Art


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Take a Journey Inside Vincent Van Gogh’s Paintings with a New Digital Exhibition

Vincent van Gogh died in 1890, long before the emergence of any of the visual technologies that impress us here in the 21st century. But the distinctive vision of reality expressed through paintings still captivates us, and perhaps captivates us more than ever: the latest of the many tributes we continue to pay to van Gogh's art takes the form Van Gogh, Starry Night, a "digital exhibition" at the Atelier des Lumières, a disused foundry turned projector- and sound system-laden multimedia space i...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, Technology, College, Paris, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh, Auvers, Colin Marshall, Van Gogh Starry Night, 21st Century Los Angeles


Leonard Bernstein Awkwardly Turns the Screws on Tenor Jose Carreras While Recording West Side Story (1984)

What have we here? Evidence that the Maestro is a monster? Or a behind the scenes reminder that Arrested Development’s wannabe actor Tobias Fünke is not too far off base when he says that to make it in “this business of show, you have to have the heart of an angel and the hide... of an elephant.” Both? Neither? Any way you slice it, the recording session above is not for your typical cast album. West Side Story, with a book by Arthur Laurents, music by Leonard Bernstein, and lyrics b...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, New York City, Theatre, Vienna, Stephen Sondheim, Broadway, Opera, Verona, Maria, Public Domain, Bernstein, Tony, Natalie Wood


Jack Kerouac’s “Beat Paintings:” Now Gathered in One Book and Exhibition for the First Time

Most of us enter Jack Kerouac's world through his 1959 novel On the Road. Those of us who explore it more deeply thereafter may find much more than we expected to: Kerouac's inner life came out not just in his formidable body of written work, but in spoken-word jazz albums, fantasy baseball materials, and even paintings. Though Kerouac has now been gone for nearly half a century, it wasn't until just last year that his works of visual art were brought together: Kerouac: Beat Painting did it in ...
Tags: Google, Art, Milan, College, Literature, Road, Jack Kerouac, Kerouac, Seoul, Truman Capote, First Time, Facebook Twitter, Bandera, Colin Marshall, David Barnett, Pope Paul VI


Buckminster Fuller Rails Against the “Nonsense of Earning a Living”: Why Work Useless Jobs When Technology & Automation Can Let Us Live More Meaningful Lives

We are a haunted species: haunted by the specter of climate change, of economic collapse, and of automation making our lives redundant. When Marx used the specter metaphor in his manifesto, he was ironically invoking Gothic tropes. But Communism was not a boogeyman. It was a coming reality, for a time at least. Likewise, we face very real and substantial coming realities. But in far too many instances, they are also manufactured, under ideologies that insist there is no alternative. But let’s a...
Tags: Google, Art, Politics, Technology, Education, College, Economics, Creativity, Sxsw, Marx, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Bill Black, Kottke, Fuller, Buckminster Fuller


Discover the Great Medieval Manuscript, the Book of Kells, in a Free Online Course

Last week, we called your attention to the digitization of the Book of Kells, one of the great manuscripts from the medieval period. The digitized manuscript, we should note, comes accompanied by another great resource--a free online course on the Book of Kells. Both digital initiatives are made possible by Trinity College Dublin. The six-week course covers the following topics: Where and how the manuscript was made The social context from which the manuscript emerged, including early me...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, History, Ireland, Online Courses, Facebook Twitter, Trinity College Dublin, Kells, Bibliothèque Nationale de France


The Roman Roads of Spain & Portugal Visualized as a Subway Map: Ancient History Meets Modern Graphic Design

Between the first century BC and the fourth century AD, Rome displayed what we might call an impressive ambition. In his project illustrating those chapters of history in a way no one has before, statistics student Sasha Trubetskoy has shown increasingly Roman-grade ambitions himself, at least in the realm of historical graphic design. We've previously featured his modern subway-style maps of as well as  here on Open Culture. Today, we have , the region today occupied mainly by Spain and Po...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, Spain, History, Rome, Portugal, Seoul, Iberia, Facebook Twitter, Roman Empire, Colin Marshall, Antoninus, Sasha Trubetskoy, Trubetskoy


Bill Murray Explains How a 19th-Century Painting Saved His Life

You don't understand prewar 20th-century America unless you understand a particular 19th-century French painting: Jules Breton's The Song of the Lark. "In this evocative work, a young peasant woman stands silently in the flat fields of the artist's native Normandy as the sun rises, listening to the song of a distant lark," says a post from the Art Institute of Chicago. Apart from being selected as America's favorite painting in 1934, it was also Eleanor Roosevelt's favorite work of art, ...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, UK, College, America, Chicago, Normandy, Bill Murray, Seoul, Thompson, Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, Facebook Twitter, Willa Cather, John Prine


Van Gogh’s Ugliest Masterpiece: A Break Down of His Late, Great Painting, The Night Café (1888)

Ask passersby to name a Vincent van Gogh painting off the top of their heads, and most will come up with works like The Starry Night, The Potato Eaters, one of his self-portraits (probably with his ear bandaged), or maybe the one with the smoking skeleton David Sedaris used for a book cover. How many will mention 1888's The Night Café, an interior, van Gogh wrote to his brother Theo from Arles (the town in the south of France where he had come in search of Japan-like surroundings), "of t...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, France, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Edward Hopper, Vincent, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh, David Sedaris, Evan Puschak, Theo


The Medieval Masterpiece, the Book of Kells, Is Now Digitized & Put Online

If you know nothing else about medieval European illuminated manuscripts, you surely know the Book of Kells. “One of Ireland’s greatest cultural treasures” comments Medievalists.net, “it is set apart from other manuscripts of the same period by the quality of its artwork and the sheer number of illustrations that run throughout the 680 pages of the book.” The work not only attracts scholars, but almost a million visitors to Dublin every year. “You simply can’t travel to the capital of Ireland,”...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Books, College, History, Ireland, Middle East, Dublin, Iona, County Meath, North Africa, Moss, Facebook Twitter, Ryan, Trinity College Dublin


Watch Lin-Manuel Miranda Perform the Earliest Version of Hamilton at the White House, Six Years Before the Play Hit the Broadway Stage (2009)

Another immigrant comin' up from the bottom His enemies destroyed his rep, America forgot him…  Holler if you can remember a time when few Americans were well-versed enough in founding father Alexander Hamilton’s origin story to recite it in rhyme at the drop of a hat. Believe it or not, as recently as the summer of 2015, when Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Hamilton: An American Musical exploded on Broadway, Hamilton the man was, as the Tony award winning lyrics above sugges...
Tags: Google, Music, Politics, Obama, College, White House, New York City, Theatre, America, History, Broadway, James Earl Jones, Dc, Miranda, George Stephanopoulos, Dick Cheney


An Animated Introduction to the Chaotic Brilliance of Jean-Michel Basquiat: From Homeless Graffiti Artist to Internationally Renowned Painter

By the late 1970s, New York City had fallen into such a shambolic state that nobody could have been expected to notice the occasional streak of additional spray paint here and there. But somehow the repeated appearance of the word "SAMO" caught the attention of even jaded Lower Manhattanites. That tag signified the work of Al Diaz and Jean-Michel Basquiat, the latter of whom would create work that, four decades later, would sell for over $110 million at auction, a record-breaking number ...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, New York City, Animation, Andy Warhol, Seoul, University Of Maryland, Soho, Facebook Twitter, Jean Michel Basquiat, Basquiat, William S Burroughs, Taschen, William Burroughs


Professor of Theater (Technical Theater) (Full-time, Tenure-track)

Teach a variety of lower division courses including Introduction to Theater, Stagecraft, Stage Lighting, Introduction to Theater Design, Sound for Theater and Introduction to Stage Management. Professor of Theater (Technical Theater) (Full-time, Tenure-track)Mt. San Antonio CollegeTerm:10 months/yearSalary:Initial placement, $65,837- $98,256 annually Application Procedure: First Review of Applications: Complete application packets will be accepted until the position is filled; howeve...
Tags: Art, Usa, Jobs, California, College, United States, San Antonio, Board, Board of Trustees, Mt San Antonio College, San Antonio College, San Antonio College Human Resources, Mt San Antonio Community College, MetLife Social Security, ORCalifornia Community College, Interest Mt San Antonio College


Behold The Drawings of Franz Kafka (1907-1917)

Runner 1907-1908 UK-born, Chicago-based artist Philip Hartigan has posted a brief video piece about Franz Kafka’s drawings. Kafka, of course, wrote a body of work, mostly never published during his lifetime, that captured the absurdity and the loneliness of the newly emerging modern world: In The Metamorphosis, Gregor transforms overnight into a giant cockroach; in The Trial, Josef K. is charged with an undefined crime by a maddeningly inaccessible court. In story after story, Kafka showed his...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, UK, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Chicago, Literature, Kafka, Vladimir Nabokov, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Hartigan, Franz Kafka, William Faulkner


All the Rembrandts: The Rijksmuseum Puts All 400 Rembrandts It Owns on Display for the First Time

If you've wanted to see some Rembrandts, as most every art lover has, you've wanted to go to the Rijksmuseum. The jewel in the crown of the Netherlands' most popular museum must surely be Rembrandt's masterpiece The Night Watch, whose latest restoration will stream live this summer. But Rembrandt enthusiasts planning their first trip to the Rijksmuseum only after the completion of that restoration may want to reconsider, given that between now and June, they can see not just some Rembran...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Netherlands, Amsterdam, Smithsonian, Rembrandt, First Time, Rijksmuseum, Facebook Twitter, 21st Century Los Angeles, Marissa Fessenden, Smithsonian Artnet Related Content, Masterpiece Rembrandt


The Life & Work of Edvard Munch, Explored by Patti Smith and Charlotte Gainsbourg

Look beyond the highly distressed genderless figure in the foreground of The Scream, one of the most famous painting in existence, and you'll find plenty of women. While its painter Edvard Munch was a man, as his name might suggest, the rest of his body of work featured not a few female bodies: 1895's Woman in Three Stages, 1896's Young Woman on the Beach, and in 1907's The Sick Child, a highly personal work by an artist whose mother and sister both died of tuberculosis. Or take 1895's M...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Pink Floyd, Madonna, Norway, Patti Smith, Smith, Seoul, Munch, Edvard Munch, Facebook Twitter, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Gainsbourg, Colin Marshall, Munch Museum


Discover the KattenKabinet: Amsterdam’s Museum Devoted to Works of Art Featuring Cats

Image by T_Marjorie, via Flickr Commons There’s been quite a bit of barking in the media lately to herald the reopening of the American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog, relocating from St. Louis to New York City’s Park Avenue. What’s a cat person to do? Perhaps decompress within Amsterdam’s KattenKabinet… In contrast to the Museum of the Dog’s glitzy, glass-fronted HQ, the Cat Cabinet maintains a fairly low profile inside a 17th-century canal house. (Several visitors have noted in their Trip Advi...
Tags: Travel, Google, Art, College, New York City, America, Bbc, Nature, Malaysia, Amsterdam, Rembrandt, St Louis, Morgan, Edward Gorey, Ken, Minsk


How the Mona Lisa Went From Being Barely Known, to Suddenly the Most Famous Painting in the World (1911)

Is the Mona Lisa really “ten times better than every other painting”? No one seriously believes this, and how would anyone measure such a thing? There may be no such critical scale, but there is a popular one. The Louvre, where the famous Leonardo da Vinci—maybe the most famous painting of all time—hangs, says that 80 percent of its visitors come just to see the Mona Lisa. Her enigmatic smile adorns merchandise the world wide. Books, essays, documentaries, songs, coffee mugs—hers may be ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Smithsonian, Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, Npr, Vox, Napoleon, Louvre, Mona Lisa, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci, Paducah, Leonardo da Vinci, Josh Jones


Gustave Doré’s Haunting Illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy

Inferno, Canto X: Many artists have attempted to illustrate Dante Alighieri's epic poem the Divine Comedy, but none have made such an indelible stamp on our collective imagination as the Frenchman Gustave Doré. Doré was 23 years old in 1855, when he first decided to create a series of engravings for a deluxe edition of Dante's classic.  He was already the highest-paid illustrator in France, with popular editions of Rabelais and Balzac under his belt, but Doré was unable to convince his publishe...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, France, Israel, Edgar Allan Poe, Literature, Hachette, Christ, Dante, Rose, Facebook Twitter, Judas Iscariot, Virgil, Beatrice


Watch Bauhaus World, a Free Documentary That Celebrates the 100th Anniversary of Germany’s Legendary Art, Architecture & Design School

This April 1st marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus, the German art school that, though short-lived, launched an entire design movement with a stark, functional aesthetic all its own. It can be tempting, looking into that aesthetic that finds the beauty in industry and the industry in beauty, to regard it as purely a product of its time and place, specifically a 20th-century Europe between the wars searching for ways to invent the future. But as revealed in Bauhaus ...
Tags: Google, Europe, Japan, Design, London, College, Mexico, Germany, Architecture, Tokyo, Nazi, Detroit, Seoul, Bauhaus, Amman, Deutsche Welle


Famous Drawings by Leonardo da Vinci Celebrated in a New Series of Stamps

No special occasion is required to celebrate Leonardo da Vinci, but the fact that he died in 1519 makes this year a particularly suitable time to look back at his vast, innovative, and influential body of work. Just last month, "Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing" opened in twelve museums across the United Kingdom. "144 of Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest drawings in the Royal Collection are displayed in 12 simultaneous exhibitions across the UK," says the exhibition's site, with each venue's dra...
Tags: Google, Art, UK, College, History, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Royal Mail, Cardiff, Belfast, Seoul, Bhutan, San Francisco Bay Area, Kate Brown, Facebook Twitter, Sparta


Dean, Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts

Webster University seeks a talented and creative leader in the arts to serve as the dean of the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts. Webster University seeks a talented and creative leader in the arts to serve as the dean of the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts. Applications and nominations are invited; the University will begin reviewing candidates immediately and hopes to have the new dean in place by the summer of 2019. Webster University’s entrepreneurial spirit drives its mission t...
Tags: Art, Jobs, College, Africa, University, St Louis, Council, Webster, EEO, Europe Asia, The University, Higher Learning Commission HLC, Webster Groves Missouri, Webster University, Department of Dance, Dean Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts


Dieter Rams Lists the 10 Timeless Principles of Good Design–Backed by Music by Brian Eno

Nearly all of us have heard the dictum "Less, but better," and nearly all of us have used Braun products. But how many of us know that both of those owe their considerable popularity to the same man? After studying architecture, interior decoration, and carpentry, the German industrial designer Dieter Rams spent 40 years at Braun, most of them as the company's chief design officer. There he created such hits as the 606 universal shelving system, the SK61 record player, and the ET66 calculat...
Tags: Apple, Google, Design, College, Netflix, Brian Eno, Seoul, Saul Bass, Braun, Dieter Rams, Facebook Twitter, Rams, Paola Antonelli, Colin Marshall, Gary Hustwit, 21st Century Los Angeles


Neil Gaiman Reads His Manifesto on Making Art: Features the 10 Things He Wish He Knew As a Young Artist

I think you're absolutely allowed several minutes, possibly even half a day to feel very, very sorry for yourself indeed. And then just start making art. - Neil Gaiman It’s a bit early in the year for commencement speeches, but fortunately for lifelong learners who rely on a steady drip of inspiration and encouragement, author Neil Gaiman excels at putting old wine in new bottles. He repurposed his keynote address to Philadelphia's University of the Arts’ Class of 2012 for Art Matter...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, College, Life, New York City, Neil Gaiman, Literature, Philadelphia, Hackney, Ursula K Le Guin, Alice, East London, Waterstones, Facebook Twitter, Chris Riddell


Historic Manuscript Filled with Beautiful Illustrations of Cuban Flowers & Plants Is Now Online (1826 )

The internet has become an essential back up system for thousands of pieces of historical art, science, and literature, and also for a specialized kind of text incorporating them all in degrees: the illustrated natural science book, from the golden ages of book illustration and philosophical naturalism in Europe and the Americas. We’ve seen some fine digital reproductions of the illustrated Nomenclature of Colors by Abraham Gottlob Werner, for example—a book that accompanied Darwin on his Beagl...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Books, Science, College, Cuba, Cornell, Darwin, Mary, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, Josh Jones, Euclid, Mary Shelley, Goethe


Download Free Coloring Books from 113 Museums

One can only color so many floral-trimmed affirmations before one begins to crave something slightly more perverse. An emaciated, naked, anthropomorphized mandrake root, say or… Thy wish is our command, but be prepared to hustle, because today is the final day of Color Our Collections, a compellingly democratic initiative on the part of the New York Academy of Medicine. Since 2016, the Academy has made an annual practice of inviting other libraries, archives, and cultural institutions around th...
Tags: Google, Art, College, New York City, West Virginia, Museums, Vilnius, University Of Illinois, Villanova University, Facebook Twitter, Mutter Museum, Ayun Halliday, Patrick J Costello, Andover Harvard Theological Library, Franz Hogenberg


The Real Locations of Ukiyo-e, Historic Japanese Woodblock Prints, Plotted on a Google Map

The undisputed last great master of ukiyo-e was Utagawa Hiroshige. He is best known for the many series he created of bucolic landscapes, which offered collectors a chance to see parts of Japan they might never reach. The Japan of his early 19th century work holds a special place in Japanese hearts--a final look at an isolated and beautiful country just before the opening up of the ports to the West and, with it, industrialization. Apart from Mount Fuji, the locations that Hiroshige drew have l...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Kyoto, George, DEWA, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Mount Fuji, Kanazawa, Google Map, Ted Mills, Hiroshige


Artificial Intelligence Brings Salvador Dalí Back to Life: “Greetings, I Am Back”

Whatever Hippocrates meant when he said “art is long, life is short,” we usually take the saying to illustrate one indisputable medical truth and one more philosophical: everyone dies, but art lives for hundreds, thousands, of years—and may in some sense be a kind of immortality for the artist. This was probably what Salvador Dalí meant when he said, “Si muero, no muero por todo”—“If I die, I won’t completely die.” But maybe he knew he’d return one day in another form as well. What if ar...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Andy Warhol, Salvador Dalí, Alfred Hitchcock, Facebook Twitter, Dali, Dali Museum, Ingrid Bergman, Josh Jones, St Petersburg Florida, Hippocrates, Durham NC Follow, Surrealist Salvador Dalí Painting, Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí


Enter an Online Interactive Documentary on Rembrandt’s The Night Watch and Learn About the Painting’s Many Hidden Secrets

What possessed the man who attacked Rembrandt’s The Night Watch with a bread knife in 1975, “jabbing two-foot-long knife marks into the surface,” as Nina Siegal writes at The New York Times, “cutting a seven-foot-wide hole, and ripping off a section of the canvas”? This was not the first time the painting had been mangled. In 1715, just a little over 70 years after the monumental work’s 1642 completion, the Amsterdam city government decided to move it, and removed a significant part to shrink i...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Amsterdam, The New York Times, Rembrandt, Peter Greenaway, Facebook Twitter, Escher, Hieronymus Bosch, Militia Company of District II, Frans Banninck Cocq, Nina Siegal, Pieter Roelofs


Arts Transcending Borders Fellow

The ATB Fellow supports the administration of the Arts Transcending Borders program while gaining experience in all aspects of managing a visiting artist program in an academic setting. Arts Transcending Borders Fellow About College of the Holy Cross: Founded in 1843 in Worcester, Massachusetts, the College of the Holy Cross is among the nation’s leading liberal arts institutions. A highly selective, four-year, exclusively undergraduate college of 3,000 students, Holy Cross is reno...
Tags: Art, Jobs, College, Massachusetts, Microsoft Office, Catholic, New England, Providence, Central Massachusetts, Twitter Facebook, Worcester Massachusetts, Holy Cross, ATB, Jesuit Catholic, Boston Hartford, Equal Opportunity


Watch a New Virtual Reality Production of Shakespeare’s Hamlet: A Modern Take on a Classic Play

Often compared to The Tempest, Samuel Beckett's Endgame may have as much of Shakespeare’s Hamlet in it, though the author was unwilling to acknowledge the influence to Theodor Adorno. Beckett's central character, the blind, aged Hamm, spends all of his time in a throne haranguing the other three, in a gloomy place, The New York Times’ Brooks Atkinson wrote, “somewhere between life and death.” Hamm might have been the Danish prince grown old and bitter, left with nothing but what Beckett ...
Tags: Google, Technology, Youtube, College, Boston, Theatre, New York Times, Literature, Pbs, Shakespeare, Hamlet, New York Public Library, Samuel Beckett, HARRIS, Facebook Twitter, Beckett



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