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Focus on Book Arts conference brochure available too!

Yep, it’s another blog post about the Focus on Book Arts conference! I can’t help it – I’m just so excited! I recently received a batch of FOBA brochures in the mail – they offer an overview of the conference, along with a listing of this year’s workshops. When I opened up one of the brochures, I was excited to see a close-up of one of the books that folks will be making in my workshop: Then I noticed the photo to the left of it – it was taken during my workshop in 2017! You can see me in the ...
Tags: Art, Education, Workshop, Conference, Bookbinding, Book Arts, Elissa, Don, Focus on Book Arts, FOBA


How the Mona Lisa Went From Being Barely Known, to Suddenly the Most Famous Painting in the World (1911)

Is the Mona Lisa really “ten times better than every other painting”? No one seriously believes this, and how would anyone measure such a thing? There may be no such critical scale, but there is a popular one. The Louvre, where the famous Leonardo da Vinci—maybe the most famous painting of all time—hangs, says that 80 percent of its visitors come just to see the Mona Lisa. Her enigmatic smile adorns merchandise the world wide. Books, essays, documentaries, songs, coffee mugs—hers may be ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Smithsonian, Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, Npr, Vox, Napoleon, Louvre, Mona Lisa, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci, Paducah, Leonardo da Vinci, Josh Jones


Graduate Assistantships in Arts Administration

Two open positions for the 19-20 academic year, including hourly pay and tuition benefits. Jump-start your career in arts administration by earning a Master’s in 15 months at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, NY. Two Graduate Assistant positions are devoted to our program, providing students with hands-on marketing, fundraising, and management experience while completing our program. MORE INFORMATION
Tags: Art, Education, Syracuse NY, Le Moyne College


Gustave Doré’s Haunting Illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy

Inferno, Canto X: Many artists have attempted to illustrate Dante Alighieri's epic poem the Divine Comedy, but none have made such an indelible stamp on our collective imagination as the Frenchman Gustave Doré. Doré was 23 years old in 1855, when he first decided to create a series of engravings for a deluxe edition of Dante's classic.  He was already the highest-paid illustrator in France, with popular editions of Rabelais and Balzac under his belt, but Doré was unable to convince his publishe...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, France, Israel, Edgar Allan Poe, Literature, Hachette, Christ, Dante, Rose, Facebook Twitter, Judas Iscariot, Virgil, Beatrice


Famous Drawings by Leonardo da Vinci Celebrated in a New Series of Stamps

No special occasion is required to celebrate Leonardo da Vinci, but the fact that he died in 1519 makes this year a particularly suitable time to look back at his vast, innovative, and influential body of work. Just last month, "Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing" opened in twelve museums across the United Kingdom. "144 of Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest drawings in the Royal Collection are displayed in 12 simultaneous exhibitions across the UK," says the exhibition's site, with each venue's dra...
Tags: Google, Art, UK, College, History, Liverpool, United Kingdom, Royal Mail, Cardiff, Belfast, Seoul, Bhutan, San Francisco Bay Area, Kate Brown, Facebook Twitter, Sparta


Dean, Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts

Webster University seeks a talented and creative leader in the arts to serve as the dean of the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts. Webster University seeks a talented and creative leader in the arts to serve as the dean of the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts. Applications and nominations are invited; the University will begin reviewing candidates immediately and hopes to have the new dean in place by the summer of 2019. Webster University’s entrepreneurial spirit drives its mission t...
Tags: Art, Jobs, College, Africa, University, St Louis, Council, Webster, EEO, Europe Asia, The University, Higher Learning Commission HLC, Webster Groves Missouri, Webster University, Department of Dance, Dean Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts


2019 Focus on Book Arts catalog available

The 2019 Focus on Book Arts conference catalog was just published – woot! They won’t be mailing them this year, but you can at your leisure. Seeing my workshop in print makes my teaching there all the more real. This is so happening! I love this conference so much. The first time I attended was in 2007, which was P.B. (pre-blog). Here’s a refresher about FOBA – they put on a 5-day book arts conference every other year in Forest Grove, OR. In addition to workshops, they have evening activiti...
Tags: Art, Education, Workshop, Conference, Bookbinding, Book Arts, Elissa, Forest Grove, Karen Hanmer, Bonnie Stahlecker, Focus on Book Arts, Pietro Accardi, Sam Ellenport, Steph Rue, Pietro Accardi Sam Ellenport Bonnie Stahlecker


Neil Gaiman Reads His Manifesto on Making Art: Features the 10 Things He Wish He Knew As a Young Artist

I think you're absolutely allowed several minutes, possibly even half a day to feel very, very sorry for yourself indeed. And then just start making art. - Neil Gaiman It’s a bit early in the year for commencement speeches, but fortunately for lifelong learners who rely on a steady drip of inspiration and encouragement, author Neil Gaiman excels at putting old wine in new bottles. He repurposed his keynote address to Philadelphia's University of the Arts’ Class of 2012 for Art Matter...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, College, Life, New York City, Neil Gaiman, Literature, Philadelphia, Hackney, Ursula K Le Guin, Alice, East London, Waterstones, Facebook Twitter, Chris Riddell


Historic Manuscript Filled with Beautiful Illustrations of Cuban Flowers & Plants Is Now Online (1826 )

The internet has become an essential back up system for thousands of pieces of historical art, science, and literature, and also for a specialized kind of text incorporating them all in degrees: the illustrated natural science book, from the golden ages of book illustration and philosophical naturalism in Europe and the Americas. We’ve seen some fine digital reproductions of the illustrated Nomenclature of Colors by Abraham Gottlob Werner, for example—a book that accompanied Darwin on his Beagl...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Books, Science, College, Cuba, Cornell, Darwin, Mary, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, Josh Jones, Euclid, Mary Shelley, Goethe


Download Free Coloring Books from 113 Museums

One can only color so many floral-trimmed affirmations before one begins to crave something slightly more perverse. An emaciated, naked, anthropomorphized mandrake root, say or… Thy wish is our command, but be prepared to hustle, because today is the final day of Color Our Collections, a compellingly democratic initiative on the part of the New York Academy of Medicine. Since 2016, the Academy has made an annual practice of inviting other libraries, archives, and cultural institutions around th...
Tags: Google, Art, College, New York City, West Virginia, Museums, Vilnius, University Of Illinois, Villanova University, Facebook Twitter, Mutter Museum, Ayun Halliday, Patrick J Costello, Andover Harvard Theological Library, Franz Hogenberg


The Real Locations of Ukiyo-e, Historic Japanese Woodblock Prints, Plotted on a Google Map

The undisputed last great master of ukiyo-e was Utagawa Hiroshige. He is best known for the many series he created of bucolic landscapes, which offered collectors a chance to see parts of Japan they might never reach. The Japan of his early 19th century work holds a special place in Japanese hearts--a final look at an isolated and beautiful country just before the opening up of the ports to the West and, with it, industrialization. Apart from Mount Fuji, the locations that Hiroshige drew have l...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Kyoto, George, DEWA, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Mount Fuji, Kanazawa, Google Map, Ted Mills, Hiroshige


5 favorite books of Albert Einstein

Einstein had a large library and was a voracious reader.The famous physicist admitted that some books influenced his thinking.The books he preferred were mostly philosophical and scientific in nature. None Undoubtedly considered one of the brightest individuals who ever lived, Albert Einstein did not become so accomplished in a vacuum. The physicist learned from the best minds of the time, as is evidenced by his voracious appetite for reading and his extensive personal book collection.In "Einste...
Tags: Art, Books, Astronomy, Isis, Science, Education, Intelligence, History, Physics, Innovation, Philosophy, Albert Einstein, Einstein, Newton, Mach, Cervantes


Artificial Intelligence Brings Salvador Dalí Back to Life: “Greetings, I Am Back”

Whatever Hippocrates meant when he said “art is long, life is short,” we usually take the saying to illustrate one indisputable medical truth and one more philosophical: everyone dies, but art lives for hundreds, thousands, of years—and may in some sense be a kind of immortality for the artist. This was probably what Salvador Dalí meant when he said, “Si muero, no muero por todo”—“If I die, I won’t completely die.” But maybe he knew he’d return one day in another form as well. What if ar...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Andy Warhol, Salvador Dalí, Alfred Hitchcock, Facebook Twitter, Dali, Dali Museum, Ingrid Bergman, Josh Jones, St Petersburg Florida, Hippocrates, Durham NC Follow, Surrealist Salvador Dalí Painting, Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí


Enter an Online Interactive Documentary on Rembrandt’s The Night Watch and Learn About the Painting’s Many Hidden Secrets

What possessed the man who attacked Rembrandt’s The Night Watch with a bread knife in 1975, “jabbing two-foot-long knife marks into the surface,” as Nina Siegal writes at The New York Times, “cutting a seven-foot-wide hole, and ripping off a section of the canvas”? This was not the first time the painting had been mangled. In 1715, just a little over 70 years after the monumental work’s 1642 completion, the Amsterdam city government decided to move it, and removed a significant part to shrink i...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Amsterdam, The New York Times, Rembrandt, Peter Greenaway, Facebook Twitter, Escher, Hieronymus Bosch, Militia Company of District II, Frans Banninck Cocq, Nina Siegal, Pieter Roelofs


Arts Transcending Borders Fellow

The ATB Fellow supports the administration of the Arts Transcending Borders program while gaining experience in all aspects of managing a visiting artist program in an academic setting. Arts Transcending Borders Fellow About College of the Holy Cross: Founded in 1843 in Worcester, Massachusetts, the College of the Holy Cross is among the nation’s leading liberal arts institutions. A highly selective, four-year, exclusively undergraduate college of 3,000 students, Holy Cross is reno...
Tags: Art, Jobs, College, Massachusetts, Microsoft Office, Catholic, New England, Providence, Central Massachusetts, Twitter Facebook, Worcester Massachusetts, Holy Cross, ATB, Jesuit Catholic, Boston Hartford, Equal Opportunity


The Cleveland Museum of Art Digitizes Its Collection, Putting 30,000 Works Online and Into the Public Domain

The lines of the descent from the plutocratic wealth and autocratic power of the late 19th century to the worst atrocities of the early 20th might seem apparent to some people. So too can we trace from the Gilded Age an institutional system of monuments to art, culture, and higher learning unique to modern times. Whether by virtue of greed, guilt, or noblesse oblige, or some of all of the above, wealthy industrialists sought to show—as Andrew Carnegie wrote in his “Gospel of Wealth”—that...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Korea, Cleveland, Cma, Turner, Van Gogh, Public Domain, édouard Manet, Wade, Facebook Twitter, Cleveland Museum of Art, Josh Jones, Art Institute of Chicago, Wade Park


Moebius Draws Adventurous Ads for Maxwell House Coffee (1989)

What do you do after you’ve helped create one of the “first anti-heroes in Western comics”; pioneered the underground comics industry and heavy metal album covers; won the enduring admiration of Federico Fellini, Stan Lee, and Hayao Miyazaki; and brought your distinctive creative style to the look of sci-fi classics like Blade Runner, Alien, Tron, and The Abyss? Sit back, have a coffee, and design a series of ads for Maxwell House. Why not? You’re Moebius. You can draw whatever you want. No one...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Art, College, Mexico, France, Africa, Algeria, Seattle, Hayao Miyazaki, Tintin, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Dune, Facebook Twitter, Moebius, Maxwell House


Behold Moebius’ Many Psychedelic Illustrations of Jimi Hendrix

The 1995 release of posthumous Jimi Hendrix compilation Voodoo Soup has divided fans and critics for over two decades now. But whatever its merits, its cover art should hold an honored place in every Hendrix fan’s collection. Drawn by the legendary cult comic artist Moebius from a photograph of Hendrix eating soup in France , it captures the sound Hendrix was moving toward at the end of his life—his head exploding in flames, or mushroom clouds, or pink psychedelic bronchial tubes. The image com...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, College, France, Electric Ladyland, Jimi Hendrix, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Facebook Twitter, Hendrix, Moebius, Josh Jones, Jimi, Linda McCartney, Durham NC Follow, Comics/Cartoons


Download Vincent van Gogh’s Collection of 500 Japanese Prints, Which Inspired Him to Create “the Art of the Future”

Vincent van Gogh never went to Japan, but he did spend quite a bit of time in Arles, which he considered the Japan of France. What made him think of the place that way had to do entirely with aesthetics. The Netherlands-born painter had moved to Paris in 1886, but two years later he set off for the south of France in hopes of finding real-life equivalents of the "clearness of the atmosphere and the gay colour effects" of Japanese prints. These days, we've all seen at least a few examples of tha...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, Microsoft, College, France, Paris, Netherlands, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Vincent, Simon Schama, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Theo


Making Sense of White Paintings: A Short Art History Lesson on Minimalism and the All-White Painting

“I could do that” goes the refrain of philistines at modern art galleries, sometimes followed by a “Hell, my dog/cat/baby/elephant could do that!” Sophisticates smirk knowing smirks. Oh no, sir or madam, they most certainly could not. But maybe everyone, at some level, comes across Agnes Martin’s White Stone or Jo Baer’s Untitled (White Square Lavender) and thinks it looks like someone “just took a tube of white paint and spread it on a canvas.” It's tempting to imagine, notes Vox in the...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, Harvard, Vox, Sherman, Whitney Museum, Frank Stella, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, White Stone, Josh Jones, Agnes Martin, Delacroix, Yasmina Reza


The Artistry Behind an All-White Painting: A Short Art History Lesson on Minimalism and the All-White Painting

“I could do that” goes the refrain of philistines at modern art galleries, sometimes followed by a “Hell, my dog/cat/baby/elephant could do that!” Sophisticates smirk knowing smirks. Oh no, sir or madam, they most certainly could not. But maybe everyone, at some level, comes across Agnes Martin’s White Stone or Jo Baer’s Untitled (White Square Lavender) and thinks it looks like someone “just took a tube of white paint and spread it on a canvas.” It's tempting to imagine, notes Vox in the...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, Harvard, Vox, Sherman, Whitney Museum, Frank Stella, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, White Stone, Josh Jones, Agnes Martin, Delacroix, Yasmina Reza


The Musical Instruments in Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights Get Brought to Life, and It Turns Out That They Sound “Painful” and “Horrible”

Welcome to The Garden of Earthly Delights. You’ll find no angelic strings here. Those are reserved for first class citizens whose virtuous lives earned them passage to the uppermost heights. Down below, stringed instruments produce the most hellish sort of cacophony, a fitting accompaniment for the horn whose bell is befouled with the arm of a tortured soul. How do we know that's what they sounded like? A group of musicologists, craftspeople and academics from the Bate Collection of Musical...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, Comedy, College, New York City, Religion, Museums, University of Oxford, Lamb, Slayer, Bosch, Facebook Twitter, Hieronymus Bosch, Ayun Halliday, Andrew Lamb


Artist Hand-Cuts an Intricate Octopus From a Single Piece of Paper: Discover the Japanese Art of Kirie

At first glance, the octopus in the video above might appear to be breathing. A second look reveals that it isn't actually breathing, nor is it actually an octopus at all, but seemingly just a highly detailed drawing of one. Only upon the third look, if even then, does it become clear that the octopus has been not drawn but intricately cut, and out of a single large sheet of paper at that. The two-dimensional sea creature represents a recent high point in the work of Japanese artist Masa...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, Seoul, Osaka, Facebook Twitter, Waldman, Fukuda, Colin Marshall, Spoon Tamago, 21st Century Los Angeles, Kirie, Johnny Waldman, Masayo Fukuda, TANT


Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments for Living in a Healthy Democracy

Image by J. F. Horrabin, via Wikimedia Commons Bertrand Russell saw the history of civilization as being shaped by an unfortunate oscillation between two opposing evils: tyranny and anarchy, each of which contain the seed of the other. The best course for steering clear of either one, Russell maintained, is liberalism. "The doctrine of liberalism is an attempt to escape from this endless oscillation," writes Russell in A History of Western Philosophy. "The essence of liberalism is an attempt to...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, History, New York Times, New York Times Magazine, Facebook Twitter, Russell, Wise, John Locke, Bertrand Russell, Healthy Democracy, Bertrand Russell Authority, J F Horrabin


The Getty Digital Archive Expands to 135,000 Free Images: Download High Resolution Scans of Paintings, Sculptures, Photographs & Much Much More

J. Paul Getty was not a billionaire known for his generosity. But since his death, the Getty Trust and complex of Getty museums in L.A. have carried forth in a more magnanimous spirit, ostensibly adhering to values that transcend their founder: “service, philanthropy, teaching, and access.” A collection first gathered for private investment and consumption (sometimes under a cloud of scandal) has expanded into galleries that millions pass through every year; a Conservation Institute dedicated t...
Tags: Google, Art, Photography, College, Getty, West Coast, Dorothea Lange, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Research Institute, Roehampton, Paul Getty, Durham NC Follow, Andrea Mantegna, Paul Gaugin, Thomas Gaehtgens


When Pablo Picasso and Guillaume Apollinaire Were Accused of Stealing the Mona Lisa (1911)

If you visit the Louvre today, you'll notice two phenomena in particular: the omnipresence of security, and the throng of visitors obscuring the Mona Lisa. If you'd visited just over a century ago, neither would have been the case. And if you happened to visit on August 22nd, 1911, you wouldn't have encountered Leonardo's famed portrait at all. That morning, writes Messy Nessy, "Parisian artist Louis Béroud, famous for painting and selling his copies of famous artworks, walked into the Louvre t...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, France, History, Pablo Picasso, Hitler, Seoul, Huffington Post, Louvre, Mona Lisa, Picasso, Sara Boboltz, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci


Classic Illustrations of Edgar Allan Poe’s Stories by Gustave Doré, Édouard Manet, Harry Clarke, Aubrey Beardsley & Arthur Rackham

What do you see when you read the work of Edgar Allan Poe? The great age of the illustrated book is far behind us. Aside from cover designs, most modern editions of Poe’s work circulate in text-only form. That’s just fine, of course. Readers should be trusted to use their imaginations, and who can forget indelible descriptions like “The Tell-Tale Heart”’s “eye of a vulture—a pale, blue eye, with a film over it”? We need no picture book to make that image come alive. Yet, when we first discover ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Brooklyn, Literature, Clarke, Alice, Poe, édouard Manet, Manet, Don Quixote, Harry Clarke, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Daniel Horowitz


Earn Your Master’s Degree by Spending One Weekend a Month in NYC

Bank Street’s Leadership in Museum Education Master’s Program is designed for working educators. Attend classes in New York City one weekend per month and apply what you learn directly to your work! As a student in Bank Street College of Education’s Leadership in Museum Education Master’s Program, you will meet one weekend per month, plus one week in early June, over two years. You will develop your capacity for leadership, organizational change, community engagement, diversity, inclusion...
Tags: Art, Education, New York City, Brian Hogarth


The Largest J.R.R. Tolkien Exhibit in Generations Is Coming to the U.S.: Original Drawings, Manuscripts, Maps & More

"I first took on The Lord of the Rings at the age of eleven or twelve," writes The New Yorker's Anthony Lane. "It was, and remains, not a book that you happen to read, like any other, but a book that happens to you: a chunk bitten out of your life." The preteen years may remain the most opportune ones in which to pick up the work of J.R.R. Tolkien, but whatever the period in life at which they find their way in, most readers who make the journey through Middle-earth never really leave th...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, Maps, New York, College, America, Seoul, Middle Earth, Robert Louis Stevenson, Tolkien, Morgan, Facebook Twitter, Anthony Lane, Lane, May


Watch the Painstaking and Nerve-Racking Process of Restoring a Drawing by Michelangelo

We live in a disposable culture, but certain things warrant the time and effort of mending—good shoes, hearts, Michelangelo drawings… The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s paper conservator Marjorie Shelley, above, had the nerve-wracking task of tackling the latter, in preparation for last year’s Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer exhibition. The work in question, a two-sided sketch featuring designs for a monumental altar or facade, thought to be San Silvestro in Capite, Rome, arriv...
Tags: Google, Art, College, New York City, Architecture, Museums, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Facebook Twitter, Michelangelo, SHELLEY, San Silvestro, Marjorie Shelley, Capite Rome, Filippo Baldinucci



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