Art


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The Age of Cathedrals: A Free Online Course from Yale University

From Yale professor Howard Bloch comes Age of Cathedrals, an online course that offers “an introduction to some of the most astonishing architectural monuments the world has ever known—Gothic cathedrals,” including Notre Dame, Chartres, and Saint-Denis. The course description adds: “We shall study the art, literature, intellectual life, economics, and new social arrangements that arose in the shadow of the cathedrals and that were such an important part of the revival of cities in the tw...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, History, Harvard, Yale, Online Courses, Rembrandt, Goya, Yale University, Leonardo, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Howard Bloch, Age of Cathedrals, Notre Dame Chartres


A Side Splitting Medieval TikTok Account: Get a Laugh at Medieval Yoga Poses & Much More

@greedypeasant?‍?? Medieval Yoga ? #medievaltiktok #yoga #yogalover #peacewithin #fyp #foryou #foryoupage? original sound – Tyler Gunther 30-year-old Brooklyn-based artist Tyler Gunther views his creation, Greedy Peasant, as “the manifestation of all the strange medieval art we now enjoy in meme form”: Often times medieval history focuses on royals, wars, popes and plagues. With this peasant guide, we get to experience the world through the lens of a queer artist who is just trying to mak...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Fashion, Comedy, College, New York City, History, Brooklyn, Arkansas, Robin, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Susan, Gunther, St Catherine, Tyler Gunther, Robin Frohardt


Ethan Hawke Explains How to Give Yourself Permission to Be Creative

The most creative people, you’ll notice, throw themselves into what they do with absurd, even reckless abandon. They commit, no matter their doubts about their talents, education, finances, etc. They have to. They are generally fighting not only their own misgivings, but also those of friends, family, critics, financiers, and landlords. Artists who work to realize their own vision, rather than someone else’s, face a witheringly high probability of failure, or the kind of success that com...
Tags: Art, Facebook, New York, College, Poetry, America, Creativity, Ethan Hawke, David Lynch, Ginsberg, Hawke, Buckley, William F Buckley, Josh Jones, Krishna, Allen Ginsberg


Sci-Fi “Portal” Connects Citizens of Lublin & Vilnius, Allowing Passersby Separated by 376 Miles to Interact in Real Time

Can we ever transcend our tendency to divide up the world into us and them? The history of Europe, which political theorist Kenneth Minogue once called “plausibly summed up as preparing for war, waging war, or recovering from war,” offers few consoling answers. But perhaps it isn’t for history, much less for theory or politics, to dictate the future prospects for the unity of mankind. Art and technology offer another set of views on the matter, and it’s art and technology that come together in ...
Tags: Travel, Art, Facebook, Europe, Technology, College, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Florence, Vilnius, Barnes, London England, Reykjavik Iceland, Vilnius Lithuania, Lublin, Lublin Poland


How Egyptian Papyrus Is Made: Watch Artisans Keep a 5,000-Year-Old Art Alive

In 2013, French Egyptologist Pierre Tallet discovered in an excavation site near the Red Sea “entire rolls of papyrus, some a few feet long and still relatively intact, written in hieroglyphics as well as hieratic, the cursive script the ancient Egyptians used for everyday communication,” Alexander Stille writes at Smithsonian. The scrolls contained the “Diary of Merer,” the journals of an official who led a transportation crew, and who observed the building of the largest of the pyramid...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, History, Egypt, Smithsonian, Pliny, Red Sea, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Pierre Tallet, Tallet, Harvard 's Digital Giza Project, Alexander Stille, University of Michigan Libraries


Director, College Center – Beautiful NW Montana

The Paul D. Wachholz College Center, scheduled to open in spring 2022, is located on the main campus of Flathead Valley Community College in Kalispell, Montana. As the premier performing arts facility serving western Montana, the College Center features a 50,000 square foot facility to include a large performance and lecture hall, a multi-purpose activity complex with two basketball courts, an outdoor amphitheater, and a reception hall with an exhibition gallery. JOB TITLE:Director, College C...
Tags: Google, Art, Jobs, College, Montana, United States, Kalispell, Flathead Valley, Northwest Montana, Kalispell Montana, National Service, Flathead Valley Community College, AmeriCorps Peace Corps, Paul D Wachholz College Center, College Center, MT Public Employees Retirement System and Employer


The Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery: A New Site Presents 403 Paintings from The Joy of Painting Series (and Uses Data Analysis to Demystify Bob Ross’ Craft)

“We don’t make mistakes. We have happy accidents,” the late Bob Ross soothed fans painting along at home, while brushing an alarming amount of black onto one of his signature nature scenes. His mellow on-camera demeanor and flowing, wet-on-wet oil painting style were perfectly calibrated to help tightly-wound viewers relax into a right-brained groove. The creators of the Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery take a more left brained approach. Having collected data on Ross’ evergreen series, The Joy ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, Television, College, Data, Ross, Bob Ross, Van Dyke Brown, Ayun Halliday, Bob Ross Banksy, Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery, John Thamm, Thamm, Connor Rothschild, Virtual Art Gallery


The Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery: A New Site Presents 403 Paintings from The Joy of Painting Series

“We don’t make mistakes. We have happy accidents,” the late Bob Ross soothed fans painting along at home, while brushing an alarming amount of black onto one of his signature nature scenes. His mellow on-camera demeanor and flowing, wet-on-wet oil painting style were perfectly calibrated to help tightly-wound viewers relax into a right-brained groove. The creators of the Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery take a more left brained approach. Having collected data on Ross’ evergreen series, The Joy o...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, Television, College, Data, Ross, Bob Ross, Van Dyke Brown, Ayun Halliday, Bob Ross Banksy, Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery, John Thamm, Thamm, Connor Rothschild, Virtual Art Gallery


The Art of Creating a Bonsai: One Year Condensed Condensed Into 22 Mesmerizing Minutes

To be a good writer, one must be a good reader. This is made true by the need to absorb and assess the work of other writers, but even more so by the need to evaluate one’s own. Writing is re-writing, to coin a phrase, and effective re-writing can only follow astute re-reading. This condition applies to other arts and crafts as well: take bonsai, the regarding of which constitutes a skill in and of itself. To craft an aesthetically pleasing miniature tree, one must first be able to see a...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Japan, College, Nature, Seoul, Barnes, Bucky Barnes, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


What Is Contemporary Art?: A Free Online Course from The Museum of Modern Art

What is contemporary art? In this course from the Museum of Modern Art, you’ll explore this question through more than 70 works of art made from 1980 to the present, with a focus on art of the last decade. You’ll hear directly from artists, architects, and designers from around the globe about their creative processes, materials, and inspiration. 3D printed glass and sculptures made of fiber. Dance performed in the factory and the museum. Hacking into television and video games. Portrait...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Online Courses, Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Each


Download 1,000+ Beautiful Woodblock Prints by Hiroshige, the Last Great Master of the Japanese Woodblock Print Tradition

For 200 years, beginning in the 1630s, Japan closed itself off from the world. In its capital of Edo the country boasted the largest city in existence, and among its population of more than a million not a single one was foreign-born. “Practically the only Europeans to have visited it were a handful of Dutchmen,” writes professor of Japanese history Jordan Sand in a new London Review of Books piece, “and so it would remain until the mid-19 th century. No foreigners were permitted to live or tr...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Seoul, Nagasaki, Minneapolis Institute Of Art, Mount Fuji, Edo, Hokusai, London Review of Books, Utagawa Hiroshige, Colin Marshall


Download 1,000+ Beautiful Woodblock Prints by Hiroshige, the Last Great Master of the Woodblock Print Tradition

For 200 years, beginning in the 1630s, Japan closed itself off from the world. In its capital of Edo the country boasted the largest city in existence, and among its population of more than a million not a single one was foreign-born. “Practically the only Europeans to have visited it were a handful of Dutchmen,” writes professor of Japanese history Jordan Sand in a new London Review of Books piece, “and so it would remain until the mid-19 th century. No foreigners were permitted to live or tr...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Seoul, Nagasaki, Minneapolis Institute Of Art, Mount Fuji, Edo, Hokusai, London Review of Books, Utagawa Hiroshige, Colin Marshall


Who Designed the 1980s Aesthetic?: Meet the Memphis Group, the Designers Who Created the 80s Iconic Look

For those who remember the 1980s, it can feel like they never left, so deeply ingrained have their designs become in the 21st century. But where did those designs themselves originate? Vibrant, clashing colors and patterns, bubbly shapes; “the geometric figures of Art Deco,” writes Sara Barnes at My Modern Met, “the color palette of Pop Art, and the 1950s kitsch” that inspired designers of all kinds came from a movement of artists who called themselves the Memphis Group, after Bob Dylan’...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Fashion, Design, Milan, College, Architecture, Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Vox, Brian Eno, Memphis, Memphis Tennessee, Dada, Josh Jones, Ettore Sottsass


When Salvador Dalí Created a Surrealist Funhouse at New York World’s Fair (1939)

Only the violence and duration of your hardened dream can resist the hideous mechanical civilization that is your enemy, that is also the enemy of the ‘..pleasure-..principle’ of all men. It is man’s right to love women with the ecstatic heads of fish. — Salvador Dalí, “Declaration of the Independence of the Imagination and the Rights of Man to His Own Madness”  Whatever organizers of the 1939 New York World’s Fair thought they might get when Salvador Dalí was chosen to design a pavilion...
Tags: Art, Facebook, New York, College, Salvador Dalí, Coney Island, Alice Cooper, Dali, Josh Jones, New York World, Taschen, Durham NC Follow, Julien Levy, Boticelli, Messy Nessy, Montse Aguer Director


Design Thinking for the Greater Good: A Free Online Course from the University of Virginia

Design Thinking for the Greater Good: Innovation in the Social Sector shows how and why human-centered design is a powerful tool. Offered by the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia, the course lets students “view design thinking success stories from around the world, in areas as diverse as government, health care, and education.” Throughout the course, students will “learn the tools, techniques and mindset needed to use design thinking to uncover new and creative solu...
Tags: Facebook, Business, Design, College, Online Courses, University Of Virginia, Ideo, Greater Good, Social Sector, Darden School of Business, Smithsonian Design Museum Digitizes


The Airline Toilets Theatre Company: Watch One Man Stage Comical Shows in Airplane Bathrooms

When COVID 19 struck, theater lovers were faced with a choice. Let go entirely, or expand our definitions of what constitutes “theater.” We’ve had 14 months to get used to the idea of performances staged in closets, in podcast form, or as phone calls hinging on audience participation. We’re sick of Zoom, but we no longer consider it mandatory for the players to inhabit the same space as each other or the audience. This is all old news to Peter Brooke Turner, a member of the Ukulele O...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, Comedy, London, College, Singapore, Theatre, US, Jimi Hendrix, Creativity, Bob Dylan, Daniel Craig, Auckland, Turner, Brian May, Abraham Lincoln


Art Historian Provides Hilarious & Surprisingly Efficient Art History Lessons on TikTok

@_theiconoclassIf youse come at me again for my Australian pronunciation I swear ? #arthistory #arthistorytiktok #baroque? original sound – AyseDeniz When a commenter on the Baroque TikTok took umbrage that she referred to Artemisia Gentileschi by first name only, McGillivray followed up with an educational video explaining the convention from the 17th-century perspective. @_theiconoclassReply to @rajendzzz her dad was hot, comment if you agree #baroque #artemisia #arthistoryclass? Guil...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Comedy, College, History, Bbc, White, Giotto, John Berger, Artemisia Gentileschi, Ayun Halliday, Dominic White, Sandro Botticelli, How to Learn for Free, McGillivray, Fra Angelico


The Art of Balancing Stones: How Artists Use Simple Materials to Make Impossible Sculptures in Nature

Not so long ago, a wave of long-form entreaties rolled through social media insisting that we stop building rock cairns. Like many who scrolled past them, I couldn’t quite imagine the offending structures they meant, let alone recall constructing one myself. The cairns in question turned out, mundanely, to be those little stacks of flat rocks seen in parks, alongside trails and streams. They’re as common in South Korea, where I live, as they seem to be in the United States. Both countrie...
Tags: Art, Facebook, South Korea, College, Nature, United States, Seoul, China Japan, Colin Marshall, Michael Grab, 21st Century Los Angeles, Jonna Jinton, Jinton, Prehistoric Times Watch


Behold the Astronomicum Caesareum, “Perhaps the Most Beautiful Scientific Book Ever Printed” (1540)

Art, science, and magic seem to have been rarely far apart during the Renaissance, as evidenced by the elaborate 1540 Astronomicum Caesareum — or “Emperor’s Astronomy” — seen here. “The most sumptuous of all Renaissance instructive manuals, ” the Metropolitan Museum of Art notes, the book was created over a period of 8 years by Petrus Apianus, also known as Apian, an astronomy professor at the University of Ingolstadt. Modern-day astronomer Owen Gingerich, professor emeritus at Harvard Universi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Books, Science, College, Harvard University, Getty, Charles, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Ferdinand, Lund University, Halley, Josh Jones, Charles V, Durham NC Follow, Gingerich


What Makes the Art of Bonsai So Expensive?: $1 Million for a Bonsai Tree, and $32,000 for Bonsai Scissors

During the past year’s stretches of time at home, quite a few of us have attempted to introduce more plant life into our surroundings. By some accounts, indoor gardening ranks among the most cost-effective ways of increasing the quality of one’s domestic life. But those of us who get too deep into it (aggressive pursuit of interests being a known characteristic of Open Culture readers) may find themselves getting more than they bargained for, or at any rate paying more than they intended...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Japan, College, Seoul, Osaka, Yamamoto, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Chieko Yamamoto, Yasuhiro Hiraka, Masakazu Yoshikawa, Hiraka, Bonsai Scissors


Room Decor Under $50: The Trendiest Pieces to Transform Your Room

Let's face it; we could all use a little decor refresh.
Tags: Shopping, College, Bedroom, Interior Design, Dorm, Shopping Guide, Room Decor, Dorm Room Shopping, Dorm Room Design


The Great Wave Off Kanagawa by Hokusai: An Introduction to the Iconic Japanese Woodblock Print in 17 Minutes

When woodcut artist Katsushika Hokusai made his famous print The Great Wave off Kanagawa in 1830 — part of the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji — he was 70 years old and had lived his entire life in a Japan closed off from the rest of the world. In the 19th century, however, “the rest of the world was becoming industrialized,” James Payne explains above in his Great Art Explained video, “and the Japanese were concerned about foreign invasions.” The Great Wave shows “an image of Japa...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Europe, Japan, College, Berlin, Tokyo, Nagasaki, Goya, Monet, Claude Debussy, Vincent Van Gogh, Josh Jones, Mount Fuji, Kanazawa, Hokusai


Watch a Masterpiece Emerge from a Solid Block of Stone

As a younger person, I became enthralled with the art-historical novels of Irving Stone, especially The Agony and the Ecstasy, his fictionalized biography of Michelangelo. Few books live up to their title so well — Stone’s Michelangelo is a tumult of passion and pain, a Romantic hero tailor-made for those who believe artistic creation transcends almost any other act. Stone describes Michelangelo’s sculpture emerging from the marble fully-formed in a creation imbued with so much sexual en...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Rodin, Alexander Calder, Michelangelo, Stone, Durham NC Follow, Irving Stone, Anna Rubincam, David More Josh Jones, Rubincam, Solid Block of Stone


Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Get Digitized: Where to Read the Renaissance Man’s Manuscripts Online

From the hand of Leonardo da Vinci came the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, among other art objects of intense reverence and even worship. But to understand the mind of Leonardo da Vinci, one must immerse oneself in his notebooks. Totaling some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, they record something of every aspect of the Renaissance man’s intellectual and daily life: studies for artworks, designs for elegant buildings and fantastical machines, observations of the world around him, lists of hi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Science, College, History, Bill Gates, Archives, Seoul, Da Vinci, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Colin Marshall, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 21st Century Los Angeles, Codex Arundel, Francesco Melzi


Where to Read Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Online: A Roundup of the Renaissance Man’s Digitized Manuscripts

From the hand of Leonardo da Vinci came the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, among other art objects of intense reverence and even worship. But to understand the mind of Leonardo da Vinci, one must immerse oneself in his notebooks. Totaling some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, they record something of every aspect of the Renaissance man’s intellectual and daily life: studies for artworks, designs for elegant buildings and fantastical machines, observations of the world around him, lists of hi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Science, College, History, Bill Gates, Archives, Seoul, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Colin Marshall, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 21st Century Los Angeles, Codex Arundel, Francesco Melzi, App Leonardo da Vinci


David Hockney Shows Us His Sketch Book, Page by Page

Still working and exhibiting in his eighties, and indeed seeming to grow more and more productive with age, David Hockney has become a living symbol of what it is to live as an artist. This entails not just making a lot of paintings, or even making a lot of paintings with an immediately recognizable style under a well-cultivated image. It means constantly and instinctively converting the reality in which one lives into art, an activity evidenced by Hockney’s sketchbooks. In the video abo...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Los Angeles, Bradford, Yorkshire, David Hockney, Seoul, Vincent Van Gogh, Taschen, Hockney, NPG, Colin Marshall, Giorgio de Chirico, Richard Diebenkorn, 21st Century Los Angeles


Beautiful 19th-Century Indian Drawings Show Hatha Yoga Poses Before They Reached the West

Yoga as an athletic series of postures for physical health came into being only about 100 years ago, part of a wave of gymnastics and calisthenics that spread around the Western world in the 1920s and made its way to India, combining with classical Indian spirituality and asanas, a word which translates to “seat.”  Yoga, of course, had existed as a classical spiritual discipline in India for thousands of years. (The word is first found in the Rig Veda), but it had little to do with fitness, as ...
Tags: Health, Art, Facebook, Books, College, India, Religion, West, Pali, East, Henry David Thoreau, Swami Vivekananda, Singleton, Public Domain Review, Feuerstein, Mark Singleton


Great Art Explained: Watch 15 Minute Introductions to Great Works by Warhol, Rothko, Kahlo, Picasso & More

Can great art be explained? Isn’t it a little like explaining a joke? Yet this can be worthwhile when the joke is in a foreign language or an unfamiliar idiom, a long-forgotten dialect or an alien idiolect. Consider, for example, the most common response to Mark Rothko’s monochromatic rectangles: “I don’t get it.” Will perplexed viewers better understand Rothko’s Seagram murals when they learn that “he was found in a pool of blood six by eight feet wide, roughly the size of one of his pa...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Hollywood, London, College, Marilyn Monroe, Andy Warhol, Warhol, Tate Modern, Monet, Andy, Forbes, Mozart, Payne, Josh Jones, Mark Rothko


Affinities, a Book of Images to Celebrate 10 Years of The Public Domain Review

In a similar way to how Open Culture aims to distill in one place the web’s high-quality free cultural and educational media, so The Public Domain Review aims to help readers explore the vast (and sometimes overwhelming!) sea of public domain works available online — like a small exhibition gallery at the entrance to an immense network of archives and storage rooms that lie beyond. Celebrating curious and beautiful public domain images is at the very heart of what we do, and so it seem...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Books, College, Adam Green, Public Domain Review, Thames Hudson It, PDR Press Affinities


Watch 400+ Documentaries from German Broadcaster Deutsche Welle: Art Forgery, Fashion Photography, the Mona Lisa, and More

You’re certainly familiar with Nouvelle Vague, the “French new wave” that shook up world cinema in the mid-2oth century. You’ve probably also heard of Hallyu, the “Korean wave” of pop music and television dramas (and, increasingly, films) now crashing across not just Asia but the West. As for Deutsche Welle, literally the “German wave,” you may know the term better in its abbreviated form: DW, the brand of Germany’s public international broadcaster. Here on Open Culture we’ve previously ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Asia, Europe, Photography, Television, College, Germany, Berlin, Africa, West, United States, Seoul, Roma, Turkmenistan, Goethe Institut



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