Art


Posts filtered by tags: History[x]


 

Vintage Geological Maps Get Turned Into 3D Topographical Wonders

What good is an old-fashioned map in the age of apps? One need not be a mountaineer, geoscientist, or civil engineer to get the topographical lay of the land with a speed and accuracy that would have blown Lewis and Clark’s minds’ right through the top of the lynx and otter toppers they took to wearing after their standard issue army lids wore out. There’s still something to be said for the old ways, though. Graphic designer Scott Reinhard has all the latest technological advances at his di...
Tags: Google, Maps, Design, Technology, College, New York City, History, United States, K-12, Jason Kottke, Lewis, Facebook Twitter, Clark, U S Geological Survey USGS, U S Geological Survey, Hoosier State


Teeth prove women helped produce 8th-century religious manuscripts

It turns out medieval religious manuscripts were not exclusively the domain of male monks. Fleck of a rare gemstone pigment in fossilized teeth prove women were involved in the making of religious manuscripts. We'll never see these exquisite books the same way again. Surviving medieval religious manuscripts can be quite beautiful, with impeccable calligraphy and adorned with intricately detailed and brightly colorful illustrations. By and large, their authors remain unknown, and they've been as...
Tags: Art, Books, Gender, History, Afghanistan, Christianity, Innovation, Faith, Salzburg, Radini, Anita Radini, Fleck, Max Planck Institute, Ancient World, Badakshan, Alison Beach


Rare gemstone particles found in an 8th-century nun's mouth shatter a historical misconception

It turns out medieval religious manuscripts were not exclusively the domain of male monks. Fleck of a rare gemstone pigment in fossilized teeth prove women were involved in the making of religious manuscripts. We'll never see these exquisite books the same way again. Surviving medieval religious manuscripts can be quite beautiful, with impeccable calligraphy and adorned with intricately detailed and brightly colorful illustrations. By and large, their authors remain unknown, and they've been as...
Tags: Art, Books, Gender, History, Afghanistan, Christianity, Innovation, Faith, Salzburg, Radini, Anita Radini, Fleck, Max Planck Institute, Ancient World, Badakshan, Alison Beach


Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments for Living in a Healthy Democracy

Image by J. F. Horrabin, via Wikimedia Commons Bertrand Russell saw the history of civilization as being shaped by an unfortunate oscillation between two opposing evils: tyranny and anarchy, each of which contain the seed of the other. The best course for steering clear of either one, Russell maintained, is liberalism. "The doctrine of liberalism is an attempt to escape from this endless oscillation," writes Russell in A History of Western Philosophy. "The essence of liberalism is an attempt to...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, History, New York Times, New York Times Magazine, Facebook Twitter, Russell, Wise, John Locke, Bertrand Russell, Healthy Democracy, Bertrand Russell Authority, J F Horrabin


When Pablo Picasso and Guillaume Apollinaire Were Accused of Stealing the Mona Lisa (1911)

If you visit the Louvre today, you'll notice two phenomena in particular: the omnipresence of security, and the throng of visitors obscuring the Mona Lisa. If you'd visited just over a century ago, neither would have been the case. And if you happened to visit on August 22nd, 1911, you wouldn't have encountered Leonardo's famed portrait at all. That morning, writes Messy Nessy, "Parisian artist Louis Béroud, famous for painting and selling his copies of famous artworks, walked into the Louvre t...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, France, History, Pablo Picasso, Hitler, Seoul, Huffington Post, Louvre, Mona Lisa, Picasso, Sara Boboltz, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci


Public Domain Day Is Finally Here!: Copyrighted Works Have Entered the Public Domain Today for the First Time in 21 Years

Earlier this year we informed readers that thousands of works of art and entertainment would soon enter the public domain—to be followed every year by thousands more. That day is nigh upon us: Public Domain Day, January 1, 2019. At the stroke of midnight, such beloved classics as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Yes! We Have No Bananas” will become the common property of the people, to be quoted at length or in full anywhere when the copyright expires on work produced ...
Tags: Google, Art, Film, College, History, Creativity, Atlantic, Winston Churchill, Smithsonian, Literature, James Joyce, Walt Disney, Virginia Woolf, Harlem, First Time, Mickey Mouse


10 Rules for Appreciating Art by Sister Wendy Beckett (RIP), the Nun Who Unexpectedly Popularized Art History on TV

While life lasts, let us live it, not pass through as zombies, and let us find in art a glorious passageway to a deeper understanding of our essential humanity. - Sister Wendy Beckett (1930-2018) Sister Wendy, a cloistered nun whose passion for art led her to wander out into the world, where she became a star of global proportions, entertained the television masses with her frank humanist assessments. Unphased by nudity, carnality, and other sensual excesses, she initially came across ...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Art, Television, College, New York City, Religion, History, Bbc, Catholic Church, Francis Bacon, Bacon, Norfolk, Christ, Bill Moyers, Wendy


Public Domain Day Is Coming: On January 1st, 2019, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain for the First Time in 21 Years

Earlier this year we informed readers that thousands of works of art and entertainment would soon enter the public domain—to be followed every year by thousands more. That day is nigh upon us: Public Domain Day, January 1, 2019. At the stroke of midnight, such beloved classics as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Yes! We Have No Bananas” will become the common property of the people, to be quoted at length or in full anywhere when the copyright expires on work produced ...
Tags: Google, Art, Film, College, History, Creativity, Atlantic, Winston Churchill, Smithsonian, Literature, James Joyce, Walt Disney, Virginia Woolf, Harlem, First Time, Mickey Mouse


Marc-Aurele Fortin’s Small-Town Quebec

~ Sticking (mostly) with the winter theme that I’ve been thinking about lately, Marc-Aurele Fortin is another artist in whose works winter figured prominently.  Fortin was a contemporary of the Group of Seven painters and he focused on scenes of small-town Quebec, his native province, and the landscape of the surrounding St. Lawrence River Valley.  […]
Tags: Art, Landscape, Religion, Inspiration, Painting, History, Canada, Quebec, Countryside, Rural, Small Towns, Fortin, Marc Aurele Fortin, St Lawrence River Valley


Buckminster Fuller Documented His Life Every 15 Minutes, from 1920 Until 1983

If you've heard of Buckminster Fuller, you've almost certainly heard the word "Dymaxion." Despite its strong pre-Space Age redolence, the term has somehow remained compelling into the 21st century. But what does it mean? When Fuller, a self-described “comprehensive, anticipatory design scientist,” first invented a house meant practically to reinvent domestic living, Chicago's Marshall Field and Company department store put a model on display. The company "wanted a catchy label, so it hired a c...
Tags: Google, Design, College, History, Chicago, Architecture, Seoul, Stanford University, Facebook Twitter, Elizabeth Kolbert, Fuller, Buckminster Fuller, Colin Marshall, Ted Mills, Kolbert, Dymaxion Car House


Guest Post Review: The Dam

        Anastasia Gonis has been reviewing books for over twenty years. Her reviews and interviews have appeared in Bookseller & Publisher, Good Reading magazine, Australian Book Review, The Age, The Herald Sun, AllWrite, and many other publications. Anastasia currently writes both articles and reviews and is a revered reviewer for Kids’ Book … Continue reading Guest Post Review: The Dam The post Guest Post Review: The Dam appeared first on The Boomerang Books Blog.
Tags: Art, Books, Music, Environment, History, Nature, Social Issues, Conservation, Guest Post, Loss, Anastasia, Book Reviews - Childrens and Young Adult, New Book Releases, Children's Picture Books, Dimity Powell, David Almond


Powers Irish Whiskey’s Illustrious Heritage

Tracing the history of the proudly Irish brand Powers Irish Whiskey is one of the most beloved whiskeys in the world. It’s also one of the most popular Irish whiskeys consumed by actual Irish people in Ireland. But a good whiskey is par for the course. The Irish people have fought for a very long time to keep Ireland whole and take great pride in …
Tags: Design, Interviews, History, Ireland, Whiskey, Irish, Food + Drink, Powers, Irish whiskey, Illustrious Heritage


Discover Isotype, the 1920s Attempt to Create a Universal Language with Stylish Icons & Graphic Design

How long has mankind dreamed of an international language? The first answer that comes to mind, of course, dates that dream to the time of the Biblical story of the Tower of Babel. If you don't happen to believe that humanity was made to speak a variety of mutually incomprehensible tongues as punishment for daring to build a tower tall enough to reach heaven, maybe you'd prefer a date somewhere around the much later development of Esperanto, the best-known language invented specifically to atta...
Tags: Google, Facebook, England, Design, College, History, Austria, Vienna, Atlantic, Holland, Gizmodo, Seoul, Cindy Sherman, Rotterdam, Facebook Twitter, U S Department of Transportation


A Visual History of Anchor Brewing’s Christmas Beer

Dating back to 1975, Anchor Brewing’s Christmas Ale arrives in mid-November and disappears by early January every year. Though consistent in style, the recipes and labels change annually. Regarding the latter, artist Jim Stitt chooses a new seasonal tree to hand-draw. As for the former, the recipe shifts its spice profile. The beer is an exemplary display of craftsmanship and holiday spirit. Some even cellar the previous years’ …
Tags: Design, Christmas, History, Beer, Labels, Linkaboutit, Anchor Brewing, Anchor Beer, Label Design, Jim Stitt


King of Egress: Lincoln Stretches 2019 Continental, Swaps Rear Doors for a Limited Few

It’s true. You’ll soon be able to slap down a pile of hard-earned cash for a 2019 Lincoln Continental with suicide coach-style doors. Well, 80 of you will. To mark the 80th anniversary of the Continental nameplate, Lincoln Motor Company went the extra mile for heritage devotees, revealing a limited-edition model that dispenses with front-hinged […] The post King of Egress: Lincoln Stretches 2019 Continental, Swaps Rear Doors for a Limited Few appeared first on The Truth About Cars.
Tags: Design, History, Production, Heritage, Autos, Limited Edition, Lincoln, Continental, Lincoln Continental, News Blog, Lincoln Motor Company, Product Planning, Suicide Doors, 2019 Lincoln Continental


Do you ever wonder what paper clips looked like 150 years ago?

If you do wonder what paper clips looked like in eras long gone by, Clip Art (clever wordplay alert?) is a wonderful history lesson in paper clip design. The series features ten different paper clips from 1860 to 1934, recreated from ancient patent records. While we’re pretty happy now in 2018 with the stapler, or the default paper clip (Clippy from Microsoft Office, if one remembers it), the Clip Art is a series worth collecting and admiring, especially for the way it captures how subtly diffe...
Tags: Deals, Design, Office, History, Microsoft Office, Stationery, Popular, Product Design, Clip Art, Paper Clip, Present & Correct


The Evolution of The Great Wave off Kanazawa: See Four Versions That Hokusai Painted Over Nearly 40 Years

Has any Japanese woodblock print — or for that matter, any piece of Japanese art — endured as well across place and time as The Great Wave off Kanagawa? Even those of us who have never known its name, let alone those of us unsure of who made it and when, can bring it to mind it with some clarity, as sure a sign as any (along with the numerous parodies) that it taps into something deep within all of us. But though the artist behind it, 18th- and 19th-century ukiyo-e painter Katsushika Hokusai, w...
Tags: Google, Art, College, History, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Kanazawa, Hokusai, Kanagawa, Katsushika Hokusai, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


Link About It: This Week’s Picks

"Hearables," fungi, the history of both humanity and the bandana and so much more from the web Fungi’s Many Life-Changing Uses While there are 144,000 discovered species of fungi on the planet, there could be many more—millions more, in fact. But finding fungi and sorting out whether or not they contain any useful chemical compounds comes down to chance. The serendipity, scientists argue, is what …
Tags: Wearables, Gender, Science, Design, Africa, Tech, Smartphones, History, Smartwatches, Sculpture, Fungi, Npr, Banksy, Archeology, Sexual Harassment, Linkaboutit


Extreme Body Modifications Through the Ages

Body modification is found in all crevices of the world — even tattoos qualify!
Tags: Art, Life, Society, Amazing, History, World, Bizarre, Gallery, Trending, Galley, Intriguing, Science & Nature


This 2.4-Million-Year-Old Discovery Alters Human History

The discovery of 2.4-million-year-old stone tools in north Africa have—yet again—altered the human origin story. “The evidence from Algeria has changed [our] earlier view regarding East Africa [as] being the cradle of humankind. Actually, the entire Africa was the cradle of humankind,” Mohamed Sahnouni, an archaeologist at Spain’s National Research Center for Human Evolution, says. Humanity’s distant cousin, the hominin, moved north through (and evolved and develop …
Tags: Science, Design, Africa, Spain, History, Culture, Archaeology, Algeria, Archeology, Linkaboutit, North Africa, East Africa, Mohamed Sahnouni, National Research Center for Human Evolution


Anatomy of a Fake: Forgery Experts Reveal 5 Ways To Spot a Fake Painting by Jackson Pollock (or Any Other Artist)

In the old days, determining an art forgery was mostly a matter of narrative deduction, a la Sherlock Holmes. Thiago Piwowarczyk and Jeffrey Taylor, founders of New York Art Forensics, employ such techniques to establish provenance, tracing the chain of ownership of any given work back to its original sale by researching catalogues, title transfers, and correspondence. But they also bring a number of high tech tools to the table, to further prove—or in the case of the alleged Jackson...
Tags: Google, Art, Science, Technology, College, History, Chemistry, Taylor, Jackson Pollock, Facebook Twitter, Galileo, Pollock, Jeffrey Taylor, Ayun Halliday, Greg Kotis, Truth About Santa


An exploration of silence, in a new exhibition in Switzerland

What’s the sound of an exhibition devoted to silence? From John Cage recreations to the latest in interactive virtual reality tech, it turns out there’s a lot. The exhibition’s lead Jascha Dormann tells us more – and gives us a look inside. The results are surprisingly poetic – like a surrealist listening playground on the topic of isolation. “Sounds of Silence” opened this month at the Museum of Communication in Bern, Switzerland, and is on through July 2019. Just as John Cage’s revel...
Tags: Art, Music, History, Museums, Silence, Switzerland, Stories, Exhibitions, Interactive, Sound, Stuttgart, Skye, Composition, Interaction-design, John-cage, Bern


Why American history lives between the cracks

History is written by lions. But it's also recorded by lambs.In order to understand American history, we need to look at the events of the past as more prismatic than the narrative given to us in high school textbooks.Including different voices can paint a more full and vibrant portrait of America. Which is why more walks of American life can and should be storytellers. The Light of the World: A Memoir (Pulitzer Prize in Letters: Biography...
Tags: Art, Books, Video, Poetry, America, History, United States, Innovation, Literature, Novel, Jwplatform.com


Ancient Bathroom Humor Discovered

Uncovered this week in Turkey, inside what was once a Roman latrine, are a bunch of dirty jokes that date back to the second century. The two mosaics depict well-known Greek and Roman characters, Narcissus and Ganymede—only the scenes are a little different than the myths. In one, Narcissus is staring, obsessed with his penis; in the other, Ganymede (who was kidnapped by the eagle of Zeus) is …
Tags: Science, Design, Turkey, History, Culture, Nsfw, Archaeology, Linkaboutit, Ancient Rome, Ganymede, Narcissus


Newfound Evidence Changes Chocolate’s History

The origins of chocolate, at least until last week, dated back about 3,500 years ago to civilizations in Mexico and Central America. But now, thanks to newfound evidence, cacao’s history actually begins 1,500 years earlier in South America. Tests run on the bowls, mortars and jars found in the highlands of Ecuador—in the area known as Santa Ana-La Florida—proved traces of cacao remained. This confirms a …
Tags: Design, Mexico, History, South America, Chocolate, Ecuador, Central America, Cacao, Food + Drink, Linkaboutit, Santa Ana La Florida


Building the Toronto Subway: John DeRinzy’s Art

~ Unless you were around when it was built (I wasn’t, by the way!), it’s difficult to imagine how massive an undertaking it was to build Toronto’s subway.  Shortly before it’s opening in 1954, local artist John DeRinzy, who worked as a graphics designer for Simpson’s department store (later part of the Hudson’s Bay chain), […]
Tags: Art, Subway, Religion, Inspiration, Toronto, Workers, History, Cities, Canada, Drawing, Vintage, Hudson, Bay, Ontario, Watercolor, Simpson


Inside an Upstate NY Witch Camp

Last weekend, at OlioHouse—an unassuming Victorian-style home in Wassaic—a sizable group of 20- and 30-somethings attended Witch Camp. There were no spells cast at the upstate New York location, but there were art classes, sage-burning, a Halloween-themed party and lectures on the witch trials of the 16th and 17th centuries. While witches today don’t face the same horrific repercussions as those in history, Tara Kenny (an Olio …
Tags: Gender, Politics, New York, Design, History, Culture, Feminism, Magic, Witches, Linkaboutit, Upstate New York, Wassaic, Upstate NY Witch Camp, Tara Kenny


How to Interpret Traditions – 3 Easy Tips!

It’s official—with our calendars now turned to November, it’s full-speed-ahead into the winter holiday season, a time marked by some of our most cherished traditions. For us Americans, this means a Thanksgiving full of great food, football, family, and friends—followed by the December holidays and capped off with the fireworks of New Years. We embrace our traditions, cherish them, and reminisce about them throughout the year. If you were asked to create a museum exhibit about these traditions, h...
Tags: Food, Themes, Family, Design, Exhibits, Winter, Thanksgiving, Holidays, Friends, Memory, Football, Christmas, Holiday, Turkey, History, Story


The Model Book of Calligraphy (1561–1596): A Stunningly Detailed Illuminated Manuscript Created over Three Decades

Whenever a technology develops just enough to become interesting, someone inevitably pushes it to extremes. In the case of that reliable and long-lived technology known as the book, writers and artists were looking for ways to maximize its potential as a device for conveying the written word and the drawn image as far back as the 16th century. One particularly glorious example, The Model Book of Calligraphy, has come available online, to view or download, thanks to the Getty. This decades-spann...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Books, College, History, Vienna, Getty, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Ferdinand, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Public Domain Review Related Content, Georg Bocskay, Rudolph II Ferdinand


Exploring the World of Vermouth With Martini & Rossi

We visit the botanical fields in Pessione to learn about the misunderstood, herbaceous libation Anyone who has enjoyed a martini, Manhattan, or a negroni already knows that one of the critical ingredients in their beloved cocktail is vermouth.  And yet somehow, vermouth continues to be one of the least understood and least respected bottles in the bar. (First things first, your vermouth belongs in the refrigerator, not …
Tags: Design, Milan, Alcohol, History, Farming, Drinking, Manhattan, Cocktails, Italian, Turin, Botanicals, Food + Drink, ROSSI, Vermouth, Pessione, Medicinal



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