Education


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The Charlie Chaplin Archive Opens, Putting Online 30,000 Photos & Documents from the Life of the Iconic Film Star

Charlie Chaplin knew his movies were popular, but could he have imagined that we'd still be watching them now, as the 130th anniversary of his birth approaches? And even if he could, he surely wouldn't have guessed that even the materials of his long working life would draw great fascination in the 21st century — much less that they would be made instantaneously available to the entire world on a site like the Charlie Chaplin Archive. A project of the Fondazione Cineteca di Bologna, which has p...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, Film, Bali, College, History, Switzerland, Seoul, Jean Cocteau, Charlie Chaplin, Facebook Twitter, Chaplin, Cocteau, Rube Goldberg Machine, Colin Marshall


Take a Journey Inside Vincent Van Gogh’s Paintings with a New Digital Exhibition

Vincent van Gogh died in 1890, long before the emergence of any of the visual technologies that impress us here in the 21st century. But the distinctive vision of reality expressed through paintings still captivates us, and perhaps captivates us more than ever: the latest of the many tributes we continue to pay to van Gogh's art takes the form Van Gogh, Starry Night, a "digital exhibition" at the Atelier des Lumières, a disused foundry turned projector- and sound system-laden multimedia space i...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, Technology, College, Paris, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh, Auvers, Colin Marshall, Van Gogh Starry Night, 21st Century Los Angeles


Alan Watts Presents a 15-Minute Guided Meditation: A Time-Tested Way to Stop Thinking About Thinking

The concept of emptiness—sh?nyat?—in Mahayana Buddhism is perhaps a subject best avoided in casual conversation. It so vexes everyone not least because of issues of translation: "emptiness," many scholars think, hardly suffices as a substitute. In English it has a more distinctly nihilist flavor than was intended. Yet emptiness is so indispensable that it can hardly go unmentioned when the practice and purpose of meditation come up in Buddhist thought. Leave it to Zen to put things in su...
Tags: Google, Japan, Zen, California, College, Religion, San Francisco, Britain, Philosophy, Buddhist, Watts, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Suzuki, Mahayana, Alan Watts


Sleep or Die: Neuroscientist Matthew Walker Explains How Sleep Can Restore or Imperil Our Health

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could fix the work/life thing by chucking out the difference? At home, you're in the office, at the office, you're at home, always on and never off—sleep, optional. Two-four hours per 24-hour cycle should be enough, right? Wrong. We need proper sleep like we need good food, low stress, engaging pursuits, etc.—to thrive and live a long and happy life. If you wait until you’re dead to sleep, you’ll be dead sooner than you think. “Short sleep predicts a shorter lif...
Tags: Health, Google, Japan, College, Neuroscience, The Guardian, World Health Organisation, Rsa, Brian Eno, Facebook Twitter, Walker, Cooke, Josh Jones, Rachel Cooke, Terry Gross, Matthew Walker


Van Gogh’s Ugliest Masterpiece: A Break Down of His Late, Great Painting, The Night Café (1888)

Ask passersby to name a Vincent van Gogh painting off the top of their heads, and most will come up with works like The Starry Night, The Potato Eaters, one of his self-portraits (probably with his ear bandaged), or maybe the one with the smoking skeleton David Sedaris used for a book cover. How many will mention 1888's The Night Café, an interior, van Gogh wrote to his brother Theo from Arles (the town in the south of France where he had come in search of Japan-like surroundings), "of t...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, France, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Edward Hopper, Vincent, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh, David Sedaris, Evan Puschak, Theo


Baked cod, miso and bok choy: unpacking the world's healthiest school lunches

Japan’s state-run kyushoku system combines flavour with fresh ingredients and high nutritional value at low costThe list of dishes reads like a health-conscious menu at an upmarket cafe: mackerel cooked in miso, a light salad of daikon radish and sour plum, thinly sliced pickled vegetables and a selection of fresh fruit. But the “restaurant” is actually a classroom at Konan primary school in central Japan, where the pupils need only the gentlest encouragement to eat their greens.When the Guardia...
Tags: Food, Japan, Nutrition, Education, Children, World news, Asia Pacific, Pacific, Konan, Fukuroi


Baked cod, miso and bok choy: unpacking Japan's healthy school lunches

Japan’s state-run kyushoku system combines flavour with fresh ingredients and high nutritional value at low costThe list of dishes reads like a health-conscious menu at an upmarket cafe: mackerel cooked in miso, a light salad of daikon radish and sour plum, thinly sliced pickled vegetables and a selection of fresh fruit. But the “restaurant” is actually a classroom at Konan primary school in central Japan, where the pupils need only the gentlest encouragement to eat their greens.When the Guardia...
Tags: Food, Japan, Nutrition, Education, Children, World news, Asia Pacific, Pacific, Konan, Fukuroi


Finland’s education system is failing. Should we look to Asia?

Finland scored high on the original PISA education assessment, but its scores have slipped in recent years.Critics argue that Finland's success came from earlier education models, not from headline-making features like late start times, lack of homework, and absence of test assessment.Asia's rigorous education system is now eclipsing Finland's PISA scores. Which approach is the right one? Which is truly shortsighted? None In 2000, the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) released...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Japan, Education, Society, Taiwan, Policy, Teaching, United States, Testing, Innovation, Cambridge, Finland, OECD, Fareed Zakaria, The Washington Post


All that glitters not gold? Criticisms of Finland’s education system.

Finland scored high on the original PISA education assessment, but its scores have slipped in recent years.Critics argue that Finland's success came from earlier education models, not from headline-making features like late start times, lack of homework, and absence of test assessment.Asia's rigorous education system is now eclipsing Finland's PISA scores. Which approach is the right one? Which is truly shortsighted? None In 2000, the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) released...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Japan, Education, Society, Taiwan, Policy, Teaching, United States, Testing, Innovation, Cambridge, Finland, OECD, Fareed Zakaria, The Washington Post


Alice in Wonderland, Hamlet, and A Christmas Carol Written in Shorthand (Circa 1919)

For hundreds of years before the regular use of dictation machines, word processors, and computers, many thousands of court records, correspondence, journalism, and so on circulated in translation. All of these texts were originally in their native language, but they were transcribed in a different writing system, then translated back into the standard orthography, by stenographers using various kinds of shorthand. In English, this meant that a mess of irregular, phonetically nonsensical spellin...
Tags: Google, Books, Japan, Greece, Writing, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Rome, Literature, Lewis Carroll, Shakespeare, Alice, Pepys, Facebook Twitter, Cicero, Europe North America


Watch Bauhaus World, a Free Documentary That Celebrates the 100th Anniversary of Germany’s Legendary Art, Architecture & Design School

This April 1st marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus, the German art school that, though short-lived, launched an entire design movement with a stark, functional aesthetic all its own. It can be tempting, looking into that aesthetic that finds the beauty in industry and the industry in beauty, to regard it as purely a product of its time and place, specifically a 20th-century Europe between the wars searching for ways to invent the future. But as revealed in Bauhaus ...
Tags: Google, Europe, Japan, Design, London, College, Mexico, Germany, Architecture, Tokyo, Nazi, Detroit, Seoul, Bauhaus, Amman, Deutsche Welle


The Mastermind of Devo, Mark Mothersbaugh, Presents His Personal Synthesizer Collection

Mark Mothersbaugh’s studio is located in a cylindrical structure painted bright green - it looks more like a festive auto part than an office building. It's a fitting place for the iconoclast musician. For those of you who didn’t spend your childhoods obsessively watching the early years of MTV, Mark Mothersbaugh was the mastermind behind the band Devo. They skewered American conformity by dressing alike in shiny uniforms and their music was nervy, twitchy and weird. They taught a nation th...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Japan, Hollywood, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Mtv, Jesus, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Devo, Mothersbaugh, Mark Mothersbaugh, Bob Moog


How Asian Colleges are Different From American Colleges

If you're studying abroad in Asia, here's what you need to know. Asia is the largest continent on the planet, rich with different cultures and filled with more than four billion people. This, naturally, makes it an appealing study abroad destination. But obviously it's important to know the cultural differences and what to expect before going there. Because you will be studying on a college campus, whether through an international partnership of your school or through a faculty-led program, kno...
Tags: Asia, South Korea, Japan, Indonesia, College, China, India, US, University, Thailand, United States, Philippines, Colleges, Study Abroad, College Life, American College Football


A History of the Entire World in Less Than 20 Minutes

Thanks for watching history. I hope I mentioned everything. - Bill Wurtz Here at Open Culture, we happily acknowledge that learning is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. The internet may be doing a number on our attention spans, but as the world has grown smaller, the educational buffet has grown richer, more varied, and vastly more affordable. Take for example the History of the World. Geography fans can approach the subject via Ollie Bye's year-by-year animated map. John Green’s play...
Tags: Google, Japan, Technology, Microsoft, College, New York City, Time, History, World, Egypt, Animation, Vine, Columbia University, John Green, Facebook Twitter, Tigris


The Real Locations of Ukiyo-e, Historic Japanese Woodblock Prints, Plotted on a Google Map

The undisputed last great master of ukiyo-e was Utagawa Hiroshige. He is best known for the many series he created of bucolic landscapes, which offered collectors a chance to see parts of Japan they might never reach. The Japan of his early 19th century work holds a special place in Japanese hearts--a final look at an isolated and beautiful country just before the opening up of the ports to the West and, with it, industrialization. Apart from Mount Fuji, the locations that Hiroshige drew have l...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Kyoto, George, DEWA, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Mount Fuji, Kanazawa, Google Map, Ted Mills, Hiroshige


Mountain Monks: A Vivid Short Documentary on the Monks Who Practice an Ancient, Once-Forbidden Religion in Japan

If you need to get some serious thinking done, go to the mountains. That notion holds across a wide range of cultures, but it has a particular force in Japan, where solo hiking, sometimes greatly extended solo hiking, has long been a popular treatment for a wide variety of troubles both personal and professional. But no group has taken it to quite the extreme as have the Yamabushi, ascetic mountain hermits who have practiced Shugend?, a hybridization of versions of esoteric Buddhism, Taoism...
Tags: Google, Japan, Film, College, Religion, Seoul, Schumann, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Yamagata, Fritz Schumann, 21st Century Los Angeles, Yamabushi, Facebook Mountain


Nutritional Psychiatry: Why Diet May Play an Essential Role in Treating Mental Health Conditions, Including Depression, Anxiety & Beyond

For years neuroscientists have been trying to correct the old assumption that our minds are reducible to our brains. Research into what is known as the gut microbiome, for example, has shown that mood and mental health are intimately linked to the functioning of an ecosystem of microorganisms within the digestive system. As researchers write in the Journal of Neuroscience, “experimental changes to the gut microbiome can affect emotional behavior and related brain systems [and] may play a...
Tags: Health, Google, Japan, College, Stanford, Harvard, Food & Drink, Johns Hopkins, Mediterranean, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Roland Griffiths, Durham NC Follow, Robert Sapolsky, Harvard Health Blog, Selhub


Around the world and back with Google for Education

Editor’s note: This week, we’re joining thousands of educators and students at BETT in London. Visit us at booth C230, where you can demo a range of Chromebooks designed for education, including the brand new Chrome OS tablet. Follow along on Twitter and Facebook for the latest news and updates. It started with an idea in 2006: how might teaching and learning improve if we brought Google’s suite of productivity tools to schools? 13 years later, there are 80 million educators and students arou...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Europe, Japan, UK, London, Education, Australia, Mexico, Asia Pacific, Dartmouth, New Zealand, Brazil, Google Docs, Canberra, North America


A Page of Madness: The Lost, Avant Garde Masterpiece from Early Japanese Cinema (1926)

It’s a sad fact that the vast majority of silent movies in Japan have been lost thanks to human carelessness, earthquakes and the grim efficiency of the United States Air Force. The first films of hugely important figures like Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujiro Ozu, and Hiroshi Shimizu have simply vanished. So we should consider ourselves fortunate that Teinosuke Kinugasa’s Kuretta Ippei -- a 1926 film known in the States as A Page of Madness -- has somehow managed to survive the vagaries of fate. Kinuga...
Tags: Google, Japan, Yahoo, Film, College, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Akira Kurosawa, States, Born, Cabinet, Page, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, United States Air Force, Abel Gance


Download Vincent van Gogh’s Collection of 500 Japanese Prints, Which Inspired Him to Create “the Art of the Future”

Vincent van Gogh never went to Japan, but he did spend quite a bit of time in Arles, which he considered the Japan of France. What made him think of the place that way had to do entirely with aesthetics. The Netherlands-born painter had moved to Paris in 1886, but two years later he set off for the south of France in hopes of finding real-life equivalents of the "clearness of the atmosphere and the gay colour effects" of Japanese prints. These days, we've all seen at least a few examples of tha...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, Microsoft, College, France, Paris, Netherlands, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Vincent, Simon Schama, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Theo


Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Competing Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books

By now we've all heard of Marie Kondo, the Japanese home-organization guru whose book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up became an international bestseller in 2011. Her advice about how to straighten up the home, branded the "KonMari" method, has more recently landed her that brass ring of early 21st-century fame, her own Netflix series. A few years ago we featured her tips for dealing with your piles of reading material, which, like all her advice, are based on discarding the items t...
Tags: Google, Books, Japan, Washington Post, College, Netflix, Seoul, Tupperware, Facebook Twitter, Marie Kondo, Kondo, Colin Marshall, Ron Charles, Anakana Schofield, 21st Century Los Angeles, Schofield Charles


Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Two Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books

By now we've all heard of Marie Kondo, the Japanese home-organization guru whose book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up became an international bestseller in 2011. Her advice about how to straighten up the home, branded the "KonMari" method, has more recently landed her that brass ring of early 21st-century fame, her own Netflix series. A few years ago we featured her tips for dealing with your piles of reading material, which, like all her advice, are based on discarding the items t...
Tags: Google, Books, Japan, Washington Post, College, Netflix, Seoul, Tupperware, Facebook Twitter, Marie Kondo, Kondo, Colin Marshall, Ron Charles, Anakana Schofield, 21st Century Los Angeles, Schofield Charles


Artist Hand-Cuts an Intricate Octopus From a Single Piece of Paper: Discover the Japanese Art of Kirie

At first glance, the octopus in the video above might appear to be breathing. A second look reveals that it isn't actually breathing, nor is it actually an octopus at all, but seemingly just a highly detailed drawing of one. Only upon the third look, if even then, does it become clear that the octopus has been not drawn but intricately cut, and out of a single large sheet of paper at that. The two-dimensional sea creature represents a recent high point in the work of Japanese artist Masa...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, Seoul, Osaka, Facebook Twitter, Waldman, Fukuda, Colin Marshall, Spoon Tamago, 21st Century Los Angeles, Kirie, Johnny Waldman, Masayo Fukuda, TANT


The Moonlight Sonata But the Bass Is a Bar Late, and the Melody Is a Bar Early

From composer and electronic musician Isaac Schankler comes an experimental take on Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. As the title says, the bass is a bar late and the melody is a bar early. Sheet music for the experiment can be found here. And some of Schankler's more serious compositions here. Follow Open Culture on Facebook and   Twitter and  share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox.  If y...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Japan, College, Beethoven, Random, Facebook Twitter, Isaac Schankler, Schankler


Studying in Berlin: 4 International Students Share Their Experience

Deciding to move away from your home country to study abroad can probably be one of the most difficult decisions in your life. Choosing the right city is not about spinning the globe with eyes closed and dropping a finger on a random destination. Unfortunately, the choice is way more complicated, and even if it is not easy to realize it at the very start, it can be literally life-changing. Sending applications to university in other countries means to gradually plan your future and to figure out...
Tags: Fashion, Japan, Greece, Education, Study, Berlin, US, People, University, Italy, Stories, Student, Istanbul, Alice, Expat, Michael


See Classic Japanese Woodblocks Brought Surreally to Life as Animated GIFs

Much of the image we have of life in Japan in the 17th through the 19th century, we have because of woodblock prints, or specifically ukiyo-e, or "pictures of the floating world," which vividly capture a great variety of scenes and the people who inhabited them. The once-closed-off Japan has changed a great deal since that era, on most levels even more so than other countries, and the artistic portrayals of Japanese life have also multiplied enormously. Yet even in the 21st century, ukiyo-e con...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Japan, London, College, Animation, Seoul, Osaka, Marty Mcfly, Facebook Twitter, Yoshida, Kanazawa, Doc Brown, Hokusai, Utagawa Hiroshige


How the Astonishing Sushi Scene in Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs Was Animated: A Time-Lapse of the Month-Long Shoot

Since the moviegoing public first started hearing it twenty years ago, Wes Anderson's name has been a byword for cinematic meticulousness. The association has only grown stronger with each film he's made, as the live-action ones have featured increasingly complex ships, trains, and grand hotels — to say nothing of the costumes worn and accoutrements possessed by the characters who inhabit them — and the stop-motion animated ones have demanded a superhuman attention to detail by their ver...
Tags: Google, Japan, Film, College, Fox, Food & Drink, Animation, Wes Anderson, Akira Kurosawa, Grand Budapest Hotel, Seoul, Anderson, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Isle of Dogs, Wes Anderson Yasujiro Ozu


Two more Japanese medical schools admit discriminating against women

Sexism row deepens as one university claims women ‘mature faster’ and male applicants need extra helpA sexism row engulfing Japan’s medical schools has deepened after two more universities admitted discriminating against female applicants, months after it was revealed that Tokyo Medical University had manipulated exam scores to favour male candidates.Juntendo University and Kitasato University, both in Tokyo, said this week that they had set a lower pass mark for men than for women in order to s...
Tags: Japan, Education, Women, World news, Asia Pacific, Higher Education, Tokyo, Juntendo University, Kitasato University, Tokyo Medical University


The Strange History of Smooth Jazz: The Music We All Know and Love … to Hate

It’s the most unloved and derided of music genres, but the history of Smooth Jazz is not as bad as you might think. In another chapter of Vox’s excellent Earworm series (see Chapter 1 here and Chapter 2 here), Estelle Caswell explores the rise and fall of this modern day elevator music and asks if it’s worth reconsidering. The undisputed star of smooth jazz has to be the “Songbird” himself, the frizzy-hair be-coifed Kenny G. (The only part of the video I took issue with is when one fan i...
Tags: Google, Music, Japan, College, Los Angeles, Broadway, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Vox, Kenny G, Montgomery, Clinton, Benson, Wes Montgomery, Coltrane, Facebook Twitter


Want to Learn How to Sew? These Are the Best Youtube Sewing Channels to Teach You

They're 'sew' good! With New Year's coming up, there's no better time to start a new hobby. Why not try sewing? As you may know, I learned how to sew from Youtube, and there's no reason you couldn't do the same. But where should you start?Although there's a wealth of information out there, I've handpicked these five channels because to me, they stood out over the rest with their creativity, easy-to-follow teaching, focus of staying green, or overall style.Here are my top 5 best sewing channels ...
Tags: Topshop, Japan, Diy, Youtube, College, Sewing, College Life, Wendy Wendy, Angela Clayton Angela Clayton, Annika Victoria Annika



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