Art


Posts filtered by tags: Sculpture[x]


 

‘Clay feels perverse’ – Theaster Gates on working on Obama’s library and going back to pottery

The superstar ‘social artist’ has revived derelict buildings and rescued a legendary record collection – but in lockdown, as two new UK exhibitions show, it was singing and throwing pots that made him happy Theaster Gates likes to get his hands dirty. His two new London exhibitions are dedicated to clay, and in one there’s a film of him singing with great gusto as he throws a pot. So it feels a shame not to be meeting one to one, but via laptop. The artist decided at the last minute to stay at h...
Tags: Art, UK, London, Obama, Chicago, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Ceramics, Theaster Gates, Serpentine pavilion, Magdalene Odundo


Gandhi in heels? Maria Callas statue hits the wrong note

Critics compare figure of famous soprano erected in Greek capital to an Oscar statuette Drama in life, drama in posterity. For Maria Callas, Greece’s greatest diva, there is, even 44 years after her death, no let up from the artistic wrangling that was her lot.But this time the uproar is focused on a statue erected at the foot of the ancient Acropolis, opposite the Roman theatre where the world-renowned opera singer made her debut. Continue reading...
Tags: Art, Europe, Music, Greece, World news, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Acropolis, Roman, Gandhi, Maria Callas


Cambridge college to be first in UK to return looted Benin bronze

Jesus College will give sculpture of a cockerel back to Nigeria, which could spark a wave of repatriationsA Cambridge college is to become the first British institution to return one of the Benin bronzes to Nigeria later this month in what has been described as “a historic moment”.Jesus College, University of Cambridge, will return the bronze cockerel to Nigerian delegates on 27 October, in a handover ceremony that Nigerian officials say offers “hope for amicable resolutions” to the ongoing disp...
Tags: Art, UK, Nigeria, Africa, World news, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Cambridge, Colonialism, University of Cambridge, Benin, Jesus College, Jesus College University of Cambridge


From concealed penises to Barbra Streisand: how Frieze got its mojo back – review

Regent’s Park, LondonAfter decades of fun, noise, fame and money, the London art fair has found its soul. But there’s still plenty of outrage and sleaze at the grown-up FriezeI was relieved when I finally found the hidden willies. At times, the first post-pandemic Frieze art fair is so relaxing you could fall asleep in one of its classy lounges. So it was good to see Lindsey Mendick flying the flag for subtle outrage. At the Carl Freedman Gallery booth I come across her lustrous, decadent cerami...
Tags: Art, London, Painting, UK News, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Exhibitions, Tate, Freedman, Frieze, Frieze art fair, Lindsey Mendick


K-boom! How the unstoppable stars of K-pop went gunning for the art world

First came K-cinema, then K-pop and K-TV. Now South Korea’s young stars are conquering the world with K-art. But what do their dark visions say about their nation’s psyche – and ours?Ohnim is having a blue period, just like Picasso. Over Zoom from a gallery in Seoul, the Korean rapper Song Min-ho, better known as Mino to K-pop fans but Ohnim in the art world, shows me a painting he finished the previous evening in collaboration with artist Choi Na-ri. It depicts a blue crouched figure, like a de...
Tags: Art, South Korea, Music, London, Culture, Asia Pacific, Art and design, Pop and rock, Sculpture, Korea, Installation, Exhibitions, Seoul, Rodin, Saatchi Gallery, Saatchi


‘I sculpt the air’ – does scent artist Anicka Yi plan to make Tate’s Turbine Hall smell like vaginas?

She has made art out of smells, ants, bacteria, spit and vaginal swabs. So what is the US artist about to unveil for her Turbine Hall commission? Yi, who was once a vagabond in London, takes us on an olfactory odysseyAnicka Yi offers me some beetroot crisps. These, along with carrot crisps, are her breakfast, both free of oil and salt. “I can’t eat greens, dairy, sugar, legumes, beans, nuts, seeds, nightshades, spice, alcohol – nothing,” the Korean American conceptual artist explains. “I can onl...
Tags: Art, New York, London, US, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Installation, Tate Modern, Turbine Hall, Tate, Yi, Tate Modern 's Turbine Hall, Anicka Yi


"The Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks, who was under police protection after his controversial drawing of the Prophet Muhammad in 2007 led to a series of death threats..."

"... has been killed in a car crash. Vilks died after the civilian police vehicle in which he was travelling near the town of Markaryd in southern Sweden collided with a lorry on Sunday.... Two police officers who were in the vehicle with the 75-year-old artist were also killed." The London Times reports. The cartoon that elicited the death threats — which seems unconnected to this car crash — depicted the head of Muhammad on the body of a dog. From Vilks's Wikipedia page: From 1997 to 20...
Tags: Art, Sweden, Law, Wikipedia, Sculpture, Cartoons, Christo, Muhammad, Lars Vilks, Joseph Beuys, London Times, ARX, Ann Althouse, Nimis, Bergen National Academy of the Arts, Vilks


Fruit sculptures in Hackney honour Windrush generation

Veronica Ryan creates UK’s first permanent artwork dedicated to people affected by the scandalThe first permanent artwork to honour the Windrush generation in the UK has been unveiled in the east London borough of Hackney, as councils across the country kick off the first day of Black History Month.The work, created by the artist Veronica Ryan, is one of two permanent sculptures that symbolise the council’s respect and commitment to the Windrush generation and their legacy and contribution to th...
Tags: Art, UK, London, Race, UK News, Immigration and asylum, Sculpture, Home Office, Hackney, Black History Month, Windrush, Commonwealth immigration, Windrush scandal, Thomas J Price, Veronica Ryan


Anish Kapoor on vaginas, recovering from breakdown and his violent new work: ‘Freud would have a field day’

Why has the artist painted scenes of bloodletting, decapitation and a woman with 10,000 breasts? He’s scared to talk about it – but he can explain his fascination with vaginas and the world’s blackest blackAt 67, Anish Kapoor, with a knighthood, a Turner prize and a retrospective due at the Venice Biennale next year, appears determined to strip away his own artistic skin. Like Marsyas – the satyr flayed alive by Apollo, whose gory fate Kapoor once commemorated in a 150m-long, 10-storey-high scul...
Tags: Art, London, Painting, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Turner, Venice Biennale, Freud, Anish Kapoor, Kapoor, Modern Art Oxford, Marsyas


Massive and magnificent creatures created from leftover rice straw

In Niigata, Japan, artists create astounding creatures from rice straw, a byproduct of rice production. Called Wara Art, the sculptures are created in a collaboration between Niigata City residents and students from Musashino Art University. The Wara Art Festival is taking place right now through October 31 in the city's Uwasekigata Park. — Read the rest
Tags: Art, Post, Japan, News, Sculpture, Rice, Sculptures, Niigata City, Niigata Japan, Uwasekigata Park Read


Hitler’s favourite artists: why do Nazi statues still stand in Germany?

A shocking new exhibition reveals the thriving postwar careers of artists the Führer endorsed as ‘divinely gifted’. Many made public works that remain on show todayA photograph from 1940 shows three conquering Nazis in Paris against the backdrop of the Eiffel Tower. Within a few years one of these men, Adolf Hitler, was dead by his own hand; another, Albert Speer, was writing his memoirs in Spandau prison, having eluded a death sentence at the Nuremberg trials. But the third, Arno Breker, was al...
Tags: Art, Germany, Nazis, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Paris, Nuremberg, Hitler, Adolf Hitler, Nazism, West Germany, Spandau, Albert Speer, Arno Breker


Snakes, spirits and Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry: São Paulo Biennial makes defiant stand in Brazil’s culture wars

As the Bolsonaro government stokes divisions, the art festival offers a pointedly diverse and inclusive programme, including sculptures by the late dub reggae legendWhen fire devastated the National Museum in Brazil in 2018, one of the few objects to be found intact among the smouldering ruins was the St Luisa meteorite. While the Rio de Janeiro museum is still being rebuilt, the black rock, around a metre in length, is the star exhibit of the São Paulo Biennial, which opened at the weekend.The ...
Tags: Art, Photography, Americas, Painting, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Brazil, Installation, Rio De Janeiro, Venice Biennale, Lee, Perry, National Museum, Bolsonaro, São Paulo Biennial


Take a rrip to Randyland, one of the most colorful places in the United States

If you find yourself in Pittsburgh, PA, be sure to take a trip to a magical place called Randyland. Randyland is an incredible DIY art museum that a man named Randy Gilson constructed in his own yard. I had an awesome time there over the weekend, and I'll be back again as soon as I can.  — Read the rest
Tags: Art, Post, News, United States, Sculpture, Pittsburgh, Randy Gilson, Mexican War Streets, Randyland, Randyland Randyland


Take a trip to Randyland, one of the most colorful places in the United States

If you find yourself in Pittsburgh, PA, be sure to take a trip to a magical place called Randyland. Randyland is an incredible DIY art museum that a man named Randy Gilson constructed in his own yard. I had an awesome time there over the weekend, and I'll be back again as soon as I can.  — Read the rest
Tags: Art, Post, News, United States, Sculpture, Pittsburgh, Randy Gilson, Mexican War Streets, Randyland, Randyland Randyland


Yayoi Kusama pumpkin sculpture washed into sea by Japan storm

Experts consider possibility of rebuilding artist’s work, which was swept off a pier near NaoshimaExperts are determining whether it is possible to reconstruct one of Japan’s most recognisable works of modern art after it was badly damaged during a recent tropical storm.The sculpture, a giant black and yellow polka-dotted pumpkin by the celebrated artist Yayoi Kusama, has stood at the end of a pier on the “art island” of Naoshima in the Seto inland sea since 1994. Continue reading...
Tags: Art, Japan, World news, Asia Pacific, Sculpture, Yayoi Kusama, Naoshima


Call for Entries: Society of Wildlife Artists Annual Exhibition 2021

If you want to enter the Annual Exhibition by the Society of Wildlife Artists the deadline for entries is Friday 20 August, 12 noon Last year's SWLA Annual Exhibition The images in this... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] [Author: [email protected] (Making A Mark)]
Tags: Art, Painting, Sculpture, Artists, Exhibition, Mall Galleries, Call For Entries, Open Exhibition, Wildlife Art, Society of Wildlife Artists, Drawing Wildlife, Original Prints


What is it with statues / sculptures of women?

I knew I didn't like the statue of Princess Diana - as in there was something not right about the face. However, I was unprepared for the scathing criticism which has emerged from all... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] [Author: [email protected] (Making A Mark)]
Tags: Art, Sculpture, Diana, Statue


‘I had designed it a little too small’: Abraham Poincheval on spending a week inside a sculpture of himself

He’s lived within a boulder, hatched a nest of hen’s eggs, and now plans to encase himself in a beehive. Is this France’s most extreme performance artist –and how does he go to the toilet? Last month, in a smart gallery in Paris, the back of a sculpture was removed and a man was lifted out. He looked around, disoriented, as his body slowly unfurled. A doctor rushed to his side and, after inspecting him, announced he was in good health. The crowd cheered. He’d been in there for seven days.Abraham...
Tags: Art, France, World news, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Paris, Performance art, Hartung, Abraham Poincheval, Hans Hartung


An awkward, lifeless shrine – the Diana statue is a spiritless hunk of nonsense | Jonathan Jones

The only provocative thing about Ian Rank-Broadley’s characterless sculpture is how shamelessly it plays up to mawkish Diana worshipIan Rank-Broadley’s statue of Diana, commissioned by her sons, was kept secret until its unveiling as if it might be wildly provocative. Looking through the artist’s previous oeuvre, I noticed he has a taste for the nude and created a statue for the late Felix Dennis called Lord Rochester, His Whore and a Monkey. That raised the fascinating prospect of a naked Diana...
Tags: Art, UK News, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Monarchy, Diana, Princess of Wales, Rochester, Jonathan Jones, Broadley, Felix Dennis, Ian Rank Broadley


William and Harry unveil Diana statue at Kensington Palace

Bronze artwork depicts princess flanked by children to represent ‘generational impact of her work’The sons of Diana, Princess of Wales have unveiled a long-awaited statue of her in Kensington Palace.In the shadow of their mother’s likeness cast in bronze, the Duke of Cambridge and the Duke of Sussex put on a united front. With Diana’s siblings watching, William and Harry pulled away a cloth covering the monument that will remind visitors to the palace, her former home, about its most famous resi...
Tags: Art, Wales, UK News, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Cambridge, Monarchy, Prince William, Diana, Princess of Wales, Prince Harry, Harry, William, Duke, Kensington Palace


‘They thought we were terrorists’: meet Joe Rush, the master of mutoid art and king of Glastonbury

The punky master of outsider art was once a pariah, thrown out of Britain for his anarchist ways. Now, he’s a national treasure. Joe Rush relives 40 years of sticking it to the ‘straight world’“They thought we were terrorists,” says Joe Rush, remembering the day not long after the fall of the Berlin Wall when he and a fellow anarchist took over a patch of no man’s land at the heart of the German capital. They filled it with military hardware: tanks and artillery and the like – along with a MiG-2...
Tags: Art, Music, Television, Documentary, Berlin Wall, Culture, Britain, Art and design, Television & radio, Sculpture, Festivals, Glastonbury festival, Music Festivals, Glastonbury, Joe Rush


‘My parents’ trauma is my trauma’ – Veronica Ryan on making first Windrush monument

She used to worry about ‘not making enough to pay the rent’. But with a solo show, a commission to make UK’s first Windrush monument and an OBE, the artist has stepped out of the shadowsVeronica Ryan’s handbag is always heavy. The British sculptor has been a collector since childhood, and her bag is her toolbox, her magpie’s nest, her anchor for a life lived in many places. It’s also fertile ground. Ryan’s mother once caught a glimpse of a date stone she was attempting to germinate in there. “Yo...
Tags: Art, UK, Culture, Britain, Art and design, Sculpture, Bristol, Ryan, Windrush, Windrush scandal, Veronica Ryan, Ryan And


‘Cultural appropriation is a two-way thing’: Yinka Shonibare on Picasso, masks and the fashion for black artists

Picasso was so enthralled by African art, he used it to start a revolution. But did it give rise to a fantasy of Africa that still endures? British-Nigerian artist Shonibare tells us why he’s revisiting that seismic moment In 1998, in a hilarious work called Diary of a Victorian Dandy, Yinka Shonibare inserted himself, impeccably attired, into the sitting rooms, drawing rooms, billiards rooms and bedrooms of high society Victorian Britain, invariably causing a sensation in each of the perfectly ...
Tags: Art, Nigeria, Africa, Race, UK News, World news, Culture, Britain, Art and design, Sculpture, Paris, Henry Moore, Francis Bacon, Hogarth, Picasso, Tate


Masks, monsters and masterpieces: Yinka Shonibare squares up to Picasso

Picasso was so enthralled by African art, he used it to start a revolution. But did it give rise to a fantasy of Africa that still endures? British-Nigerian artist Shonibare tells us why he’s revisiting that seismic moment In 1998, in a hilarious work called Diary of a Victorian Dandy, Yinka Shonibare inserted himself, impeccably attired, into the sitting rooms, drawing rooms, billiards rooms and bedrooms of high society Victorian Britain, invariably causing a sensation in each of the perfectly ...
Tags: Art, Nigeria, Africa, Race, UK News, World news, Culture, Britain, Art and design, Sculpture, Paris, Henry Moore, Francis Bacon, Hogarth, Picasso, Tate


invisible sculpture for sale

From the department of “you are not going to believe this”, there’s an Italian artist named Salvatore Garau who recently auctioned a sculpture that does not actually exist and someone paid $18,300 for it! Literally, there is nothing but a certificate of authenticity and some instructions for how to display it. He calls it an […]
Tags: Art, News, In the News, Sculpture, Humor, Silly, Satire, Statue, Modern Art, Random, Invisible, Salvatore Garau


Modi’s bulldozing of parliament shows him as the architect of a Hindu Taliban | Anish Kapoor

Flattening the majestic Murghal-inspired buildings is the latest stage in a hateful, vanity-fuelled campaign to de-Islamify IndiaAt the heart of New Delhi, the capital of India, sits a Mughal-inspired monument that houses the seat of the Indian parliament. Built by the British architect Edwin Lutyens between 1911 and 1931, the parliament buildings and their grand roadways and water channels follow the form established by the Islamic rulers of Iran and elaborated by the Islamic sultanate of Samar...
Tags: Art, India, Narendra Modi, World news, Iran, Culture, Architecture, South and Central Asia, Art and design, Sculpture, New Delhi, Samarkand, Anish Kapoor, Modi, Lutyens, Edwin Lutyens


In praise of African art: How Shona sculpting emerged

How Shona stone art came into its own after independence The post In praise of African art: How Shona sculpting emerged appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Art, Tradition, Sculpture, Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, Philosophy, Henry Moore, Museum of Modern Art, Friday, British Museum, Symbolism, Civilisation, Tristan Tzara, Constantin Brancusi, Shona, Rhodesia


Hand-painted hearts or Captain Tom in bronze? Memorialising the fallen of Covid-19

As heroic statues fall out of vogue, communities have turned to experimental structures – from flourishing gardens to abstract sculptures – as monuments to loss on a vast scaleMaya Lin was a 21-year-old architecture student at Yale University when, in 1981, lacking professional experience, she submitted a class project to a design competition for a memorial for Vietnam war veterans on the National Mall in Washington DC. Her winning design, influenced by the minimalist sculpture and earth art of ...
Tags: Art, New York, Washington, Culture, Architecture, Art and design, Sculpture, National Mall, Vietnam, Yale University, Tom, Lin, Coronavirus, Frederick Hart


Is that a surrealist masterpiece by the draining board? Inside Leonora Carrington’s sculpture-filled home

The great British artist’s home in Mexico has been turned into a wonderful museum, full of her sculptures, books, diaries and unsmoked cigarettes. Our writer, Carrington’s cousin, takes an emotional tourIn October 2010, a few months before her death, I said my last goodbye to my cousin Leonora Carrington. As I left her home in Mexico City, she stood waving on the doorstep. Today, I’m back for the first time – to see Leonora’s house recreated as a visitor attraction. It feels surreal, but the sur...
Tags: Art, New York, Mexico, Painting, Culture, Britain, Art and design, Heritage, Museums, Sculpture, Paris, Mexico City, Moma, Carrington, Leonora, Max Ernst


Was the fiddler framed? How Nero may have been a good guy after all

He was a demonic emperor who stabbed citizens at random and let Rome burn. Or was he? We go behind the scenes at a new show exploding myths about the ancient world’s favourite baddieNero comes with a lurid reputation. “The main thing we know about him is his infamy,” says Thorsten Opper, curator of the first British exhibition devoted to the Roman emperor. “The glutton, the profligate, the matricide, the megalomaniac.” Also, the pyromaniac: famously, Nero “fiddled while Rome burned”, or at least...
Tags: Art, Books, Music, Film, Fiction, History, Bbc, Rome, Culture, Art and design, Sculpture, Classical Music, Exhibitions, Opera, British Museum, Roman Britain



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