Education


Posts filtered by tags: Facebook[x]


 

The Cicadas Return After 17 Years: Stunning Footage of the Brood X Cicadas

Sing, fly, mate, die. The periodical cicadas in Brood X are emerging from underground, where they have spent the last 17 years as nymphs. They are making the final climb of their lives, intent on escaping their carapaces in order to make more cicadas. And as always they are doing it en masse. Once free, they must quickly get the hang of their brand new wings, and make for the trees, where the males will sing (some say scream) in a bid for females with whom to mate. The pregnant females dril...
Tags: Facebook, New York, Science, Maryland, Biology, Australia, College, Environment, Nature, Bob Dylan, Philadelphia, Pbs, Princeton, Baltimore, International Union For Conservation Of Nature, Indiana University


Startup School: Take YCombinator’s Free Online Course for Current & Aspiring Entrepreneurs

If you’re working on a startup, take note. YCombinator–a well-known Silicon Valley accelerator–has created Startup School, a free online program for entrepreneurs. The school has a track for current startup founders, and another one for aspiring/eventual founders. In each case, the school strives to offer the best lessons and advice on how to start a startup, while building “a community of entrepreneurs who can encourage, teach and support one another.” Startup School is completely free. You jus...
Tags: Facebook, Business, College, Stanford, Online Courses, Silicon Valley, Startup School, Lens of Venture Capital, Stanford Startup School


Watch a Masterpiece Emerge from a Solid Block of Stone

As a younger person, I became enthralled with the art-historical novels of Irving Stone, especially The Agony and the Ecstasy, his fictionalized biography of Michelangelo. Few books live up to their title so well — Stone’s Michelangelo is a tumult of passion and pain, a Romantic hero tailor-made for those who believe artistic creation transcends almost any other act. Stone describes Michelangelo’s sculpture emerging from the marble fully-formed in a creation imbued with so much sexual en...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Rodin, Alexander Calder, Michelangelo, Stone, Durham NC Follow, Irving Stone, Anna Rubincam, David More Josh Jones, Rubincam, Solid Block of Stone


Rick Steves Tells the Story of Fascism’s Rise & Fall in Germany

“Healthy, vigorous, respectable: everyone’s favorite uncle.” How many of us hear these words and think of that most beloved of all American travel-television personalities, Rick Steves? Indeed, in the video above they’re spoken by Steves, though to describe a figure very different from himself: Adolf Hitler, who convinced his people not to tour Europe but to invade it, sparking the deadliest conflict of all time. How and why this happened has been a historical question written about perh...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, Europe, Politics, Television, College, Germany, Berlin, America, History, Poland, Nuremberg, Hitler, Seoul, Adolf Hitler, Rick Steves


The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain’s Headbanging Cover of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit”

Smells Like Teen Spirit is an unusual anthem because it refuses the role of the anthem. It’s perfect for the generation it represented because this was a cohort that was so ambivalent about any traditional values [or] conventional success. — music critic Ann Powers  The screaming existential angst of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” ensured that Nirvana would define, transcend, and outlast the 90s grunge scene. The song was an instant hit. Here’s a description from someone who was present at th...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Comedy, College, Seattle, Ac Dc, Kurt Cobain, Susan, Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain, Jake Shimabukuro, Ann Powers, Ayun Halliday, Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain, Peter Brooke Turner, David Suich, Ukulele Orchestra


Discover Ibn Sina (Avicenna), a Missing Pixel in Your Image of Philosophy: Partially Examined Life Episode #267 Featuring Peter Adamson

https://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/secure/partiallyexaminedlife/PEL_ep_267pt1_3-21-21.mp3 Most American students in philosophy live on a diet of ancient Greek philosophy on the one hand, and then “modern” philosophy, which starts around the time of Descartes (the 17th century), with numerous schools and approaches spilling into the present day. If you get anything from between those ancient days and modernity, it’s probably some churchmen, i.e. Augustine (from the 4th c...
Tags: Facebook, Podcasts, College, Religion, Philosophy, Aristotle, Peter, King 's College, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Ibn Rushd, Augustine, Aquinas, Ibn Sina, Peter Adamson, Ibn Sina Avicenna


Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Get Digitized: Where to Read the Renaissance Man’s Manuscripts Online

From the hand of Leonardo da Vinci came the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, among other art objects of intense reverence and even worship. But to understand the mind of Leonardo da Vinci, one must immerse oneself in his notebooks. Totaling some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, they record something of every aspect of the Renaissance man’s intellectual and daily life: studies for artworks, designs for elegant buildings and fantastical machines, observations of the world around him, lists of hi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Science, College, History, Bill Gates, Archives, Seoul, Da Vinci, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Colin Marshall, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 21st Century Los Angeles, Codex Arundel, Francesco Melzi


Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour Composes a Soundtrack to Arthur C. Clarke’s Documentary on Mind-Bending Fractals

An observer once called the Mandelbrot Set “The Thumbprint of God,” the simple equation that led to the discovery of fractal geography, chaos theory, and why games like No Man’s Sky even exist. In 1994, Arthur C. Clarke, writer of both science fiction and science fact, narrated a one-hour documentary on the new mathematics, called Fractals: The Colors of Infinity. If that sounds familiar, dear reader, it’s because we’ve told you about it long ago. But it’s worth revisiting, and it’s wort...
Tags: Facebook, Math, Music, College, Pink Floyd, Clarke, Arthur C Clarke, Syd Barrett, Infinity, Eugene, Floyd, Mandelbrot, KCRW, David Gilmour, Gilmour, Ted Mills


Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour Composes a Soundtrack to Arthur C. Clarke’s Documentary Fractals: The Colors of Infinity

An observer once called the Mandelbrot Set “The Thumbprint of God,” the simple equation that led to the discovery of fractal geography, chaos theory, and why games like No Man’s Sky even exist. In 1994, Arthur C. Clarke, writer of both science fiction and science fact, narrated a one-hour documentary on the new mathematics, called Fractals: The Colors of Infinity. If that sounds familiar, dear reader, it’s because we’ve told you about it long ago. But it’s worth revisiting, and it’s wort...
Tags: Facebook, Math, Music, College, Pink Floyd, Clarke, Arthur C Clarke, Syd Barrett, Infinity, Eugene, Floyd, Mandelbrot, KCRW, David Gilmour, Gilmour, Ted Mills


Where to Read Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Online: A Roundup of the Renaissance Man’s Digitized Manuscripts

From the hand of Leonardo da Vinci came the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, among other art objects of intense reverence and even worship. But to understand the mind of Leonardo da Vinci, one must immerse oneself in his notebooks. Totaling some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, they record something of every aspect of the Renaissance man’s intellectual and daily life: studies for artworks, designs for elegant buildings and fantastical machines, observations of the world around him, lists of hi...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Science, College, History, Bill Gates, Archives, Seoul, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci, Colin Marshall, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 21st Century Los Angeles, Codex Arundel, Francesco Melzi, App Leonardo da Vinci


A 5-Hour Walking Tour of Paris and Its Famous Streets, Monuments & Parks

&start=20 “We’ll always have Paris,” Bogart tells Bergman in the final scene of Casablanca, a line and film inseparable from the grand mythology of Paris. The city still inspires non-Parisians to purchase Belle Epoque poster art by the shipload and binge Netflix series in which Paris looks like a “city where the clouds part, your brain clears, and your soul finds meaning,” Alex Abad-Santos writes at Vox. It’s also a place in such media where one can seem to find “success without much sacr...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, College, France, Netflix, Paris, Eiffel Tower, Vox, Casablanca, Parks, Gertrude Stein, Montmartre, Belle Epoque, Hemingway, Les Halles, James Baldwin


The Utopian, Socialist Designs of Soviet Cities

Modernist architecture transformed the modern city in the 20th century, for good and ill. Nowhere is this transformation more evident than the former Soviet Union and its former republics. There, we find truth in the western stereotypes of the Soviet city as cold, faceless, and soul-crushingly nondescript — so much so that the plot of a 1975 Russian TV film called The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, hinges on a man drunkenly traveling to Leningrad by mistake and falling asleep in a s...
Tags: Facebook, College, Bloomberg, Architecture, Moscow, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, Leningrad, Josh Jones, Le Corbusier, Brezhnev, Durham NC Follow, Byrnes, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko Constructivists, Mark Byrnes


The Utopian Socialist Designs of Soviet Cities

Modernist architecture transformed the modern city in the 20th century, for good and ill. Nowhere is this transformation more evident than the former Soviet Union and its former republics. There, we find truth in the western stereotypes of the Soviet city as cold, faceless, and soul-crushingly nondescript — so much so that the plot of a 1975 Russian TV film called The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, hinges on a man drunkenly traveling to Leningrad by mistake and falling asleep in a s...
Tags: Facebook, College, Bloomberg, Architecture, Moscow, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, Leningrad, Josh Jones, Le Corbusier, Brezhnev, Durham NC Follow, Byrnes, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko Constructivists, Mark Byrnes


In 1926, Nikola Tesla Predicts the World of 2026

Not long after Nikola Tesla died in 1943, the world seemed to forget him. The first public tribute paid to his considerable research and development in the realm of electricity thereafter came in 1960 with the introduction of the tesla, the SI unit of magnetic flux density. But in the decades since Tesla has enjoyed an afterlife as an icon of under-appreciated prescience. Some of this reputation is based on interviews given in the 1920s and 1930s, when he was still a celebrity. Take the ...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, New York, Technology, College, Tesla, History, United States, Liberty, Nikola Tesla, Seoul, Colliers, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Technoillusionist Marco Tempest Futurist, Telephone Free College


David Lynch Directs a New Music Video for Donovan

I often feel Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan has been misunderstood. When he shows up these days, it’s in songs like his creepy “Hurdy Gurdy Man” and “Season of the Witch,” in films and TV series about serial killers. This may leave younger viewers with the impression that the psychedelic folk hero went down some scary musical paths. But those who remember Donovan in his heyday remember him as the singer of “Sunshine Superman,” his biggest hit, and “Mellow Yellow,” which hit Number 2 ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Film, College, David, Lou Reed, David Lynch, Syd Barrett, Lynch, Mandy, Donovan, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Donovan Leitch, Jeremiah Sand


Pink Floyd’s First Masterpiece: An Audio/Video Exploration of the 23-Minute Track, “Echoes” (1971)

Of the many things that can and have been said of Pink Floyd’s 1973 masterpiece, The Dark Side of the Moon, one consistently bears repeating: it set a standard for how a rock album could function as a seamless, unified whole. There have been few releases since that meet this standard. Even Floyd themselves didn’t seem like they could measure up to Dark Side’s maturity just a few years earlier. But they were well on their way with 1971’s Meddle. “Meddle is really the album where all four ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Pink Floyd, Kubrick, Pompeii, Wright, Floyd, Hendrix, Josh Jones, David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Gilmour, Mojo, LeFevre, Nick Mason


The History of the Guitar: See the Evolution of the Guitar in 7 Instruments

A thoroughly modern instrument with an ancient heritage, the history of the guitar dates back some 500-plus years. If we take into account similar stringed instruments with similar designs, we can push that date back a few thousand years, but there is some scholarly disagreement over when the guitar emerged as an instrument distinct from the lute. In any case, stringed instrument historian Brandon Acker is here to walk us through some of the significant differences, with “seven checkpoin...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Spain, History, Portugal, Keith Richards, North Africa, Les Paul, Josh Jones, Mesopotamia, Rob Scallon, John Dowland, Acker, Durham NC Follow, Circuit Board


Tune Into Japanese Jazz Week: Hear Sonic Explorations of Rich Jazz Tradition

“Man,” a fellow working the checkout counter at Los Angeles’ Amoeba Music once said to me, “you sure do like Japanese jazz.” His tone was one of faint disbelief, but then, this particular record-shopping trip happened well over a decade ago. Since then the global listenership of Japanese jazz has increased enormously, thanks to the expansion of audiovisual streaming platforms and the enterprising collectors and curators who’ve used them to share the glory of the most American of all art forms a...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Japan, London, College, America, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Miles Davis, John Peel, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Thompson, Sonny Rollins, Colin Marshall, Ryo Kawasaki


Sonic Explorations of Japanese Jazz: Stream 8 Mixes of Japan’s Jazz Tradition Free Online

“Man,” a fellow working the checkout counter at Los Angeles’ Amoeba Music once said to me, “you sure do like Japanese jazz.” His tone was one of faint disbelief, but then, this particular record-shopping trip happened well over a decade ago. Since then the global listenership of Japanese jazz has increased enormously, thanks to the expansion of audiovisual streaming platforms and the enterprising collectors and curators who’ve used them to share the glory of the most American of all art forms a...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Japan, London, College, America, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Miles Davis, John Peel, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Thompson, Sonny Rollins, Colin Marshall, Ryo Kawasaki


David Hockney Shows Us His Sketch Book, Page by Page

Still working and exhibiting in his eighties, and indeed seeming to grow more and more productive with age, David Hockney has become a living symbol of what it is to live as an artist. This entails not just making a lot of paintings, or even making a lot of paintings with an immediately recognizable style under a well-cultivated image. It means constantly and instinctively converting the reality in which one lives into art, an activity evidenced by Hockney’s sketchbooks. In the video abo...
Tags: Art, Facebook, College, Los Angeles, Bradford, Yorkshire, David Hockney, Seoul, Vincent Van Gogh, Taschen, Hockney, NPG, Colin Marshall, Giorgio de Chirico, Richard Diebenkorn, 21st Century Los Angeles


Watch the Most Expensive Scene in Silent Film History: The Train Wreck From Buster Keaton “The General” (1926)

Were it filmed today, the set piece of Buster Keaton’s The General (watch it online here) would surely be computer generated. The studio would insist upon that. We like to think Keaton, who both directed and starred, would fight them tooth and nail. Elaborate stunts thrilled him, and what could be more thrilling — or costly — than sending a 26-ton locomotive over a burning train trestle in hopes the structure would crumble, plunging the locomotive into the river below? The fact that ...
Tags: Facebook, Film, College, Oregon, History, Chamber of Commerce, Julien Smith, Keaton, Buster Keaton, American Film Institute, Cottage Grove, Row River, Ayun Halliday, Sennett, Marion Mack, Cottage Grove Oregon Sentinel


Who Invented Heavy Metal Music?: A Search for Origins

Where exactly did “heavy metal” start? Like a similar question—“what is the first rock and roll song?”–there’s not so much a direct answer as a spreading of ingredients over a number of years, all of which combine to create “heavy metal,” and its numerous sub-genres that have sprung forth from it. There’s not so much a year of origin as there is a year after which one cannot claim a beginning. (Now that’s a sentence!) If you’re confused, this quick history by Polyphonic will answer all o...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Heavy Metal, College, Paul Mccartney, Dick Dale, Pete Townshend, Zeppelin, KCRW, Ted Mills, Ian Gillan, Mario Bava, Parental Advisory Sticker, Religious Right Watch Heavy Metal Parking Lot, Pat Hare, Joe Hill Lewis


Foo Fighters Perform “Back in Black” with AC/DC’s Brian Johnson: When Live Music Returns

At Saturday’s benefit concert, “Vax Live: The Concert to Reunite the World,” the Foo Fighters took the stage and performed “Back in Black” with AC/DC’s Brian Johnson. It’s a tantalizing taste of the world to come, if we all do our part… Would you like to support the mission of Open Culture? Please consider making a donation to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners every...
Tags: Facebook, College, Uncategorized, Italy, Ac Dc, Brian Johnson, Rick Astley


Viral video gives ‘distorted’ picture of class confrontation, professor’s defenders say

Cypress College advised the professor vilified in a class video to remain silent, even as a potentially one-sided view of her encounter with a student went viral and resulted in death threats to the professor, according to social media posts by colleagues. In an attempt to set the record straight, those colleagues have taken to Facebook  and started a to raise money for the professor’s security. The GoFundMe campaign, “Help us protect Professor Faryha Salim,” has raised more than $3,700 to hel...
Tags: Facebook, Politics, News, Education, Congress, College, Stanford, Sport, Soccer, Higher Education, Colleges, Biden, Free Speech, Cal State Fullerton, Trump, Ellis


An Immersive Pink Floyd Museum Exhibition Is Coming to the U.S.: Get Tickets Online

While it’s not technically incorrect to call Pink Floyd a rock band, the term feels somehow unequal to the descriptive task at hand. One doesn’t so much listen to albums like The Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall as experience them, and this went even more so for their elaborate, increasingly colossal live performances. A retrospective of Pink Floyd’s history, which stretched back to 1965, must do justice to Pink Floyd’s transcendent ambition: this was the goal of Pink Floyd: Their Mort...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Bruce Springsteen, London, College, Los Angeles, History, Bbc, Pink Floyd, United States, Victoria, Salvador Dalí, Tristram Hunt, Seoul, Syd Barrett, Bedford


Japanese Carpenters Unearth 100-Year-Old Wood Joineries While Taking Apart a Traditional House

According to myth, the first Japanese poet, Susano-o, the storm god, named the activity of building as equal to the works of nature. Travel blog Kansai Odyssey writes, “Susano-o felt rather inspired” while at Suga Shrine in Shimane Prefecture, “and recited the first poem in Japanese literature.” Roughly translated, it reads: “In Izumo, where the clouds form, / I see a fence of clouds. / To protect my wife, I too, built a fence. / These clouds are as my fence.” An embrace of the natural w...
Tags: Facebook, Japan, College, Architecture, Josh Jones, IZUMO, Colin Marshall, Durham NC Follow, Iwakuni, Yamanashi, Susano, Dylan Iwakuni, Grace Ebert, Shimane Prefecture, Traditional House, Kansai Odyssey


Wendy Carlos Demonstrates the Moog Synthesizer on the BBC (1970)

We can break popular music into two periods: before the Moog and after the Moog. Upon its debut in 1964, that synthesizer made a big splash in the small but long-established electronic-music world by, among other innovative qualities, being smaller than an entire room. Over the next few years, inventor Bob Moog (whose previous line was in theremins) refined his eponymous brainchild to the point that it became accessible to composers not already on the cutting edge of music technology. Bu...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Technology, Television, College, Bbc, Stanley Kubrick, Seoul, Glenn Gould, Wendy, Carlos, Bach, Leonard Bernstein, Moog, BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Wendy Carlos


Watch “Colette,” the Oscar-Winning Short Documentary (2021)

Thanks to The Guardian, you can now watch online “Colette,” the film that recently won the Academy Award in the category of best documentary short. The British newspaper sets the stage as follows: 90-year-old Colette Marin-Catherine confronts her past by visiting the German concentration camp Mittelbau-Dora where her brother was killed. As a young girl, she fought Hitler’s Nazis as a member of the French Resistance. For 74 years, she has refused to step foot in Germany, but that changes ...
Tags: Facebook, Film, College, Germany, Hitler, Tijuana, Colette, Saul Bass, Lucie, Anthony Giacchino, Herb Alpert, Eric Hobsbawm, Colette Marin Catherine, Alice Doyard, Mittelbau Dora, Marin Catherine


Beautiful 19th-Century Indian Drawings Show Hatha Yoga Poses Before They Reached the West

Yoga as an athletic series of postures for physical health came into being only about 100 years ago, part of a wave of gymnastics and calisthenics that spread around the Western world in the 1920s and made its way to India, combining with classical Indian spirituality and asanas, a word which translates to “seat.”  Yoga, of course, had existed as a classical spiritual discipline in India for thousands of years. (The word is first found in the Rig Veda), but it had little to do with fitness, as ...
Tags: Health, Art, Facebook, Books, College, India, Religion, West, Pali, East, Henry David Thoreau, Swami Vivekananda, Singleton, Public Domain Review, Feuerstein, Mark Singleton


Watch Online Eric Hobsbawm: The Consolations of History, a Documentary Exploring the Life & Work of the Influential Historian

Courtesy of The London Review of Books, you can now watch Eric Hobsbawm: The Consolations of History: In this documentary, Anthony Wilks traces the connections between the events of Eric Hobsbawm’s life and the history he told, from his teenage years in Germany and his communist membership, to the jazz clubs of 1950s Soho and the makings of New Labour, taking in Italian bandits, Peruvian peasant movements and the development of nationalism in the modern world, with help from the assiduou...
Tags: Facebook, College, Germany, Uncategorized, Marx, Soho, David Harvey, Theodor Adorno, Eric Hobsbawm, Hobsbawm, Raymond Geuss, The London Review of Books, Anthony Wilks, Donald Sassoon



Filters
show more filters
March - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    
April - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  
May - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31