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When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: Read the 1,288-Word Sentence from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: 1,288 Words from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


‘We spoke English to set ourselves apart’: how I rediscovered my mother tongue

While I was growing up in Nigeria, my parents deliberately never spoke their native Igbo language to us. But later it became an essential part of me. By Adaobi Tricia NwaubaniWhen I was a child, my great-grandmother, whom we called Daa, came to live with my family in Umuahia in south-eastern Nigeria. My father had spent most of his infancy in her care, mostly during a period when his mother was preoccupied with her role as one of the founders of a local Assemblies of God church. As Daa grew olde...
Tags: Books, Education, Nigeria, Africa, World news, Language, Languages, Umuahia, Adaobi Tricia NwaubaniWhen


Lynn Enright Destroys Myths About the Female Body

In her new book Vagina: A Re-Education, Lynn Enright (journalist and “accidental vagina specialist”) is debunking the myths, theories and lies that many women grew up believing. From gender bias in sex education to pain, pleasure, pregnancy and beyond, Enright explores the female body and the experience of living inside one—with many personal anecdotes. Enright spoke with Kelly Pigram about the book, which is fascinating …
Tags: Health, Books, Gender, Science, Design, Education, Anatomy, Sex, Reading, Culture, Bodies, Linkaboutit, Enright, Kelly Pigram, Lynn Enright, Vagina: A Re-Education


William Faulkner’s Review of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea (1952)

Images via Wikimedia Commons In the mid-20th century, the two big dogs in the American literary scene were William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. Both were internationally revered, both were masters of the novel and the short story, and both won Nobel Prizes. Born in Mississippi, Faulkner wrote allegorical histories of the South in a style that is both elliptical and challenging. His works were marked by uses of stream-of-consciousness and shifting points of view. He also favored titanically lo...
Tags: Google, Books, Mississippi, Yahoo, College, Washington, Time, Los Angeles, New York Times, Paris, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Lee University, FAULKNER


Tongue Tied: Untangling Communication in Sex, Kink, and Relationships

Tongue Tied: Untangling Communication in Sex, Kink, and Relationships $10 Kindle/%15 physical from Amazon I wasn’t intending to read Tongue Tied initially. I was previously unfamiliar with Stella Harriss (who I now know is an experienced sex educator and coach as well as an erotica writer) and, perhaps more importantly, felt pretty familiar with communicating about sex. I’ve frequently read about the topic. I’ve argued that we need to talk more about sex and do it in a healthy way that isn...
Tags: Reviews, Amazon, Books, College, Sex, Communication, Reddit, Stella, Kink, HARRIS, Harriss, Stella Harris, Stella Hariss, Tongue Tied, Stella Harriss


Four Passionate Italian Women Artists

Win a pre-publication bound galley of LA PASSIONE from Goodreads! Click to enter the raffle. The giveaway ends March 13. Italy’s dazzling pantheon of artistic geniuses seems a man’s world. Yet as I discovered in researching my upcoming book, a few women with singular passion defied all obstacles and created important works of art. As a way of celebrating International Women’s Day, here are four artists whose stories I recount in LA PASSIONE: How Italy Seduced the World: Plautilla Nelli (1524-...
Tags: Travel, Art, Books, England, Education, Spain, Culture, Italy, Florence, Greenwich, Christ, Palermo, Genoa, Bologna, Caravaggio, ROSSI


The Medieval Masterpiece, the Book of Kells, Is Now Digitized & Put Online

If you know nothing else about medieval European illuminated manuscripts, you surely know the Book of Kells. “One of Ireland’s greatest cultural treasures” comments Medievalists.net, “it is set apart from other manuscripts of the same period by the quality of its artwork and the sheer number of illustrations that run throughout the 680 pages of the book.” The work not only attracts scholars, but almost a million visitors to Dublin every year. “You simply can’t travel to the capital of Ireland,”...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Books, College, History, Ireland, Middle East, Dublin, Iona, County Meath, North Africa, Moss, Facebook Twitter, Ryan, Trinity College Dublin


100-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor Helen Fagin Reads Her Letter About How Books Save Lives

"Could you imagine a world without access to reading, to learning, to books?" Helen Fagin, who poses that question, doesn't have to imagine it: she experienced that grim reality, and worse besides. "At twenty-one," she continues, "I was forced into Poland’s World War II ghetto, where being caught reading anything forbidden by the Nazis meant, at best, hard labor; at worst, death." There she operated a school in secret where she taught Jewish children Latin and mathematics, soon realizing th...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, College, Nazis, Neil Gaiman, History, Poland, Brian Eno, Seoul, Judy Blume, David Byrne, Facebook Twitter, Yo Yo Ma, Jane Goodall, Helen Keller


John Cleese Revisits His 20 Years as an Ivy League Professor in His New Book, Professor at Large: The Cornell Years

Creative Commons image by Paul Boxley It takes real intelligence to successfully make dumb comedy. John Cleese and his Monty Python colleagues are a premium example. You can call sketches like the “Ministry of Silly Walks” and “Dead Parrot” surrealist, and they are comparable to the absurdist stunts favored by certain early 20th century modern artists. But you can also call them very smart kinds of stupid, a description of some of the highest forms of comedy, I’d say, and one that applies to so...
Tags: Google, Books, Comedy, College, John Cleese, Eu, Smith, Wanda, Cornell, Cornell University, Facebook Twitter, Jean Claude Juncker, BBC Radio, Josh Jones, Fawlty Towers, Dean Smith


The British Library Digitizes Its Collection of Obscene Books (1658-1940)

Many people are cheated out of an authentic education in English literature because of a longstanding puritanical approach to its curation. One might spend a lifetime reading the traditional canon without ever, for example, learning much about the long history of popular pornographic British writing, a genre that flourished in the 18th and 19th centuries as the popularity of the novel exploded. Everyone knows the Marquis de Sade, even if they haven’t read him, not least because he lent his name...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Smithsonian, Literature, Smith, British Library, Oscar Wilde, Gale, Facebook Twitter, Pamela, Richardson, Henry Fielding, Justine, Voltaire, Josh Jones


Alice in Wonderland, Hamlet, and A Christmas Carol Written in Shorthand (Circa 1919)

For hundreds of years before the regular use of dictation machines, word processors, and computers, many thousands of court records, correspondence, journalism, and so on circulated in translation. All of these texts were originally in their native language, but they were transcribed in a different writing system, then translated back into the standard orthography, by stenographers using various kinds of shorthand. In English, this meant that a mess of irregular, phonetically nonsensical spellin...
Tags: Google, Books, Japan, Greece, Writing, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Rome, Literature, Lewis Carroll, Shakespeare, Alice, Pepys, Facebook Twitter, Cicero, Europe North America


022: The Little Things

The "little things" matter -- a lot. Right down to making the world a better place for generations to come, and they're easy to do. And really: if a 5-year-old is obviously starting to develop Uncommon Sense, anyone who puts their mind to it can develop it too. Show Page: https://thisistrue.com/podcast22
Tags: Books, Podcasts, Education, Giving Back


The Little Things

In This Episode: The "little things" matter -- a lot. Right down to making the world a better place for generations to come, and they're easy to do. And really: if a 5-year-old is obviously starting to develop Uncommon Sense, anyone who puts their mind to it can develop it too. Show Page: https://thisistrue.com/podcast22
Tags: Books, Podcasts, Education, Giving Back


Podcast 022: The Little Things

In This Episode: The "little things" matter -- a lot. Right down to making the world a better place for generations to come, and they're easy to do. And really: if a 5-year-old is obviously starting to develop Uncommon Sense, anyone who puts their mind to it can develop it too. Show Page: https://thisistrue.com/podcast22
Tags: Books, Podcasts, Education, Giving Back


Has the Voynich Manuscript Finally Been Decoded?: Researchers Claim That the Mysterious Text Was Written in Phonetic Old Turkish

There are still several ancient languages modern scholars cannot decipher, like Minoan hieroglyphics (called Linear A) or Khipu, the intricate Incan system of writing in knots. These symbols contain within them the wisdom of civilizations, and there’s no telling what might be revealed should we learn to translate them. Maybe scholars will only find accounting logs and inventories, or maybe entirely new ways of perceiving reality. When it comes, however, to a singularly indecipherable tex...
Tags: Google, Books, College, History, Artificial Intelligence, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Johns Hopkins University, Ahmet, Pelling, Durham NC Follow, Medieval Academy of America, Voynich, Khipu, Latin Sino, Ardiç


800 Illuminated Medieval Manuscripts Are Now Online: Browse & Download Them Courtesy of the British Library and Bibliothèque Nationale de France

Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel The Buried Giant begins with an immersive depiction of what it might have been like to live in a European village during the middle ages. Or what it might feel like for us moderns, at least. The couple at the center of the story spends several pages fretting over the loss of a candle, their only one. Without it, their nights are pitch black. In the day, they wander in a fog, unable to remember anything. Though the cause of this turns out to be dark magic, one can’t help t...
Tags: Google, Books, England, College, France, History, Libraries, British Library, Kazuo Ishiguro, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, France England, Mirador, Polonsky Foundation, Durham NC Follow, Bibliothèque Nationale de France


Good Rules for Choosing Non-Fiction Books

I have a few rules for choosing non-fiction books: I won’t read a book promising to reveal the “insider secrets” of an organization or field. (The author only knows 1% of the secrets, and they’ll oversell them.) If I find a book too broad or challenging, I go down a reading level—or even find a comic book version with…Read more...
Tags: Books, Education, Reading, Lifehacks, Non Fiction


Neil Gaiman Reads His Manifesto on Making Art: Features the 10 Things He Wish He Knew As a Young Artist

I think you're absolutely allowed several minutes, possibly even half a day to feel very, very sorry for yourself indeed. And then just start making art. - Neil Gaiman It’s a bit early in the year for commencement speeches, but fortunately for lifelong learners who rely on a steady drip of inspiration and encouragement, author Neil Gaiman excels at putting old wine in new bottles. He repurposed his keynote address to Philadelphia's University of the Arts’ Class of 2012 for Art Matter...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, College, Life, New York City, Neil Gaiman, Literature, Philadelphia, Hackney, Ursula K Le Guin, Alice, East London, Waterstones, Facebook Twitter, Chris Riddell


Historic Manuscript Filled with Beautiful Illustrations of Cuban Flowers & Plants Is Now Online (1826 )

The internet has become an essential back up system for thousands of pieces of historical art, science, and literature, and also for a specialized kind of text incorporating them all in degrees: the illustrated natural science book, from the golden ages of book illustration and philosophical naturalism in Europe and the Americas. We’ve seen some fine digital reproductions of the illustrated Nomenclature of Colors by Abraham Gottlob Werner, for example—a book that accompanied Darwin on his Beagl...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Books, Science, College, Cuba, Cornell, Darwin, Mary, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, Josh Jones, Euclid, Mary Shelley, Goethe


21 Places To Read Free Books Online

Here are 21 of my favorite places to read free books online. Getting ebooks for free online will save you money, and save you some bookshelf space as well! The post 21 Places To Read Free Books Online appeared first on Bible Money Matters and was written by Peter Anderson. Copyright © Bible Money Matters - please visit biblemoneymatters.com for more great content.
Tags: Books, Education, Entertainment, Marketing, Frugality, Peter Anderson


Pioneering Sci-Fi Author William Gibson Predicts in 1997 How the Internet Will Change Our World

"What's the one thing that all great works of science fiction have in common?" asks a 1997 episode of The Net, the BBC's television series about the possibilities of this much-talked-about new thing called the internet. "They all tried to see into the future, and they all got it wrong. Orwell's 1984, Huxley's Brave New World, Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: all, to some extent or other, wrong. And there's another name to add to this list: William Gibson." But then on strolls Gibson himself, fre...
Tags: Google, Books, Technology, College, Bbc, Literature, Clarke, Sci Fi, William Gibson, Mark Twain, Seoul, Orwell, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter, Gibson, London Times


The “Slave Bible” Removed Key Biblical Passages In Order to Legitimize Slavery & Discourage a Slave Rebellion (1807)

Photo via the Museum of the Bible In an 1846 speech to the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Frederick Douglass summed up the twisted bond between slavery and religion in the U.S. He began with a short summary of atrocities that were legal, even encouraged, against enslaved people in Virginia and Maryland, including hanging, beheading, drawing and quartering, rape, “and this is not the worst.” He then made his case: No, a darker feature is yet to be presented than the mere existence of ...
Tags: Google, Books, UK, Maryland, College, Virginia, Israel, Religion, America, History, Atlantic, Egypt, Washington Dc, Smithsonian, Npr, Caribbean


The “Slave Bible” That Removed Key Passages Thought to Justify Rebellion, or Call Slavery Into Question (1807)

Photo via the Museum of the Bible In an 1846 speech to the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, Frederick Douglass summed up the twisted bond between slavery and religion in the U.S. He began with a short summary of atrocities that were legal, even encouraged, against enslaved people in Virginia and Maryland, including hanging, beheading, drawing and quartering, rape, “and this is not the worst.” He then made his case: No, a darker feature is yet to be presented than the mere existence of ...
Tags: Google, Books, UK, Maryland, College, Virginia, Israel, Religion, America, History, Atlantic, Britain, Egypt, Washington Dc, Smithsonian, Npr


5 favorite books of Albert Einstein

Einstein had a large library and was a voracious reader.The famous physicist admitted that some books influenced his thinking.The books he preferred were mostly philosophical and scientific in nature. None Undoubtedly considered one of the brightest individuals who ever lived, Albert Einstein did not become so accomplished in a vacuum. The physicist learned from the best minds of the time, as is evidenced by his voracious appetite for reading and his extensive personal book collection.In "Einste...
Tags: Art, Books, Astronomy, Isis, Science, Education, Intelligence, History, Physics, Innovation, Philosophy, Albert Einstein, Einstein, Newton, Mach, Cervantes


Why Should We Read Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451? A New TED-Ed Animation Explains

Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 envisions a future where "firemen" are sent out not to put out fires, but to burn up any books they find with flamethrowers. To students assigned to read the novel today, the idea of an America that has outlawed books entirely might seem like an intriguing if far-fetched notion, perhaps more suited to the reality of the 1950s than the reality of today. Even if we've never read Fahrenheit 451, nearly all of us know the basic outline of its story by now, so wh...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Ray Bradbury, America, United States, Animation, Gillespie, Seoul, Alexandria, University of Wisconsin Madison, Facebook Twitter, Bradbury, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Read Ray Bradbury


The 5 Best Books for Achieving Your New Year's Resolutions

Be the change you want to see in 2019. How is it only mid-January? I feel like this is always the looongest month of the year. Since it's right after the holidays (post-holiday syndrome is real) and the coldest time of the year, January is downright depressing, making it a great time to read some inspiring and motivating books.Plus, if you slacked off on your New Year's resolutions after the first week, the end of January is a great time to get back to work on those goals and solidify them into...
Tags: Books, Arianna Huffington, Obama, College, Happiness, Inspiration, Self-help, Netflix, Michelle Obama, Vanessa King, Cookbook, New Year's Resolution, Marie Kondo, Huffington, Kondo, College Life


Originally Poe envisioned a parrot, not a raven

Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1949) is considered one of America's great writers. Poe penned his most famous poem, The Raven, in his 30s. Originally, the poem's feathered subject was a bit flamboyant. None By his mid-30s, Edgar Allan Poe was not only weary by the hardships of poverty, but also regularly intoxicated — by more than just macabre visions. Despite this, the Gothic writer lucidly insisted that there was still a method to his madness when it came to devising poems.In an essay titled "The Philo...
Tags: Books, Death, Education, Poetry, Edgar Allan Poe, America, Innovation, Graham, Poe, Hulton, Magazine Poe, Lenore With


Librarian Honors a Dying Tree by Turning It Into a Little Free Library

And then she said to Annika, "Why don't you feel in that old tree stump? One practically always finds things in old tree stumps."  - Pippi Longstocking, Astrid Lindgren  Remember that other classic of children's literature, wherein a boy runs from the city to a secluded mountain, taking up residence in an old tree he hollows into a cozy shelter? Public librarian and artist Sharalee Armitage Howard’s Little Free Library is a bit like that, except there was no running involved. When the ve...
Tags: Google, Books, Design, College, New York City, Creativity, Idaho, K-12, Libraries, Reddit, Howard, Facebook Twitter, Beatrix Potter, Little Free Library, Pippi Longstocking, Pippi Longstocking Astrid Lindgren


A New Edition of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 That’s Only Readable When You Apply Heat to Its Pages: Pre-Order It Today

Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, a novel of a nearly bookless dystopian future in which "firemen" go around burning any last volumes they can find, lends itself well to highly physical special editions. Last year we featured an asbestos-bound, fireproof version, 200 copies of which were published at the book's first printing in 1953. The year before we featured an experimental edition perhaps even more faithfully reflective of the story's premise, one whose all-black pages only reveal the ...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Ray Bradbury, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Electric Literature, Bradbury, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Read Ray Bradbury, Radio Drama Based, Facebook A New Edition of Ray Bradbury



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