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John Prine’s Last Song Was Also His First to Go No. 1: Watch Him Perform “I Remember Everything”

It feels cosmically ironic that Great American Songwriter John Prine died of COVID-19 in early April, just before the U.S. response to the virus was developing into what may well be the Greatest Political Folly most Americans have ever witnessed in their lifetimes. Mass death for profit and power, colossal stupidity and bullying ignorance—these were just the kinds of things that got Prine’s wheels turning. His thoughts became folk poetry with teeth. Prine’s targets included the conservat...
Tags: Google, Music, College, America, Bill Murray, Leonard Cohen, Facebook Twitter, John Prine, NPR Music, Dave Cobb, Tom Petty, Josh Jones, Prine, Durham NC Follow, Zaleski, Annie Zaleski


Michael Jordan’s “The Last Dance” and Hero Worship: A Pretty Much Pop Culture Podcast Discussion (#50)

https://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/secure/partiallyexaminedlife/PMP_050_6-18-20.mp3 The 10-part ESPN documentary dissecting Michael Jordan and the Bulls' six championships has provided some much needed sports during the pandemic, roping in even sports haters with a mix of game highlights and behind-the-scenes drama. Your hosts Brian Hirt, Erica Spyres, and Mark Linsenmayer are joined by Seth from The Partially Examined Life to interrogate the event: Was it actually worth...
Tags: Google, Television, Podcasts, College, Sports, Michael Jordan, Espn, Jordan, Facebook Twitter, Bulls, Seth, Don Yaeger, Rob Schaefer, Mark Linsenmayer, Pretty Much Pop, Brian Hirt Erica Spyres


How Ornette Coleman Shaped the Jazz World: An Introduction to His Irreverent Sound

Ornette Coleman “arrived in New York in 1959,” writes Philip Clark, “with a white plastic saxophone and a set of ideas about improvisation that would shake jazz to its big apple core.” Every big name in jazz was doing something similar at the time, inventing new styles and languages. Coleman went further out there than anyone, infuriating and frustrating other jazz pioneers like Miles Davis. He called his theory “Harmolodics,” a Buckminster Fuller-like melding of “harmony,” “movement,” a...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Ornette Coleman, Coleman, Facebook Twitter, Clark, Josh Jones, Beefheart, Jacques Derrida, Miles Davis He, Durham NC Follow, Philosopher Jacques Derrida Interviews Jazz, Philip Clark, Lou Reed Which Lou Called


A 1947 French Film Accurately Predicted Our 21st-Century Addiction to Smartphones

When we watch a movie from, say, twenty years ago, it strikes us that both nothing and everything has changed. Apart from their slightly baggier clothes, the people look the same as us. But where are their phones? Compared to the recent past, the look of life today hasn't changed much, but thanks to the internet and even more so to smartphones, the feel has changed enormously. Most literary and cinematic predictions of the future got this exactly wrong, envisioning flamboyant aesthetic t...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Television, Film, College, Paris, William Gibson, Nikola Tesla, Seoul, Thomas Edison, Facebook Twitter, Gibson, Jules Verne, Isaac Asimov, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


How Two Teenage Dutch Sisters Ended Up Joining the Resistance and Assassinating Nazis During World War II

Germany invaded the Netherlands in 1940 and quickly overpowered the country’s small forces. Nazis arrested and deported Jews, created forced labor, strictly rationed food, and banned all non-Nazi organizations. “Almost every Dutch person was affected by the consequences of the occupation,” the Verzets Resistance Museum writes. “The choices and dilemmas facing the population became more far reaching.” Often those choices were stark: Collaborate and live? Or resist and willingly put onesel...
Tags: Google, Europe, College, Germany, Nazis, History, Netherlands, Albert Camus, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Freddie, Haarlem, Rossen, Durham NC Follow, Hannie, Truus


When the Beatles Refused to Play Before Segregated Audiences on Their First U.S. Tour (1964)

When American rock and roll made its way to the UK in the 1950s and 60s, along with a burgeoning folk and blues revival, many young British fans hadn’t been conditioned to think of music in the same way as their U.S. counterparts. “Unlike racially segregated Americans,” for example, “the Beatles didn’t see—or hear—the difference between Elvis and Chuck Berry,” writes Joseph Tirella, “between the Everly Brothers and the Marvelettes.” They also couldn’t see playing to segregated audien...
Tags: Google, Music, Florida, UK, College, John Lennon, US, Paul Mccartney, Elvis, Beatles, Mccartney, Ron Howard, Jacksonville, South, Facebook Twitter, Little Rock


Rewatch Every Episode of The Sopranos with the Talking Sopranos Podcast, Hosted by Michael Imperioli & Steve Schirripa

The Sopranos premiered on January 10, 1999, and television did not change forever — or rather, not right away. Though its treatment of the life of mid-level New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano drew large numbers of dedicated viewers right away, few could have imagined during the show's eight-year run how completely its success would eventually rewrite the rules of dramatic TV. More than twenty years later, nearly all of us place the beginning of our ongoing televisual "golden age" at the br...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Television, Podcasts, College, New Jersey, David Chase, James Gandolfini, Seoul, Tony, Jamie Lynn Sigler, Facebook Twitter, Michael Imperioli, Tony Soprano, Matt Zoller Seitz, Edie Falco


An Immaculate Copy of Leonardo’s The Last Supper Digitized by Google: View It in High Resolution Online

Romantic poets told us that great art is eternal and transcendent. They also told us everything made by human hands is bound to end in ruin and decay. Both themes were inspired by the rediscovery and renewed fascination for the arts of antiquity in Europe and Egypt. It was a time of renewed appreciation for monumental works of art, which happened to coincide with a period when they came under considerable threat from looters, vandals, and invading armies. One work of art that appeared on the it...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, England, Milan, College, Egypt, Royal Academy of Arts, Brazil, Notre Dame, Napoleon, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci, National Museum, Leonardo, Leonardo da Vinci


The Beastie Boys & Rick Rubin Reunite and Revisit Their Formative Time Together in 1980s NYC

The Beastie Boys’ record-shattering Licensed to Ill is thirty-four years old. This fact might mean nothing to you, or it might mean that you are thirty-four years older than the moment the album came out in November of 1986, and suburban parents around the country, maybe even your parents, freaked out in unison. The album was a stroke of genius from producer Rick Rubin, delivering hip-hop safe for white kids while also giving them permission to be as obnoxious as possible. Ostensibly a r...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Brooklyn, Slayer, Ill, Spike Jonze, Nme, Nyu, Kerry King, PAUL, Zeppelin, Facebook Twitter, Perry, Rick Rubin, Josh Jones


Milton Glaser (RIP) Explains Why We Must Overcome the Fear of Failure, Take Risks & Discover Our True Potential

Milton Glaser died last week at the age of 91, a long life that included decade upon decade as the best-known name in graphic design. Within the profession he became as well-known as several of his designs did in the wider world: the Bob Dylan poster, logos for companies like DC Comics, the Glaser Stencil font, and above all  I ? NY. Glaser may have become an icon, but he didn't become a brand — "one of my most despised words," he says in the interview clip above. He also acknowledges tha...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, Life, Bob Dylan, Pablo Picasso, Seoul, Samuel Beckett, Picasso, Saul Bass, Facebook Twitter, Glaser, Paulo Coelho, Milton Glaser, Colin Marshall


Behold Octavia Butler’s Motivational Notes to Self

Handwritten notes on the inside cover of one of Octavia E. Butler’s commonplace books, 1988 I was attracted to science fiction because it was so wide open. I was able to do anything and there were no walls to hem you in and there was no human condition that you were stopped from examining. —Octavia E. Butler Like many authors, the late Octavia E. Butler took up writing at a young age. At 11, she was churning out tales about horses and romance. At 12, she saw Devil Girl from Mars, and figured (c...
Tags: Google, Books, Writing, College, K-12, New York Times, Literature, Mars, Pluto, Harlan Ellison, Facebook Twitter, Butler, MacArthur, Octavia Butler, Austin Kleon Related Content, Clarion Science Fiction Writing Workshop


Milton Glaser (RIP) Presents 10 Rules for Life & Work: Wisdom from the Celebrated Designer

“None of us has really the ability to understand our path until it’s over,” the celebrated graphic designer Milton Glaser (RIP) muses less than a minute into the above video. Glaser’s many contributions to pop culture---the  I ? NY logo, the psychedelic portrait of a rainbow-haired Bob Dylan, DC Comics’ classic bullet logo---confer undeniable authority. To the outside eye, he seems to have had a pretty firm handle on the path he traveled for lo these many decades. Aspirant designers would d...
Tags: Google, Design, College, Life, Vietnam, Aiga, Marx, John Cage, Don, Facebook Twitter, Glaser, Milton Glaser, Roger Rosenblatt, Bob Dylan DC Comics, Milton Glaser Dieter Rams, Brian Eno Ayun Halliday


Who really benefits from reskilling?

Nearly 40 million Americans are unemployed, and a recent study that examined more than 66,000 tech job layoffs found that sales and customer success roles are most vulnerable amid COVID-19. In response, some quarters of Silicon Valley are abuzz about a long-standing technology: reskilling, or training individuals to adopt an entirely new skillset or career for employment. As millions look for a way to reenter the workforce, the question arises: Who really benefits from reskilling technology? Tha...
Tags: Google, Work, Startups, TC, Layoffs, Education, Tech, Silicon Valley, Talent, Edtech, Herrera, David Blake, Degreed, The New York Times Now, Extra Crunch, Coronavirus


Saxophonist Plays into Large Gas Pipes & Then Uses the Echo to Accompany Himself

The best saxophonists play just as well unaccompanied as they do accompanied — but they also know that, in the act of musical creation, it certainly helps to have even a little bit of sound to play off coming your way. German musician Armin Küpper discovered more than a little bit of sound coming his way when he tried playing his saxophone into a gas pipe he happened across near his home. Kept at a construction site and not currently in a state to pipe any gas, it served him as a kind of...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Miles Davis, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Gerry Rafferty, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Armin Küpper, Pipelinefunk, Pipelineblues, Küpper, Instagram Saxophonist Plays


Explore 1,100 Works of Art by Georgia O’Keeffe: They’re Now Digitized and Free to View Online

Lake George Reflection (circa 1921) via Wikimedia Commons What comes to mind when you think of Georgia O’Keeffe? Bleached skulls in the desert? Aerial views of clouds, almost cartoonish in their puffiness? Voluptuous flowers (freighted with an erotic charge the artist may not have intended)? Probably not Polaroid prints of a dark haired pet chow sprawled on flagstones… Or watercolor sketches of demurely pretty ladies... Or a massive cast iron abstraction… If your knowledge of America’s most cel...
Tags: Google, Art, College, America, Georgia, K-12, Polaroid, Gene Hackman, Facebook Twitter, Dole, Alfred Stieglitz, O'Keeffe, Georgia O'Keeffe, Juan Hamilton, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Hawaiian Pineapple Company


Nile Rodgers Tells the Story of How He Turned David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance” from Folk to New Wave Funk

When David Bowie invited Chic guitarist and all-around funk/disco guitar genius Nile Rodgers to make an album of “hits” in Switzerland, Rogers remembers thinking, “okay, ‘hits’ with David Bowie, that’s an awesome project.” The way he deadpans might make us think he wasn’t super stoked about it, but the fact is, it’s hard to impress Nile Rodgers. He has produced, written, and played guitar—the very Stratocaster he’s holding in the video above—on “hundreds, maybe thousands” of records, he ...
Tags: Google, Music, Texas, College, David, David Bowie, Switzerland, Npr, Nile Rodgers, Rogers, Bowie, Facebook Twitter, Rodgers, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow


Meet features help engage students and moderate classes

This year, as educators conducted class remotely, the equivalent of over 1,300 years of learning took place each day on Google Meet. With more than 140 million educators and students now using G Suite for Education worldwide to create, collaborate and communicate, many more schools and educators are using Meet to stay connected. We’re excited to share some Meet features that will be launching later this year to help educators improve moderation and engagement in remote or hybrid learning environ...
Tags: Google, Education, Meet, G Suite for Education, G Suite Enterprise for Education, Arpit Guglani, Meet For G Suite Enterprise for Education


Get a First Glimpse of Foundation, the New TV Series Being Adapted from Isaac Asimov’s Iconic Series of Novels

Five years ago we told you about the plans to create a mini-series out of Isaac Asimov’s classic sci-fi series Foundation, while also pointing you in the direction of the 1973 BBC radio dramatization. Back in 2015, Jonathan Nolan, brother of Christopher, was attached and HBO was set to produce. And then we all forgot about it. (Well I did, anyway.) Fast forward into the COVID tsunami of this week and AppleTV just dropped the first trailer for the series. Nolan is out and David Goyer is i...
Tags: Google, Hbo, Television, College, Bbc, United States, Ireland, Sci Fi, Nolan, David Goyer, Lee Pace, Facebook Twitter, Christopher, Gaal, Nero, KCRW


Creating more inclusive classrooms

Education is a critical element of our ongoing commitments to racial equity. Classrooms offer a space to imagine and encourage a more equitable and just future. This is not new work, but following the heinous deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and many other Black members of our communities, there’s an even greater sense of urgency to make progress toward creating this future together. Building on last year’s $5 million Google.org grant to help DonorsChoose launch #ISeeMe—an ...
Tags: Google, Education, America, Black, Google.org, HANNAH, DonorsChoose, Latinx, George Floyd Ahmaud Arbery Breonna Taylor, Ed Trust


Hear Brian Eno’s Rarely-Heard Cover of the Johnny Cash Classic, “Ring of Fire”

"Ring of Fire" has been covered many times and in many ways since Johnny Cash released it in 1963. But for all its recognition as one of his signature songs, Cash's "Ring of Fire" is itself a cover — or another interpretation, in any case, of a tune originally written by Cash's wife June Carter and songwriter Merle Kilgore for June's sister, Anita Carter. Though it made nothing like the mark Cash's recording did, the original "Ring of Fire" has its appreciators, a group that may well inc...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Atlantic, Bob Marley, Brian Eno, Seoul, Eno, John Cale, Cale, Facebook Twitter, Woodbridge, Johnny Cash, David Pescovitz, June Carter


Hear the Voices of Americans Born in Slavery: The Library of Congress Features 23 Audio Interviews with Formerly Enslaved People (1932-75)

“During the last three decades of legal slavery in America,” writes Lucinda MacKethan at the National Humanities Center, “African American writers perfected one of the nation’s first truly indigenous genres of written literature: the North American slave narrative.” These heavily mediated memoirs were the only real firsthand accounts of slavery most Americans outside the South encountered. Their authors were urged by abolitionist publishers to adopt conventions of the sentimental novel, ...
Tags: Google, Congress, College, America, History, Atlantic, Libraries, South, Douglas, Charlie Smith, Facebook Twitter, Jacobs, Harriet Jacobs, Charlottesville Virginia, Josh Jones, Zora Neale Hurston


The End of an Era: A Short Film About The Last Day of Hot Metal Typesetting at The New York Times (1978)

This is usually what happens when I write a piece for Open Culture: As I drink an overpriced coffee at my local coffee shop, I research a topic on the internet, write and edit an article on Microsoft Word and then copy and paste the whole thing into WordPress. My editor in Open Culture’s gleaming international headquarters up in San Francisco gives it a look-over and then, with the push of a button, publishes the article on the site. It’s sobering to think what I casually do over the course...
Tags: Google, Technology, Microsoft, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, San Francisco, History, New York Times, The New York Times, Times, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Friedrich Nietzsche, Linotype, Jonathan Crow


Martin Amis Explains His Method for Writing Great Sentences

Why does Martin Amis writes sentences well? As a novelist, he naturally has a high degree of professional interest in the matter. But why does he write sentences so well? One might put forth the influence of his father Kingsley Amis, author of Lucky Jim, an enduring contender for the title of the funniest novel in the English language. But given how seldom one acclaimed novelist sires another — an event, in fact, nearly unheard of — the heritability of literary talent remains unknowable....
Tags: Google, Facebook, Writing, College, Uganda, Literature, Martin Amis, Seoul, Kingsley Amis, Martin, Kingsley, Facebook Twitter, Jim, Scott Fitzgerald, Nietzsche, Chicago Humanities Festival


Neil Armstrong Sets Straight an Internet Truther Who Accused Him of Faking the Moon Landing (2000)

Image via Wikimedia Commons People have been graduating from college this year who are as old as the role of internet truther. It is a venerable hobby (some might call it a disease) leading to increasing numbers of people to bizarre conclusions drawn from dubious evidence proffered by spurious sources; people convinced that some wild allegation or other must be true because they saw it on the Internet, shared by people they knew and liked. Twenty years ago, one pioneering truther wrote Mr. Neil...
Tags: Google, Science, College, Nasa, Letters, Neil Armstrong, Facebook Twitter, Armstrong, Josh Jones, Whitman, Wikimedia Commons People, Durham NC Follow, Stanley Kubrick Faked


How Georgia O’Keeffe Became Georgia O’Keeffe: An Animated Video Tells the Story

When Georgia O’Keeffe first saw the home in Abiquiú, in Northern New Mexico that she would purchase from the Catholic Church in 1945 “the 5,000-square-foot compound was in ruins,” writes the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. The artist immediately seized on its potential: “As I climbed and walked about in the ruin,” she remembers, “I found a patio with a very pretty well house and bucket to draw up water. It was a good-sized patio with a long wall with a door on one side. That wall with a door in...
Tags: Google, Art, New York, College, Georgia, Catholic Church, Van Gogh, Southwest, Facebook Twitter, Gogh, Josh Jones, Abiquiu, Alfred Stieglitz, Frida Kahlo, O'Keeffe, Taos


Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #49 Considers Conspiracy Theories as Pop

https://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/secure/partiallyexaminedlife/PMP_049_6-13-20.mp3 Ex-philosopher Al Baker works at the UK-based Logically, a company that fights misinformation. He joins your hosts Mark Linsenmayer, Erica Spyres, and Brian Hirt to try to answer such questions as: What's the appeal of conspiracy theories? How similar is being consumed them to being a die-hard fan of some pop culture property? What's the relation between pernicious conspiracy theories and...
Tags: Google, Politics, UK, Podcasts, College, Bbc, Cia, Conspiracy Theories, Mel Gibson, Elvis, Facebook Twitter, Matt Miller, Hugh Gusterson, Craig Silverman, Karl Popper, al Baker


Iterative Coordination and Innovation

Do Agile methodologies promote innovation? Results of a field experiment with Google show that increasing the frequency and goal orientation of stand-up meetings reinforces integration and value but reduces specialization and novelty in outcomes. [Author: by Sourobh Ghosh and Andy Wu]
Tags: Google, College, Andy Wu, by Sourobh Ghosh and Andy Wu, Sourobh Ghosh


The World According to Le Corbusier: An Animated Introduction to the Most Modern of All Architects

Among modern architects, was any architect ever so modernity-minded as Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, better known a Le Corbusier? Like many cultural figures well-known outside their field — Franz Kafka, George Orwell, David Lynch — his name has long since been adjectivized, though nowadays the term "Corbusian" is seldom used as a compliment. Many a self-described opponent of modern architecture, whatever they consider modern architecture to be, points to Le Corbusier as the originator of al...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Europe, College, History, Architecture, Animation, Paris, Manhattan, Unite, Seoul, Marseilles, Frank Lloyd Wright, Facebook Twitter, Le Corbusier, Right Bank


A new way for coaches to strengthen their practice

Educators around the world have been increasingly relying on technology for distance learning. For many, this transition wasn’t easy, and is a reminder that professional development is critical. One way schools can support educators is through instructional coaches, who work hand-in-hand with educators to help them achieve their teaching and learning goals with technology. That's why we created the Google for Education Certified Coach Program—to help instructional coaches become even more effect...
Tags: Google, Education, Amanda Del Balso, Google for Education Certified Coach Program, Google for Education Certified Coach


Watch Hundreds of Free Films from Around the World: Explore Film Archives from Japan, France, and the U.S.

While the world retreated indoors in March, and the cinemas we knew and loved closed up shop, so many film libraries have turned around and opened up their archives to the world. This is a good thing. Don’t say you have nothing to watch! We have explored all the links below and can verify that they are all indeed free to watch. Some are even free to download. Here’s a brief rundown of some we’ve found: The National Film Registry of the Library of Congress The Library of Congress annually selects...
Tags: Google, Japan, Congress, Film, Australia, College, Orson Welles, Seo, House, Paris, New Zealand, Harlem Globetrotters, Frank Gehry, Eiffel Tower, Johnson, Puerto Rico



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