Art


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Bisa Butler’s Beautiful Quilted Portraits of Frederick Douglass, Nina Simone, Jean-Michel Basquiat & More

Fiber artist Bisa Butler’s quilted portraits of Black Americans gain extra power from their medium. Each work is comprised of many scraps, carefully cut and positioned after hours of research and preliminary sketches. Velvet and silk nestle against bits of vintage flour sacks, West African wax print fabric, denim and, occasionally, hand-me-downs from the sitter’s own collection. In The Warmth of Other Sons, a 12-foot, life-sized portrait of an African American family who migrated nor...
Tags: Google, Art, Fashion, Microsoft, College, Stanford, Nigeria, Africa, History, Creativity, South Africa, Yale, New Jersey, Michelle Obama, West Africa, Civil rights movement


Does Every Picture Tell a Story? A Conversation with Artist Joseph Watson for Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #51

https://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/secure/partiallyexaminedlife/PMP_051_6-27-20.mp3 Storytelling is an essential part of Las Vegas artist Joseph Watson's painting methodology, whether he's creating city scenes or public sculpture or children's illustrations. So how does the narrative an author may have in mind affect the viewer, and is this different for different types of art? Joseph is perhaps best known as the illustrator of the Go, Go, GRETA! book series and does onl...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Podcasts, College, Pablo Picasso, Brian, Las Vegas, Quentin Blake, Narnia, Joseph, Facebook Twitter, Greta, Erica, Shepard, Andrey


Salvador Dalí Explains Why He Was a “Bad Painter” and Contributed “Nothing” to Art (1986)

Not so very long ago, Salvador Dalí was the most famous living painter in the world. When the BBC's Arena came to shoot an episode about him in 1986, they asked him what that exalted state felt like. "I don't know if I am the most famous painter in the world," Dalí responds, "because lots of the people who ask for my autograph in the street don't know if I'm a singer, a film star, a madman, a writer — they don't know what I am." He was, in one sense or another, most of those things and o...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Television, College, Bbc, Raphael, Salvador Dalí, Dick Cavett, Seoul, Sigmund Freud, Freud, Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Arena, Velázquez


Thomas Jefferson’s Great-Great-Great-Great-Great-Great Grandson Poses for a Presidential Portrait

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness…  —Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of the United States of America He was a brilliant man who preached equality, but he didn’t practice it. He owned people. And now I’m here because of it. —Shannon LaNier, co-author of Jefferson’s Children: The Story of One American Family Many of the Amer...
Tags: Google, Art, Photography, College, Virginia, America, History, Current Affairs, Museums, New York Times, Kkk, Madison, Thomas Jefferson, United States of America, Abraham Lincoln, Maya Rudolph


Shannon LaNier Poses as His Sixth Great-Grandfather Thomas Jefferson: Two Portraits Juxtaposed

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness…  —Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of the United States of America He was a brilliant man who preached equality, but he didn’t practice it. He owned people. And now I’m here because of it. —Shannon LaNier, co-author of Jefferson’s Children: The Story of One American Family Many of the Amer...
Tags: Google, Art, Photography, College, Virginia, America, History, Current Affairs, Museums, New York Times, Kkk, Madison, Thomas Jefferson, United States of America, Abraham Lincoln, Maya Rudolph


An Immaculate Copy of Leonardo’s The Last Supper Digitized by Google: View It in High Resolution Online

Romantic poets told us that great art is eternal and transcendent. They also told us everything made by human hands is bound to end in ruin and decay. Both themes were inspired by the rediscovery and renewed fascination for the arts of antiquity in Europe and Egypt. It was a time of renewed appreciation for monumental works of art, which happened to coincide with a period when they came under considerable threat from looters, vandals, and invading armies. One work of art that appeared on the it...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, England, Milan, College, Egypt, Royal Academy of Arts, Brazil, Notre Dame, Napoleon, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci, National Museum, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci


Milton Glaser (RIP) Explains Why We Must Overcome the Fear of Failure, Take Risks & Discover Our True Potential

Milton Glaser died last week at the age of 91, a long life that included decade upon decade as the best-known name in graphic design. Within the profession he became as well-known as several of his designs did in the wider world: the Bob Dylan poster, logos for companies like DC Comics, the Glaser Stencil font, and above all  I ? NY. Glaser may have become an icon, but he didn't become a brand — "one of my most despised words," he says in the interview clip above. He also acknowledges tha...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, Life, Bob Dylan, Pablo Picasso, Seoul, Samuel Beckett, Picasso, Saul Bass, Facebook Twitter, Glaser, Paulo Coelho, Milton Glaser, Colin Marshall


Milton Glaser (RIP) Presents 10 Rules for Life & Work: Wisdom from the Celebrated Designer

“None of us has really the ability to understand our path until it’s over,” the celebrated graphic designer Milton Glaser (RIP) muses less than a minute into the above video. Glaser’s many contributions to pop culture---the  I ? NY logo, the psychedelic portrait of a rainbow-haired Bob Dylan, DC Comics’ classic bullet logo---confer undeniable authority. To the outside eye, he seems to have had a pretty firm handle on the path he traveled for lo these many decades. Aspirant designers would d...
Tags: Google, Design, College, Life, Vietnam, Aiga, Marx, John Cage, Don, Facebook Twitter, Glaser, Milton Glaser, Roger Rosenblatt, Bob Dylan DC Comics, Milton Glaser Dieter Rams, Brian Eno Ayun Halliday


Explore 1,100 Works of Art by Georgia O’Keeffe: They’re Now Digitized and Free to View Online

Lake George Reflection (circa 1921) via Wikimedia Commons What comes to mind when you think of Georgia O’Keeffe? Bleached skulls in the desert? Aerial views of clouds, almost cartoonish in their puffiness? Voluptuous flowers (freighted with an erotic charge the artist may not have intended)? Probably not Polaroid prints of a dark haired pet chow sprawled on flagstones… Or watercolor sketches of demurely pretty ladies... Or a massive cast iron abstraction… If your knowledge of America’s most cel...
Tags: Google, Art, College, America, Georgia, K-12, Polaroid, Gene Hackman, Facebook Twitter, Dole, Alfred Stieglitz, O'Keeffe, Georgia O'Keeffe, Juan Hamilton, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Hawaiian Pineapple Company


How Georgia O’Keeffe Became Georgia O’Keeffe: An Animated Video Tells the Story

When Georgia O’Keeffe first saw the home in Abiquiú, in Northern New Mexico that she would purchase from the Catholic Church in 1945 “the 5,000-square-foot compound was in ruins,” writes the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. The artist immediately seized on its potential: “As I climbed and walked about in the ruin,” she remembers, “I found a patio with a very pretty well house and bucket to draw up water. It was a good-sized patio with a long wall with a door on one side. That wall with a door in...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, Georgia, Catholic Church, Van Gogh, Southwest, Facebook Twitter, Gogh, Josh Jones, Abiquiu, Alfred Stieglitz, Frida Kahlo, O'Keeffe, Taos


John Trumbull’s Famous 1818 Painting Declaration of Independence Virtually Defaced to Show Which Founding Fathers Owned Slaves

Statues of slaveholders and their defenders are falling all over the U.S., and a lot of people are distraught. What’s next? Mount Rushmore? Well… maybe no one’s likely to blow it up, but some honesty about the “extremely racist” history of Mount Rushmore might make one think twice about using it as a limit case. On the other hand, a sandblasting of the enormous Klan monument in Stone Mountain, Georgia—created earlier by Rushmore sculptor Gutzon Borglum—seems long overdue. We are learning a lot ...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Politics, College, Washington, US, History, Atlantic, Philosophy, South, Facebook Twitter, Carolina, Jefferson, Locke, Josh Jones


Exquisite 2300-Year-Old Scythian Woman’s Boot Preserved in the Frozen Ground of the Altai Mountains

Shoes and boots, show where your feet have gone. —Guy Sebeus, 10 New Scythian Tales  In the age of fast fashion, when planned obsolescence, cheap materials, and shoddy construction have become the norm, how startling to encounter a stylish women’s boot that’s truly built to last… …like, for 2300 years. It helps to have landed in a Scythian burial mound in Siberia’s Altai Mountains, where the above boot was discovered along with a number of nomadic afterlife essentials—jewelry, food, weapons, an...
Tags: Google, Fashion, Design, College, History, Museums, Reddit, Siberia, British Museum, Facebook Twitter, Altai Mountains, State Hermitage Museum, Ayun Halliday, Scythians, Guy Sebeus, Dan D'Silva


Construct Your Own Bayeux Tapestry with This Free Online App

A wise woman once quoth that one man’s adult coloring book is another’s Medieval Tapestry Edit. If taking crayons to empty outlines of mandalas, floral patterns, and forest and ocean scenes has failed to calm your mind, the Historic Tale Construction Kit may cure what ails you. Programmers Leonard Allain-Launay and Mathieu Thoretton and software engineer Maria Cosmina Etegan created the online kit as a tribute to a late, great, early 21st-century application designed by Academy of Media Arts Co...
Tags: Google, Art, Design, College, History, K-12, David Bowie, Hastings, Facebook Twitter, Bayeux Tapestry, Bayeux, Hildegard von Blingin, Leonard Allain Launay, Mathieu Thoretton, Maria Cosmina Etegan, Academy of Media Arts Cologne


Why This Font Is Everywhere: How Cooper Black Became Pop Culture’s Favorite Font

You know Times New Roman, you know Helvetica, you know Comic Sans — and though you may not realize it, you know Cooper Black as well. Just think of the "VOTE FOR PEDRO" shirt worn in Napoleon Dynamite (and in real life for years thereafter), or a few decades earlier, the cover of Pet Sounds. In fact, the history of Cooper Black extends well before the Beach Boys' mid-1960s masterpiece; to see and hear the full story, watch the Vox video above. It begins, as narrator Estelle Caswell expla...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, History, Chicago, Vox, Seoul, Helvetica, Cooper, Facebook Twitter, Napoleon Dynamite, Colin Marshall, Caswell, Vincent Connare, Estelle Caswell


Artificial Intelligence Brings to Life Figures from 7 Famous Paintings: The Mona Lisa, Birth of Venus & More

Denis Shiryaev is an AI wizard who has liberally applied his magic to old film—upscaling, colorizing, and otherwise modernizing scenes from Victorian England, late Tsarist Russia, and Belle Époque Paris. He trained machines to restore the earliest known motion picture, 1888’s Roundhay Garden Scene and one of the most mythologized works of early cinema, the Lumière Brothers 50-second Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station. Shiryaev’s casual distribution of these efforts on YouTube can ma...
Tags: Google, Art, England, Technology, College, Russia, Software, Creativity, Nvidia, Rembrandt, Mona Lisa, Hummingbird, Victorian England, Grant Wood, Facebook Twitter, Leonardo


Can Reality TV Save the Fine Arts? Body Painter Robin Slonina (Skin Wars) on Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #47

https://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/secure/partiallyexaminedlife/PMP_048_6-6-20.mp3 Fine art and reality TV are typically rated our highest and lowest forms of entertainment, yet creative competition shows combine the two. Robin Slonina graduated from Chicago's Art Institute and lived in the gallery world doing sculptures, paintings and installations for several years before discovering body painting and opening Skin City Body Painting in Las Vegas, perhaps the foremost i...
Tags: Google, Art, Television, Podcasts, College, Chicago, Brian, Las Vegas, Robin, Art Institute, Facebook Twitter, Rupaul, Shannon Lee, Pretty Much Pop, Mark Erica, Robin Slonina


An Introduction to Thought Forms, the Pioneering 1905 Theosophist Book That Inspired Abstract Art: It Returns to Print on November 6th

“It is sometimes difficult to appreciate the impact that the late-nineteenth century (and ongoing) occult movement called Theosophy had on global culture,” Mitch Horowitz writes in his introduction to the newly republished 1905 Theosophical book, Thought Forms. That impact manifested “spiritually, politically, and artistically” in the work of literary figures like James Joyce and William Butler Yeats and religious figures like Jiddu Krishnamurti, handpicked as a teenager by Theosophist leader C...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, College, India, New York City, Religion, Wassily Kandinsky, James Joyce, Rishikesh, Western Europe, East, Facebook Twitter, William Butler Yeats, Leadbeater, Josh Jones


Al Jaffee, Iconic Mad Magazine Cartoonist, Retires at Age 99 … and Leaves Behind Advice About Living the Creative Life

Apart from Alfred E. Neuman, there is no Al more closely identified with Mad magazine than Al Jaffee. Born in 1921, he was around for more than 30 years before the launch of that satirical magazine turned American cultural phenomenon — and now, at age 99, he's on track to outlive it. Just this week, the longest-working cartoonist in history and inventor of the Fold-In announced his retirement, and "to mark his farewell," writes the Washington Post's Michael Cavna, "Mad’s 'Usual Gang of I...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Comedy, Washington Post, College, Fbi, Magazines, Al Jaffee, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Alfred E Neuman, Creative Life, Colin Marshall, Jaffee, Cavna


An Introduction to the Sublime, Entrepreneurial Art of Christo & Jeanne-Claude (Courtesy of Alain de Botton’s School of Life)

Of all the work that made Christo and Jeanne-Claude the most famous installation artists of the past fifty years, none still exists. If you wanted to see the Reichstag wrapped in silver fabric, you'd have to have been in Berlin in the summer of 1995. If you wanted to see Central Park threaded with Shinto shrine-style gates, you'd have to have been in New York in the winter of 2005. If you wanted to see an enormous Mesopotamian mastaba made out of 7,506 oil barrels, you'd have to have bee...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, New York, London, College, Berlin, World, Paris, Seoul, Central Park, Christo, Facebook Twitter, School of Life, Colin Marshall, Beautiful San Francisco


How the Visionary Artist Christo (RIP) Changed the Way We See the World

Husband and wife team Christo and Jeanne-Claude produced what is arguably the most grandiose body of work in modern history. Their temporary monuments to the very idea of hugeness were viewable from space and impossible to ignore on the ground: Entire islands wrapped in miles of pink fabric. Gargantuan yellow and blue umbrellas placed up and down the coasts of California and Japan. The Reichstag bundled up in white fabric like a massive, shiny Christmas gift. These projects left an indel...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, California, College, France, New York Times, Paris, Seoul, Central Park, Christo, Facebook Twitter, Charles de Gaulle, William Grimes, Josh Jones, Claude Monet


This Huge Crashing Wave in a Seoul Aquarium Is Actually a Gigantic Optical Illusion

I live in Seoul, and whenever I'm back in the West, I hear the same question over and over: what's Gangnam like? Presumably Westerners wouldn't have had anything to ask me before the virality of "Gangnam Style," and specifically of the music video satirizing the image of that part of the Korean capital. In Korean, "Gangnam" literally means "south of the river," the waterway in question being the Han River, which runs through modern Seoul much as the Thames and the Seine run through Londo...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Technology, London, College, Thames, Samsung, Paris, Korea, Seoul, Seine, Facebook Twitter, Escher, Han River, COEX


Iggy Pop, David Byrne, and More Come Together with Bedtime Stories (For Grownups)

View this post on Instagram A post shared by New Museum (@newmuseum) on May 14, 2020 at 10:10am PDT That level of engagement would have pleased conceptual artist Maurizio Cattelan, who launched Bedtime Stories under the digital auspices of New York City's New Museum, asking friends, fellow artists, and favorite performers to contribute brief readings to foment a feeling of togetherness in these isolated tim...
Tags: Google, Art, College, New York City, Museums, Dolly Parton, The New York Times, Margaret Atwood, Michael Stipe, Thomas Hardy, David Byrne, Jeff Koons, Tacita Dean, Takashi Murakami, Facebook Twitter, New Museum


Studio Ghibli Producer Toshio Suzuki Teaches You How to Draw Totoro in Two Minutes

This is something you can do at home. Everyone, please draw pictures —Toshio Suzuki There’s no shortage of online tutorials for fans who want to draw Totoro, the  enigmatic title character of Studio Ghibli’s 1988 animated feature, My Neighbor Totoro: There’s a two-minute, non-narrated, God's-Eye-view with shading... A detailed geometry-based step-by-step… A ten-minute version for kids that utilizes a drinking glass and a bottle cap to get the proportions right prior to penciling, inking,...
Tags: Google, Art, Film, College, Animation, K-12, Hayao Miyazaki, Facebook Twitter, Totoro, Toshio Suzuki, Totoro Kiki, Ayun Halliday, Studio Ghibli Museum Build Your Own Miniature Sets


DEVO Is Now Selling COVID-19 Personal Protective Equipment: Energy Dome Face Shields

According to DEVO's co-principle songwriter and bassist Gerald Casale, the experimental art band turned early MTV pop-punk darlings were “pro-information, anti stupid conformity and knew that the struggle for freedom against tyranny is never-ending.” Their singular performance garb also set them apart, and none more so than the bright red plastic Energy Dome helmets they donned 40 years ago this month, upon the release of their third album, Freedom of Choice. The record, which the ba...
Tags: Health, Google, Facebook, Fashion, Music, Design, California, College, Current Affairs, Mtv, Facebook Twitter, Devo, Mark Mothersbaugh, Casale, Ayun Halliday, Devo Mark Mothersbaugh


The Largest & Most Detailed Photograph of Rembrandt’s The Night Watch Is Now Online: Zoom In & See Every Brush Stroke

What makes great paintings great? Unless you can see them for yourself—and be awed, or not, by their physical presence—the answers will generally come second-hand, through the words of art historians, critics, curators, gallerists, etc. We can study art in reproduction, but seeing, for example, the paintings of Rembrandt van Rijn in the flesh presents an entirely different aesthetic experience than seeing them on the page or screen. Lately, however, the situation is changing, and the boundaries...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Rembrandt, Rembrandt Van Rijn, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Kottke, Durham NC Follow, Surrealist Salvador Dalí Painting, Robert Erdmann, Complete Works of Vermeer, VR Salvador Dalí, Restoration of Rembrandt


William Blake Illustrates Mary Wollstonecraft’s Work of Children’s Literature, Original Stories from Real Life (1791)

Most of us know Mary Wollstonecraft as the author of the 1792 pamphlet A Vindication of the Rights of Women, and as the mother of Frankenstein author Mary Shelley. Fewer of us may know that two years before she published her foundational feminist text, she wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Men, a pro-French Revolution, anti-monarchy argument that first made her famous as a writer and philosopher. Perhaps far fewer know that Wollstonecraft began her career as a published author in 1787 with T...
Tags: Google, Art, London, College, Literature, Philosophy, William Blake, Metz, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary, Blake, Facebook Twitter, Caroline, Frankenstein, University of Tennessee, Josh Jones


Salvador Dalí’s Tarot Cards, Cookbook & Wine Guide Re-Issued as Beautiful Art Books

Maintaining an aggressively upward-waxed mustache; making a surrealist film with Luis Buñuel that Buñuel described as "nothing more than a desperate impassioned call for murder"; bringing an anteater on The Dick Cavett Show: Salvador Dalí can be described as a master of attention-grabbing gambits, by his admirers and detractors alike. No wonder, then, that he appears to have some serious admirers at Taschen. Known as a publisher of books that draw a great deal of press for their boundary-pushin...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Books, California, College, Salvador Dalí, Seoul, Alice, Facebook Twitter, Dali, Millet, Taschen, Gala, Luis Buñuel, Colin Marshall


Patti Smith’s Self Portraits: Another Side of the Prolific Artist

Young artists can understandably feel hesitant about trying new things. It’s hard enough to compete as a musician, for example. Why try to publish poetry or make visual art, too? Older, more established artists who branch out often have trouble being taken seriously in other fields. Patti Smith—poet, singer, memoirist, photographer, visual artist—has never seemed to suffer in either regard. “Her artwork has been exhibited everywhere from New York to Munich,” notes Dangerous Minds, “and in 2008 ...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, New York, College, Munich, Paris, Patti Smith, Rembrandt, Smith, Richard, Willem De Kooning, Robert, Robert Rauschenberg, Facebook Twitter, Robert Mapplethorpe


The Art of the New Deal: Why the Federal Government Funded the Arts During the Great Depression

It’s odd to think that the gray-faced, gray-suited U.S. Cold Warriors of the 1950s funded Abstract Expressionism and left-wing literary magazines in a cultural offensive against the Soviet Union. And yet they did. This seeming historical irony is compounded by the fact that so many of the artists enlisted (mostly unwittingly) in the cultural Cold War might not have had careers were it not for the New Deal programs of 20 years earlier, denounced by Republicans at the time as communist. The New D...
Tags: Health, Google, Art, Congress, College, US, America, History, United States, Washington Dc, Yale, Treasury, Smithsonian, National Gallery, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Eleanor


The Stay At Home Museum: Your Private, Guided Tours of Rubens, Bruegel & Other Flemish Masters

Of the many world class museums treating a stuck-at-home public to virtual tours of their collections, none inspire the resolve for future travel as the Stay At Home Museum, an initiative of the Flanders tourism board. Before the COVID-19 epidemic response demanded the temporary shuttering of all such attractions, the region was entering the final year of a 3-year festival celebrating such Flemish masters as Jan Van Eyck, Pieter Bruegel, and Peter Paul Rubens. Its website appeals to ...
Tags: Travel, Google, Art, College, Museums, Belgium, Brussels, Christ, Bruges, Ghent, Bacchus, Facebook Twitter, Adam, Ruben, Eve, Rubens



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