not Nearly Over

The legendary Powell’s still sits empty of customers, no matter how many people may be buying online or via curbside pickup. The hope for 2021 is just to survive, says its CEO. But for some smaller bookstores, nimble moves were easier. Take Maggie Mae’s, a children’s bookstore. “The takeway for Maggie Mae’s … is to ’embrace the pivot’ by making changes that will benefit both the business and the community.” – The Oregonian
Tags: Art, Words, Powell, Maggie Mae, 01.02.21


How A 65-Year-Old Actor Became An Instagram Maven

Leslie Jordan wasn’t planning any of this, not the 5.5 million followers or the media attention. But, hey, lockdown. “Out of boredom, he began sharing ‘silly’ pieces of content like his ‘Pillow Talk’ series, where he snuggles up with a pillow and tells comfort food tales of Hollywood; videos of him dancing to Lisa Rinna’s aerobics class or with his cats; and Sunday sessions of him singing hymns with songwriter and producer Travis Howard. And well, s—!, as Jordan likes to say. It didn’t take lon...
Tags: Art, Hollywood, People, Jordan, Leslie Jordan, Lisa Rinna, Travis Howard, 01.03.21


Theatremakers Want – And Need – A New New Deal

Hurray for the Save Our Stages money, but theatres need a lot more: “a new Federal Theatre Project (FTP), like the Depression-era government agency that directly employed artists to produce new work.” Save not just the stages, but all of the workers of the stage as well. – The Undefeated
Tags: Art, Theatre, 12.30.20


David Fincher Hates Hollywood

Or at least the “unhappiest auteur” hates happy endings. Manohla Dargis dives deep on the director and his “beautiful bummers,” including, of course, the newish Mank, “a movie that, in its broadest strokes, enshrines its own loathing of the industry, partly through its strained relationship to the truth.” – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Hollywood, Media, David Fincher, Manohla Dargis, Mank, 01.01.21


Marshall McKay, Who Steered Autry Museum Toward The West’s True Diversity, Has Died Of Covid At 68

McKay was one of a kind, a leader “who helped secure economic independence for the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation near Sacramento, and whose deep support of cultural causes led to his becoming the first Indigenous chairman on the board of the Autry Museum of the American West,” and so much more. – Los Angeles Times
Tags: Art, Sacramento, Los Angeles, People, McKay, Autry Museum of the American West, Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, 01.02.21


"A 33-metre reinforced concrete vagina has sparked a Bolsonarian backlash in Brazil..."

"... with supporters of the country’s far-right president clashing with leftwing art admirers over the installation. The handmade sculpture, entitled Diva, was unveiled by visual artist Juliana Notari on Saturday at a rural art park... In a Facebook post, Notari said the scarlet hillside vulva was intended to 'question the relationship between nature and culture in our phallocentric and anthropocentric western society' and provoke debate over the 'problematisation of gender.'...  Bolsonaro’s US...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Law, Wikipedia, US, Bbc, Language, Paris, Brazil, Anish Kapoor, Versailles, Kapoor, Ann Althouse, Genitalia, Bolsonaro


The Antiquities Trade Is About To Get Reined In

Or at least, that’s the hope of the U.S. Congress. “Regulators have long worried that the opacity of the antiquities trade, where buyers and sellers are seldom identified, even to the parties in a transaction, made it an easy way to shroud illicit transfers of money. The new legislation empowers federal regulators to design measures that would remove secrecy from transactions.” – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Visual, 01.01.21, Congress Regulators


What real estate agents should know about closets

Armoires, walk-ins, built-ins and storage systems — there are a myriad of ways we store our belongings. Here’s what sets them apart, and how their design and purpose have evolved over the years.
Tags: Design, Storage, Radio, Agent, Closet, Closets, Select, Gerard Spelndore



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