Art


 

Entertainment Venues Fear Problems With A Vaccine Passport

Out of 700 businesses surveyed by the Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), which represents businesses like nightclubs, bars and festivals, 70% felt that vaccine certificates, negative testing or immunity proof were not necessary to reopen, the organisation said. And 69% felt they would have a negative impact on business. – BBC
Tags: Art, Issues, 04.05.21, Night Time Industries Association NTIA


“Godzilla” Is A Hit — And It Could Change How Movies Are Distributed

It’s the kind of hybrid release that would have seemed impossible to pull off prior to the pandemic. Today, it’s the clearest indication yet that COVID-19 has forever changed how movies will be distributed. And the results have left Hollywood questioning what the film’s success means for the future of moviegoing. – Baltimore Sun
Tags: Art, Hollywood, Media, Audience, 04.06.21


How We Make Language

Today, our world has over 7,000 languages, each with its own words and particular grammar. These languages are so mindbogglingly different that you might think, “anything goes!” But in reality, there are countless possibilities in sound patterns and grammars that never occur. – The Conversation
Tags: Art, Words, 04.05.21


Why Is Shakespeare Still Such A Big Part Of Our School Curriculum?

This has serious consequences for what ought to be the primary function of high school study: developing a love of reading that will last a lifetime. This is next to impossible when your major contact with literature is a guy from the 1500s who wrote with a quill in what might as well be a second language. And when your teachers aren’t theatre people who can bring the works from page to stage, for which they were intended and where they shine. – The Walrus
Tags: Art, Words, 03.31.21


Machines Will Save Us/Machines Will Kill Us — Time To Figure It Out

“We once obsessed about how to restrain machines we could not predict or control — now we worry about how to use machines to restrain humans we cannot predict or control. But the old problem hasn’t gone away: How do we know whether the machines will do as we wish?” – The New Atlantis
Tags: Art, Ideas, Spring 2021


They Tell Aspiring Writers To Read Read Read. What If That’s Wrong?

“Now that I am a published writer, it is against this backdrop, of limited exposure to books in my adolescence, that I find the advice of established authors given to aspiring writers to “read, read and read books” lacking in nuance, unimaginative, and ignorant of the realities of those from backgrounds of scarcity, displacement, and war, like myself.” – Lithub
Tags: Art, Words, 04.01.21


Latvia’s Huge Body Of Traditional Poetry Is Finally Appearing in English

The verses, typically four lines long and metrical, are called daina. Thanks to an effort to transcribe them in the 19th and 20th centuries, there are now about a million of them collected at the national library in Riga. “Aficionados say this canon of folk poems is as significant as any body of classical literature. … For the past 22 years, Ieva Szentivanyi has been rendering dainas into English. Her first volume was published in 2018 and the second is ready for the press.” – The Economist ...
Tags: Art, Latvia, Words, 03.31.21, Riga Aficionados, Ieva Szentivanyi


Venice Passes New Rules Restricting Biennale Business — Will They Help Or Hurt?

It may be a hasty measure in which practical consequences have not been thought through, or it may, as some suggest, be an indirect boost to the ­Biennale, which looks with some suspicion upon those who want to ride its jet stream by setting up ancillary exhibitions in the city. – The Art Newspaper
Tags: Art, Venice, Visual, 04.06.21


Morris Dickstein, Cultural Historian And Literary Critic, Dead At 81

“A self-described ‘freethinking intelligence yet a child of the ghetto,’ … [he was] a public intellectual who examined such topics as the cultural ferment of the 1960s, the artistic legacy of the Depression and the evolution of the American novel in works that were both penetrating and penetrable, offering a model of what he regarded as the ideal role of the critic in modern society.” – The Washington Post
Tags: Art, People, Morris Dickstein, 03.29.21


How Do You Become A Broadway Choreographer? It’s Not Easy, But It’s Fairly Straightforward

“In much of the dance world, the process of becoming successful as a choreographer can seem frustratingly oblique. On Broadway, however, that path is surprisingly linear and well defined. Most people end up following a sequence of positions that includes becoming dance captain of a show, then assistant choreographer, then associate choreographer and, finally, main choreographer. What boosts you from one rung of the ladder to the next is a combination of initiative, networking and, of course, cr...
Tags: Art, Dance, Broadway, 04.05.21


American Museums Versus Looted Art — They’re Failing

“In 2008, the AAM admirably pledged to fight the trade in looted antiquities by passing a set of guidelines for its member institutions that own or acquire archeological material and ancient art. We recently put AAM member museums to the test to see whether they were actually complying with these guidelines. What we found is gravely concerning, not just for these museums, but for the United States’ ability to fight the global black market in looted art.” – Hyperallergic
Tags: Art, United States, Visual, 03.28.21


Salman Rushdie: India Is No Longer The Country I Wrote About In ‘Midnight’s Children’

“When I wrote this book I could associate big-nosed Saleem with the elephant-trunked god Ganesh, the patron deity of literature, among other things, and that felt perfectly easy and natural even though Saleem was not a Hindu. All of India belonged to all of us, or so I deeply believed. And still believe, even though the rise of a brutal sectarianism believes otherwise. … Right now, in India, it’s midnight again.” – The Guardian
Tags: Art, India, Words, Ganesh, Salman Rushdie, Saleem, 04.03.21


The Arts Went Online During COVID — What Happens When Theatre Audiences Return?

“Right now, a streamed concert that sells well will just about cover the cost, and we have to proof every second of the video. Even once live performances come back, I highly doubt we could offer livestreams because of our small staff.” – Chicago Tribune
Tags: Art, Media, 04.05.21


The Spectacular Golden Parade Of The Mummified Pharaohs

“Crowds gathered on Saturday to witness the multimillion-dollar spectacle of 18 kings and four queens making the 7km journey (four miles) from the Egyptian Museum in central Cairo’s Tahrir Square to … their new home in the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation.” – Al Jazeera
Tags: Art, Cairo, Visual, Tahrir Square, 04.03.21


Guillermo Del Toro Absolved In ‘Shape Of Water’ Plagiarism Case

“The producers of The Shape of Water will no longer have to contend with a copyright lawsuit that claims that Oscar-winning Guillermo del Toro film infringed the work of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Paul Zindel. On Friday, Disney’s Fox units, Guillermo del Toro and other defendants filed court papers indicating that the parties in the litigation had reached an agreement to dismiss the case.” – The Hollywood Reporter
Tags: Art, Media, Fox, Guillermo Del Toro, Paul Zindel, 04.05.21, Guillermo Del Toro Absolved


Another Pandemic Silver Lining: Overhaul Of Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall Is Way Ahead Of Schedule

“With concerts in the hall canceled since March 2020, construction began in earnest over the past few months. Work is expected to continue for the next year and a half, with a reopening planned for fall 2022, the orchestra and center announced on Monday. That is a year and a half ahead of schedule.” – The New York Times
Tags: Art, Music, Lincoln Center 's David Geffen Hall, 04.05.21


Artist Makes Micro-Miniature Sculptures So Small They Fit on the Head of a Pin

The jury remains out as to the number of angels that can dance on a pin, but self-taught artist Flor Carvajal is amassing some data regarding the number of itty bitty sculptures that can be installed on the tips of matchsticks, pencil points, and — thanks to a rude encounter with a local reporter — in the eye of a needle. According to Tucson’s Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures, where her work is on display through June, The Vanguardia Liberal was considering running an interview in ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Religion, Creativity, Museums, Columbia, Facebook Twitter, Tucson, Leonardo da Vinci, Juan Valdez, Ayun Halliday, Time Machine Museum of Miniatures, Watch Mouthwatering Tiny Woolen Food Animations, Flor Carvajal, Vanguardia Liberal


A Supreme Court Ruling On Computer Code Has Hollywood Worried

“While a copyright dispute about computer code might not seem like a subject of particular consequence for them, an opinion from Justice Stephen Breyer concluding that Google made fair use of copyrighted material will very likely be discussed for quite some time and be invoked in other contexts. As such, a few lines in particular from today’s opinion regarding public benefits and public harms could have many in Hollywood quite tense about a future staked on intellectual property.” – The Hollywo...
Tags: Google, Art, Hollywood, Supreme Court, Issues, Stephen Breyer, 04.05.21, Hollywood Worried


Dutch police arrest man over £18m theft of Van Gogh and Hals paintings

Search continues for Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring and Two Laughing Boys, stolen last yearDutch police have arrested a 58-year-old man on suspicion of stealing paintings by Vincent van Gogh and Frans Hals with an estimated value of £18m during night-time raids on museums in the Netherlands last year.The unnamed man was arrested on Tuesday morning at his home in the central town of Baarn over the thefts of Van Gogh’s The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring and Hals’s Two Laughing Boys. Co...
Tags: Art, Europe, Painting, World news, Culture, Art and design, Netherlands, Art Theft, Van Gogh, Vincent Van Gogh, Hals, Baarn, Frans Hals, Nuenen, Parsonage Garden


From The Wreckage Left By ISIS, Mosul’s Museum Begins To Rise Again

“By the time Mosul was liberated by Iraqi government forces in July 2017, most of the artefacts in the Mosul Cultural Museum had been destroyed or looted. An international partnership was quickly launched to try and salvage what remained. … The project has now entered its second phase: the reconstruction of the 1970s-era building. This might seem like small cause for celebration: most of the fractured artefacts are still in a storage facility awaiting restoration. But even this is success in th...
Tags: Art, Video, Mosul, ISIS Mosul, 04.05.21, Mosul Cultural Museum


Want A Subscription With Top Seats To Broadway Shows At Philly’s Kimmel Center? Give Them $1,000

“The Kimmel Center is instituting a mandatory $1,000 donation for access to the best seats in its Broadway series. That’s $1,000 up front, before the cost of the tickets themselves. The new policy goes into effect now for new subscribers and in the 2022-23 season for existing ones.” – The Philadelphia Inquirer
Tags: Art, Theatre, Broadway, Philly, Kimmel Center, 04.02.21


Spoleto Festival USA Moves Cautiously Back Into Live Performance

There will be 80 events spread across four stages, three of them outdoors and two of those newly-constructed. (The old Dock Street Theater, site of the popular noontime chamber music concerts, will be this year’s sole indoor venue.) Capacity will be about one-quarter that of a normal year. – Charleston City Paper
Tags: Art, Issues, Spoleto Festival USA, Charleston City, 04.05.21


A Report From New York’s Wary Return To Indoor Shows

“Like budding flowers awakening just in time for spring, music, dance, theater and comedy began a cautious return this past week as venues were allowed to reopen with limited capacity — in most cases, for the first time since March 2020. … Reporters from The New York Times visited some of the first indoor performances, and spoke with the pioneering audience members and staff who took them in. Here is what they saw.” – The New York Times
Tags: Art, New York, New York Times, Issues, 04.04.21


Dutch police arrest man over theft of Van Gogh and Hals paintings

Search continues for multimillion-pound Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring and Two Laughing BoysDutch police have arrested a 58-year-old man on suspicion of stealing two paintings by Vincent van Gogh and Frans Hals from museums in the Netherlands last year.The man was held at his home in the central town of Baarn over the thefts of Van Gogh’s The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring and Hals’s Two Laughing Boys. Continue reading...
Tags: Art, Europe, Painting, World news, Culture, Art and design, Netherlands, Art Theft, Van Gogh, Vincent Van Gogh, Hals, Baarn, Frans Hals, Nuenen, Parsonage Garden


Watt EV Coupe – Will It Make It to Production or Not?

The Watt Electric Vehicle Company (WEVC)  has unveiled the EV Coupe, a classic shape inspired by the 1955 Porsche 356A. WEVC is not connected with Porsche AG. WEVC does not imply that any of their products are a product of Porsche AG, nor are the Porsche or 356 names used or associated with WEVC products. […] The post Watt EV Coupe – Will It Make It to Production or Not? appeared first on The Truth About Cars.
Tags: Electric Vehicle, UK, Design, Technology, Eu, Green, Porsche, Electric Vehicles, Autos, Replica, Nostalgia, Ev, Porsche AG, WEVC, Sports EV Concept, Curbside Classics


A 900-Page Pre-Pantone Guide to Color from 1692: A Complete High-Resolution Digital Scan

There’s ahead of its time, then there’s Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau — or, in its original Dutch title, Klaer Lightende Spiegel der Verfkonst, a 900-page book of paint colors made before any such things were common tools of the artist’s, scientist’s, and industrial designer’s trade. Author and artist A. Boogert created one, and only one, copy of his extraordinary manual on color mixing in 1692. Appearing on the threshold of modern color theory, and featuring over 700 pages ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Charles Darwin, Newton, Provence, Aristotle, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Goethe, Werner, Aix, Durham NC Follow, Erik Kwakkel, Goethe Newton, Opticks


Paul Ritter: Friday Night Dinner star dies of brain tumour at 54

Ritter, who also appeared in films including Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, died at home alongside his wife and two sonsThe actor Paul Ritter has died of a brain tumour at the age of 54, his agent has told the Guardian. Ritter who starred as the family patriarch Martin in Channel 4’s Friday Night Dinner alongside Tamsin Greig, Simon Bird and Tom Rosenthal died on Monday.In a statement, his agent said that the actor, who also appeared in numerous films including Harry Potter and the Half...
Tags: Television, Film, Theatre, Culture, Television & radio, Stage, Harry Potter, Prince, Quantum of Solace, Martin, Ritter, Paul Ritter, Tom Rosenthal, Friday Night Dinner, Guardian Ritter, Tamsin Greig Simon Bird


Friday Night Dinner star Paul Ritter dies of brain tumour at 54

Ritter, who also appeared in films including Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, died at home alongside his wife and two sonsThe actor Paul Ritter has died of a brain tumour at the age of 54, his agent has told the Guardian. Ritter who starred as the family patriarch Martin in Channel 4’s Friday Night Dinner alongside Tamsin Greig, Simon Bird and Tom Rosenthal died on Monday.In a statement, his agent said that the actor, who also appeared in numerous films including Harry Potter and the Half...
Tags: Television, Film, Theatre, Culture, Television & radio, Stage, Harry Potter, Prince, Quantum of Solace, Martin, Ritter, Paul Ritter, Tom Rosenthal, Friday Night Dinner, Guardian Ritter, Tamsin Greig Simon Bird


'They are living maps': how Richard Mosse captured environmental damage in the Amazon

In a new set of photos, environmental degradation in the Amazon is explored to shine light on ‘a hideously complex story’In his 20s, Irish photographer Richard Mosse made his first foray into photojournalism by capturing postwar Balkan nations. This experience led to a realisation that the medium was inadequately suited to capture complex, layered narratives. “You have to put the thing in front of the camera, and when that thing is an abstraction, far bigger than a human figure, it’s very diffic...
Tags: Amazon, Art, Europe, Photography, Environment, Culture, Art and design, Trees and forests, Deforestation, Amazon Rainforest, DR Congo, Richard Mosse



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