Art


 

UK Theatre Returns To Stages, Having Learned Some Things During Lockdown

Shakespeare’s Globe has announced a mid-May reopening, albeit with a capacity of up to only 500 in a popular auditorium that can hold as many as 1,700. The coveted standing places that allow the so-called Globe groundlings to jostle one another, and on occasion the actors, will be replaced by seats; a lack of intermissions will further limit unwanted contact. The idea is to return to normal practice, assuming restrictions ease as the summer season continues. – The New York Times
Tags: Art, UK, Theatre, Shakespeare 's Globe, 03.31.21


Experimental Film Captures Dance In The Wild

“We were demonstrating that we were still there, that we were still dancing, that we still wanted to dance, that we were still those people that engage in practices that are not Zoom-able, and that the things that we offer the world are not essential. We’re demonstrating that our bodies are these things that are meaty and fleshy and sweaty and vulnerable. And we’re continuing to demonstrate why we need to be in each other’s presence.” – Columbus Live
Tags: Art, Dance, 03.31.21


What Good Is Criticism After Something Bad Happens?

Every day I’m thankful for the work I get to do. I am paid to watch, to think, to write. But this week, like so many others recently, it has felt pointless, even silly, to analyze fictional stories when real people are dying.” – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Issues, 03.28.21


What Music Festivals Could Look Like This Summer

Certainly with international travel likely to be restricted in some form for a while, the chances are that international and local demand for festivals will still not be the same as they were pre-COVID. – The Conversation
Tags: Art, Music, 04.01.21


Podcasts By Retired Sports Stars Are Becoming Big Business

“If athlete-driven podcasts were once shoestring affairs, they’ve now been absorbed into the sports-media economy. Last year, [sports-podcast network] The Ringer was acquired by Spotify for around two hundred million dollars.” And the athlete-hosts don’t talk only about the game; they sometimes have on as guests rock musicians, movie stars, entertainment execs, and politicians. – The New Yorker
Tags: Art, Spotify, Media, 03.29.21


Now Clear: How Brexit Is A Disaster For UK Artists

“It is being slightly masked by Covid, but we are already seeing individuals losing their jobs because they don’t hold an EU passport. People are being told their application for a post is not welcome anymore, or that gigs are being postponed or cancelled because EU promoters are not certain whether British talent will be able to make it across the channel.” –
Tags: Art, UK, Eu, Issues, 03.31.21


All 18 works at show of Spanish artist Maruja Mallo were fakes, say experts

Curator of Galician show honouring surrealist admits ‘we knew there would be a fuss’ over authenticityA year after an exhibition celebrating the works of the pioneering Spanish surrealist artist Maruja Mallo closed its doors, a letter from experts has emerged claiming that none of the works displayed actually sprang from the hand of the avant garde painter.Mallo, who died in 1995, was associated with the so-called literary Generation of 27, whose members included Federico García Lorca, Ernestina...
Tags: Art, Europe, Spain, World news, Culture, Art and design, Exhibitions, South America, Mallo, Maruja Mallo, Rafael Alberti


Nobel Prize: Sweet!

Lucky in Manhattan to have a Japanese market nearby, and because I’m enticed by anything in a post-Pop package, I fell for Nobel’s Super Cola, three ounces for $3, a dozen or so globes of hot surprise. I told myself that I sprung for my candyphile boyfriend, but they were really for me. When artists such as Lichtenstein or Indiana (not Gary) are ripped off for the package, I grab it. – Jeff Weinstein
Tags: Art, Indiana, Manhattan, Ajblogs, Gary, Lichtenstein, 04.01.21, Super Cola


Syracuse Musings: Words of Wisdom (or not) from Panelists at the Deaccession Symposium

Here are some lessons from old-school conference speakers who acknowledged the need for progress, but defended what former Metropolitan Museum director Philippe de Montebello once called “the primacy of art” in the museum’s mission. – Lee Rosenbaum
Tags: Art, Metropolitan Museum, Ajblogs, Philippe de Montebello, 04.01.21


Web Streaming and Book Publishing: Two Bright Spots for the Cultural Sector During COVID-19?

Compared with the average annual growth rate of arts and cultural industries as a whole (+3 percent), web streaming and web publishing surged by 12 percent, in terms of the value added by those industries to the U.S. economy. The book and software publishing industry grew by over 7 percent. In both cases, we might expect to see sustained if not accelerated growth when the 2020 numbers are released next year. – Sunil Iyengar
Tags: Art, Ajblogs, 04.01.21


In Search Of Classical Music From Africa

Cellist Julian Lloyd Webber writes about his colleague Rebeca Omordia, a pianist of Romanian and Nigerian parentage who, since 2013, has been pursuing a project to find and present music by African composers working in Western classical genres. She’s found more than 200 of them, and she presents their work every year in a concert series in London. – The Guardian
Tags: Art, Music, London, Africa, Julian Lloyd Webber, Rebeca Omordia, 03.31.21


Big Claims For The Kind Of Art AI Will Make

Miller argues that AI-fueled art gains independence from its algorithmic parents and takes flight in works that bear the hallmarks of creativity and genius and will one day exceed human artists’ wildest imaginative dreams. Miller says he sympathizes with what I’m saying about the power of art coming from the connection with a human artist, plumbing their emotions and consciousness. But I’m being premature. Just wait, he says, computers will one day produce art as transcendent as the works of Be...
Tags: Art, Ideas, Beethoven, Miller, Picasso, 03.31.21


How Big New Money Is Ripping Up The Art Market

The traditional hierarchies of the art market, where values, both monetary and aesthetic, were established and policed by art historians, curators and museums, are being assaulted by a new breed of wealthy new players, with new tastes and “new” money. Their wallets are stuffed with the currently surging cryptocurrencies. The traditional art world may sniff at some of their choices—but they don’t give a stuff. – The Art Newspaper
Tags: Art, Visual, 03.31.21


What If Elena Ferrante Is Really A Man?

Over the past few years, a series of stylometric analyses, employing both human brains and AI software, has found that the true identity of the famously pseudonymous and reclusive author is almost certainly that of writer Domenico Starnone. (The other prime candidate, identified by an investigative journalist in The New York Review of Books, is Starnone’s wife, translator Anita Raja.) Comparative literature scholar Elisa Sotgiu revisits those studies and how they came to their conclusion, and s...
Tags: Art, Words, Elena Ferrante, New York Review of Books, Domenico Starnone, 03.31.21, Starnone, Anita Raja, Elisa Sotgiu


Kurt Weill Was Destined For Broadway All Along

Joshua Barone: “Kurt Weill is often described as if he were two composers. One spun quintessential sounds of Weimar-era Berlin in works like The Threepenny Opera, and the other wrote innovative earworms for Broadway’s golden age. His career was bifurcated, so the story goes — split not only by a shift in style, but also by the Atlantic Ocean, when he fled Nazi Germany and eventually settled in the United States. Yet it’s possible to trace an unbroken line from Weill’s earliest works, as a teena...
Tags: Art, Music, Germany, Berlin, United States, Broadway, Weimar, Atlantic Ocean, Kurt Weill, Weill, Joshua Barone, 03.25.21


London’s National Gallery Creates First Exhibition Designed For Mobile Phones

The mobile experience will allow people to zoom in on the details. It will include six poems in the voice of Balthasar, the black king pictured to the left of Mary, with his gift of myrrh and wearing a lynx-fur-lined red robe and fabulous boots with leather so fine you can see his toes. – The Guardian
Tags: Art, London, Visual, Mary, Balthasar, 03.31.21


Cooper Union Says It Will Be Tuition-Free Again By 2029

The prestigious, competitive art/architecture/engineering school in Manhattan’s East Village charged no fees to students from its opening in 1859 until 2012, when an overambitious building program and bad management decisions led to financial disaster and free tuition was abolished, much to the fury of students, alumni, and others. There were worries that the pandemic would hamper the fundraising necessary to return to free tuition, but, says president Laura Sparks, “we landed right on budget.”...
Tags: Art, Manhattan, Issues, East Village, Cooper Union, Laura Sparks, 04.01.21


Is The Corps De Ballet Going To Become A Relic Of The Past?

In most places, the pandemic has put a stop to large-scale corps dancing. Yet, even when the virus is finally under control, there’s reason to wonder about the future of large groups of ballet dancers beyond revivals of old classics: few contemporary choreographers make use of more than small groups. Laura Cappelle looks at why that is and why it matters. – Pointe Magazine
Tags: Art, Dance, Corps de Ballet, Laura Cappelle, 03.31.21


Show of Spanish artist Maruja Mallo's works contained fakes, experts say

Curator of Galician show honouring surrealist admits ‘we knew there would be a fuss’ over authenticityA year after an exhibition celebrating the works of the pioneering Spanish surrealist artist Maruja Mallo closed its doors, a letter from experts has emerged claiming that none of the works displayed actually sprang from the hand of the avant garde painter.Mallo, who died in 1995, was associated with the so-called literary Generation of 27, whose members included Federico García Lorca, Ernestina...
Tags: Art, Europe, Spain, World news, Culture, Art and design, Exhibitions, South America, Mallo, Maruja Mallo, Rafael Alberti


Exhibition of Spanish artist Maruja Mallo's works were fakes, experts say

Curator of Galician show honouring surrealist admits ‘we knew there would be a fuss’ over authenticityA year after an exhibition celebrating the works of the pioneering Spanish surrealist artist Maruja Mallo closed its doors, a letter from experts has emerged claiming that none of the works displayed actually sprang from the hand of the avant garde painter.Mallo, who died in 1995, was associated with the so-called literary Generation of ’27, whose members included Federico García Lorca, Ernestin...
Tags: Art, Spain, Art and design, South America, Mallo, Maruja Mallo, Rafael Alberti


NHTSA Recalls GM Vans for Potential Fire Hazard

A warning was issued today to owners of 2021 Chevrolet Express and GMC Savana vans with 6.6-liter gas engines by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). If a battery short circuit were to happen, there may be a low battery voltage warning, the battery might die, or an engine compartment fire could take place. […] The post NHTSA Recalls GM Vans for Potential Fire Hazard appeared first on The Truth About Cars.
Tags: Design, Safety, General Motors, Recall, Autos, Chevrolet, Hot Takes, Nhtsa, Gmc, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Chevrolet Express, GMC Savana, Vans, News Blog, Short Circuit, GM Death Watch


We’ve Got Robot Artists. Now We May Get Robot Art Critics.

“For human art lovers, learning which style or category a piece of art falls in is a relatively straightforward and objective task. Like the neural networks [in artificial intelligence], we can learn how to do that by looking at a lot of art and finding patterns. But there’s something humans do that computers don’t: we also form opinions about the art and can share in words how looking at it makes us feel. Computers can’t do that yet — or can they?” Here’s how one group of researchers is workin...
Tags: Art, Visual, 03.30.21


How We’ll Know If An AI Develops Consciousness

Clearly, asking questions about consciousness does not prove anything per se. But could an AI zombie formulate such questions by itself, without hearing them from another source or belching them out from random outputs? To me, the answer is clearly no. If I’m right, then we should seriously consider that an AI might be conscious if it asks questions about subjective experience unprompted. – Nautilus
Tags: Art, Ideas


"For a while now, I’ve been talking about art objects as 'machines for thinking': Our job as viewers is..."

"... to switch them on, and it’s almost impossible to do that when all you’re getting is a glimpse through the gaps in a crowd." Writes Blake Gopnik in (NYT).This essay belongs in the transgressive literary genre, The Blessings of Covid. Have you spent much time gazing at museum art, anticipating lofty thoughts and emotional transport? It's hard to experience the contemplative level of awareness needed when there are always other people shifting around you, taking too little time, shattering y...
Tags: Art, Law, Meditation, Museums, Solitude, Ann Althouse, Blake Gopnik, The Amsterdam Notebooks


Smithsonian Holds Off On Reopening Its Museums

“Despite the reopening of most private museums in Washington, the Smithsonian and the National Gallery of Art have no set date to reopen from pandemic-related closures that began in November. … When they are ready to reopen this spring, they will mimic last summer’s multiphased approach, [Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie] Bunch said, with the National Zoo one of the first to come back. The phased reopening will be faster than last time, when it took two months to open eight sites.” – The Washington...
Tags: Art, Washington, Smithsonian, Visual, National Zoo, National Gallery of Art, 03.31.21, Lonnie -RSB- Bunch


France Gets Another Nationwide Lockdown, But Arts Venues Could Open By Mid-May

With COVID caseloads on the rise again, President Macron announced a new set of restrictions, less strict than the first set introduced last year, running April 3 to at least May 2. He also said his office is preparing a timetable for “certain” cultural venues to accept visitors again, a process he hopes will start in mid-May, pandemic conditions permitting. – Deadline
Tags: Art, France, Issues, Macron, 03.31.21


Gianluigi Colalucci, Lead Restorer Of Sistine Chapel, Dead At 92

From 1980 to 1994, he led a team of workers who carefully washed away, frequently with plain soap and water, centuries’ worth of dust, smoke and other grime from Michelangelo’s work — revealing what were, to those who had been accustomed to the dim, grim aspect of the unrestored “Last Judgment” fresco, the astonishingly vivid colors the artist used. – Firstpost (AFP)
Tags: Art, People, Michelangelo, 03.30.21, Gianluigi Colalucci


Live-Streamed Stand-Up Comedy Might Just Outlast The Pandemic

“Many are skeptical, including fans who badly miss being surrounded by echoing laughter and stand-ups who are exhausted by performing for screens and who widely prefer telling jokes in the same room as crowds. While conceding that nothing replaces the traditional comedy format, [the CEO of the largest digital comedy club] said the doubts will look as shortsighted as early mockery of Twitter, podcasting and so many other now common internet forms. She has good reason for such swagger.” – The New...
Tags: Art, Theatre, Audience, 03.31.21


This is the kind of writing about painting that you used to see everywhere half a century ago.

I'm have twitchy twinges of nostalgia reading this from Sebastian Smee in The Washington Post:Twombly’s restive, twitchy marks are cryptic, conjuring both the fog of battle and an atmosphere of human and creative fade-out. The “math” part of “aftermath” is old German for “mowing.” And there’s a sense in which Twombly’s work relates to the Old Masters as a field of stubble relates to a golden wheat field in high summer. Even the headline is a throwback to the distant past: "Yes, your kid could (p...
Tags: Art, Headlines, Law, Washington Post, Smee, Ann Althouse, Sebastian Smee



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