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Posts filtered by tags: Josh Jones[x]


 

A 5-Hour Walking Tour of Paris and Its Famous Streets, Monuments & Parks

&start=20 “We’ll always have Paris,” Bogart tells Bergman in the final scene of Casablanca, a line and film inseparable from the grand mythology of Paris. The city still inspires non-Parisians to purchase Belle Epoque poster art by the shipload and binge Netflix series in which Paris looks like a “city where the clouds part, your brain clears, and your soul finds meaning,” Alex Abad-Santos writes at Vox. It’s also a place in such media where one can seem to find “success without much sacr...
Tags: Travel, Facebook, College, France, Netflix, Paris, Eiffel Tower, Vox, Casablanca, Parks, Gertrude Stein, Montmartre, Belle Epoque, Hemingway, Les Halles, James Baldwin


The Utopian, Socialist Designs of Soviet Cities

Modernist architecture transformed the modern city in the 20th century, for good and ill. Nowhere is this transformation more evident than the former Soviet Union and its former republics. There, we find truth in the western stereotypes of the Soviet city as cold, faceless, and soul-crushingly nondescript — so much so that the plot of a 1975 Russian TV film called The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, hinges on a man drunkenly traveling to Leningrad by mistake and falling asleep in a s...
Tags: Facebook, College, Bloomberg, Architecture, Moscow, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, Leningrad, Josh Jones, Le Corbusier, Brezhnev, Durham NC Follow, Byrnes, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko Constructivists, Mark Byrnes


The Utopian Socialist Designs of Soviet Cities

Modernist architecture transformed the modern city in the 20th century, for good and ill. Nowhere is this transformation more evident than the former Soviet Union and its former republics. There, we find truth in the western stereotypes of the Soviet city as cold, faceless, and soul-crushingly nondescript — so much so that the plot of a 1975 Russian TV film called The Irony of Fate, or Enjoy Your Bath!, hinges on a man drunkenly traveling to Leningrad by mistake and falling asleep in a s...
Tags: Facebook, College, Bloomberg, Architecture, Moscow, Joseph Stalin, Soviet Union, Leningrad, Josh Jones, Le Corbusier, Brezhnev, Durham NC Follow, Byrnes, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko Constructivists, Mark Byrnes


David Lynch Directs a New Music Video for Donovan

I often feel Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan has been misunderstood. When he shows up these days, it’s in songs like his creepy “Hurdy Gurdy Man” and “Season of the Witch,” in films and TV series about serial killers. This may leave younger viewers with the impression that the psychedelic folk hero went down some scary musical paths. But those who remember Donovan in his heyday remember him as the singer of “Sunshine Superman,” his biggest hit, and “Mellow Yellow,” which hit Number 2 ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Film, College, David, Lou Reed, David Lynch, Syd Barrett, Lynch, Mandy, Donovan, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Donovan Leitch, Jeremiah Sand


Pink Floyd’s First Masterpiece: An Audio/Video Exploration of the 23-Minute Track, “Echoes” (1971)

Of the many things that can and have been said of Pink Floyd’s 1973 masterpiece, The Dark Side of the Moon, one consistently bears repeating: it set a standard for how a rock album could function as a seamless, unified whole. There have been few releases since that meet this standard. Even Floyd themselves didn’t seem like they could measure up to Dark Side’s maturity just a few years earlier. But they were well on their way with 1971’s Meddle. “Meddle is really the album where all four ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Pink Floyd, Kubrick, Pompeii, Wright, Floyd, Hendrix, Josh Jones, David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Gilmour, Mojo, LeFevre, Nick Mason


The History of the Guitar: See the Evolution of the Guitar in 7 Instruments

A thoroughly modern instrument with an ancient heritage, the history of the guitar dates back some 500-plus years. If we take into account similar stringed instruments with similar designs, we can push that date back a few thousand years, but there is some scholarly disagreement over when the guitar emerged as an instrument distinct from the lute. In any case, stringed instrument historian Brandon Acker is here to walk us through some of the significant differences, with “seven checkpoin...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Spain, History, Portugal, Keith Richards, North Africa, Les Paul, Josh Jones, Mesopotamia, Rob Scallon, John Dowland, Acker, Durham NC Follow, Circuit Board


Japanese Carpenters Unearth 100-Year-Old Wood Joineries While Taking Apart a Traditional House

According to myth, the first Japanese poet, Susano-o, the storm god, named the activity of building as equal to the works of nature. Travel blog Kansai Odyssey writes, “Susano-o felt rather inspired” while at Suga Shrine in Shimane Prefecture, “and recited the first poem in Japanese literature.” Roughly translated, it reads: “In Izumo, where the clouds form, / I see a fence of clouds. / To protect my wife, I too, built a fence. / These clouds are as my fence.” An embrace of the natural w...
Tags: Facebook, Japan, College, Architecture, Josh Jones, IZUMO, Colin Marshall, Durham NC Follow, Iwakuni, Yamanashi, Susano, Dylan Iwakuni, Grace Ebert, Shimane Prefecture, Traditional House, Kansai Odyssey


Watch a New Director’s Cut of Prince’s Blistering “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” Guitar Solo (2004)

Recently, I was walking with a young relative who, upon passing a mural of the late Prince Rogers Nelson, looked up at me and asked, “who is that?,” whereupon my eyes grew wide as saucers and I began the tale of a musical hero who conquered every instrument, every musical style, every chord and scale, etc. It was a story fit for young ears, mind you, but mythic enough, I guess, that it inspired my relative to stop me mid-sentence and ask in awe, “was he a god?” To which I stammered, caug...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, George Harrison, New York Times, Prince, Tom, Jeff, Clapton, Dunn, Tom Petty, Josh Jones, Jeff Lynne, Gallen, Durham NC Follow, ROGERS NELSON


Muhammad Ali Explains Why He Refused to Fight in Vietnam: “My Conscience Won’t Let Me Go Shoot My Brother… for Big Powerful America” (1970)

In April of 1967, Muhammad Ali arrived at the U.S. Armed Forces Examining and Entrance Station in Houston, Texas. “Standing beside twenty-five other nerve-racked young men called to the draft,” writes David Remnick at The New Yorker, Ali “refused to respond to the call of ‘Cassius Clay!’” Offered the choice of going to Vietnam or to jail, he chose the latter “and was sentenced to five years in prison and released on bail.” Ali lost his title, his boxing license, his passport, and — as fa...
Tags: Facebook, Television, Supreme Court, Abc, College, Sports, America, History, Rome, Canada, United States, Army, Sports Illustrated, Vietnam, Muhammad Ali, Dick Cavett


Keith Richards Demonstrates His Famous 5-String Technique (Used on Classic Stones Songs Like “Start Me Up,” “Honky Tonk Women” & More)

For the guitarist, alternate tunings expand the sonic possibilities of the instrument. But where, say, a progressive metal player will add a seventh or eighth string, pitch everything down, and get technical, the opposite is the case with “open” tunings in folk and blues. They are an ideal basis for slide guitar and three-chord, 12-bar vamps, and became the perfect platform for Keith Richards, giving him the room he needed to translate the music of his folk heroes into the gritty, distor...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Chicago, Rolling Stone, Keith Richards, Huffington Post, Thompson, Ry Cooder, Keith, Martin, Zeppelin, Richards, Keef, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow


Great Art Explained: Watch 15 Minute Introductions to Great Works by Warhol, Rothko, Kahlo, Picasso & More

Can great art be explained? Isn’t it a little like explaining a joke? Yet this can be worthwhile when the joke is in a foreign language or an unfamiliar idiom, a long-forgotten dialect or an alien idiolect. Consider, for example, the most common response to Mark Rothko’s monochromatic rectangles: “I don’t get it.” Will perplexed viewers better understand Rothko’s Seagram murals when they learn that “he was found in a pool of blood six by eight feet wide, roughly the size of one of his pa...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Hollywood, London, College, Marilyn Monroe, Andy Warhol, Warhol, Tate Modern, Monet, Andy, Forbes, Mozart, Payne, Josh Jones, Mark Rothko


Invisible People: Watch Poignant Mini-Documentaries Where Homeless People Tell Their Stories

Over the past year, the story of evictions during COVID has often risen above the muck. It’s made headlines in major newspapers and TIME magazine, and received serious attention from the government, with stop-gap eviction moratoriums put in effect and renewed several times, and likely due to be renewed again. Stopping evictions is not enough. “For many landlords,” notes the United Way, “the order created a financial burden of housing renters with no payments,” and without income, they ha...
Tags: Facebook, Politics, UK, Youtube, College, Life, Los Angeles, Current Affairs, New York Public Library, United Way, Josh Jones, Horvath, Durham NC Follow, Josephine Baker, Mark Horvath, Canada Peru


A Short Animation Explores the Nature of Creativity & Invention, with Characters That Look Like Andrei Tarkovsky & Sergei Eisenstein

A gentleman goes to the movies, only to find a marquee full of retreads, reboots, sequels, and prequels. He demands to know why no one makes original films anymore, a reasonable question people often ask. But it seems he has run directly into a graduate student in critical theory behind the glass. The ticket-seller rattles off a theory of unoriginality that is difficult to refute but also, it turns out, only a word-for-word recitation of the Wikipedia page on “Plagiarism.” This is one of...
Tags: Facebook, Writing, Film, College, Wikipedia, Neil Gaiman, Language, Philosophy, Mark Twain, Quentin Tarantino, Christie, Roland Barthes, Barthes, Helen Keller, Twain, Josh Jones


How the Clash Embraced New York’s Hip Hop Scene with Their Single “The Magnificent Seven” & “The Magnificent Dance”

“Before playing guitar for Captain Beefheart and Jeff Buckley,” John Kruth writes at the Observer, “Gary Lucas worked as a copywriter for CBS/Epic Records,” where he fell in love with a punk band called the Clash, just signed to the label in 1977. “They weren’t easy to work with,” he remembered. “Like Frank Zappa, they spoke about politics, government and corporate interference with radio. They were, as I said, when I came up with the slogan to promote the album: ‘The only group that mat...
Tags: Facebook, Chuck, Music, New York, College, New York City, US, Bronx, Public Enemy, Frank Zappa, ESG, Jones, Jeff Buckley, Gary Lucas, Blondie, Rage Against The Machine


How the Clash Embraced New York’s Hip Hop Scene and Released the Dance Track, “The Magnificent Dance” (1981)

“Before playing guitar for Captain Beefheart and Jeff Buckley,” John Kruth writes at the Observer, “Gary Lucas worked as a copywriter for CBS/Epic Records,” where he fell in love with a punk band called the Clash, just signed to the label in 1977. “They weren’t easy to work with,” he remembered. “Like Frank Zappa, they spoke about politics, government and corporate interference with radio. They were, as I said, when I came up with the slogan to promote the album: ‘The only group that mat...
Tags: Facebook, Chuck, Music, New York, College, New York City, US, Bronx, Public Enemy, Frank Zappa, ESG, Jones, Jeff Buckley, Gary Lucas, Blondie, Rage Against The Machine


Watch Colorized 1940s Footage of London after the Blitz: Scenes from Trafalgar Square, Piccadilly Circus, Buckingham Palace & More

“Regular features of the time: neatly swept-up piles of glass, litter of stone and splinters of flint, smell of escaping gas, knots of sightseers waiting at the cordons.” — George Orwell What was it like to live in London during and after the Blitz? George Orwell’s notebooks from the time contain a “fascinating account of everyday life in London during the Second World War,” full of journalistic detail, the British Library writes. In Orwell’s estimation, the city was riven with class di...
Tags: Facebook, London, Film, College, Germany, Berlin, Thames, History, Britain, George Orwell, Buckingham Palace, British Library, Orwell, Trafalgar Square, St Petersburg, Peter Watts


Scientists at Purdue University Create the “Whitest White” Paint Ever Seen: It Reflects 98% of the Sun’s Light

Xiulin Ruan, a Purdue University professor of mechanical engineering, holds up his lab’s sample of the whitest paint on record. Purdue University/Jared Pike Surely, you’ve heard of Vantablack, the high-tech coating invented by UK company Surrey NanoSystems that absorbs over 99 percent of light and makes three-dimensional objects look like black holes? Aside from its controversially exclusive use by artist Anish Kapoor, the blackest of black paints has so far proven to be most effective in spac...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Science, Greece, Washington Post, College, Earth, Chicago, Harvard, Egypt, Anish Kapoor, Purdue, Josh Jones, Purdue University, ACS Applied Materials Interfaces, Durham NC Follow


30,000 People Line Up for the First McDonald’s in Moscow, While Grocery Store Shelves Run Empty (1990)

Everyone has waited in a long line — for burgers, Broadway tickets, Black Friday sales… But few us have the notorious queuing resilience of the Soviets. “When the first McDonald’s arrived in Moscow in 1990, the city went mad,” Boris Egorov writes at Russia Beyond. “Thousands of Muscovites flocked to the new burger joint, forming lines several kilometers long in the center of Moscow on Pushkinskaya Square.” On its first day, the restaurant obliterated the previous record for most McDonald...
Tags: Google, Washington Post, College, Russia, America, History, Budapest, Food & Drink, Broadway, Pizza Hut, Moscow, Andy Warhol, Mikhail Gorbachev, Cbc, Soviet Union, McDonald


Watch a Newly-Restored Peter Gabriel-Era Genesis Concert Film From 1973 in Stunning 4K Quality

There are two late-20th century rock bands named Genesis and both of them featured Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks. The second Genesis we know of as one of the biggest-selling bands of all time and authors of such massive hits as “Land of Confusion,” “In Too Deep,” and “Throwing It All Away.” The first we may not know at all, except indirectly by way of its frontman, Peter Gabriel, better known as… solo artist Peter Gabriel. One reason Genesis, the second, is more famous th...
Tags: Google, Music, England, College, Mtv, Paris, Broadway, Kate Bush, Rolling Stone, Collins, Bataclan, Facebook Twitter, Peter Gabriel, Gabriel, Josh Jones, Steve Hackett


Watch “Hi-Fi-Fo-Fum,” a Short Satirical Film About the Invention of the Audiophile (1959)

Sometime in the mid-1990s, my father gave me his hi-end, hi-fi stereo system from the mid-1970s: a vacuum tube-powered amplifier, pair of stereo speakers in walnut cabinets, and a turntable. Heavy, bulky, and built with hardly an ounce of plastic between them, these components lacked all of the functionality we look for in consumer audio today: no 4K HDMI, no Bluetooth, no surround sound of any kind. As such features became de rigeur, my stereo migrated to the closet, piece by piece, then out th...
Tags: Google, Music, Television, College, Bbc, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Ted Gioia, Durham NC Follow, Typewriters Electric Shavers, Cadeddu, Audiophilia, Lucio Cadeddu


Watch the “Greatest Juggler of the Ages,” Frances Brunn, Perform His “Painfully Exciting” Juggling Routine (1969)

When John Ringling North, then president of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, saw a pair of German  jugglers and acrobats perform in Spain, he immediately invited them to join “the Greatest Show on Earth.” A brother and sister team, Francis and Lottie Brunn would astonish audiences. In 1950, theater critic Brooks Atkinson called Francis “the greatest juggler of the ages. Not many people in the world are as perfectly adjusted as Mr. Brunn is. He will never have to visit a psychia...
Tags: Google, England, Television, College, White House, Spain, Dance, Creativity, New York Times, Francis, Palace, Eisenhower, Alexander Calder, Judy Garland, Martin, Facebook Twitter


Watch Metallica Play “Enter Sandman” Before a Crowd of 1.6 Million in Moscow, During the Final Days of the Soviet Union (1991)

In the years following the collapse of the Soviet Union a “triumphalist discourse” arose in the U.S., writes historian Richard Sakwa, “which suggests that the Soviet demise was a deliberate act plotted and executed by president Ronald Reagan” with massive military budgets and nuclear threats. This narrative has less exclusive currency today. There are as many theories as theorists of Soviet demise, among them the “compelling argument,” says Jim Brown, producer of a documentary called Fre...
Tags: Google, Music, Time Warner, College, Gorbachev, Atlantic, Ronald Reagan, Mtv, New York Times, Metallica, Moscow, Cia, Motley Crue, Soviet Union, Brown, Facebook Twitter


Watch 4 Music Videos That Bring to Life Songs from Leonard Cohen’s Final Album, Thanks for the Dance

Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker is a bleak masterpiece. Released just 19 days before his death, the album sounds like a warning from beyond, one Cohen seemed to know we’d never heed. His sympathy for human failure reached its denouement in the posthumous Thanks for the Dance, a project “much less apocalyptic” in tone than its predecessor, writes Thomas Hobbs at NME. Unlike many a posthumous album, “this point of difference more than justifies the record’s release,” even if the materia...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Npr, Leonard Cohen, Nme, Cohen, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Adam, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Leonard Cohen David Bowie, Thomas Hobbs, Javier Mas, Beck Feist Bryce Dessner


Watch 4 Music Videos for Songs from Leonard Cohen’s Final Album, Thanks for the Dance

Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker is a bleak masterpiece. Released just 19 days before his death, the album sounds like a warning from beyond, one Cohen seemed to know we’d never heed. His sympathy for human failure reached its denouement in the posthumous Thanks for the Dance, a project “much less apocalyptic” in tone than its predecessor, writes Thomas Hobbs at NME. Unlike many a posthumous album, “this point of difference more than justifies the record’s release,” even if the materia...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Npr, Leonard Cohen, Nme, Cohen, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Adam, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Leonard Cohen David Bowie, Thomas Hobbs, Javier Mas, Beck Feist Bryce Dessner


Watch Radiohead Perform In Rainbows & The King of Limbs in Intimate Live Settings, with No Host or Audience

Over the past twenty years Radiohead managed to achieve something no other rock band ever has: enduring outsider art rock credibility that shielded them from the media machinery they came to loathe at the end of the millennium, and enduring popularity that meant they could drop their last, 2016 LP, A Moon Shaped Pool “without doing a single interview and it still topped the charts all over the world,” Rolling Stone writes,” even if Drake and Beyonce kept them stuck at Number Three in Ame...
Tags: Google, Music, Beyonce, College, America, Radiohead, Drake, Thom Yorke, Ross, Alex Ross, Facebook Twitter, Selway, Josh Jones, Nigel Godrich, Durham NC Follow, Phil Selway


The Digital Lomax Archive Provides Free Access to the Pioneering Recordings of John & Alan Lomax, Compiled Across 7 Decades

The work of ethnomusicologist father and son team John and Alan Lomax was intended to preserve the local musical cultures of the United States and regions around the world against an encroaching mass media threatening to erase them. But the thousands of Lomax recordings, films, books, articles, and other documents not only conserved regional music; they also helped transform mass culture by introducing local forms that have since become part of a global musical grammar. Lomax and his son...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, Mississippi, College, Kentucky, Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, History, United States, Cbs, Columbia University, John, Alan, Facebook Twitter, Dylan


Is “Rain” the Perfect Beatles Song?: A New Video Explores the Radical Innovations of the 1966 B-Side

“That one was the gift of God… of Ja actually—the god of marijuana, right? So Ja gave me that one.” The Beatles 1966 Revolver, a mini-masterpiece, contains all the elements that would inform the band’s revolutionary late-60s sound on Sgt. Pepper’s, Abbey Road, The White Album, and Let it Be. The album’s first track, “Taxman,” announced “a sweeping shift in the essential nature of the Beatles’ sound,” writes music historian Kenneth Womack. Its ultimate track, “Tomorrow Never Knows,” was “...
Tags: Google, Music, College, John Lennon, Paul Mccartney, Playboy, Ringo, Mccartney, Lennon, Robert Rodriguez, PAUL, Facebook Twitter, EMI, Josh Jones, George Martin, Durham NC Follow


The Strangest Books in the World: Discover The Madman’s Library, a Captivating Compendium of Peculiar Books​ & Manuscripts

If you are a frequent reader of Open Culture, or the many blogs we tend to read — especially those concerned with the rare, unusual, and obscure — it’s likely you’ve encountered some of the books in The Madman’s Library, Edward Brooke-Hitching’s fantastic new volume of literary oddities. If not, you’re probably familiar with a few of the categories he identifies under his subtitle, “The Strangest Books, Manuscripts and Other Literary Curiosities from History.” These include “Books Made o...
Tags: Google, Books, Cook, London, College, Smithsonian, Saddam Hussein, Yeats, George, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Jonathan Swift, Durham NC Follow, Edward Brooke Hitching, Brooke Hitching, Peculiar Books amp


Harvard’s Digital Giza Project Lets You Access the Largest Online Archive on the Egyptian Pyramids (Including a 3D Giza Tour)

Nothing excites the imagination of young history-and-science-minded kids like the Egyptian pyramids, which is maybe why so many people grow up into amateur Egyptologists with very strong opinions about the pyramids. For such people, access to the highest quality information seems critical for their online debates. For professional academics and serious students of ancient Egypt such access is critical to doing their work properly. All lovers and students of ancient Egypt will find what t...
Tags: Google, Youtube, College, History, Harvard, Egypt, Harvard University, K-12, Libraries, Giza, Facebook Twitter, Giza Egypt, Josh Jones, Harvard Gazette, Durham NC Follow, Museum of Fine Arts Boston


Buckminster Fuller, Isaac Asimov & Other Futurists Make Predictions About the 21st Century in 1967: What They Got Right & Wrong

Why bother with reason and evidence to make predictions when you can put your faith in a chance roll of the dice? These two methods could be said to represent the vastly divergent ways of science and superstition, two realms that rarely intersect except, perhaps, when it comes to fortune-telling — or, in the argot of the 20th century’s soothsayers, “Futurism,” where predictions seem to rely as much on wishful thinking as they do on intuition and intellect. In the 1967 short documentary f...
Tags: Google, Science, Television, College, Cbs, University of Pittsburgh, Facebook Twitter, Monte Carlo, Josh Jones, Isaac Asimov, Fuller, Walter Cronkite, McGraw Hill, Cronkite, Buckminster Fuller, Durham NC Follow



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