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Posts filtered by tags: Colin Marshall[x]


 

Rick Steves Tells the Story of Fascism’s Rise & Fall in Germany

“Healthy, vigorous, respectable: everyone’s favorite uncle.” How many of us hear these words and think of that most beloved of all American travel-television personalities, Rick Steves? Indeed, in the video above they’re spoken by Steves, though to describe a figure very different from himself: Adolf Hitler, who convinced his people not to tour Europe but to invade it, sparking the deadliest conflict of all time. How and why this happened has been a historical question written about perh...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, Europe, Politics, Television, College, Germany, Berlin, America, History, Poland, Nuremberg, Hitler, Seoul, Adolf Hitler, Rick Steves


Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Get Digitized: Where to Read the Renaissance Man’s Manuscripts Online

From the hand of Leonardo da Vinci came the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, among other art objects of intense reverence and even worship. But to understand the mind of Leonardo da Vinci, one must immerse oneself in his notebooks. Totaling some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, they record something of every aspect of the Renaissance man’s intellectual and daily life: studies for artworks, designs for elegant buildings and fantastical machines, observations of the world around him, lists of hi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Science, College, History, Bill Gates, Archives, Seoul, Da Vinci, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Colin Marshall, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 21st Century Los Angeles, Codex Arundel, Francesco Melzi


Where to Read Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Online: A Roundup of the Renaissance Man’s Digitized Manuscripts

From the hand of Leonardo da Vinci came the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, among other art objects of intense reverence and even worship. But to understand the mind of Leonardo da Vinci, one must immerse oneself in his notebooks. Totaling some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, they record something of every aspect of the Renaissance man’s intellectual and daily life: studies for artworks, designs for elegant buildings and fantastical machines, observations of the world around him, lists of hi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Science, College, History, Bill Gates, Archives, Seoul, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Colin Marshall, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 21st Century Los Angeles, Codex Arundel, Francesco Melzi, App Leonardo da Vinci


In 1926, Nikola Tesla Predicts the World of 2026

Not long after Nikola Tesla died in 1943, the world seemed to forget him. The first public tribute paid to his considerable research and development in the realm of electricity thereafter came in 1960 with the introduction of the tesla, the SI unit of magnetic flux density. But in the decades since Tesla has enjoyed an afterlife as an icon of under-appreciated prescience. Some of this reputation is based on interviews given in the 1920s and 1930s, when he was still a celebrity. Take the ...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, New York, Technology, College, Tesla, History, United States, Liberty, Nikola Tesla, Seoul, Colliers, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Technoillusionist Marco Tempest Futurist, Telephone Free College


Sonic Explorations of Japanese Jazz: Stream 8 Mixes of Japan’s Jazz Tradition Free Online

“Man,” a fellow working the checkout counter at Los Angeles’ Amoeba Music once said to me, “you sure do like Japanese jazz.” His tone was one of faint disbelief, but then, this particular record-shopping trip happened well over a decade ago. Since then the global listenership of Japanese jazz has increased enormously, thanks to the expansion of audiovisual streaming platforms and the enterprising collectors and curators who’ve used them to share the glory of the most American of all art forms a...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Japan, London, College, America, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Miles Davis, John Peel, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Thompson, Sonny Rollins, Colin Marshall, Ryo Kawasaki


Tune Into Japanese Jazz Week: Hear Sonic Explorations of Rich Jazz Tradition

“Man,” a fellow working the checkout counter at Los Angeles’ Amoeba Music once said to me, “you sure do like Japanese jazz.” His tone was one of faint disbelief, but then, this particular record-shopping trip happened well over a decade ago. Since then the global listenership of Japanese jazz has increased enormously, thanks to the expansion of audiovisual streaming platforms and the enterprising collectors and curators who’ve used them to share the glory of the most American of all art forms a...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Japan, London, College, America, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Miles Davis, John Peel, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Thompson, Sonny Rollins, Colin Marshall, Ryo Kawasaki


David Hockney Shows Us His Sketch Book, Page by Page

Still working and exhibiting in his eighties, and indeed seeming to grow more and more productive with age, David Hockney has become a living symbol of what it is to live as an artist. This entails not just making a lot of paintings, or even making a lot of paintings with an immediately recognizable style under a well-cultivated image. It means constantly and instinctively converting the reality in which one lives into art, an activity evidenced by Hockney’s sketchbooks. In the video abo...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Los Angeles, Bradford, Yorkshire, David Hockney, Seoul, Vincent Van Gogh, Taschen, Hockney, NPG, Colin Marshall, Giorgio de Chirico, Richard Diebenkorn, 21st Century Los Angeles


An Immersive Pink Floyd Museum Exhibition Is Coming to the U.S.: Get Tickets Online

While it’s not technically incorrect to call Pink Floyd a rock band, the term feels somehow unequal to the descriptive task at hand. One doesn’t so much listen to albums like The Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall as experience them, and this went even more so for their elaborate, increasingly colossal live performances. A retrospective of Pink Floyd’s history, which stretched back to 1965, must do justice to Pink Floyd’s transcendent ambition: this was the goal of Pink Floyd: Their Mort...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Bruce Springsteen, London, College, Los Angeles, History, Bbc, Pink Floyd, United States, Victoria, Salvador Dalí, Tristram Hunt, Seoul, Syd Barrett, Bedford


Japanese Carpenters Unearth 100-Year-Old Wood Joineries While Taking Apart a Traditional House

According to myth, the first Japanese poet, Susano-o, the storm god, named the activity of building as equal to the works of nature. Travel blog Kansai Odyssey writes, “Susano-o felt rather inspired” while at Suga Shrine in Shimane Prefecture, “and recited the first poem in Japanese literature.” Roughly translated, it reads: “In Izumo, where the clouds form, / I see a fence of clouds. / To protect my wife, I too, built a fence. / These clouds are as my fence.” An embrace of the natural w...
Tags: Facebook, Japan, College, Architecture, Josh Jones, IZUMO, Colin Marshall, Durham NC Follow, Iwakuni, Yamanashi, Susano, Dylan Iwakuni, Grace Ebert, Shimane Prefecture, Traditional House, Kansai Odyssey


Wendy Carlos Demonstrates the Moog Synthesizer on the BBC (1970)

We can break popular music into two periods: before the Moog and after the Moog. Upon its debut in 1964, that synthesizer made a big splash in the small but long-established electronic-music world by, among other innovative qualities, being smaller than an entire room. Over the next few years, inventor Bob Moog (whose previous line was in theremins) refined his eponymous brainchild to the point that it became accessible to composers not already on the cutting edge of music technology. Bu...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Technology, Television, College, Bbc, Stanley Kubrick, Seoul, Glenn Gould, Wendy, Carlos, Bach, Leonard Bernstein, Moog, BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Wendy Carlos


Watch “Degrees of Uncertainty,” an Animated Documentary about Climate Science, Uncertainty & Knowing When to Trust the Experts

We should just trust the experts. But wait: to identify true expertise requires its own kind of even more specialized expertise. Besides, experts disagree with each other, and over time disagree with themselves as well. This makes it challenging indeed for all of us non-experts — and we’re all non-experts in the fields to which we have not dedicated our lives — to understand phenomena of any complexity. As for grasping climate change, with its enormous historical scale and countless many...
Tags: Facebook, Science, College, Data, Current Affairs, Antarctica, New Orleans, Seoul, Halloran, Colin Marshall, Facebook Watch, 21st Century Los Angeles, Neil Halloran, Climate Science Uncertainty amp, Amsterdam Miami


How the Internet Archive Has Digitized More than 250,000 78 R.P.M. Records: See the Painstaking Process Up-Close

In the history of recorded music, no medium has demonstrated quite the staying power of the phonograph record. Hearing those words, most of us envision a twelve-inch disc designed to play at 33  1 ⁄ 3 revolutions per minute, the kind still manufactured today. But like every other form of technology, that familiar vinyl LP didn’t appear ex nihilo: on its introduction in 1948, it was the latest in a series of phonograph records of different sizes and speeds. The first dominant record form...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, History, Internet Archive, Seoul, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Boston Public Library Will Digitize Put Online, Alex Steinweiss Father, Kait Sanchez, George Blood LP, Columbia RCA Victor Decca Capitol


The Isolator: A 1925 Helmet Designed to Eliminate Distractions & Increase Productivity (Created by SciFi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback)

The anti-distraction device is the modern mousetrap: build a better one, and the world will beat a path to your door. Or so, at least, will the part of the world engaged in the pursuits we’ve broadly labeled “knowledge work.” Even among the knowledge workers who’ve spent most of the past year in pandemic-prompted isolation, many still feel besieged by unending claims on their attention. Laments at having been rendered unproductive by constant distraction go back at least to medieval times, but ...
Tags: Facebook, Technology, College, History, Science And Invention, Seoul, Hugo Gernsback, Gernsback, Colin Marshall, World Science Fiction Society, 21st Century Los Angeles, SciFi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback, Technocracy Review, Computer Scientist Cal Newport Pico Iyer


The Story of the Rolling Stones: A Selection of Documentaries on the Quintessential Rock-and-Roll Band

The Rolling Stones define the rock-and-roll band, as they have for nearly six decades now. Exactly how they’ve done so is thoroughly documented, not least by the band’s own expansive and still-growing catalog of songs and albums (all of which I happen to have spent the last few months listening through). But the story of the Stones continues to compel, told and re-told as it is in every form of media produced by each era through which the band has passed: books, articles, podcasts, and a...
Tags: Facebook, Music, London, College, Beach Boys, History, Mick Jagger, Kent, Seoul, Keith Richards, Jagger, Watts, Andrew Loog Oldham, Richards, Rolling Stones, Brian Jones


What Makes Citizen Kane a Great Film: 4 Video Essays Revisit Orson Welles’ Masterpiece on the 80th Anniversary of Its Premiere

To understand why Citizen Kane has for so long been referred to as the “greatest film of all time,” simply watch any film made before it. Glib though that often-made prescription may sound, it gets at a truth about Orson Welles’ tale of the rise and fall of an American media magnate, his first and by far his most highly regarded picture, now just days from the eightieth anniversary of its premiere. “Its impact on cinema was so profound, and its techniques became so ubiquitous, that its o...
Tags: Facebook, Hollywood, Film, College, Orson Welles, History, Seoul, Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Kane, Welles, Ted Turner, Fincher, Pauline Kael, Colin Marshall, Mankiewicz


Watch 400+ Documentaries from German Broadcaster Deutsche Welle: Art Forgery, Fashion Photography, the Mona Lisa, and More

You’re certainly familiar with Nouvelle Vague, the “French new wave” that shook up world cinema in the mid-2oth century. You’ve probably also heard of Hallyu, the “Korean wave” of pop music and television dramas (and, increasingly, films) now crashing across not just Asia but the West. As for Deutsche Welle, literally the “German wave,” you may know the term better in its abbreviated form: DW, the brand of Germany’s public international broadcaster. Here on Open Culture we’ve previously ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Asia, Europe, Photography, Television, College, Germany, Berlin, Africa, West, United States, Seoul, Roma, Turkmenistan, Goethe Institut


Behold the 1940s Typewriter That Could Type in English, Chinese & Japanese: Watch More Than a Thousand Different Characters in Action

There was a time, not long after the widespread adoption of telegraphy in the 19th century, when the written Chinese language looked doomed. Or at least it did to certain thinkers considering the implications of that instant global communication-enabling technology having been developed for the relatively simple Latin alphabet. And as unsuited as the Chinese writing system must have seemed to the world of the telegraph, it would have presented a seemingly even heavier burden in the world...
Tags: Facebook, Japan, Technology, College, China, History, West, Shanghai, Ibm, Seoul, Toshiba, Friedrich Nietzsche, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Facebook Behold, Hou Kun Chow


The Meaning of Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights Explained

Over the half-millennium since Hieronymus Bosch painted it, The Garden of Earthly Delights has produced an ever-widening array of interpretations. Is it “a painting about sexual freedom”? A “medieval acid trip”? An “erotic fantasy”? A “heretical attack on the church”? The work of “a member of an obscure free-love cult”? James Payne, the London curator behind the Youtube channel Great Art Explained, rejects all these views. In the opening of the in-depth video analysis above, he describes...
Tags: Art, Facebook, London, College, History, Seoul, Bosch, Adam, Payne, Garden of Eden, Hieronymus Bosch, James Payne, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


Critics Celebrate Two-Lane Blacktop, the 1971 Existential Road-Movie Masterpiece by Monte Hellman (RIP), Starring James Taylor & Dennis Wilson

The road movie has long since proven itself as one of the great American cultural forms, not least by capturing the imagination of other societies, no matter how distant or different. As New York Times critic A.O. Scott declares in the video above, “one of the finest road movies, and perhaps the purest of them all, is Monte Hellman’s Two-Lane Blacktop.” In his original 1971 review of the film, a Roger Ebert described Hellman as “an American director whose work is much prized by the Frenc...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Washington, Beach Boys, Roger Ebert, New York Times, James Bond, James Taylor, Dennis Hopper, New Mexico, Woody Allen, Seoul, Taylor, Tom, Scott


Critics Celebrate Two-Lane Blacktop, the 1971 Existential Road-Movie Masterpiece by Monte Hellman (RIP), Starring James Tayler & Dennis Wilson

The road movie has long since proven itself as one of the great American cultural forms, not least by capturing the imagination of other societies, no matter how distant or different. As New York Times critic A.O. Scott declares in the video above, “one of the finest road movies, and perhaps the purest of them all, is Monte Hellman’s Two-Lane Blacktop.” In his original 1971 review of the film, a Roger Ebert described Hellman as “an American director whose work is much prized by the Frenc...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Washington, Beach Boys, Roger Ebert, New York Times, James Bond, James Taylor, Dennis Hopper, New Mexico, Woody Allen, Seoul, Taylor, Tom, Scott


Hear Joni Mitchell’s Earliest Recording, Rediscovered After More than 50 Years

How excited would you be to listen to a recording, made at an AM radio station in 1963, labeled “JONI ANDERSON AUDITION TAPE”? If you know much about the singer-songwriters of the mid-20th century, you’d be quite excited indeed. For Joni Anderson is none other than Joni Mitchell, who under that married name would go on to become one of the most influential solo performers to come out of the folk-music scene. Not that she prized the designation that thus accompanied her to stardom: “I was...
Tags: Google, Music, California, College, Toronto, Joni Mitchell, Seoul, Anderson, Mitchell, Saskatoon, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Bob Dylan Roger McGuinn Gordon Lightfoot, Joni Anderson, Barry Bowman


How Frank Lloyd Wright’s Son Invented Lincoln Logs, “America’s National Toy” (1916)

How many architectural careers have been kindled by Lincoln Logs? Since their invention in the mid-1910s, these deceptively simple wooden building blocks have entertained generations of children, whichever profession they entered upon growing up. I myself have fond memories of playing with Lincoln Logs, which, with about 70 years of history already behind them, were a venerable playtime institution, not that I knew it at the time. I certainly had no idea that they’d been invented by th...
Tags: Google, College, America, History, Architecture, United States, Tokyo, John, Seoul, Frank Lloyd Wright, Lincoln Logs, Wright, Facebook Twitter, Oak Park Illinois, Imperial Hotel, John Lloyd Wright


The Beautiful, Innovative & Sometimes Dark World of Animated Soviet Propaganda (1925-1984)

Growing up, we assembled our worldview from several different sources: parents, siblings, classmates. But for most of us, wherever and whenever we passed our formative years, nothing shaped our early perceptions of life as vividly, and as thoroughly, as cartoons — and this is just as Lenin knew it would be. “With the establishment of the Soviet Union in 1922,” writes New York Times film critic Dave Kehr, “Lenin proclaimed the cinema the most important of all the arts, presumably for its ...
Tags: Google, Politics, Film, College, Disney, History, West, Animation, New York Times, Seoul, Voice, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter, Lenin, V Club, Perestroika


How Pixar’s Movement Animation Became So Realistic: The Technological Breakthroughs Behind the Animation

More than a quarter-century ago, Toy Story made Pixar Animation Studios into a household name. Nobody had ever seen a computer-animated feature of such high quality before — indeed, nobody had ever seen a computer-animated feature at all. Though the movie succeeded on many more levels than as a proof of technological concept, it also showed great ingenuity in finding narrative materials suited to the capabilities of CGI at the time, which could render figures of plastic and cloth (or, as...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Animation, Pixar Animation Studios, Pixar, Seoul, Cgi, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Pixar Khan Academy Pixar Khan Academy, Pixar Based, Facebook How Pixar


Exquisite Watercolors of Demons, Magic & Signs: Behold the Compendium Of Demonology and Magic from 1775

Noli me tangere, says the title page of the Compendium of Demonology and Magic: “Do not touch me.” For the book’s target audience, one suspects, this was more enticement than warning. Written in Latin (its full title is Compendium rarissimum totius Artis Magicae sistematisatae per celeberrimos Artis hujus Magistros) and German, the book purports to come from the year 1057. In fact it’s been dated as more than 700 years younger, though to most 21st-century beholders a book from around 1775 carri...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, College, Religion, America, Iran, History, Magic, Dan Brown, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci, Colin Marshall, Public Domain Review, 21st Century Los Angeles


Experience Footage of Roaring 1920s Berlin, Restored & Colorized with Artificial Intelligence

Offered the chance to travel back in time to any city in any period, surely more than a few would choose Berlin in the 1920s. Ideally it would be Berlin in the mid-1920s: after much of the social and economic damage of the Great War had been repaired, but before the Great Depression reached Germany at the end of the decade, doing its part to enable the rise of Hitler. The closest experience to stepping in that time machine yet developed is the video above, a series of clips from Walther ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, New York, Film, College, Germany, Berlin, History, Hitler, Seoul, Havana, Weimar, Weimar Republic, Facebook Twitter, Fritz Lang, Paris New York


Free Software Lets You Create Traditional Japanese Wood Joints & Furniture: Download Tsugite

The Japanese art of tsugite, or wood joinery, goes back more than a millennium. As still practiced today, it involves no nails, screws, or adhesives at all, yet it can be used to put up whole buildings — as well as to disassemble them with relative ease. The key is its canon of elaborately carved joints engineered to slide together without accidentally coming apart, the designs of which we’ve previously featured here on Open Culture in animated GIF form. Though it would be natural to ass...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Architecture, Seoul, University Of Tokyo, Facebook Twitter, CNC, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Tsugite, Wood Nick Offerman, Facebook Free Software


The Decay of Cinema: Susan Sontag, Martin Scorsese & Their Lamentations on the Decline of Cinema Explored in a New Video Essay

This deep into the coronavirus pandemic, how many cinephiles haven’t yet got word of the bankruptcy or shuttering of a favorite movie theater? Though the coronavirus hasn’t quite killed filmgoing dead — at least not everywhere in the world — the culture of cinema itself had been showing signs of ill health long before any of us had heard the words “social distancing.” The previous plague, in the view of Martin Scorsese, was the Hollywood superhero-franchise blockbuster. “That’s not cinem...
Tags: Google, New York, Hollywood, Film, College, Orson Welles, Netflix, New York Times, Wes Anderson, Paul Thomas Anderson, Mike Leigh, Lars von Trier, Vigo, Scorsese, Seoul, Federico Fellini


The Ingenious Inventions of Leonardo da Vinci Recreated with 3D Animation

We revere Leonardo da Vinci for his industry, but even more so for his imagination. Most of us would envision ourselves, had we lived in the late 15th or early 16th century, being perfectly content with having painted the Mona Lisa. But Leonardo had designs on a host of other domains as well, most of them not strictly artistic. His ventures into science and engineering made him the archetypal polymath “Renaissance man,” but he was also a man before his time: most of the inventions he cam...
Tags: Google, Technology, Milan, College, History, Mit, Francis, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Dassault, Colin Marshall, Dassault Systemes, 21st Century Los Angeles


Watch a Master Japanese Printmaker at Work: Two Unintentionally Relaxing ASMR Videos

Today we can appreciate Japanese woodblock prints from sizable online archives whenever we like, and even download them for ourselves. Before the internet, how many chances would we have had even to encounter such works of art in the course of life? Very few of us, certainly, would ever have beheld a Japanese printmaker at work, but here in the age of streaming video, we all can. In the Smithsonian video above, printmaker Keiji Shinohara demonstrates a suite of traditional techniques (an...
Tags: Google, Art, College, United States, Tokyo, Asmr, Seoul, Pacific Ocean, Kyoto, Osaka, Facebook Twitter, Bob Ross, Colin Marshall, Facebook Watch, Shinohara, 21st Century Los Angeles



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