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Hear the Sounds of the Actual Instruments for Which Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn, and Handel Originally Composed Their Music

When we go to a concert of orchestral music today, we hear most every piece played on the same range of instruments — instruments we know and love, to be sure, but instruments designed and operated within quite strict parameters. The pleasing quality of the sounds they produce may make us believe that we're hearing everything just as the composer originally intended, but we usually aren't. To hear what the likes of Mozart, Beethoven, Handel, and Haydn would have had in their head as they...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, History, Beethoven, Seoul, Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Haydn, Handel, Hieronymus Bosch, Colin Marshall, Facebook Hear, OAE


An Animated History of Cheese: 10,000 Years in Under Six Minutes

We can now eat cheese nearly anywhere in the world, and most world cuisines seem to have found — to varying degrees of success — ways of working the stuff into their native dishes. But if cheese has gone and continues to go global, from where did its journey begin? The TED-Ed video above can tell you that and more, having been written by University of Vermont professor of nutrition and food sciences Paul Kindstedt, author of Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and its Place in Wester...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, Food & Drink, Seoul, Leo Tolstoy, Mediterranean, University Of Vermont, Facebook Twitter, BCE, Fertile Crescent, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Paul Kindstedt, Kindstedt


An Ancient Egyptian Homework Assignment from 1800 Years Ago: Some Things Are Truly Timeless

Every generation of schoolchildren no doubt first assumes homework to be a historically distinct form of punishment, developed expressly to be inflicted on them. But the parents of today's miserable homework-doers also, of course, had to do homework themselves, as did their parents' parents. It turns out that you can go back surprisingly far in history and still find examples of the menace of homework, as far back as ancient Egypt, a civilization from which one example of an out-of-classroom as...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Education, Writing, College, History, Egypt, Seoul, British Library, Turin, Livescience, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Jason Daley, 21st Century Los Angeles, Egypt Mesopotamia China


Download Vincent van Gogh’s Collection of 500 Japanese Prints, Which Inspired Him to Create “the Art of the Future”

Vincent van Gogh never went to Japan, but he did spend quite a bit of time in Arles, which he considered the Japan of France. What made him think of the place that way had to do entirely with aesthetics. The Netherlands-born painter had moved to Paris in 1886, but two years later he set off for the south of France in hopes of finding real-life equivalents of the "clearness of the atmosphere and the gay colour effects" of Japanese prints. These days, we've all seen at least a few examples of tha...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, Microsoft, College, France, Paris, Netherlands, Seoul, Arles, Van Gogh, Vincent, Simon Schama, Facebook Twitter, Vincent Van Gogh, Theo


Dressing for Dream Destinations: South Korea

How to dress when visiting South Korea's ancient sites and urban jungles alike. Pexels "Dressing for Dream Destinations" is a travel series that takes us across the world to daydream about what we'd wear to various locations.South Korea is emerging as one of the top tourist destinations in Asia for a good reason. The exciting cities, food scene, and plethora of historical sites makes for an unforgettable vacation. Cities like Seoul and Busan are known for being home to very fashionable and tre...
Tags: Travel, Asia, South Korea, College, Inspiration, Korea, Vacation, Busan, Seoul, Packing, Jeju, Jeju Island, Outfits, SEOUL Seoul, Busan Busan, Jeju Island Jeju Island


A New Edition of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 That’s Only Readable When You Apply Heat to Its Pages: Pre-Order It Today

Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, a novel of a nearly bookless dystopian future in which "firemen" go around burning any last volumes they can find, lends itself well to highly physical special editions. Last year we featured an asbestos-bound, fireproof version, 200 copies of which were published at the book's first printing in 1953. The year before we featured an experimental edition perhaps even more faithfully reflective of the story's premise, one whose all-black pages only reveal the ...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Ray Bradbury, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Electric Literature, Bradbury, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Read Ray Bradbury, Radio Drama Based, Facebook A New Edition of Ray Bradbury


Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Competing Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books

By now we've all heard of Marie Kondo, the Japanese home-organization guru whose book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up became an international bestseller in 2011. Her advice about how to straighten up the home, branded the "KonMari" method, has more recently landed her that brass ring of early 21st-century fame, her own Netflix series. A few years ago we featured her tips for dealing with your piles of reading material, which, like all her advice, are based on discarding the items t...
Tags: Google, Books, Japan, Washington Post, College, Netflix, Seoul, Tupperware, Facebook Twitter, Marie Kondo, Kondo, Colin Marshall, Ron Charles, Anakana Schofield, 21st Century Los Angeles, Schofield Charles


Marie Kondo v. Tsundoku: Two Japanese Philosophies on Whether to Keep or Discard Unread Books

By now we've all heard of Marie Kondo, the Japanese home-organization guru whose book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up became an international bestseller in 2011. Her advice about how to straighten up the home, branded the "KonMari" method, has more recently landed her that brass ring of early 21st-century fame, her own Netflix series. A few years ago we featured her tips for dealing with your piles of reading material, which, like all her advice, are based on discarding the items t...
Tags: Google, Books, Japan, Washington Post, College, Netflix, Seoul, Tupperware, Facebook Twitter, Marie Kondo, Kondo, Colin Marshall, Ron Charles, Anakana Schofield, 21st Century Los Angeles, Schofield Charles


Artist Hand-Cuts an Intricate Octopus From a Single Piece of Paper: Discover the Japanese Art of Kirie

At first glance, the octopus in the video above might appear to be breathing. A second look reveals that it isn't actually breathing, nor is it actually an octopus at all, but seemingly just a highly detailed drawing of one. Only upon the third look, if even then, does it become clear that the octopus has been not drawn but intricately cut, and out of a single large sheet of paper at that. The two-dimensional sea creature represents a recent high point in the work of Japanese artist Masa...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, Seoul, Osaka, Facebook Twitter, Waldman, Fukuda, Colin Marshall, Spoon Tamago, 21st Century Los Angeles, Kirie, Johnny Waldman, Masayo Fukuda, TANT


When Pablo Picasso and Guillaume Apollinaire Were Accused of Stealing the Mona Lisa (1911)

If you visit the Louvre today, you'll notice two phenomena in particular: the omnipresence of security, and the throng of visitors obscuring the Mona Lisa. If you'd visited just over a century ago, neither would have been the case. And if you happened to visit on August 22nd, 1911, you wouldn't have encountered Leonardo's famed portrait at all. That morning, writes Messy Nessy, "Parisian artist Louis Béroud, famous for painting and selling his copies of famous artworks, walked into the Louvre t...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, France, History, Pablo Picasso, Hitler, Seoul, Huffington Post, Louvre, Mona Lisa, Picasso, Sara Boboltz, Facebook Twitter, Da Vinci


Watch Four Daring Films by Lois Weber, “the Most Important Female Director the American Film Industry Has Known” (1913-1921)

These days, every cinephile can name more than a few women among their favorite living filmmakers: Sofia Coppola, Ava DuVernay, Kathryn Bigelow, Jane Campion, Agnès Varda — the list goes on. But if we look farther back into cinema history, coming up with examples becomes much more difficult. There's Ida Lupino, previously featured here on Open Culture, whose The Hitch-Hiker made her the only female director of a 1950s film noir, but before her? No name from that early era is more importa...
Tags: Google, New York, Film, College, Wikipedia, History, Seoul, Pittsburgh, Gretel, Weber, Facebook Twitter, Griffith, Ida Lupino, Colin Marshall, Alice Guy Blaché, Lotte Reiniger


The Largest J.R.R. Tolkien Exhibit in Generations Is Coming to the U.S.: Original Drawings, Manuscripts, Maps & More

"I first took on The Lord of the Rings at the age of eleven or twelve," writes The New Yorker's Anthony Lane. "It was, and remains, not a book that you happen to read, like any other, but a book that happens to you: a chunk bitten out of your life." The preteen years may remain the most opportune ones in which to pick up the work of J.R.R. Tolkien, but whatever the period in life at which they find their way in, most readers who make the journey through Middle-earth never really leave th...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, Maps, New York, College, America, Seoul, Middle Earth, Robert Louis Stevenson, Tolkien, Morgan, Facebook Twitter, Anthony Lane, Lane, May


The King and the Mockingbird: The Surreal French Animated Film That Took 30 Years to Complete, and Profoundly Influenced Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata

Animation, as anyone who has ever tried their hand at it knows, takes a great deal of time. The King and the Mockingbird (Le Roi et l'Oiseau), for example, required more than thirty years, a journey lengthened by much more than just the laboriousness of bringing hand-drawn images to life. But it does that gloriously, with a style and sensibility quite unlike any animated film made before or since — a signature of its creators, animator Paul Grimault and poet/screenwriter Jacques Prévert....
Tags: Google, Europe, Film, College, Roald Dahl, America, Animation, Charles, Seoul, Isao Takahata, Miyazaki, Hayao Miyazaki, Studio Ghibli, Jean Cocteau, Walt Disney, Hans Christian Andersen


An Animated History of Versailles: Six Minutes of Animation Show the Construction of the Grand Palace Over 400 Years

Few tourists making their first trip to France go home without having seen Versailles. But why do so many want to see Versailles in the first place? Yes, its history goes all the way back to the 1620s, with its comparatively modest beginnings as a hunting lodge built for King Louis XIII, but much in Europe goes back quite a bit further. It did house the French royal family for generations, but absolute monarchy hasn't been a favored institution in France for quite some time. Only the mos...
Tags: Google, Europe, College, France, History, Architecture, Paris, Seoul, Versailles, Facebook Twitter, Louis XIII, Louis XV, Louis XIV, Colin Marshall, Fifth Republic, 21st Century Los Angeles


450+ Movie Scenes Where Actors Break the Fourth Wall, Presented in Two Big Supercuts

Do you remember the first time you saw the fourth wall broken? Few of us probably do, but maybe we all should, given how radial a departure from established dramatic convention — specifically, the convention dictating that a work of dramatic art not acknowledge the fact that it is a work of dramatic art — fourth-wall-breakage represents. Then again, a work of art can break the fourth wall subtly, too subtly to make an outsized impact on our consciousness: take, for example, all the brief...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Hollywood, Film, College, France, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Molière, Coetzee, J M Coetzee, Vincent Canby, Colin Marshall, Denis Diderot, 21st Century Los Angeles, Elizabeth Costello


Watch an Art Conservator Bring Classic Paintings Back to Life in Intriguingly Narrated Videos

Even in our age of unprecedentedly abundant images, delivered to us at all times by print, film, television, and especially the ever-multiplying forms of digital media, something inside us still values paintings. It must have to do with their physicality, the physicality of oil on canvas or whatever tangible materials the painter originally used. But in that great advantage of the painting lies the great disadvantage of the painting: tangible materials degrade over time, and many, if not most, ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Chicago, Asmr, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Baumgartner, Colin Marshall, Facebook Watch, Mother Mary, 21st Century Los Angeles, Julian Baumgartner, Kate Sierzputowski Baumgartner, William Merrit Chase Baumgartner, Hitchcock Movies Rembrandt


Haruki Murakami Day: Stream Seven Hours of Mixes Collecting All the Jazz, Classical & Classic American Pop Music from His Novels

What makes the novels of Haruki Murakami — originally written in Japanese and almost unfailingly filled with some odd but deeply characteristic mixture of cats, wells, parallel worlds, mysterious disappearing women with well-formed ears, and much else besides — so beloved around the world? A large part of it must have to do with Murakami's cultural references, sometimes Japanese but most often western, and even more so when it comes to music. "Almost without exception," writes The Week music cr...
Tags: Google, Books, Music, London, College, Georgia, Tokyo, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Brook Benton, Facebook Twitter, Murakami, Colin Marshall, Scott Meslow, Meslow, Miles Davis Glenn Gould


Earthrise, Apollo 8’s Photo of Earth from Space, Turns 50: Download the Iconic Photograph from NASA

Just a little over fifty years ago, we didn't know what Earth looked like from space. Or rather, we had a decent idea what it looked like, but no clear color images of the sight existed. 2001: A Space Odyssey presented a particularly striking vision of Earth from space in the spring of 1968, but it used visual effects and imagination (both to a still-impressive degree) to do so. Only on Christmas Eve of that year would Earth be genuinely photographed from that kind of distance, captured with a ...
Tags: Google, Photography, Astronomy, Washington Post, College, Washington, History, Nasa, Earth, New Mexico, Ansel Adams, Seoul, Hasselblad, Facebook Twitter, Hernandez, Anders


NASA Creates Movie Parody Posters for Its Expedition Flights: Download Parodies of Metropolis, The Matrix, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and More

For just over eighteen years now, NASA has been conducting expeditions to the International Space Station. Each of these missions has not just a name, or at least a number (last week saw the launch of Expedition 58), but an official poster with a group photo of the crew. "These posters were used to advertise expeditions and were also hung in NASA facilities and other government organizations," says Bored Panda. "However, when astronauts got bored of the standard group photos they decided to spi...
Tags: Google, Science, Design, College, Nasa, Earth, Metropolis, Sci Fi, Seoul, Douglas Adams, Facebook Twitter, Fritz Lang, Andrei Tarkovsky, Colin Marshall, Future of Space Travel, NASA NASA


Buckminster Fuller Documented His Life Every 15 Minutes, from 1920 Until 1983

If you've heard of Buckminster Fuller, you've almost certainly heard the word "Dymaxion." Despite its strong pre-Space Age redolence, the term has somehow remained compelling into the 21st century. But what does it mean? When Fuller, a self-described “comprehensive, anticipatory design scientist,” first invented a house meant practically to reinvent domestic living, Chicago's Marshall Field and Company department store put a model on display. The company "wanted a catchy label, so it hired a c...
Tags: Google, Design, College, History, Chicago, Architecture, Seoul, Stanford University, Facebook Twitter, Elizabeth Kolbert, Fuller, Buckminster Fuller, Colin Marshall, Ted Mills, Kolbert, Dymaxion Car House


What Makes Music Sound Like Christmas Music? Hear the Single Most Christmassy Chord of All Explained

During the past few months of this year, as in those same months of any year, we've been hearing a great deal of Christmas music. Some of the songs in the mix — "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," "The Christmas Song" — few of us have ever known a time without, and others make it in because of their seasonally themed lyrical content. But certain songs just sound like Christmas songs, somehow, and to understand what, in musical terms, fills those co...
Tags: Google, Music, College, John Lennon, Christopher Lee, James Brown, Yoko Ono, Paul Mccartney, Vox, Seoul, Mariah Carey, Rudolph, Facebook Twitter, Johnny Cash, Irving Berlin, Baskin Robbins


Artificial Intelligence Creates Realistic Photos of People, None of Whom Actually Exist

Each day in the 2010s, it seems, brings another startling development in the field of artificial intelligence — a field widely written off not all that long ago as a dead end. But now AI looks just as alive as the people you see in these photographs, despite the fact that none of them have ever lived, and it's questionable whether we can even call the images that depict them "photographs" at all. All of them come, in fact, as products of a state-of-the-art generative adversarial network, a type...
Tags: Google, Photography, Technology, College, Nvidia, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Bach, James Vincent, Colin Marshall, Petapixel Related Content, 21st Century Los Angeles, Artificial Intelligence Program Tries, Facebook Artificial Intelligence, Printer Data Analysis of Rembrandt


Discover Isotype, the 1920s Attempt to Create a Universal Language with Stylish Icons & Graphic Design

How long has mankind dreamed of an international language? The first answer that comes to mind, of course, dates that dream to the time of the Biblical story of the Tower of Babel. If you don't happen to believe that humanity was made to speak a variety of mutually incomprehensible tongues as punishment for daring to build a tower tall enough to reach heaven, maybe you'd prefer a date somewhere around the much later development of Esperanto, the best-known language invented specifically to atta...
Tags: Google, Facebook, England, Design, College, History, Austria, Vienna, Atlantic, Holland, Gizmodo, Seoul, Cindy Sherman, Rotterdam, Facebook Twitter, U S Department of Transportation


Take a Virtual Tour of Brazil’s National Museum & Its Artifacts: Google Digitized the Museum’s Collection Before the Fateful Fire

How to describe the magnitude of the loss when Brazil's Museu Nacional caught fire in September? The New Yorker's Alejandro Chacoff ventured an analogy that would resonate with readers of that magazine: "It’s as if, in New York, the American Museum of Natural History and the New School, or a part of the Columbia campus, had been built on the same spot, and then was reduced to ashes." The 200-year-old museum lost an estimated 92.5 percent of its 20-million-item archive, one of the largest collec...
Tags: Google, Amazon, New York, College, Americas, Museums, Brazil, American Museum of Natural History, Seoul, Columbia, Facebook Twitter, New School, LUZIA, Colin Marshall, Alejandro Chacoff, 21st Century Los Angeles


Watch the First-Ever Kiss on Film Between Two Black Actors, Just Honored by the Library of Congress (1898)

In 1896, Thomas Edison produced The Kiss. One of the first films ever commercially screened, it adapts the then-popular musical The Widow Jones — or at least it adapts about twenty seconds of it, a kiss that happens in the very last scene. Two years later came the equally short but differently groundbreaking Something Good – Negro Kiss, a version of The Kiss starring black actors instead of white ones. Only now, thanks in part to the efforts of University of Southern California archivist Di...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Congress, Film, College, America, History, Chicago, Shanghai, Npr, Museum of Modern Art, Seoul, Jones, University Of Southern California, Field, Thomas Edison


See Classic Japanese Woodblocks Brought Surreally to Life as Animated GIFs

Much of the image we have of life in Japan in the 17th through the 19th century, we have because of woodblock prints, or specifically ukiyo-e, or "pictures of the floating world," which vividly capture a great variety of scenes and the people who inhabited them. The once-closed-off Japan has changed a great deal since that era, on most levels even more so than other countries, and the artistic portrayals of Japanese life have also multiplied enormously. Yet even in the 21st century, ukiyo-e con...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Japan, London, College, Animation, Seoul, Osaka, Marty Mcfly, Facebook Twitter, Yoshida, Kanazawa, Doc Brown, Hokusai, Utagawa Hiroshige


The Revolutionary Title Sequences and Trailers Created by Pablo Ferro: Dr. Strangelove, A Clockwork Orange, Stop Making Sense, Bullitt & Other Films

Pablo Ferro, who died last month after more than 60 years in graphic design, had such an impact on cinema that we've all felt it at one time or another, despite the fact that he never directed a single feature himself. Rather, he made his mark with title sequences and trailers, each of them exuding no small amount of then-revolutionary and still difficult-to-imitate style. Having emigrated from Cuba to New York at the age of twelve, Ferro taught himself to animate before finding his firs...
Tags: Google, New York, Film, College, Animation, Beethoven, Stanley Kubrick, Kubrick, Steve McQueen, Cuba, Seoul, Alfred Hitchcock, Saul Bass, Facebook Twitter, Strangelove, Ferro


Pristine Footage Lets You Revisit Life in Paris in the 1890s: Watch Footage Shot by the Lumière Brothers

Pioneering filmmakers Auguste and Louis Lumière, the inventors of the projected motion picture, held their first private screening in Paris in March of 1895. The streets of the French capital would go on to provide the brothers with plenty of life in motion for their new technology to capture in the years thereafter, and you can watch eight such real scenes compiled in the video above. With its startling clarity — and its more recently corrected motion and added sound — this selection of...
Tags: Google, London, Film, College, Berlin, New York City, San Francisco, History, Paris, Tokyo, Eiffel Tower, Seoul, Coen Brothers, Facebook Twitter, Eric Rohmer, Paris Metro


How the Astonishing Sushi Scene in Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs Was Animated: A Time-Lapse of the Month-Long Shoot

Since the moviegoing public first started hearing it twenty years ago, Wes Anderson's name has been a byword for cinematic meticulousness. The association has only grown stronger with each film he's made, as the live-action ones have featured increasingly complex ships, trains, and grand hotels — to say nothing of the costumes worn and accoutrements possessed by the characters who inhabit them — and the stop-motion animated ones have demanded a superhuman attention to detail by their ver...
Tags: Google, Japan, Film, College, Fox, Food & Drink, Animation, Wes Anderson, Akira Kurosawa, Grand Budapest Hotel, Seoul, Anderson, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Isle of Dogs, Wes Anderson Yasujiro Ozu


The Evolution of The Great Wave off Kanazawa: See Four Versions That Hokusai Painted Over Nearly 40 Years

Has any Japanese woodblock print — or for that matter, any piece of Japanese art — endured as well across place and time as The Great Wave off Kanagawa? Even those of us who have never known its name, let alone those of us unsure of who made it and when, can bring it to mind it with some clarity, as sure a sign as any (along with the numerous parodies) that it taps into something deep within all of us. But though the artist behind it, 18th- and 19th-century ukiyo-e painter Katsushika Hokusai, w...
Tags: Google, Art, College, History, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Kanazawa, Hokusai, Kanagawa, Katsushika Hokusai, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles



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