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How Does the Rorschach Inkblot Test Work?: An Animated Primer

A frightening monster? Two friendly bears? Say what!? As anybody with half a brain and the gift of sight knows, the black and red inkblot below resembles nothing so much as a pair of gnomes, gavotting so hard their knees bleed. ...or perhaps it’s open to interpretation. Back in 2013, when Open Culture celebrated psychologist Hermann Rorschach’s birthday by posting the ten blots that form the basis of his famous personality test, readers reported seeing all sorts of things in Card 2: A u...
Tags: Psychology, Google, College, Nazis, New York City, Neuroscience, Lewis Carroll, Alice, Yale University, Facebook Twitter, Searls, Hermann Rorschach, Rorschach, Ayun Halliday, Damion Searls, Rorshach


An Animated Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s Life & Thought

There’s no shame if you’ve never known how to pronounce Friedrich Nietzsche’s name correctly. Even less if you never remember how to spell it. If these happen to be the case, you may be less than familiar with his philosophy. Let Alain de Botton’s animated School of Life video briefly introduce you, and you’ll never forget how to say it: “Knee Cha.” (As for remembering the spelling, you’re on your own.) You’ll also get a short biography of the disgruntled, dyspeptic German philosophe...
Tags: Google, College, Nazis, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Elizabeth, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Friedrich Nietzsche, University of Basel, Nietzsche, Babich, de Botton, Durham NC Follow, Dionysus, Arthur Schopenhauer Richard


100-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor Helen Fagin Reads Her Letter About How Books Save Lives

"Could you imagine a world without access to reading, to learning, to books?" Helen Fagin, who poses that question, doesn't have to imagine it: she experienced that grim reality, and worse besides. "At twenty-one," she continues, "I was forced into Poland’s World War II ghetto, where being caught reading anything forbidden by the Nazis meant, at best, hard labor; at worst, death." There she operated a school in secret where she taught Jewish children Latin and mathematics, soon realizing th...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Books, College, Nazis, Neil Gaiman, History, Poland, Brian Eno, Seoul, Judy Blume, David Byrne, Facebook Twitter, Yo Yo Ma, Jane Goodall, Helen Keller


In the 1920s America, Jazz Music Was Considered Harmful to Human Health, the Cause of “Neurasthenia,” “Perpetually Jerking Jaws” & More

These are some interesting stories about the Nazis and jazz, including one about a very bad jazz propaganda band created by Goebbels himself. But we need not mention these at all, or even leave the shores of jazz’s birthplace to find examples of extreme reactions to jazz by authoritarian figures who hated and feared it for exactly the same reasons as the Nazis. Chief among such American enemies of jazz was raging anti-Semite Henry Ford, who feared that jazz was, you guessed it, a Jewish ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Germany, Nazis, America, History, Ford, Nazi, Johnson, Louis Armstrong, Henry Ford, Cincinnati, Goebbels, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones


The East German Secret Police’s Illustrated Guide for Identifying Youth Subcultures: Punks, Goths, Teds & More (1985)

Ask Germans who lived under the German Democratic Republic what they feared most in those days, and they'll likely say the agents of the Ministry for State Security, best known as the Stasi. Ask those same Germans what they laughed at most in those days, and they may well give the same answer. As one of the most thoroughly repressive secret police forces in human history, the Stasi kept a close eye and a tight grip on East German society: as one oft-told joke goes, "Why do Stasi officers make s...
Tags: Google, Fashion, College, Germany, Nazis, History, Stasi, Seoul, Leipzig, East Germany, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Secret Police, Ministry for State Security, German Democratic Republic


Fruits of College Indoctrination

Fruits of College Indoctrination U.S.A. –-(Ammoland.com)- Much of today's incivility and contempt for personal liberty has its roots on college campuses, and most of the uncivil and contemptuous are people with college backgrounds. Let's look at a few highly publicized recent examples of incivility and attacks on free speech.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his wife, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, were accosted and harassed by a deranged left-wing mob as they were leaving a di...
Tags: Transportation, Guns, Education, Congress, College, Washington, Kentucky, Senate, Nazis, America, South Africa, Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, Mitch McConnell, Fox News, University Of California Berkeley


"Frisch’s former students describe him as eccentric, nerdy, prone to lengthy classroom digressions about his stamp collection, dinosaurs or childhood snow days spent sledding."

"Any teacher who spends three decades in the classroom, speaking extemporaneously for hours on end to a roomful of teenagers, is going to have awkward moments. [Ben] Frisch might have had more of them, and they may have been a bit more awkward. But that was how he connected, and it was perhaps a way of connecting that is no longer possible. 'Everybody knew this guy was off — weird behavior, quirky,' said one parent who, fearing retribution against her child, insisted on anonymity. 'Maybe in the ...
Tags: Comedy, TV, Education, Law, Wikipedia, Nazis, Cnn, Nazi, Hitler, Anti-semitism, Gestures, Hydra, Auschwitz, Jeffrey Lord, Hogan, Quaker


How Marcel Marceau Used His Mime Skills to Save Children’s Lives During the Holocaust

In 1972, Jerry Lewis made the ill-considered decision to write, direct, and star in a film about a German clown in Auschwitz. The result was so awful that he never allowed its release, and it quickly acquired the reputation—along with disasters like George Lucas’ Star Wars Holiday Special—as one of the biggest mistakes in movie history. Somehow, this cautionary tale did not dissuade the bold Italian comedian Roberto Benigni from making a film with a somewhat similar premise, 1997’s Life ...
Tags: Google, College, France, Nazis, History, Switzerland, George Lucas, Cannes, Auschwitz, Facebook Twitter, Wen, Helen Keller, Josh Jones, Roberto Benigni, Benigni, Jerry Lewis


An Asbestos-Bound, Fireproof Edition of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 (1953)

Even by the extreme standards of dystopian fiction, the premise of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 can seem a little absurd. Firemen whose job is to set fires? A society that bans all books? Written less than a decade after the fall of the Third Reich, which announced its evil intentions with book burnings, the novel explicitly evokes the kind of totalitarianism that seeks to destroy culture—and whole peoples—with fire. But not even the Nazis banned all books. Not a few academics and writers surv...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, College, Germany, Nazis, Ray Bradbury, Literature, Sci Fi, Facebook Twitter, Lauren Davis, Guernica, Helen Keller, Josh Jones, Bradbury, Margarita


Ralph Steadman Creates an Unorthodox Illustrated Biography of Sigmund Freud, the Father of Psychoanalysis (1979)

Sigmund Freud died in 1939, and the nearly eight decades since haven't been kind to his psychoanalytical theories, but in some sense he survives. "For many years, even as writers were discarding the more patently absurd elements of his theory — penis envy, or the death drive — they continued to pay homage to Freud’s unblinking insight into the human condition," writes the New Yorker's Louis Menand. He claims that Freud thus evolved, "in the popular imagination, from a scientist into a kind of p...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Art, Books, London, College, Nazis, History, Austria, Las Vegas, Seoul, Sigmund Freud, Virginia Woolf, Thompson, Freud, Hunter


The 16,000 Artworks the Nazis Censored and Labeled “Degenerate Art”: The Complete Historic Inventory Is Now Online

The Nazis may not have known art, but they knew what they liked, and much more so what they didn't. We've previously featured here on Open Culture the “Degenerate Art Exhibition” of 1937, put on by Hitler's party four years after it rose to power. Following on a show of only Nazi-approved works — including many depictions of classically Germanic landscapes, robust soldiers in action, blonde nudes — it toured the country with the intent of revealing to the German people the "insult to German fee...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Germany, Nazis, History, Victoria, Nazi, Cia, Hitler, Paul Klee, Joseph Stalin, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Albert Museum, Hyperallergic


Doc Martens Now Come Adorned with William Blake’s Art, Thanks to a Partnership with Tate Britain

On a recent trip to Portland, I found myself at the city’s flagship Pearl District Dr. Martens’ store and was instantly transported back to much younger days when I scrimped and saved to buy my first pair of “Docs” at the local DC punk boutique. Big and clunky, the boots and shoes have been associated with outsider and alternative culture for decades (and, sadly, through no fault of their own, with neo-Nazis, as a recent Portland controversy reminded). The brand has since applied its “AirWair” ...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Art, Design, College, Nazis, Portland, William Blake, Tate Britain, Blake, Facebook Twitter, Martens, Josh Jones, Doc Martens, Pearl District, John Milton


3 Campus Activism Lessons We Learned from 'Freedom Writers'

You can make a difference.Throughout history, universities and their surrounding communities have witnessed the rise of student activism – the effort by students to enact political, environmental, or social change. When thinking of this issue, the Counterculture era (1960s-1970s) comes to mind. During this time, students, to the greatest extent in US history, became vocal about American politics and participated in social movements revolving around equality.  Women march for equality in 1970.  ...
Tags: Movies, Writing, College, Advice, Nazis, US, Netflix, United States, Erin, Anne Frank, Frank, U S Supreme Court, Erin Gruwell, Richard LaGravenese, College Life, Erin Gruwell Hilary Swank


Carl Jung Psychoanalyzes Hitler: “He’s the Unconscious of 78 Million Germans.” “Without the German People He’d Be Nothing” (1938)

Were you to google “Carl Jung and Nazism”—and I’m not suggesting that you do—you would find yourself hip-deep in the charges that Jung was an anti-Semite and a Nazi sympathizer. Many sites condemn or exonerate him; many others celebrate him as a blood and soil Aryan hero. It can be nauseatingly difficult at times to tell these accounts apart. What to make of this controversy? What is the evidence brought against the famed Swiss psychiatrist and onetime close friend, student, and colleague of Si...
Tags: Psychology, Google, College, Nazis, Berlin, History, Nazi, Cia, Hitler, Mussolini, Sigmund Freud, Weimar Republic, Facebook Twitter, Carl Jung, Oss, Odin


Watch The Idea, the First Animated Film to Grapple with Big, Philosophical Ideas (1932)

A vague sense of disquiet settled over Europe in the period between World War I and World War II. As the slow burn of militant ultranationalism mingled with jingoist populism, authoritarian leaders and fascist factions found mounting support among a citizenry hungry for certainty. Europe’s growing trepidation fostered some of the 20th century’s most striking painterly, literary, and cinematic depictions of the totalitarianism that would soon follow. It was almost inevitable that this per...
Tags: Google, Europe, College, Nazis, Fox, Animation, Philosophy, Facebook Twitter, Goethe, George Grosz, Franz Kafka, William Moritz, Frans Masereel Masereel, Masereel, Berthold Bartosch, Bartosch


20,000 Americans Hold a Pro-Nazi Rally in Madison Square Garden in 1939: Chilling Video Re-Captures a Lost Chapter in US History

Our country’s bipartisan system ensures that every election will give rise to a winning side and a losing side—and depressingly, a sizable group who refrained from casting a vote either way. There are times when the divide between the factions does not seem insurmountable, when leaders in the highest positions of authority seem sincerely committed to reaching across the divide…. And then there are other times. Earlier in the year, the Women’s March on Washington and its hundreds of sister m...
Tags: Google, Garden, Film, College, Washington, Life, Nazis, US, History, Atlantic, Current Affairs, New York Times, Laura Poitras, Manhattan, Slavoj Zizek, Charlottesville


So the Alt-Right is coming to your campus

The Southern Poverty Law Center's guide, The Alt-Right on Campus: What Students Need to Know basically advises you to network with everyone on your campus who isn't a closet Nazi, meet with the Young Republicans (or whatever) and remind them that they're inviting Nazis to come speak, and then to throw a big, fun event far from whatever Nazi is addressing your school and starve them of publicity and attention. (more…)
Tags: Post, Politics, News, Activism, Education, Nazis, Nazi, Alt-right, Don't Feed The Trolls


Kurt Vonnegut Ponders Why “Poor Americans Are Taught to Hate Themselves” in a Timely Passage from Slaughterhouse-Five

Image by Daniele Prati, via Flickr Commons Amidst what is now an ordinary day’s chaos and turmoil in the news, you may have noticed some outrage circulating over comments made by erstwhile brain surgeon, former presidential candidate, and current Secretary of HUD Ben Carson. Poverty, he said, is a “state of mind.” The idea fits squarely in the wheelhouse of Carson’s brand of magical thinking, as well as what has always been a self-help tradition in the U.S. since Poor Richard’s Almanac. Consid...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, Nazis, Israel, America, Earth, Literature, Mark Twain, Richard, Napoleon Hill, St John, Kurt Vonnegut, Martin, Campbell, Hill


Kurt Vonnegut Ponders Why “Poor Americans Are Taught to Hate Themselves” in a Timely Passage from Slaughterhouse-Five/i>

Image by Daniele Prati, via Flickr Commons Amidst what is now an ordinary day’s chaos and turmoil in the news, you may have noticed some outrage circulating over comments made by erstwhile brain surgeon, former presidential candidate, and current Secretary of HUD Ben Carson. Poverty, he said, is a “state of mind.” The idea fits squarely in the wheelhouse of Carson’s brand of magical thinking, as well as what has always been a self-help tradition in the U.S. since Poor Richard’s Almanac. Consid...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, Nazis, Israel, America, Earth, Literature, Mark Twain, Richard, Napoleon Hill, St John, Kurt Vonnegut, Martin, Campbell, Hill


Helen Keller Writes a Letter to Nazi Students Before They Burn Her Book: “History Has Taught You Nothing If You Think You Can Kill Ideas” (1933)

Helen Keller achieved notoriety not only as an individual success story, but also as a prolific essayist, activist, and fierce advocate for poor and marginalized people. She “was a lifelong radical,” writes Peter Dreier at Yes! magazine, whose “investigation into the causes of blindness” eventually led her to “embrace socialism, feminism, and pacifism.” Keller supported the NAACP and ACLU, and protested strongly against patronizing calls for her to “confine my activities to social service and ...
Tags: Google, Europe, Congress, College, Germany, Nazis, Berlin, New York City, History, Rebecca, Austria, United States, Aclu, New York Times, Nazi, Hitler


Artist is Creating a Parthenon Made of 100,000 Banned Books: A Monument to Democracy & Intellectual Freedom

With the rise of Far Right candidates in Europe and in America, along with creeping dictatorship in Turkey and authoritarianism in the Philippines, the idea of democracy and freedom of speech feels under threat more than ever. While we don’t talk about political solutions here on Open Culture, we do believe in the power of art to illuminate. Argentine artist Marta Minujín is creating a large-scale artwork called The Parthenon of Books that will be constructed on Friedrichsplatz in Kassel...
Tags: Google, Art, Europe, Politics, Greece, College, China, Nazis, America, San Francisco, Turkey, George Orwell, Philippines, Current Affairs, Argentina, Lewis Carroll


The pitfalls of drawing political parallels with the 1930s | Letters

If we are to avoid a repeat of the 1930s it is necessary to also avoid misremembering them (A warning from our darkest, bloodiest chapter, 11 March). The German hyperinflation took place not in the 1930s, but between June 1921 and January 1924, and was caused by the Weimar Republic’s attempts to comply with the reparations demanded by the western democracies (who simply seized German resources when the country proved unable to pay cash). The resulting evaporation of their savings no doubt did li...
Tags: Politics, Education, Germany, Nazis, Eu, UK News, European Central Bank, World news, History, Hitler, Weimar Republic, Nazism, Kingston University, Ian McEwan, Dachau, Streicher


Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will Wasn’t a Cinematic Masterpiece; It Was a Staggeringly Effective Piece of Propaganda

“Triumph of the Will,” says Dan Olson of the analytical video series Folding Ideas, “is not a triumph of cinema.” Already the proposition runs counter to what many of us learned in film studies classes, whose professors assured us that Leni Riefenstahl’s 1935 glorification of Nazi Germany, despite its thoroughly propagandistic nature, still counts as a serious achievement in film art. “None of the ideas or techniques were new,” Olson explains. “It is simply that no one had previously thr...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Germany, Nazis, Michael Bay, Los Angeles, History, Nazi, Seoul, Walt Disney, Noam Chomsky, Facebook Twitter, Los Angeles Review of Books, Olson, Leni Riefenstahl


How Did Nietzsche Become the Most Misunderstood & Bastardized Philosopher?: A Video from Slate Explains

Is there a more misunderstood philosopher than Friedrich Nietzsche? Granted, the question makes two assumptions: 1) That people read philosophy 2) That people read Friedrich Nietzsche. Perhaps neither of these things is widely true. Many people get their philosophy from film and television: Good Will Hunting, True Detective, Coming to America…. There’s nothing inherently wrong with that. I don’t read medical books. Most of my knowledge of medicine comes from hospital dramas. (If you ever hear m...
Tags: Google, Hollywood, College, Nazis, America, Judaism, Philosophy, God, Tony, Facebook Twitter, Wagner, Josh Jones, Tony Soprano, Friedrich Nietzsche, Richard Wagner, Nietzsche


Hannah Arendt Explains How Propaganda Uses Lies to Erode All Truth & Morality: Insights from The Origins of Totalitarianism

Image by Bernd Schwabe, via Wikimedia Commons At least when I was in grade school, we learned the very basics of how the Third Reich came to power in the early 1930s. Paramilitary gangs terrorizing the opposition, the incompetence and opportunism of German conservatives, the Reichstag Fire. And we learned about the critical importance of propaganda, the deliberate misinforming of the public in order to sway opinions en masse and achieve popular support (or at least the appearance of it). While...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, Germany, Nazis, History, Levy, Pbs, Hitler, The Washington Post, Stalin, Goebbels, McGill University, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Michiko Kakutani


Hannah Arendt Explains How Propaganda Uses Lies to Erode All Truth & Morality: An Incisive Quote from The Origins of Totalitarianism

Image by Bernd Schwabe, via Wikimedia Commons At least when I was in grade school, we learned the very basics of how the Third Reich came to power in the early 1930s. Paramilitary gangs terrorizing the opposition, the incompetence and opportunism of German conservatives, the Reichstag Fire. And we learned about the critical importance of propaganda, the deliberate misinforming of the public in order to sway opinions en masse and achieve popular support (or at least the appearance of it). While...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, Germany, Nazis, History, Levy, Pbs, Hitler, The Washington Post, Stalin, Goebbels, McGill University, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Michiko Kakutani


Holocaust in France: Recommended Reading for Vincent Peillon

Petain and Hitler France's former education minister and current candidate in the French socialist primaries for president, Vincent Peillon, is, sadly, a Dummkopf about history. Especially the unpleasant history of France during WWII. Of course running for president takes a lot of time - about three weeks for the hastily thrown together French socialist primaries - so who has time to bone up on something old and boring like the details of the round-up, deportation and murder of more tha...
Tags: Travel, Education, France, Nazis, Paris, Sarah, Jean Cocteau, Picasso, Auschwitz, Allies, East, Django Reinhardt, Mysteries of France, Paris Writers News, Pétain, Peillon


A Few Books About The Holocaust in France

Petain and Hitler   * SPECIAL HOLOCAUST IN FRANCE READING LIST  *    THE HOLOCAUST IN FRANCE - Yad Vashem "The Jews in France were deported to the East at the height of a two year process of persecution and aggressive legislation. The laws passed included statutes defining who was to be considered a Jew, isolating Jews from French society, divesting them of their livelihood, incarcerating many of them, and registering their names with the police.... A total of some 76,000 Jews from France, ...
Tags: Travel, Education, France, Nazis, Paris, Hitler, Sarah, Jean Cocteau, Picasso, Auschwitz, Allies, East, Django Reinhardt, Drancy, Mysteries of France, Paris Writers News


From Caligari to Hitler: A Look at How Cinema Laid the Foundation for Tyranny in Weimar Germany

When I first got into film criticism and was finally in a college town with a decent used bookshop, Siegfried Kracauer’s From Caligari to Hitler: A Psychological History of the German Film was in that first huge batch of books I bought to place on my shelf. I had just watched The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (watch it online here) for the first time, and had seen the book referenced often. Alas, it also sat on my shelf unread, along with some other thick critical tomes. But needless to say, I...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Germany, Nazis, Tim Burton, America, Hitler, Casablanca, Weimar, Facebook Twitter, Fritz Lang, Joseph Goebbels, Weimar Germany, Ted Mills, Frankfurt School


School for teenage codebreakers to open in Bletchley Park

Sixth-form College of National Security will teach cyber skills to some of Britain’s most gifted youngsters to fight growing threatIts first operatives famously cracked coded messages encrypted by the Nazis, hastening the end of the second world war.Now Bletchley Park is planning a new school for the next generation of codebreakers in order to plug a huge skills gap in what is fast emerging as the biggest security threat to 21st-century Britain. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Technology, Education, Internet, Nazis, World news, Cybercrime, Britain, Hacking, Schools, Bletchley Park, Espionage, Colleges, Further Education, Sixth form, Cyberwar



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