Art


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Recreating the Face of a Neolithic Dog

Built upon one of 24 dog skulls excavated in 1901 from Cuween Hill Chambered Cairn in Scotland’s Orkney Islands, this facial recreation reveals the appearance of domesticated canines roughly 4,500 years ago. The recreation—commissioned by Historic Environment Scotland and National Museum of Scotland—aimed to draw further attention to the close relationship between Neolithic humans and dogs. It was achieved by way of a 3D-printed model …
Tags: Science, Design, Dogs, Scotland, Animals, Tech, History, Archeology, Linkaboutit, Orkney Islands, National Museum of Scotland, Neolithic Age, Cuween Hill Chambered Cairn


How Leonardo da Vinci Drew an Accurate Satellite Map of an Italian City (1502)

When I look at maps from centuries ago, I wonder how they could have been of any use. Not only were they filled with mythological monsters and mythological places, but the perspectives mostly served an aesthetic design rather than a practical one. Of course, accuracy was hard to come by without the many mapping tools we take for granted—some of them just in their infancy during the Renaissance, and many more that would have seemed like outlandish magic to nearly everyone in 15th century ...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Math, Maps, College, History, Vox, Carl Sagan, Facebook Twitter, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Josh Jones, Borgia, Imola, Vitruvius


Spy Planes Spot Ancient Archaeological Sites

Using images taken by American U-2 spy planes between 1959 and 1972, researchers and archaeologists have been able to uncover archaeological sites in the Middle East that have since been developed over. Though only the final five years worth of photographs are of a high enough resolution to decipher, pre-urban sprawl imagery presented scenes of 5,000 to 8,000 stone structures with clarity. Read more about the …
Tags: Photography, Design, Planes, Tech, History, Middle East, Archaeology, Linkaboutit, Space Archaeology, Spy Planes


Link About It: This Week’s Picks

The first-ever photo of a black hole, artwork-adorned Japanese currency, inspiration from Milan Design week and more First-Ever Photo of a Supermassive Black Hole Truly a quantum leap, astronomers have “seen the unseeable” and captured an image of a supermassive black hole—a “smoke ring framing a one-way portal to eternity,” Dennis Overbye writes for the New York Times. A planet-sized network of eight radio telescopes—called …
Tags: Photography, Space, Science, Design, Environment, History, Furniture, Asteroids, Archeology, Black Holes, Self-driving, Linkaboutit, Dark Blue, Link About It, Milan Design Week, Verner Panton


Newly Discovered Species of Ancient Human

Recently discovered in a cave in the Philippines, a previously unknown species of ancient human contradicts popular evolution theory. It seems that homo sapiens weren’t the only surviving species of humans a few thousand years ago—these tinier, tree-climbing species (aka homo luzonensis) dates back 50-67,000 years ago. A lot is still a mystery about these people though: how did they end up on Luzon, an …
Tags: Science, Design, History, Culture, Philippines, Archaeology, Human, Linkaboutit, Cave, Ancient Human


When the Nazis Declared War on Expressionist Art (1937)

The 1937 Nazi Degenerate Art Exhibition displayed the art of Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Georg Grosz, and many more internationally famous modernists with maximum prejudice. Ripped from the walls of German museums, the 740 paintings and sculptures were thrown together in disarray and surrounded by derogatory graffiti and hell-house effects. Right down the street was the respectable Great German Art Exhibition, designed as counterprogramming “to show the works that Hitler approved of—de...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, Film, College, Germany, Nazis, Berlin, History, Bbc, Hitler, Moma, Burns, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Adorno


Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Sleeping over at the Louvre, floating cities, what really happened to the dinosaurs and more from around the internet The UN’s Floating City Concept Presented by a group of designers, architects and engineers at a United Nations roundtable last week, this floating city could be the future of sustainable (and affordable) living. Built in a lily pad-like array of hexagonal platforms, nearly 10,000 citizens could …
Tags: Gender, Space, Science, Design, Climate Change, Sex, History, Nasa, Mit, Vogue, United Nations, Dinosaurs, Un, Airbnb, Archeology, Louvre


Four-Legged Whale With Hooves Fossil Discovered

A 140-foot whale fossil has been discovered off the coast of Peru, only it’s unlike any other. This particular gigantic mammal would have been able to transition between land and sea with ease, thanks to its tail and four legs. Its webbed feet would have helped move underwater, but the bend in the limbs suggests that the creature could move just as well on land. …
Tags: Science, Design, Animals, History, Culture, Peru, Archaeology, Evolution, Whales, Fossil, Linkaboutit


One Day in Genoa

By Walter Sanders They Say Genova. We Say Genoa. My previous experience in Genoa was in the airport in 1999 to attend a Financial Services Congresso (Conference) in nearby Portofino. I recall the view from the car window upon leaving the airport as uninspiring: a mixed bag of grungy industrial sites, grim housing, busy highways. […]
Tags: Travel, Art, Lifestyle, History, People, Culture, Architecture, Language, Columbus, Genoa, Liguria, Miscellany, Renzo Piano, Portofino, Medieval Italy, Italian regions


The First American Picture Book, Wanda Gág’s Millions of Cats (1928)

For better (I’d say), or worse, the internet has turned cat people into what may be the world’s most powerful animal lobby. It has brought us fascinating animated histories of cats and animated stories about the cats of gothic genius and cat-loving author and illustrator Edward Gorey; cats blithely leaving inky pawprints on medieval manuscripts and politely but firmly refusing to be denied entry into a Japanese art museum. It has given us no shortage of delightful photos of artists with their c...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, College, History, K-12, Literature, Charles Dickens, Hayao Miyazaki, Ucla, Edward Gorey, Facebook Twitter, Pete, Greenwich Village, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow


Newly Discovered Evidence Confirms the Sudden Demise of Dinosaurs

In the excavated terrain of the Hell Creek geological formation, an archaeologist named Robert DePalma made a discovery. The theory that dinosaurs met their demise at the impact of a planet-rattling meteor is generally uncontested, but some researchers felt they were doomed well before the day it hit. Dinosaur fossils are never found less than nine feet below the layer of soot—known as the “KT …
Tags: Science, Design, History, Culture, Archaeology, Dinosaurs, Linkaboutit, Meteorite, Hell Creek, Robert DePalma


Killer Rabbits in Medieval Manuscripts: Why So Many Drawings in the Margins Depict Bunnies Going Bad

In all the kingdom of nature, does any creature threaten us less than the gentle rabbit? Though the question may sound entirely rhetorical today, our medieval ancestors took it more seriously — especially if they could read illuminated manuscripts, and even more so if they drew in the margins of those manuscripts themselves. "Often, in medieval manuscripts’ marginalia we find odd images with all sorts of monsters, half man-beasts, monkeys, and more," writes Sexy Codicology's Marjolein de Vos. "...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, Comedy, College, History, Monty Python, Seoul, David Lynch, Christ, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, 21st Century Los Angeles, Jon Kaneko James, Kaneko James


The Venice Time Machine: 1,000 Years of Venice’s History Gets Digitally Preserved with Artificial Intelligence and Big Data

Along with hundreds of other seaside cities, island towns, and entire islands, historic Venice, the floating city, may soon sink beneath the waves if sea levels continue their rapid rise. The city is slowly tilting to the East and has seen historic floods inundate over 70 percent of its palazzo- and basilica-lined streets. But should such tragic losses come to pass, we’ll still have Venice, or a digital version of it, at least—one that aggregates 1,000 years of art, architecture, and "mu...
Tags: Google, Art, Technology, College, Berlin, History, Rome, Architecture, Paris, Amsterdam, Venice, Archives, TED Talks, Time Machine, Abbott, Facebook Twitter


New Archive Digitizes 80,000 Historic Watercolor Paintings, the Medium Through Which We Documented the World Before Photography

The watercolor painting has a reputation for lightness. It’s a casual endeavor, done in scenic outdoor surroundings on sunlit days. Watercolors are the choice of weekend hobbyists or children unready for messier materials. Watercolors, in other words, are often treated as unserious. But for a couple hundred years, they served a very serious purpose. In addition to being a portable medium with an expansive range, watercolors’ ease made them the primary means of making documentary images b...
Tags: Google, Art, UK, College, India, History, Britain, Archives, Mount Everest, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Mount Vesuvius, Durham NC Follow, Dale Berning Sawa, Watercolour World, Fred Hohler


Reconsidering the period room as a museum-made object

For those of us used to visiting historical houses and encyclopedic museums, the word “period room” will sound familiar. A period room is a display combining architectural components, pieces of furniture, and decorative objects organized to evoke—and in some rare cases recreate—an interior, very often domestic and dating from a past era.Period rooms were widespread among European museums during the last decades of the nineteenth century, and became popular in North American institutions in the e...
Tags: Europe, Books, Design, Featured, History, Art History, Arts & Humanities, History Museum, Pixabay, Art & Architecture, History of art, Art Museums, Paul Ricoeur, Art Spaces, JDH, European Art


The Forbes Pigment Collection

How do you know for sure if your carefully-recreated 18th-century paint would fool pass muster as art dealers a legitimate recreation long enough to get away with it? of the authentic originals? Tom Scott visits the Forbes Pigment Collection. The Forbes Pigment Collection at the Harvard Art Museums is a collection of pigments, binders, and other art materials for researchers to use as standards: so they can tell originals from restorations from forgeries. It's not open to the public, because ...
Tags: Art, Video, News, Color, History, Chemistry, Tom Scott, Harvard Art Museums


Discover the Great Medieval Manuscript, the Book of Kells, in a Free Online Course

Last week, we called your attention to the digitization of the Book of Kells, one of the great manuscripts from the medieval period. The digitized manuscript, we should note, comes accompanied by another great resource--a free online course on the Book of Kells. Both digital initiatives are made possible by Trinity College Dublin. The six-week course covers the following topics: Where and how the manuscript was made The social context from which the manuscript emerged, including early me...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, History, Ireland, Online Courses, Facebook Twitter, Trinity College Dublin, Kells, Bibliothèque Nationale de France


The Roman Roads of Spain & Portugal Visualized as a Subway Map: Ancient History Meets Modern Graphic Design

Between the first century BC and the fourth century AD, Rome displayed what we might call an impressive ambition. In his project illustrating those chapters of history in a way no one has before, statistics student Sasha Trubetskoy has shown increasingly Roman-grade ambitions himself, at least in the realm of historical graphic design. We've previously featured his modern subway-style maps of as well as  here on Open Culture. Today, we have , the region today occupied mainly by Spain and Po...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, Spain, History, Rome, Portugal, Seoul, Iberia, Facebook Twitter, Roman Empire, Colin Marshall, Antoninus, Sasha Trubetskoy, Trubetskoy


Uncle Nearest Whiskey Honors a Forgotten History

Led by CEO Fawn Weaver, the young brand tells an important story in the development of US distillation Bucking the misconception that whiskey has historically been a Caucasian craft, Uncle Nearest appeared on shelves in 2017 with a new narrative: Jack Daniel wasn’t actually taught how to make whiskey by his white preacher, but rather a slave that worked on the preacher’s property, Nathan “Nearest” Green. …
Tags: Design, Interviews, Alcohol, Race, US, History, Tennessee, Whiskey, Food + Drink, Jack Daniels, Jack Daniel, Fawn Weaver, Distillation, Nearest Green, Uncle Nearest


The Medieval Masterpiece, the Book of Kells, Is Now Digitized & Put Online

If you know nothing else about medieval European illuminated manuscripts, you surely know the Book of Kells. “One of Ireland’s greatest cultural treasures” comments Medievalists.net, “it is set apart from other manuscripts of the same period by the quality of its artwork and the sheer number of illustrations that run throughout the 680 pages of the book.” The work not only attracts scholars, but almost a million visitors to Dublin every year. “You simply can’t travel to the capital of Ireland,”...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Books, College, History, Ireland, Middle East, Dublin, Iona, County Meath, North Africa, Moss, Facebook Twitter, Ryan, Trinity College Dublin


Ancient Phallic Graffiti Wasn’t For Laughs

A very familiar symbol has been discovered near Hadrian’s Wall (aka Hadrian’s Wall) in Cumbria, England—only this one dates back to 207 AD. The penis-shaped drawing isn’t just juvenile scribbling, however. According to archeologists from Newcastle University, these images are common and used to adorn doorways, walls and jewelry during the Roman Era (753 BC to 476 AD) and symbolized good fortune—and power. “Phallus graffiti, …
Tags: England, Design, History, Culture, Archaeology, Graffiti, Newcastle University, Roman, Cumbria England, Hadrian, Phallic, Roman Era


Watch Lin-Manuel Miranda Perform the Earliest Version of Hamilton at the White House, Six Years Before the Play Hit the Broadway Stage (2009)

Another immigrant comin' up from the bottom His enemies destroyed his rep, America forgot him…  Holler if you can remember a time when few Americans were well-versed enough in founding father Alexander Hamilton’s origin story to recite it in rhyme at the drop of a hat. Believe it or not, as recently as the summer of 2015, when Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Hamilton: An American Musical exploded on Broadway, Hamilton the man was, as the Tony award winning lyrics above sugges...
Tags: Google, Music, Politics, Obama, College, White House, New York City, Theatre, America, History, Broadway, James Earl Jones, Dc, Miranda, George Stephanopoulos, Dick Cheney


Italian Artist Recreates Famous Roman Emperors Through His Realistic Sculptures

What’s the first thought that comes to mind when you think about Rome? Perhaps it’s the iconic ancient Roman gladiatorial arena – the Colosseum, or an excavated heart of the Roman Empire also known as Roman Forum, which was the center of day-to-day life in Rome many centuries ago. And although Rome has all the right to boast about its architectural heritage, today’s topic is not about that. Source
Tags: Design, History, Rome, Roma, Recreation, Emperor, Sculptures, Roman Empire, Realistic


what i'm reading: solitary raven: the essential writings of bill reid

I'm supposed to be writing about the Jackie Robinson biography, which I finished weeks ago, but so far I haven't been motivated to do so. I finished another Wallander mystery -- my "in between" book -- but the next bio on my list, the new one about Frederick Douglass, hasn't come in yet. So I looked for something on my own bookshelf that I've been meaning to read, and found this: Solitary Raven: The Essential Writings of Bill Reid. It is fascinating, and by coincidence, feels very relevant.We v...
Tags: Travel, Art, London, Americas, Toronto, History, Canada, Indigenous Peoples, Vancouver, North America, Cbc, Picasso, Jackie Robinson, Robert Bringhurst, Reid, Haida Gwaii


The mystery behind Minoan bull-leaping

The Minoan civilization, which existed on the island of Crete nearly 5,000 years ago, produced a treasure trove of artwork showing a unique sport or ritual: men leaping over charging bullsScholars have argued over whether the Minoans actually performed this dangerous activity, though the evidence seems to suggest that they did.If so, modern bull-leaping sports, such as those practiced in France and Spain, may have their roots in ancient Minoa. None The Minoans, a nearly 4,000-year-old civilizati...
Tags: Art, France, Sports, Spain, History, Innovation, University of Pennsylvania, Archeology, Crete, Knossos, Ancient World, Minoans, Jeremy McInerney


The NASA Archives. 60 Years in Space.

To celebrate the organization’s first 60 years in space, The NASA Archives features 400+ photographs and rare renderings—spanning the moon landing, rovers on Mars and more. Launched in 1958, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was the world’s first civilian space agency with a focus on peaceful exploration—despite it being founded as part of the Space Race. With notes from science and tech journalists, NASA historians, …
Tags: Books, Photography, Space, Science, Design, Photo Books, History, Nasa, Reading, Mars, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA Archives


“Robert Mapplethorpe: Choreography for an exhibition” at Museo Madre, Naples

Classic art juxtaposed with the iconic photographer's work in a show that explores human form Symmetry was one of beloved photographer Robert Mapplethorpe‘s obsessions. Now, 30 years after his death, Mapplethorpe is celebrated with a major retrospective at NYC’s Guggenheim Museum and also in a smaller, more precious exhibition at the Museo Madre in Naples. Robert Mapplethorpe. Choreography for an Exhibition (curated by Laura Valente and Andrea Viliani) is focused …
Tags: Art, Photography, Design, Exhibits, NYC, History, Dance, Culture, Italy, Nsfw, Exhibitions, Naples, Guggenheim Museum, Robert Mapplethorpe, MAPPLETHORPE, Choreography


Famous Drawings by Leonardo da Vinci Celebrated in a New Series of Stamps

No special occasion is required to celebrate Leonardo da Vinci, but the fact that he died in 1519 makes this year a particularly suitable time to look back at his vast, innovative, and influential body of work. Just last month, "Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing" opened in twelve museums across the United Kingdom. "144 of Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest drawings in the Royal Collection are displayed in 12 simultaneous exhibitions across the UK," says the exhibition's site, with each venue's dra...
Tags: Google, Art, UK, College, History, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Royal Mail, Cardiff, Belfast, Seoul, Bhutan, San Francisco Bay Area, Kate Brown, Facebook Twitter, Sparta


To My Dream Exhibit – A Sonnet to Celebrate Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day has got to be one of the strangest holidays ever. From its dark origins in Roman history to modern day celebrations, it has come a long way. Most people associate this day of romance with Saint Valentine, who was martyred for marrying Christian couples in the 3rd century. While it feels like a bit of a stretch to associate this selfless act with the modern-day concept of gifting material goods on Valentine’s Day, you have to admit that is pretty romantic. In fact, we possibly ...
Tags: Design, London, Exhibits, History, Experience, Museum, Other, William Shakespeare, Fun Stuff, Valentine, Dartmouth College, Orleans, Geoffrey Chaucer, Chaucer, Taylor Studios, Valentine’s Day


Women Who Pioneered Automotive Interior Design

A progressive hiring spree (at least, for the 1950s) by GM actively sought out women to design the interiors for all of the brands under their umbrella. The women, who held degrees from some of the country’s top design schools and worked internationally prior to being hired, faced sexism but their work pushed forward design as well as women’s positions in the workplace. The team …
Tags: Gender, Design, History, Equality, Gm, Interiors, Linkaboutit, Automotive Design



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