Art


Posts filtered by tags: History[x]


 

A paradox revealed through portraiture

A photograph taken seven years before her passing says much about the life, times and character of the trailblazing Meherbai Tata The much-loved wife of Dorabji Tata and daughter in-law of Jamsetji Tata, the founder of the Tata group, Meherbai Tata was a woman of personality. A participant in the ornamental theatrics of being imperial within Empire, one finds her name regularly among the maharajas, nawabs and begums in royal chronicles. And deservedly so. Meherbai was honoured with the ‘Comm...
Tags: Art, London, Life, India, History, Heritage, Paris, Buckingham Palace, Victoria, Lafayette, Rembrandt, Mumbai, Queen Victoria, Tata, Reed, George V


The intensely grand parade of mummies.

 "The lavish, multimillion-dollar spectacle saw 22 mummies - 18 kings and four queens - transported from the peach-coloured, neo-classical Egyptian Museum to their new resting place 5km (three miles) away. With tight security arrangements befitting their royal blood and status as national treasures, the mummies were relocated to the new National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation in what is called The Pharaohs' Golden Parade. They were transported with great fanfare in chronological order of thei...
Tags: Art, Law, History, Bbc, Egypt, Museums, Royalty, Ann Althouse, National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation, Seqenenre Taa II


Behold the Elaborate Writing Desks of 18th Century Aristocrats

Sitting or standing before an esteemed writer’s desk can make us feel closer to their process. Virginia Woolf’s desks — plywood boards she held on her lap and sloped standing desks — show a kind of austere rigor in her posture. “Throughout her life as a writer,” James Barrett points out, Woolf “paid attention to the physical act of writing,” just as she paid attention to the creative act of walking. The bareness of her implements tells us a lot about her as an artist, but it tells us not...
Tags: Google, Design, College, Germany, Berlin, History, David, Virginia Woolf, Central Europe, Ernest Hemingway, Marie Antoinette, Facebook Twitter, Prussia, Josh Jones, Goethe, Woolf


March linkfest

On March 13, 2020, Merriam-Webster editor Peter Sokolowski noticed that all of the dictionary’s lookups were pandemic related: coronavirus, quarantine, draconian, lockdown, cancel. For the somber one-year anniversary this month, WGBH looked at how the pandemic has transformed the English language, and whether its impact will endure: Will people five years from now still say they are “zooming” when they conduct a video meeting online? Will slang terms like “doomscrolling” and “covidiot” make ...
Tags: Books, Maps, Wtf, Design, Washington, New York City, America, History, Britain, Italy, Linguistics, Words, Oxford University, Contests, Los Angeles Times, Donald Duck


How Leonardo da Vinci Made His Magnificent Drawings Using Only a Metal Stylus, Pen & Ink, and Chalk

The modern artist has what can seem like an unlimited range of materials from which to choose, a variety completely unknown to great Renaissance masters like Leonardo da Vinci. Few, if any, can say, however, that they have anything like the raw talent, ingenuity, and discipline that drove Leonardo to draw incessantly, constantly honing his techniques and exploiting every use of the tools and techniques available to him. What were those tools and techniques? Conservator Alan Donnithorne d...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Scotland, History, Facebook Twitter, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Josh Jones, Royal Collection Trust, Durham NC Follow, Christopher Baker, Alan Donnithorne, Francesco Melzi, Donnithorne, Leondardo da Vinci


How Edward Munch Signaled His Bohemian Rebellion with Cigarettes (1895): A Video Essay

When we think of Edvard Munch, we think of The Scream. Though not explicitly a self-portrait, that iconic 1893 canvas does, to anyone who’s read up on the painter’s life, look like a plausible expression of his troubled internal state. But “Self-Portrait with Cigarette made two years later, though less jarring, is just as concerned with Munch’s personal psychology and the dark underside of his identity as The Scream is.” So argues Evan Puschak, better known as the Nerdwriter, in his vide...
Tags: Google, Art, College, History, Pink Floyd, Norway, Patti Smith, Seoul, Munch, Edvard Munch, Facebook Twitter, Evan Puschak, Colin Marshall, Puschak, 21st Century Los Angeles, Edvard Munch Other Artists Put Online


17-Year-Old Adeline Harris Created a Quilt Collecting 360 Signatures of the Most Famous People of the 19th Century: Lincoln, Dickens, Emerson & More (1863)

These days, anyone can reach out to hundreds of celebrities, artists, writers, major heads of state, etc., on social media (or to the interns and assistants who run their accounts). Instantaneous connection also means hundreds of near-instantaneous comments in near-real time. It can occasionally mean near-instantaneous influencer fame. For 17-year-old Adeline Harris, it would take seven years or so to get in touch with 360 of the biggest names in literature, politics, philosophy, science, and o...
Tags: Google, Art, College, History, United States, Charles Dickens, Lincoln, Rhode Island, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, HARRIS, Facebook Twitter, Peck, Hale, Adeline, Durham NC Follow, Sarah Hale


17-Year-Old Adeline Harris Creates a Quilt Collecting 360 Signatures of the Most Famous People of the 19th Century: Lincoln, Dickens, Emerson & More (1863)

These days, anyone can reach out to hundreds of celebrities, artists, writers, major heads of state, etc., on social media (or to the interns and assistants who run their accounts). Instantaneous connection also means hundreds of near-instantaneous comments in near-real time. It can occasionally mean near-instantaneous influencer fame. For 17-year-old Adeline Harris, it would take seven years or so to get in touch with 360 of the biggest names in literature, politics, philosophy, science, and o...
Tags: Google, Art, College, History, United States, Charles Dickens, Lincoln, Rhode Island, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, HARRIS, Facebook Twitter, Peck, Hale, Adeline, Durham NC Follow, Sarah Hale


The Bayeux Tapestry Gets Digitized: View the Medieval Tapestry in High Resolution, Down to the Individual Thread

The Bayeux Tapestry, one of the most famous artifacts of its kind, isn’t actually a tapestry. Technically, because the images it bears are embroidered onto the cloth rather than woven into it, we should call it the Bayeux Embroidery. To quibble over a matter like this rather misses the point — but then, so does taking too literally the story it tells in colored yarn over its 224-foot length. Commissioned, historians believe, as an apologia for the Norman conquest of England in 1066, this elabor...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, England, College, History, Norman, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Louis, Halley, Smithsonian Magazine, Bayeux Tapestry, Bayeux, Colin Marshall, Bayeux Museum


8th Gen Mercedes-AMG SL Unveiled

Mercedes-AMG wanted to show you its new SL Roadster, a 2+2 seater, testing its 4Matic+ all-wheel-drive system at a private proving ground in Sweden near the Arctic Circle. In typical Mercedes fashion, they said it was as much a test of the Roadster’s convertible top as it was the all-wheel-drive system under these harsh conditions. […] The post 8th Gen Mercedes-AMG SL Unveiled appeared first on The Truth About Cars.
Tags: Europe, Design, Technology, Sweden, Germany, History, German, Autos, Mercedes-benz, Mercedes, Arctic Circle, Mercedes-AMG, Sports Car, Enthusiasm, News Blog, Tuners


Rare Vincent van Gogh Painting Goes on Public Display for the First Time: Explore the 1887 Painting Online

Images courtesy of Sothebys Not every Vincent van Gogh painting hangs at the Van Gogh Museum, or indeed in a museum at all. Though many private collectors loan their Van Goghs to art institutions that make them available for public viewing, some have never let such prized possessions out of their sight. Such, until recently, was the case with Scène de rue à Montmartre (Impasse des Deux Frères et le Moulin à Poivre), painted in 1887 but not shown to the world until this year — in preparation for...
Tags: Google, Art, College, History, Paris, Amsterdam, Smithsonian, Seoul, Arles, Montmartre, Van Gogh, Christie, Sothebys, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh


A Short Biography of Keith Haring Told with a Comic Book Illustrations & Music

Singer-songwriter-cartoonist Jeffrey Lewis is a worthy exemplar of NYC street cred. Born, raised, and still residing on New York City’s Lower East Side, he draws comics under the “judgmental” gaze of The Art of Daniel Clowes: Modern Cartoonist and writes songs beneath a poster of The Terminator onto which he grafted the face of Lou Reed from a stolen Time Out New York promo. Billing himself as “among NYC’s top slingers of folk / garagerock / antifolk,” Lewis pairs his songs with comics d...
Tags: Travel, Google, Art, Music, College, New York City, History, Museums, Marco Polo, Lou Reed, Keith Haring, Times Square, Daniel Clowes, Lewis, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter


A Short Biography of Keith Haring Told with Comic Book Illustrations & Music

Singer-songwriter-cartoonist Jeffrey Lewis is a worthy exemplar of NYC street cred. Born, raised, and still residing on New York City’s Lower East Side, he draws comics under the “judgmental” gaze of The Art of Daniel Clowes: Modern Cartoonist and writes songs beneath a poster of The Terminator onto which he grafted the face of Lou Reed from a stolen Time Out New York promo. Billing himself as “among NYC’s top slingers of folk / garagerock / antifolk,” Lewis pairs his songs with comics d...
Tags: Travel, Google, Art, Music, College, New York City, History, Museums, Marco Polo, Lou Reed, Keith Haring, Times Square, Daniel Clowes, Lewis, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter


Researchers unearth the “Lamborghini” of ancient chariots in Pompeii

Archeologists recently discovered a first-of-its-kind chariot in Pompeii.The ceremonial chariot is decorated with bronze and tin medallions, while the sides sport bronzesheets and red-and-black paintings. Given looting activity in the area, it's lucky the 2,000-year-old treasure wasn't lost to the world heritage site. In 79 CE, near the Bay of Naples, Mt. Vesuvius erupted. Geologically, this was business as usual for the volatile volcano, but for the nearby cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, it...
Tags: Art, Europe, Greece, Education, History, Rome, Museums, Italy, Innovation, Natural Disaster, Npr, Archeology, Cornell University, Mediterranean, Pompeii, Vesuvius


How art and design can rebuild a community

In the spring of 2016, a striking art installation was constructed outside MIT's building E15. The work consisted of 20,000 small green plexiglass squares, with intricate holes cut in each one, depicting vanished or endangered pieces of global cultural heritage, including buildings, monuments, and sculptures. Attached to fencing about 40 feet high, the squares collectively formed an image of the Arch of Triumph from Palmyra, Syria, an ancient treasure destroyed by fundamentalists in 2015.Lit up ...
Tags: Art, Germany, Berlin, Toronto, History, War, Mit, Architecture, Prague, Austria, United States, Egypt, Harvard University, Islam, Innovation, Serbia


The Oldest Known Globe to Depict the New World Was Engraved on an Ostrich Egg, Maybe by Leondardo da Vinci (1504)

Image by Davidguam via Wikimedia Commons Every time you think you’ve got a handle on Leonardo da Vinci’s genius (which is to say, you think you’ve heard about the most important things he painted, wrote, and invented), yet more evidence comes to light of the many ways he meets the standard for the adjective “genius”…. Recently, Leonardo re-appeared not only as an inventor of futuristic military technology or discoverer of complex human anatomy, but also as the first European to depict the “New ...
Tags: Google, Art, Maps, London, College, Southeast Asia, History, Atlantic, Cambridge, Belgium, Newfoundland, Kim, North America, Library Of Congress, Pacific, Columbus


4,000 Priceless Scrolls, Texts & Papers From the University of Tokyo Have Been Digitized & Put Online

The phrase “opening of Japan” is a euphemism that has outlived its purpose, serving to cloud rather than explain how a country closed to outsiders suddenly, in the mid-19th century, became a major influence in art and design worldwide. Negotiations were carried out at gunpoint. In 1853, Commodore Matthew Perry presented the Japanese with two white flags to raise when they were ready to surrender. (The Japanese called Perry’s fleet the “black ships of evil men.”) In one of innumerable historical...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, Japan, College, History, Libraries, Literature, Tokyo, Archives, Art Nouveau, University Of Tokyo, Facebook Twitter, Perry, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh


Archaeologists Find the Earliest Work of “Abstract Art,” Dating Back 73,000 Years

Image by C. Foster Art, as we understand the term, is an activity unique to homo sapiens and perhaps some of our early hominid cousins. This much we know. But the matter of when early humans began making art is less certain. Until recently, it was thought that the earliest prehistoric art dated back some 40,000 years, to cave drawings found in Indonesia and Spain. Not coincidentally, this is also when archaeologists believed early humans mastered symbolic thought. New finds, however, have shift...
Tags: Google, Art, Indonesia, College, Life, Africa, Spain, History, South Africa, New York Times, Johannesburg, Lascaux, Picasso, Haaretz, Facebook Twitter, University of Bergen


How Norman Rockwell Used Photographs to Create His Famous Paintings: See Side-by-Side Comparisons

More than 40 years after Norman Rockwell’s death, the question of whether his paintings are realistic or unrealistic remains open for debate. On one hand, critical opinion has long dismissed his Saturday Evening Post-adorning visions of American life as sheerest fantasy. “A little girl with a black eye, an elderly woman saying grace with her grandson, a boy going to war: Rockwellian scenes represent a certain sentimental America — an ideal America, or at least Rockwell’s ideal,” says a 2009 NPR...
Tags: Google, Art, Photography, College, America, History, Nasa, Npr, Mark Twain, Seoul, Hopper, Edward Hopper, Norman Rockwell, Facebook Twitter, Rockwell, PetaPixel


Watch a Korean Master Craftsman Make a Kimchi Pot by Hand, All According to Ancient Tradition

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlwnBy16W0E The South Korean capital of Seoul, where I live, has in the 21st century astonished visiting Westerners with its technology, its infrastructure, and its sheer urban vitality. It strikes many of those Westerners (and I include myself among them) as considerably more developed than anywhere in the countries they came from. But however much Seoul may feel like the future, nowhere in Korea has the past wholly vanished. Take the bulbous earthenware ...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, History, Food & Drink, Korea, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Jin, Colin Marshall, Facebook Watch, 21st Century Los Angeles, Take Jin Gyu, Jin Gyu


The Bauhaus Chess Set Where the Form of the Pieces Artfully Show Their Function (1922)

Learning to play chess first necessitates learning how each piece moves. This is hardly the labor of Hercules, to be sure, though it does come down to pure memorization, unaided by any verbal or visual cues. Does the name “pawn,” after all, sound particularly like something that can only step forward? And what about the shape of the knight suggests the shape of the knight’s move? The form of a chess piece, in other words, doesn’t follow its function — and under certain sets of aesthetic princip...
Tags: Google, Art, Games, College, History, Harvard, Hercules, Seoul, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Facebook Twitter, Walter Gropius, Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, Monier, Colin Marshall, Hartwig


January linkfest

The new words are here! The new words are here! Merriam-Webster has added 520 of them to its online word hoard, including coronavirus words (long hauler), identity words (BIPOC, folx), and working words (coworking, makerspace, gig worker). * Speaking of dictionaries, lexicographer Jesse Sheidlower has compiled a new historical dictionary of science-fiction, and it’s out of this world. Read about it in Wired (Adam Rogers calls Sheidlower “a lexicographical mad scientist”) and in the New York...
Tags: Elon Musk, Design, General Motors, History, New York Times, Linguistics, Gm, Perfume, Food And Drink, Words, British, Pixar, Burger King, Merriam Webster, Dali, Coco Chanel


Algerian Cave Paintings Suggest Humans Did Magic Mushrooms 9,000 Years Ago

We moderns might wonder what ancient peoples did when not hunting, gathering, and reproducing. The answer is that they did mushrooms, at least according to one interpretation of cave paintings at Tassili n’Ajjer in Algeria, some of which go back 9,000 years. “Here are the earliest known depictions of shamans with large numbers of grazing cattle,” writes ethnobotanist/mystic Terence McKenna in his book Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge. “The shamans are dancing with...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Art, College, History, Reddit, Algeria, Seoul, Johns Hopkins, Facebook Twitter, U S Forest Service, McKenna, Sahara, Roland Griffiths, Brian Akers, Colin Marshall


A 400-Year-Old Ring that Unfolds to Track the Movements of the Heavens

Rings with discreet dual purpose have been in use since before the common era, when Hannibal, facing extradition, allegedly ingested the poison he kept secreted behind a gemstone on his finger. (More recently, poison rings gave rise to a popular Game of Thrones fan theory…) Victorians prevented their most closely kept secrets—illicit love letters, perhaps? Last wills and testaments?—from falling into the wrong hands by wearing the keys to the boxes containing these items concealed in signet rin...
Tags: Google, Fashion, Astronomy, Design, College, New York City, History, Brooklyn, James Bond, British Museum, Hannibal, Facebook Twitter, Jessica Stewart, Ayun Halliday, Greg Kotis, Swedish Historical Museum


How Kipling wove a Parsi into his fantasy tale

Wonder how the world-famous author Rudyard Kipling, a Parsi artist and a Rhinoceros are connected? Look at the portrait of a Parsi artist, Pestonjee Bomanjee (1851-1938) with his long white beard, working on a canvas and beside it is a facsimile of a story written by Rudyard Kipling, on ‘How the Rhinoceros got his Wrinkly Skin’. This is a must for all English literature buffs and all those who have for long inhabited the mesmerising world of Rudyard Kipling. Article By: Firoza Punthakey Mistree ...
Tags: Art, Life, China, History, Bombay, Rudyard Kipling, Parsi, Kipling, JJ School of Art, John Lockwood Kipling, School of Art, Rudyard, Ajanta, John Griffiths, Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Dadabhai Naoroji Road


A 3,000-Year-Old Painter’s Palette from Ancient Egypt, with Traces of the Original Colors Still In It

It’s a good bet your first box of crayons or watercolors was a simple affair of six or so colors… just like the palette belonging to Amenemopet, vizier to Pharaoh Amenhotep III (c.1391 – c.1354 BC), a pleasure-loving patron of the arts whose rule coincided with a period of great prosperity. Amenemopet’s well-used artist’s palette, above, now resides in the Egyptian wing of New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. Over 3000 years old and carved from a single piece of ivory, the palette is mar...
Tags: Google, Art, College, New York City, History, Egypt, Museums, Nile, White, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Facebook Twitter, Jenny Hill, Ayun Halliday, Greg Kotis, Osiris, Akhenaton


World's oldest work of art found in a hidden Indonesian valley

Archaeologists find a cave painting of a wild pig that is at least 45,500 years old.The painting is the earliest known work of representational art.The discovery was made in a remote valley on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. A recently-found picture of a wild pig that was made over 45,500 years ago is the world's oldest known cave painting, according to archaeologists. The painting, which may also be the world's oldest representational or figurative artwork, was discovered on the island of S...
Tags: Art, Indonesia, Australia, France, History, Chemistry, Innovation, Archaeology, Griffith University, Sulawesi, Lascaux, Burhan, Wallacea, Leang Tedongnge, Basran Burhan, Oldest Cave Art Found


Niger museum is eclectic national ‘mirror’

It has displays covering art, history, dinosaurs, nuclear energy, craftwork and music as well as live animals, for it is also a zoo The post Niger museum is eclectic national ‘mirror’ appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Art, Music, Africa, Diversity, History, Zoo, Dinosaurs, Niger, Openaccess, Sahel, Nuclear Energy, Top Six, National museum of Niger


Flair Magazine: The Short-Lived, Highly-Influential Magazine That Still Inspires Designers Today (1950)

All magazines are their editors, but Flair was more its editor than any magazine had been before — or, for that matter, than any magazine has been since. Though she came to the end of her long life in England, a country to which she had expatriated with her fourth husband, a Briton, Fleur Cowles was as American a cultural figure as they come. Born Florence Freidman in 1908, she had performed on herself an unknowable number of Gatsbyesque acts of reinvention by 1950, when she found herself in a ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, England, Design, London, College, John Lennon, America, History, Magazines, Connecticut, Paris, Marilyn Monroe, Anna Wintour, Lucian Freud, Seoul


A prayer without words: The story of the wanderer

A tale of silence, an icon of human solitude in the face of the forces of nature, or perhaps a memento of the great artist? I come down from the mountains,The valley dims, the sea roars.I wander silently and am somewhat unhappy,And my sighs always ask "Where?"This is the lamenting of the Wanderer from a song composed by 19-year-old Franz Schubert to the words of G.P. Schmidt. The stranger looks for a spiritual home everywhere, but is condemned to wander forever. Schubert's music was composed in ...
Tags: Art, Music, History, Nature, Innovation, Philosophy, Mind, Jesus Christ, Franz Schubert, SCHMIDT, Schubert, Greifswald, Friedrich Schiller, Friedrich, Der Spiegel, John Updike



Filters
show more filters
February - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
March - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    
April - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930