Art


Posts filtered by tags: Dante[x]


 

Dante’s Purgatory In A Time Of Global Uncertainty

The concept of Purgatory was relatively new when Dante was born. Dante’s conception of Purgatory is remarkably like a wilderness boot camp. Its terrain is forbidding—more like an alp than like a Tuscan hillside. – The New Yorker
Tags: Art, Ideas, Dante


William Blake’s 102 Illustrations of The Divine Comedy Collected in a Beautiful Book from Taschen

In his book on the Tarot, Alejandro Jodorowsky describes the Hermit card as representing mid-life, a “positive crisis,” a middle point in time; “between life and death, in a continual crisis, I hold up my lit lamp — my consciousness,” says the Hermit, while confronting the unknown. The figure recalls the image of Dante in the opening lines of the Divine Comedy. In Mandelbaum’s translation at Columbia’s Digital Dante, we see evident similarities: When I had journeyed half of our life’s way, I fo...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Europe, Books, College, Literature, William Blake, Florence, Columbia, Dante, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Blake, Virgil, Josh Jones, Taschen, Mandelbaum


What Makes Rodin’s The Thinker a Great Sculpture: An Introduction to Rodin Life, Craft & Iconic Work

Auguste Rodin’s The Thinker exists in about 28 full-size bronze casts, each approximately 73 inches high, in museums around the world, as well as several dozen castings of smaller size and plaster models and studies. The Thinker also exists as one of the most copied and parodied artworks in world history, perhaps because of its ubiquity. “Unfortunately,” Joseph Phelan writes at the Artcyclopedia, “there is a side of Rodin’s work that has become kitsch through cheap reproductions and comm...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Paris, Dante, Rodin, Gates Of Hell, Plato, Josh Jones, Auguste Rodin, Kant, Rodin Museum, Durham NC Follow, Museum of Decorative Arts, Joseph Phelan, Artcyclopedia


Explore Divine Comedy Digital, a New Digital Database That Collects Seven Centuries of Art Inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy

The number of artworks inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy in the seven hundred years since the poet completed his epic, vernacular masterwork is so vast that referring to the poem inevitably means referring to its illustrations. These began appearing decades after the poet’s death, and they have not stopped appearing since. Indeed, it might be fair to say that the title Divine Comedy (simply called Comedy before 1555) names not only an epic poem but also its many constellations of artworks and...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Milan, College, Dubai, Literature, Columbia University, Salvador Dalí, Dante, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, John Ciardi, Visual Agency, Alessandro Vellutello, Bernard Mary, Divine Comedy Digital


Book Blurbs Have, In Fact, Existed For Centuries

“The word ‘blurb’ was coined in 1907 by the comic writer Gelett Burgess but they have been around a long time…. In the early 14th century, Dante’s great poem was simply called the Commedia, until his disciple Boccaccio added the lofty adjective Divina: arguably the most successful piece of publishing puff in history. One of the first major carnivals of blurbery came in 1516, when, ahead of the publication of his satire Utopia, Thomas More wrote to his friend Erasmus, urging him to make sure the...
Tags: Art, Words, Dante, Erasmus, Thomas More, Boccaccio, Gelett Burgess, 06.15.21


Nirvana sued over thirty-year-old t-shirt design featuring a 1949 illustration

Back in 1989, I purchased a Nirvana t-shirt emblazoned with a map of Upper Hell as described in Dante's Inferno. (The back of the shirt reads: "fudge packin crack smokin satan worshippin mother fucker") Now, the granddaughter of C.W. Scott-Giles, who created that hell illustration for a 1949 translation of Dante's Inferno, is suing Nirvana LLC for copyright infringement. — Read the rest
Tags: Art, Post, Music, News, Copyright, Nirvana, Dante, T-shirts, Scott Giles, Here We Are Now Entertain US, Nirvana LLC


Nirvana sued over t-shirt artwork dating back to 1989

Back in 1989, I purchased a Nirvana t-shirt emblazoned with a map of Upper Hell as described in Dante's Inferno. (The back of the shirt reads: "fudge packin crack smokin satan worshippin mother fucker") Now, the granddaughter of C.W. Scott-Giles, who created that hell illustration for a 1949 translation of Dante's Inferno, is suing Nirvana LLC for copyright infringement. — Read the rest
Tags: Art, Post, Music, News, Copyright, Nirvana, Dante, T-shirts, Scott Giles, Here We Are Now Entertain US, Nirvana LLC


‘Like The Metro At Rush Hour’: Vatican Museums Reopen To The Public, And It’s A Mess

“Museumgoers took to social media to complain about the institution’s failure to implement effective social-distancing measures in some of its most popular spaces last weekend, in particular those decorated with frescoes by Raphael and his workshop. … In an open letter to museum management posted on Facebook, [a Vatican docent said] that he was ‘deeply ashamed and embarrassed’ that he had led a group of unsuspecting tourists into a situation which he likened to ‘Dante’s inferno.'” – The Art New...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Vatican, Raphael, Dante, Metro, Visual, 02.17.21


Dante’s Descendant Wants Poet’s Conviction On Corruption Charges Reversed

In 1302, caught on the wrong side in one of Florence’s perpetual factional struggles, Dante Alighieri was fined and banished on a probably trumped-up charge of corruption in political office; summoned home from Ravenna the following year, he refused to come, and his sentence was commuted to death by burning. Now Dante’s great-great-many-times-great-grandson, astrophysicist Sperello di Serego Alighieri, is working to get his ancestor exonerated. – The Guardian
Tags: Art, People, Florence, Dante, Ravenna, Dante Alighieri, 02.01.21, Serego Alighieri


Rarely-Seen Illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy Are Now Free Online, Courtesy of the Uffizi Gallery

We know Dante’s Divine Comedy—especially its famous first third, Inferno—as an extended theological treatise, epic love poem, and vicious satire of church hypocrisy and the Florentine political faction that exiled Dante from the city of his birth in 1302. Most of us don’t know it the way its first readers did (and as Dante scholars do): a compendium in which “a number of medieval literary genres are digested and combined,” as Robert M. Durling writes in his translation of the Inferno. These lit...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Spain, The Guardian, Literature, Khan Academy, Provence, Dante, Robert Rauschenberg, Yale University, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Medici, Uffizi Gallery, Orsini


"Eighty-eight rarely seen drawings of Dante’s The Divine Comedy have been put on virtual display as Italy begins a year-long calendar of events to mark the 700th anniversary of the poet’s death."

"The drawings, by the 16th-century Renaissance artist Federico Zuccari, are being exhibited online, for free, by the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. 'Until now these beautiful drawings have only been seen by a few scholars and displayed to the public only twice, and only in part,' said Eike Schmidt, the Uffizi’s director. 'Now they are published in full, alongside a didactic-scientific comment, where from [Friday] they will be freely available.'"  The Guardian lets us know. Go here for all the art...
Tags: Art, Law, Museums, Italy, Florence, Dante, Uffizi Gallery, Ann Althouse, Eike Schmidt, Federico Zuccari


Italy begins year of Dante anniversary events with virtual Uffizi exhibition

Gallery puts seldom-seen Divine Comedy sketches on display online to mark 700 years since poet’s deathEighty-eight rarely seen drawings of Dante’s The Divine Comedy have been put on virtual display as Italy begins a year-long calendar of events to mark the 700th anniversary of the poet’s death.The drawings, by the 16th-century Renaissance artist Federico Zuccari, are being exhibited online, for free, by the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Continue reading...
Tags: Art, Europe, Books, World news, Culture, Art and design, Drawing, Italy, Florence, Dante, Dante Alighieri, Federico Zuccari


Italy begins year-long celebration of Dante's 700th anniversary with virtual Uffizi exhibition

Gallery puts seldom-seen Divine Comedy sketches on display online to mark 700 years since poet’s deathEighty-eight rarely seen drawings of Dante’s The Divine Comedy have been put on virtual display as Italy begins a year-long calendar of events to mark the 700th anniversary of the poet’s death.The drawings, by the 16th-century Renaissance artist Federico Zuccari, are being exhibited online, for free, by the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Continue reading...
Tags: Art, Europe, Books, World news, Culture, Art and design, Drawing, Italy, Florence, Dante, Dante Alighieri, Federico Zuccari


When Our World Became a de Chirico Painting: How the Avant-Garde Painter Foresaw the Empty City Streets of 2020

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkPmiUFZyu8 This past spring, media outlets of every kind published photos and videos of eerily empty public spaces in cities like Beijing, New York, Milan, Paris, and Seoul, cities not known for their lack of street life. At least in the case of Seoul, where I live, the depopulated image was a bit of an exaggeration, but taken as a whole, these stunned visual dispatches from around the world reflected a real and sudden change in urban life caused by this ...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, History, Seoul, Florence, Dante, Jackson Pollock, Manet, Facebook Twitter, Evan Puschak, De Chirico, Colin Marshall, Giorgio de Chirico, Puschak


What Will Post-COVID Novels Be Like? For Possible Answers, Look To Post-9/11 Fiction

Chris Bohjalian: “If 9/11 is a literary precedent, it could be years before we will see our first rush of novels about the coronavirus pandemic.” (The first such major titles, Ian McEwan’s Saturday and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, appeared in 2005.) “Some will no doubt take place in the innermost ring of Dante’s Inferno that has been New York City’s emergency rooms, and some will be about the chaos of home schooling twin 8-year-olds while your toddler crashes your c...
Tags: Art, New York City, Words, Jonathan Safran Foer, Dante, Ian McEwan, Chris Bohjalian, 05.21.20


Scholar And Author George Steiner Dead At 90

“An essayist, fiction writer, teacher, scholar and literary critic … Mr. Steiner both dazzled and dismayed his readers with the range and occasional obscurity of his literary references.” As one New York Times critic wrote, “His bracing virtue has been his ability to move from Pythagoras, through Aristotle and Dante, to Nietzsche and Tolstoy in a single paragraph. His irritating vice has been that he can move from Pythagoras, through Aristotle and Dante, to Nietzsche and Tolstoy in a single par...
Tags: Art, People, New York Times, Dante, Aristotle, Tolstoy, Steiner, Pythagoras, Nietzsche, George Steiner, 02.03.20


Artist Spent Over 4 Years Illustrating Dante’s Inferno On Violins

According to Leonardo Frigo: “Hello, my name is Leonardo Frigo and I am a London-based artist. I illustrate biographies and stories on musical instruments such as violins and cellos. “Dante Alighieri – Inferno” is a project in progress for more than four years, conceived and developed by me.” More: Leonardo Frigo h/t: boredpanda “I had managed to bring together music, poetry... Source
Tags: Art, Design, London, Dante, Violins, Inferno, Dante Alighieri, Leonardo Frigo


NYC’s Best End of the Year Cocktails Illustrated

Artist Paul Tuller illustrates some of the best seasonal and signature cocktails We sip in an age when cocktails are approached with as much artistry as stretches of canvas, forcing bartenders to seek out curious components from around the world. The quality of ingredients—from spirits to spices—is at an all-time high. Practices, like those employed for Santina‘s wintry, clarified piña colada, tease multiple senses. And …
Tags: Art, Drinks, Design, NYC, Alcohol, Bars, Mace, Artists, Cocktails, Illustrators, Dante, Food + Drink, Moma, Bemelmans, Paul Tuller, Santina


#TwistedTropes 26. Whistler's angry mother

Image from Wikimedia Commons When James Whistler painted his mother, she didn't look too pleased. In fact she looked proper hacked off, like as if any minute she was going to turn around and snarl obscenities at him and tell him exactly where he could stick his paintbrushes (steady on now - Editor).Maybe she had a migraine coming on when he asked her to pose for him. Perhaps she was expected at her Pilates class and he was making her very late. Or maybe she was simply in a bad mood. Any...
Tags: Art, Washington, Painting, Noah, Creativity, Pandora, Paris, Whistler, eLearning, Dante, Monet, édouard Manet, Manet, Plato, Schindler, Moore


A Brief Animated Introduction to the Life and Work of Frida Kahlo

Reducing an artist’s work to their biography produces crude understanding. But in very many cases, life and work cannot be teased apart. This applies not only to Sylvia Plath and her contemporary confessional poets but also to James Joyce and Marcel Proust and writers they admired, like Dante and Cervantes. Such an artist too is Frida Kahlo, a practitioner of narrative self-portraits in a modernizing idiom that at the same time draws extensively on tradition. The literary nature of her a...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Mexico, Gillespie, James Joyce, Dante, Sylvia Plath, Marcel Proust, Diego Rivera, Garcia, Facebook Twitter, Maria Garcia, Frida Kahlo, Leon Trotsky, WBUR


Chaucer Was A Remainer — A Poet Of Europe, Not Just England

“Chaucer was able to transform English poetry the way he did precisely because of his internationalism, not his nationalism. Like all educated men of his day, he was multilingual. He devoured late-antique philosophy, Latin translations of Arabic scientific treatises, and French love poems. His unusually good knowledge of Italian – and his travels to Italy – allowed him to access the latest poetry of Dante, Boccaccio and Petrarch. Indeed, Chaucer’s very fascination with vernacularity was a Europ...
Tags: Art, Europe, England, Italy, Words, Dante, Chaucer, Boccaccio, Dante Boccaccio, 03.22.19, Petrarch Indeed Chaucer


Gustave Doré’s Haunting Illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy

Inferno, Canto X: Many artists have attempted to illustrate Dante Alighieri's epic poem the Divine Comedy, but none have made such an indelible stamp on our collective imagination as the Frenchman Gustave Doré. Doré was 23 years old in 1855, when he first decided to create a series of engravings for a deluxe edition of Dante's classic.  He was already the highest-paid illustrator in France, with popular editions of Rabelais and Balzac under his belt, but Doré was unable to convince his publishe...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, France, Israel, Edgar Allan Poe, Literature, Hachette, Christ, Dante, Rose, Facebook Twitter, Judas Iscariot, Virgil, Beatrice


An Illustrated and Interactive Dante’s Inferno: Explore a New Digital Companion to the Great 14th-Century Epic Poem

Medieval conceptions of hell may have little effect on the laws and social mores of our secular age. But they sure as hell did in the late 15th century, when the first illustrated editions of Dante’s Inferno appeared. A 1481 edition contained art based on a series of unfinished illustrations by Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli. In 1491, the first fully-illustrated edition of the Inferno arrived. As were most printed works at the time, these books were elaborate and expensive, reflecting the...
Tags: Google, Design, College, Literature, Dante, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Botticelli, Durham NC Follow, Sandro Botticelli, Interactive Dante, New Digital Companion, Alberto Martini


Is Gustave Doré's "Saintly throng in the shape of a rose" the source material for the illustration for the NYT article "Everything Is for Sale Now. Even Us"?

In Dante's "Paradiso" the souls in Heaven form a rose:Dante sees an enormous rose, symbolising divine love, the petals of which are the enthroned souls of the faithful (both those of the Old Testament and those of the New). All the souls he has met in Heaven, including Beatrice, have their home in this rose. Angels fly around the rose like bees, distributing peace and love. Beatrice now returns to her place in the rose, signifying that Dante has passed beyond theology in directly contemplating G...
Tags: Psychology, Art, Etsy, Law, Dogs, Angels, America, Walmart, Blogging, Heaven, Dante, The Web, Beatrice, St Bernard, Gustave Doré, Ann Althouse


Enter an Archive of William Blake’s Fantastical “Illuminated Books”: The Images Are Sublime, and in High Resolution

William Blake earned his place as the patron saint of all freethinking outsider artists. One might say he perfected the role as he perfected his craft—or crafts rather, since his poetry inspires as much awe and acclaim as his visionary engravings and illustrations. Standing astride the Neoclassical eighteenth century and the Romantic era, Blake rejected the rationalism and classicism that surrounded him from birth and developed a prophetic style drawn from an earlier age. He “sought to emulate...
Tags: Google, Art, England, College, Jerusalem, Bbc, Literature, William Blake, Dante, Blake, Facebook Twitter, Milton, Barker, Josh Jones, John Milton, Durham NC Follow


Citizen Designer

So, what is the responsibility of a designer when the design is impeccable but the client is tainted? Being accountable to some moral standard is the key. A designer must be professionally, culturally, and socially responsible for the impact his or her design has on the citizenry. Indeed, every good citizen must understand that his or her respective actions will have reactions. All individual acts, including the creation and manufacture of design for a client, exert impact on others. But Rand ...
Tags: Books, Business, Design, Book, Ethics, World Trade Center, Dante, Enron, Glaser, Steven Heller, Milton Glaser, Veronique Vienne, Skyhorse Publishing Amazon


Visualizing Dante’s Hell: See Maps & Drawings of Dante’s Inferno from the Renaissance Through Today

The light was departing. The brown air drew down     all the earth’s creatures, calling them to rest     from their day-roving, as I, one man alone, prepared myself to face the double war     of the journey and the pity, which memory     shall here set down, nor hesitate, nor err. Reading Dante’s Inferno, and Divine Comedy generally, can seem a daunting task, what with the book’s wealth of allusion to 14th century Florentine politics and medieval Catholic theology. Much depends upon a good tran...
Tags: Google, Art, Maps, College, Literature, Dante, Robert Rauschenberg, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Virgil, Josh Jones, Botticelli, Durham NC Follow, Sandro Botticelli, John Ciardi, Antonio Manetti


When Robert Rauschenberg Asked Willem De Kooning for One of His Paintings … So That He Could Erase It

How to make a name for oneself in the art world? Every up-and-coming artist has to face that intimidating question in one way or another, but Robert Rauschenberg, now remembered as a leading light of the pop art movement, came up with a particularly memorable answer. When in 1953 he got the counterintuitive idea to make a drawing not by drawing, but by erasing, he at first tried erasing images he'd drawn himself. This brought him to the realization that not only should his erasing consti...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, Seoul, Dante, Willem De Kooning, Robert Rauschenberg, Jack Daniels, Facebook Twitter, Roberts, SFMOMA, Rauschenberg, Sarah Roberts, Colin Marshall, De Kooning


Robert Rauschenberg’s 34 Illustrations of Dante’s Inferno (1958-60)

Perhaps more than any other postwar avant-garde American artist, Robert Rauschenberg matched, and maybe exceeded, Marcel Duchamp’s puckish irreverence. He once bought a Willem de Kooning drawing just to erase it and once sent a telegram declaring that it was a portrait of gallerist Iris Clert, “if I say so.” Rauschenberg also excelled at turning trash into treasure, repurposing the detritus of modern life in works of art both playful and serious, continuing to “address major themes of worldwide...
Tags: Google, Art, College, America, Mit, Civil Rights, Literature, John F Kennedy, Vanity Fair, Dante, Robert Rauschenberg, Lewis, Kevin Young, Gilbert, Facebook Twitter, Richard Nixon


A Digital Archive of the Earliest Illustrated Editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy (1487-1568)

Book history buffs don’t need to be told, but the rest of us probably do: incunable—from a Latin word meaning “cradle,” “swaddling clothes,” or “infancy”—refers to a book printed before 1501, during the very first half-century of printing in Europe. An overwhelming number of the works printed during this period were in Latin, the transcontinental language of philosophy, theology, and early science. Yet one of the most revered works of the time, Dante’s Divine Comedy—written in Italian—fully att...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Books, College, Literature, Columbia, Dante, Yale University, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Sandro Botticelli, Digital Dante, Columbia University 's Library and Department, Jane Siegel



Filters
show more filters
July - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 
August - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
September - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930