Education


Posts filtered by tags: Music[x]


 

The Case for Why Captain Beefheart’s Awful Sounding Album, Trout Mask Replica, Is a True Masterpiece

I’ve had Trout Mask Replica in my collection for years. I can’t say I regularly pull it out to give it a listen, but I know I’d never get rid of it. It’s a sometimes impenetrable slab of genius, wrought from endless sessions and then a short burst of recording, led by a man who couldn’t read music, was prone to fits of violent anger, but dammit knew what he wanted. (And Zappa produced.) When I learned later that the house where a lot of this went down was located in the hills behind the ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, America, Ornette Coleman, Vox, Vermont, Wolf, Tom, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Zappa, Woodland Hills, KCRW, Joshua Tree, Beefheart


The Gnarly Surf Rock of Dick Dale (RIP): Watch the Legend Play “Misirlou,” Surfin’ the Wedge,” and “Pipeline” (with Stevie Ray Vaughan)

The Endless Summer is over. The archetypal 1966 surf documentary might have been scored by The Sandals, but the sound and the cultural dominance of surf culture would perhaps never come into being, and may not have survived the decade, without Dick Dale, who died on March 18th at the age of 81. His gnarly, menacing guitar on songs like “Miserlou” and “Pipeline” turned a fad dominated by the teen anthems of The Beach Boys and Annette Funicello’s post-Mouseketeers bikini and beehive into g...
Tags: Google, Music, Washington Post, College, Jimi Hendrix, United States, Quentin Tarantino, Dick Dale, Wray, Facebook Twitter, Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Dale, Annette Funicello, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow


The Lou Reed Archive Opens at the New York Public Library: Get Your Own Lou Reed Library Card and Check It Out

This past October marked the fifth anniversary of Lou Reed’s death. This month marks what would have been his 77th birthday. It seems like as good a time as any to revisit his legacy. As of this past Friday, anyone can do exactly that in person at the New York Public Library. And they can do so with their own special edition NYPL Lou Reed library card. The NYPL has just opened to the public the Lou Reed Archive, “approximately 300 linear feet,” the library writes in a press release, “of paper r...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Brooklyn, Nypl, Literature, Andy Warhol, Ornette Coleman, Lincoln Center, Archives, Lou Reed, New York Public Library, Laurie Anderson, Reed


Leonard Bernstein Awkwardly Turns the Screws on Tenor Jose Carreras While Recording West Side Story (1984)

What have we here? Evidence that the Maestro is a monster? Or a behind the scenes reminder that Arrested Development’s wannabe actor Tobias Fünke is not too far off base when he says that to make it in “this business of show, you have to have the heart of an angel and the hide... of an elephant.” Both? Neither? Any way you slice it, the recording session above is not for your typical cast album. West Side Story, with a book by Arthur Laurents, music by Leonard Bernstein, and lyrics b...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, New York City, Theatre, Vienna, Stephen Sondheim, Broadway, Opera, Verona, Maria, Public Domain, Bernstein, Tony, Natalie Wood


Watch an Animated Score for Steve Reich’s Minimalist Piece “Clapping Music“–and Try Your Hardest to Follow Along

Steve Reich’s Clapping Music is one of the simplest scores of modern classical music, and as you might soon find out, one of the most difficult to perform. Written in 1972 while on a European tour and after a night of mediocre flamenco, Clapping Music is for two players. One claps a steady rhythm (technically an African Bell Rhythm). A second performer claps in unison in the same pattern for eight bars. At the end of the eighth bar, the second performer goes out of sync for one eighth no...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Steve Reich, Reich, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Ted Mills, London Sinfonietta, Anne Teresa, Reed Phase, Keersmaeker Asked


The Band Everyone Thought Was The Beatles: Revisit the Klaatu Conspiracy of 1976

In 1976, hundreds of diehard Beatles fans became convinced that the mysterious album 3:47 EST by the band Klaatu was actually a new release from The Beatles in disguise, after a DJ in Providence, Rhode Island played one of its songs on the radio. Shortly afterward, Steve Smith discovered the album at the newspaper he worked for, Rhode Island’s The Providence Journal, listened to it, and became immediately intrigued. The album contained no photographs, no identifying information at all, a...
Tags: Google, Music, California, College, Toronto, Paul Mccartney, Smith, Steve Smith, Rhode Island, Ringo Starr, Beatles, Starr, Mccartney, Lennon, Cbc, Facebook Twitter


A Stunning Live Concert Film of Queen Performing in Montreal, Digitally Restored to Perfection (1981)

The legend of Queen is immortal. It needs no further burnishing, not even, some might argue, by the most recent Oscar-winning biopic. The film may gamely recreate the stagecraft of Britain’s most operatic export. But once you’ve seen the real thing, what need of a substitute? For the millions who loved them before Wayne’s World brought them back to global consciousness, and the millions who came to love them afterward, the only thing that could be better than watching live Queen is watch...
Tags: Google, Music, Usa, Film, College, George Harrison, Nasa, Britain, Bangladesh, Montreal, Brian May, Wayne, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Apple Mac G5


Hear Patti Smith’s New Work With The Soundwalk Collective, a Tribute to the Avant-Garde Poet Antonin Artaud

The Soundwalk Collective has made music art out of found sounds since 2004. They recorded 2012’s Medea while traversing the Black Sea and fishing for sounds using a scanner and high powered aerial antennas; 2014’s Last Beat used contact microphones on the architecture of a music club to collect vibrations instead of music; 2017’s Before Music There Is Blood collaged deep echoing recordings of classical music played in various halls. This time, in their upcoming The Peyote Dance, they hav...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Mexico, France, Russia, India, Paris, Ethiopia, Patti Smith, Smith, Black Sea, Ibiza, Eastern Europe, French Guiana, Nico


“Stay Free: The Story of the Clash” Narrated by Public Enemy’s Chuck D: A New Spotify Podcast

FYI: Spotify, in partnership with the BBC, has launched “Stay Free: The Story of the Clash," an eight-part podcast on the iconic punk band, narrated by Public Enemy front man, Chuck D. It might seem like an unexpected pairing. And yet Spotify explains: "Like The Clash, Public Enemy openly challenged the status quo in a completely original way—this parallel and Chuck D’s personal experiences bring a surprising new dimension to the story of The Clash." Reviewing the production in The New Y...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Spotify, Chuck, Music, London, College, Bbc, Tokyo, Public Enemy, Def Jam, Facebook Twitter, West London, Chuck D, Mick Jones, Joe Strummer


Watch Lin-Manuel Miranda Perform the Earliest Version of Hamilton at the White House, Six Years Before the Play Hit the Broadway Stage (2009)

Another immigrant comin' up from the bottom His enemies destroyed his rep, America forgot him…  Holler if you can remember a time when few Americans were well-versed enough in founding father Alexander Hamilton’s origin story to recite it in rhyme at the drop of a hat. Believe it or not, as recently as the summer of 2015, when Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Hamilton: An American Musical exploded on Broadway, Hamilton the man was, as the Tony award winning lyrics above sugges...
Tags: Google, Music, Politics, Obama, College, White House, New York City, Theatre, America, History, Broadway, James Earl Jones, Dc, Miranda, George Stephanopoulos, Dick Cheney


A Week In Berkeley, CA, On A $72,800 Salary

Welcome toMoney Diaries , where we're tackling what might be the last taboo facing modern working women: money. We're asking millennials how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we're tracking every last dollar.Today: a civil engineer who makes $72,800 per year and spends some of her money this week on a Twix bar.Occupation: Civil EngineerIndustry: Hydrology & HydraulicsAge: 24Location: Berkeley, CASalary: $72,800Paycheck Amount (Biweekly): $1,785.57Monthly Expense...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Fashion, Music, Pinterest, California, College, Netflix, Hulu, Berkeley, Costco, Kitchenaid, Joe, Bart, Hilary Duff, Bon Appetit


Jim Morrison Declares That “Fat is Beautiful” …. And Means It

There’s a bit of cognitive dissonance in a young rock god giving voice to the fat pride movement some four decades after his death. Years before social media amplified celebrity weight gain coverage to the realm of national news, The Doors’ lead singer, Lizard King Jim Morrison, was the subject of intense bodily scrutiny. The musician’s drug of choice—alcohol—swiftly added some extra cushioning to the sexy, shirtless young lion image photographer Joel Brodsky managed to capture in 1967. ...
Tags: Health, Google, Music, College, Life, New York City, Food & Drink, Animation, Paris, Village Voice, Smith, Morrison, Facebook Twitter, Greenwich Village, Jim Morrison, Patrick Smith


Hear Underground 12, the Earliest Known Case of Musicians Recording While Under the Influence of LSD (1966)

Music and LSD: after “Tomorrow Never Knows” and Sgt. Pepper, we knew what an acid trip should sound like. Other folks needed to know more. Somewhere in Los Angeles in 1966 a group of musicians were dosing and recording while tripping. The resulting recording--credited to “Underground 12” and considered the earliest known case of musicians recording while under the influence of LSD--was only available,  as the legend goes, by mail order-- you can see a copy of it here on discogs , a plain...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Los Angeles, World, Bob, Facebook Twitter, Zappa, Morristown New Jersey, KCRW, Madrigal, Ted Mills, Bob Reed, Huntington Park First Savings, Lysergia, Patrick Lundborg


The 100 Top Punk Songs of All Time, Curated by Readers of the UK’s Sounds Magazine in 1981

When did punk rock die? Everyone knows it happened sometime in recent history, but few people agree on when. The music still exists, in knowing quotation marks, but its winning combination of unforced abrasiveness and calculated offensiveness seems to have disappeared. Maybe pick a year at random; say, 2010, the year the last great punk songwriter, Jay Reatard, died. It also happens to be the year the last great punk band, OFF!, formed, but they’re a supergroup of classic punk musicians. One co...
Tags: Google, Spotify, Music, UK, College, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Gary Numan, Punk Rock, Durham NC Follow, Jay Reatard, Paste Magazine Stream, CBS Maybe, Johnny Rotten aka Lydon, Sounds Magazine


Watch Marc Martel, Who Supplied Vocals for the Award-Winning Queen Film, Sing Just Like Freddie Mercury: “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “We Are The Champions” & More

Understandably, given a moviegoing public seemingly starved for reality, all of the biggest winners at this year’s Academy Awards were based on true events. And nearly all of them have generated huge controversies for the liberties they took with those true stories. While some of the criticism can sound censorious, none of it is about censorship, but about the larger social question of how much truth we should sacrifice for the sake of commerce and entertainment, two human endeavors with...
Tags: Google, Music, Film, College, Freddie Mercury, The New York Times, Facebook Twitter, Edwards, Rami Malek, Josh Jones, Freddie, Martel, Roger Taylor, Durham NC Follow, Gavin Edwards, Marc Martel


Hear a Six-Hour Mix Tape of Hunter S. Thompson’s Favorite Music & the Songs Name-Checked in His Gonzo Journalism

Of all the musical moments in Hunter S. Thompson's formidable corpus of "gonzo journalism," which one comes most readily to mind? I would elect the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when Thompson's alter-ego Raoul Duke finds his attorney "Dr. Gonzo" in the bathtub, "submerged in green water — the oily product of some Japanese bath salts he'd picked up in the hotel gift shop, along with a new AM/FM radio plugged into the electric razor socket. Top volume. Some gibberish by a thing called '...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Carter, Literature, Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Keith Richards, Duke, Lennon, Thompson, Joy


Hear a Six-Hour Mix of Hunter S. Thompson’s Favorite Music & the Songs Name-Checked in His Gonzo Journalism

Of all the musical moments in Hunter S. Thompson's formidable corpus of "gonzo journalism," which one comes most readily to mind? I would elect the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when Thompson's alter-ego Raoul Duke finds his attorney "Dr. Gonzo" in the bathtub, "submerged in green water — the oily product of some Japanese bath salts he'd picked up in the hotel gift shop, along with a new AM/FM radio plugged into the electric razor socket. Top volume. Some gibberish by a thing called '...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Carter, Literature, Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Keith Richards, Duke, Lennon, Thompson, Joy


Watch the Last Time Peter Tork (RIP) & The Monkees Played Together During Their 1960s Heyday: It’s a Psychedelic Freakout

Peter Tork died yesterday at age 77. You might not have heard the news over the deafening alarms in your social media feeds lately. But a muted response is also noteworthy because of the way Tork’s fame imploded at the end of the sixties, at a time when he might have become the kind of rock star he and his fellow Monkees had proved they could become, all on their own, without the help of any studio trickery, thanks very much. The irony of making this bold statement with a feature film wa...
Tags: Google, Music, Nbc, Jack Nicholson, Film, California, College, Neil Young, Npr, Dennis Hopper, Monkees, Rolling Stone, Richard, Ringo, Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork


Hear the First Musical Composition Created by a Computer: The Illiac Suite (1956)

Think “Generative Music” and what may come to mind is Brian Eno, pushing a button and letting music flow from his studio computer. But the idea is much older than that. The “Illiac Suite” from 1952 is named after the cash-register-looking ILLIAC computer on which it was composed, and is one of the first examples of bringing computer programming into the task of creating music within some well defined parameters. The resulting score was then played by humans. You can hear the first experi...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Virginia, New York City, Alan Turing, DuPont, John, Brian Eno, University Of Illinois, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Babbitt, KCRW, Hiller, Penderecki


Haruki Murakami Announces an Archive That Will House His Manuscripts, Letters & Collection of 10,000+ Vinyl Records

Image by wakarimasita, via Wikimedia Commons It has become the norm for notable writers to bequeath documents related to their work, and even their personal correspondence, to an institution that promises to maintain it all, in perpetuity, in an archive open to scholars. Often the institution is located at a university to which the writer has some connection, and the case of the Haruki Murakami Library at Tokyo's Waseda University is no exception: Murakami graduated from Waseda in 1975, and a d...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Literature, Tokyo, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, New York Times Magazine, Vinyl Records, Facebook Twitter, Sam Anderson, Waseda University, Murakami, Waseda, Colin Marshall, Miles Davis Glenn Gould


Jimi Hendrix Arrives in London in 1966, Asks to Get Onstage with Cream, and Blows Eric Clapton Away: “You Never Told Me He Was That F-ing Good”

Jimi Hendrix arrived on the London scene like a ton of bricks in 1966, smashing every British blues guitarist to pieces the instant they saw him play. As vocalist Terry Reid tells it, when Hendrix played his first showcase at the Bag O’Nails, arranged by Animals’ bassist Chas Chandler, “there were guitar players weeping. They had to mop the floor up. He was piling it on, solo after solo. I could see everyone’s fillings falling out. When he finished, it was silence. Nobody knew what t...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Beck, Bbc, Jimi Hendrix, Britain, Stockholm, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Wolf, Facebook Twitter, Eric, Clapton, Bruce


A Telecaster Made Out of 1200 Colored Pencils

A couple weeks back, Burls Art dared to make a Stratocaster out of 1200 Crayola colored pencils. Now comes a Telecaster-style guitar, which Fender first put into production back in 1950. You can watch it get made, from start to finish, in the 11-minute video above. On a more serious note, anyone interested in the history of the electric guitar--particularly the Strat, Tele and Les Paul--should spend time with the new book by Ian S. Port, The Birth of Loud: Leo Fender, Les Paul, and the G...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, America, Willie Nelson, Random, Brian May, Ian, Facebook Twitter, Les Paul, First Electric Guitar, Leo Fender Les Paul, Strat Tele


A New Collection of Official, Authorized Prince GIFs!

Tech entrepreneur Anil Dash, podcaster, music historian, and advisor to the Obama White House’s Office of Digital Strategy, knows his way around Prince’s catalogue. Less than a year after the iconoclastic musician left the planet, Dash created a guide to help newbies and casual listeners become better acquainted with his oeuvre: The nice thing about Prince’s work is that there are no bad starting points; if you don’t like what you hear at first, he almost certainly made a song in the complete op...
Tags: Google, Music, College, New York City, Web/Tech, Anil Dash, Prince, Archives, Dash, Facebook Twitter, Maria Bartiromo, George Gershwin, Obama White House, Kottke, Redbone, ROGERS NELSON


A Six-Hour Time-Stretched Version of Brian Eno’s Music For Airports: Meditate, Relax, Study

Writing in his 1995 diary about his seminal ambient album Music for Airports, Eno remembered his initial thoughts going into it: “I want to make a kind of music that prepares you for dying--that doesn’t get all bright and cheerful and pretend you’re not a little apprehensive, but which makes you say to yourself, ‘Actually, it’s not that big a deal if I die.’” Created in 1978 from seconds-long tape loops from a much longer improv session with musicians including Robert Wyatt, Music for Ai...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Liverpool, Brian Eno, Derek Jarman, London City Airport, Eno, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Robert Wyatt, Ted Mills, La Guardia New York, Brussels Holland, San Diego International Writing, KCET Alex Zaragoza


Hear Siouxsie Sioux’s Powerful Isolated Vocals on “The Killing Jar,” “Hong Kong Garden,” “Cities In Dust” & “Kiss Them for Me”

Like hundreds of other teenagers in late seventies England, Susan Ballion, better known as Siouxsie Sioux, embraced the anyone-can-do-it-ness of punk after seeing the Sex Pistols. In 1976, already a tastemaker in the scene, she threw a band together with Sid Vicious on drums, and with no practice, or even any songs, they got onstage, and improvised a 20-minute rendition of “The Lord’s Prayer.” There launched the career of a post-punk, dark pop legend, spanning that first anarchic gig, th...
Tags: Google, Music, England, College, Kate Bush, Los Angeles Times, Pompeii, Noisey, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Bill Grundy, Robert Webb, Siouxsie, Sid Vicious, Jayne Mansfield, Durham NC Follow


How Talking Heads and Brian Eno Wrote “Once in a Lifetime”: Cutting Edge, Strange & Utterly Brilliant

Few albums of the late 1970s and early 1980s have held up as well as those by Talking Heads, but what to call the music recorded on them? Rock? Pop? New Wave? In the difficulty to pin it down lies its enduring appeal, and that difficulty didn't come about by accident: impatient with musical categorizations and expectations, frontman David Byrne and the rest of the band kept pushing themselves into new territories even after they'd begun to find success. When they set out to create their ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Mtv, Brian Eno, Seoul, David Byrne, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Fela Kuti, Byrne, Tina Weymouth, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, David Byrnes


The Sex Pistols’ Sid Vicious Sings Frank Sinatra’s “My Way”: Is Nothing Sacred?

In the great garden of forking paths and alternative timelines there are two other versions of The Great Rock n’ Roll Swindle that Julian Temple never directed. One would have been directed by Graham Chapman of Monty Python fame, but “he behaved gloriously badly to Malcolm (McLaren)” according to John Lydon many years later. The other was to be written by film critic Roger Ebert and directed by buxom beauty lover Russ Meyer (who Lydon called "shabby” and “a senile old git.”) But you do h...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, UK, College, West, Roger Ebert, Paris, Monty Python, Mclaren, Frank Sinatra, Nancy, Martin Scorsese, Julien Temple, Facebook Twitter, Rolling Stones


In the 1920s America, Jazz Music Was Considered Harmful to Human Health, the Cause of “Neurasthenia,” “Perpetually Jerking Jaws” & More

These are some interesting stories about the Nazis and jazz, including one about a very bad jazz propaganda band created by Goebbels himself. But we need not mention these at all, or even leave the shores of jazz’s birthplace to find examples of extreme reactions to jazz by authoritarian figures who hated and feared it for exactly the same reasons as the Nazis. Chief among such American enemies of jazz was raging anti-Semite Henry Ford, who feared that jazz was, you guessed it, a Jewish ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Germany, Nazis, America, History, Ford, Nazi, Johnson, Louis Armstrong, Henry Ford, Cincinnati, Goebbels, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones


A Short History of Punk: From Late 50s Rockabilly and Garage Rock to The Ramones & Sex Pistols

Seems there was a time when the dominant story of punk was the story of British punk. If you knew nothing else, you knew the name Sid Vicious, and that seemed to sum it up. Maybe it was only in the mid-nineties, around the time Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain released Please Kill Me: the Uncensored Oral History of Punk that more people began to popularly understand the lineage of late sixties garage rock, the Velvet Underground, Detroit’s Iggy and the Stooges, and the early CBGB scene in ...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Atlantic, Britain, Patti Smith, Detroit, Elvis, Iggy, David Byrne, Cbgb, Wray, Iggy Pop, Ramones, Facebook Twitter


A Vintage Grand Piano Gets Reengineered to Play 20 Different Instruments with a Push of Its Keys

The Ukrainian Band "Brunettes Shoot Blondes" took a broken, vintage grand piano and reengineered it, turning it into "a hybrid, containing 20 instruments." Now, when you press the keys, the "piano hammers beat a marimba, tambourine, cymbals or even castanets. There are also special mechanical devices that allow for the playing of cello, violins and organ." Watch it in action above... via Colossal/Laughing Squid Follow Open Culture on Facebook and   Twitter and  share intelligent me...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Facebook Twitter



Filters
show more filters
January - 2019
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
February - 2019
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728   
March - 2019
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031