Education


Posts filtered by tags: Vox[x]


 

How the Bicycle Helped Usher in the Women’s Rights Movement (Circa 1890)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPLJgkVsXpE The early history of the bicycle did not promise great things—or anything, really—for women at the dawn of the 19th century. A two-wheeled bicycle-like invention, for example, built in 1820, “was more like an agricultural implement in construction than a bicycle,” one bicycle history notes. Made of wood, the “hobby horses” and velocipedes of cycling’s first decades rolled on iron wheels. Their near-total lack of suspension led to the epithet “b...
Tags: Google, New York, Congress, College, France, San Francisco, History, Atlantic, Ohio, Vox, Belle Epoque, Facebook Twitter, Adrienne LaFrance, Josh Jones, Susan B Anthony, London Paris


How the Bicycle Accelerated the Women’s Rights Movement (Circa 1890)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPLJgkVsXpE The early history of the bicycle did not promise great things—or anything, really—for women at the dawn of the 19th century. A two-wheeled bicycle-like invention, for example, built in 1820, “was more like an agricultural implement in construction than a bicycle,” one bicycle history notes. Made of wood, the “hobby horses” and velocipedes of cycling’s first decades rolled on iron wheels. Their near-total lack of suspension led to the epithet “b...
Tags: Google, New York, Congress, College, France, San Francisco, History, Atlantic, Ohio, Vox, Belle Epoque, Facebook Twitter, Adrienne LaFrance, Josh Jones, Susan B Anthony, London Paris


How to Talk with a Conspiracy Theorist: What the Experts Recommend

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpInOs1Fyno Why do people pledge allegiance to views that seem fundamentally hostile to reality? Maybe believers in shadowy, evil forces and secret cabals fall prey to motivated reasoning. Truth for them is what they need to believe in order to get what they want. Their certainty in the justness of a cause can feel as comforting as a warm blanket on a winter’s night. But conspiracy theories go farther than private delusions of grandeur. They have spilled i...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Politics, College, Current Affairs, Reddit, University of Pennsylvania, Vox, Bill Nye, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Pew Research, Josh Jones, University of California Irvine, Cass Sunstein, MIT Technology Review


How to Talk with a Conspiracy Theorist (and Why People Believe Conspiracy Theories in the First Place): What the Experts Recommend

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpInOs1Fyno Why do people pledge allegiance to views that seem fundamentally hostile to reality? Maybe believers in shadowy, evil forces and secret cabals fall prey to motivated reasoning. Truth for them is what they need to believe in order to get what they want. Their certainty in the justness of a cause can feel as comforting as a warm blanket on a winter’s night. But conspiracy theories go farther than private delusions of grandeur. They have spilled i...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Politics, College, Current Affairs, Reddit, University of Pennsylvania, Vox, Bill Nye, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Pew Research, Josh Jones, University of California Irvine, Cass Sunstein, MIT Technology Review


The 25th Amendment: An Introduction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJlOb7n_iCI Read along with the text of the 25th Amendment online here. And get some background from the Constitution Center here, and Vox’s explainer here. The 25th Amendment: An Introduction is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.
Tags: Google, College, Current Affairs, Vox, Facebook Twitter


Why Is Napoleon’s Hand Always in His Waistcoat?: The Origins of This Distinctive Pose Explained

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTA8j5wSTx4 If the name of Napoleon Bonaparte should come up in a game of charades, we all know what to do: stand up with one foot in front of the other, stick a hand into our shirt, and consider the round won. Yet the recognition of this pose as distinctively Napoleonic may not be as wide as we assume, or so Coleman Lowndes discovered in the research for the video above, “Napoleon’s Missing Hand, Explained.” Asked to act out the image of Napoleon, not all...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, Wikipedia, Russia, History, Ted, David, Bill Murray, Napoleon Bonaparte, Bill, Vox, Seoul, Charlie Chaplin, Napoleon


US mayors expect 'dramatic' cuts with public schools hit the worst - and the US Senate's stimulus package is unlikely to help

Photo taken on Nov. 19, 2020 shows the empty playground of a public school in New York, the United States. Xinhua/Wang Ying via Getty Images A survey of 130 US mayors found that 45% expect to make or see serious cuts to public education spending due to the COVID-19 pandemic. An equal number expect cuts in parks and recreation, transportation budgets, and social services. The vast majority of mayors surveyed said the federal government's response to the pandemic was inadequate. Visit Busine...
Tags: Politics, New York, Education, Senate, White House, US, America, Trends, Joe Biden, Economy, United States, Mitch McConnell, US Senate, Survey, Mayors, Vox


How Errol Morris Became Obsessed with — and Figured Out — the Truth of a Famous War Photograph

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8QVBt2hh9M Errol Morris didn’t go all the way to the Crimean Peninsula just because of a sentence written by Susan Sontag. “No,” he once explained to a friend, “it was actually two sentences.” Found in Regarding the Pain of Others, Sontag’s late book-length essay on war photography, these lines deal with the fact that “many of the canonical images of early war photography turn out to have been staged, or to have had their subjects tampered with.” Take Val...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Photography, College, History, New York Times, Vox, Seoul, Tennyson, Morris, Valley, Abraham Lincoln, Facebook Twitter, Errol Morris, Fenton, Susan Sontag


The British Museum is Full of Looted Artifacts

As critics and fans wrote excitedly upon its release, Marvel’s Black Panther did an excellent job of creating sympathy for its villain. Many found Erik Killmonger’s radicalism more appealing than the hero’s moderation for some specific reasons, beginning with the heist at the “Museum of Great Britain,” a thinly fictionalized British Museum. “In one scene,” writes gallerist Lise Ragbir at Hyperallergic, “the blockbuster superhero movie touches on issues of provenance, repatriation, divers...
Tags: Google, College, Nigeria, Africa, History, Museums, Vox, British Museum, Benin, Great Britain, Facebook Twitter, Rosetta Stone, Josh Jones, Deborah Roberts, Hyperallergic, Durham NC Follow


Why This Font Is Everywhere: How Cooper Black Became Pop Culture’s Favorite Font

You know Times New Roman, you know Helvetica, you know Comic Sans — and though you may not realize it, you know Cooper Black as well. Just think of the "VOTE FOR PEDRO" shirt worn in Napoleon Dynamite (and in real life for years thereafter), or a few decades earlier, the cover of Pet Sounds. In fact, the history of Cooper Black extends well before the Beach Boys' mid-1960s masterpiece; to see and hear the full story, watch the Vox video above. It begins, as narrator Estelle Caswell expla...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, History, Chicago, Vox, Seoul, Helvetica, Cooper, Facebook Twitter, Napoleon Dynamite, Colin Marshall, Caswell, Vincent Connare, Estelle Caswell


Zigazoo launches to be a ‘TikTok’ for kids, surpasses 100,000 uploads and downloads

Like many parents, Zigazoo founder Zak Ringelstein worries about his children’s screen time. His worries only grew when COVID-19 led to school shutdowns and kids came home to a world of remote learning. Now, as lockdowns extend, Ringelstein is learning to embrace screen time as a way to sneak education and entertainment into his kids’ digital diet. Ringelstein, the former founder of UClass (acquired in 2015), launched Zigazoo, which he describes as a “TikTok for kids.” Zigazoo is a free app wher...
Tags: Google, Startups, TC, Facebook, Apps, Education, Youtube, Tech, New York Times, Michelle Obama, Vox, Edtech, American Federation Of Teachers, Zak Ringelstein, Ringelstein, Tiktok


Nina Simone Song “Color Is a Beautiful Thing” Animated in a Gorgeous Video

Four years (or what seems like a lifetime) ago, controversy erupted over the casting of actress Zoe Saldana, with darkened skin, as iconic pianist and singer Nina Simone in the biopic Nina. Accusations of racism and colorism met the film, historical attitudes hundreds of years in the making that Simone herself fought throughout her career, especially after she joined the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and actively made her personal struggles with racism central to her political state...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Jay Z, Village Voice, Vox, Nina Simone, Lauryn Hill, Zoe Saldana, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Simone, Nina, Lorraine Hansberry, Durham NC Follow, Simone Kelly


Netflix Makes Documentaries Free to Stream: Design, Politics, Sports, Sir David Attenborough & More

Many of us kept indoors by the COVID-19 pandemic for days — or rather weeks, or perhaps months — have been imbued with a new sense of wonder about our world. Specifically, we're wondering what's going on in it. At the same time as the global scientific community struggles to determine the nature of the new and still poorly understood virus taking lives and immobilizing economies, we hear digital word of consequent phenomena also previously unknown in our lifetimes: wild animals, for inst...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Education, Film, College, Netflix, House, Bjork, David Attenborough, Vox, Ava Duvernay, Seoul, Jason Kottke, Facebook Twitter, Kottke, Colin Marshall


This chart will tell you how biased your favorite news source is

Polarized, unreliable news can be dangerous during turbulent times, such as the coronavirus pandemic. The Ad Fontes' Media Bias Chart maps out the biases and reliability of legacy and alternative news organizations. Political bias is one of many we must be wary of when judging the quality of the news we consume. The New York Times was a failing newspaper before changing its business model to muckraking on Trump. Fox News had to drop its "Fair and Balanced" motto because that's false advertising...
Tags: Politics, News, Education, Internet, Washington Post, Democracy, Journalism, Cnn, United States, New York Times, Innovation, Associated Press, Npr, National Enquirer, Vox, Fox News Channel


How biased is your favorite news source? This chart will tell you.

Polarized, unreliable news can be dangerous during turbulent times, such as the coronavirus pandemic. The Ad Fontes' Media Bias Chart maps out the biases and reliability of legacy and alternative news organizations. Political bias is one of many we must be wary of when judging the quality of the news we consume. The New York Times was a failing newspaper before changing its business model to muckraking on Trump. Fox News had to drop its "Fair and Balanced" motto because that's false advertising...
Tags: Politics, News, Education, Internet, Washington Post, Democracy, Journalism, Cnn, United States, New York Times, Innovation, Associated Press, Npr, National Enquirer, Vox, Fox News Channel


What’s the Function of Criticism? Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #36 with Critic Noah Berlatsky

http://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/partiallyexaminedlife/PMP_036_3-11-20.mp3 Do we need professional critics regulating our entertainment intake?  Noah has written for numerous publications including The Washington Post, The Atlantic, NBC News, The Guardian, Slate, and Vox, and his work has come up for discussion in multiple past Pretty Much Pop episodes. He was invited to join hosts Mark Linsenmayer, Erica Spyres, and Brian Hirt in spelling out the functions of criticism...
Tags: Google, Music, Film, College, Noah, Criticism, Atlantic, Bob Dylan, Literature, Vox, Mel Brooks, Hemingway, Mark, Facebook Twitter, Weiner, Ken Russell


What Happened to U.S. Cities That Practiced–and Didn’t Practice–Social Distancing During 1918’s “Spanish Flu”

Americans have long been accused of growing socially distant, bowling alone, as Robert Putnam wrote in 2000, or worse becoming radicalized as "lone wolves" and isolated trolls. But we are seeing how much we depend on each other as social distancing becomes the painful normal. Not quite quarantine, social distancing involves a semi-voluntary restriction of our movements. For many people, this is, as they say, a big ask. But no matter what certain world leaders tell us, if at all possible,...
Tags: Health, Google, College, History, Current Affairs, Philadelphia, Vox, St Louis, Facebook Twitter, Lopez, Josh Jones, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Bitton, Durham NC Follow, Isaac Chotiner, Robert Putnam


Why Fighting the Coronavirus Depends on You

A public service announcement from Vox. It's worth coupling this with our previous post: Quarantined Italians Send a Message to Themselves 10 Days Ago: What They Wish They Knew Then. Would you like to support the mission of Open Culture? Please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere. Also consider following Open Culture on Fac...
Tags: Health, Google, Facebook, College, Current Affairs, Albert Camus, Vox, Facebook Twitter


Bill Gates Describes His Biggest Fear: “I Rate the Chance of a Widespread Epidemic Far Worse Than Ebola at Well Over 50 Percent” (2015)

What are billionaires afraid of? A wealth tax? Universal healthcare? Immigrants from several specific places in the world? Probably. But if you ask one billionaire, Bill Gates—who has spent the last several years spending money to combat deadly epidemics—he’ll answer with a very detailed description of a global threat to everyone, not just the handful of people in his (un)tax(ed) bracket: Pandemics like the 1918 Spanish flu, as he told Vox’s Ezra Klein in the 2015 video interview above. ...
Tags: Google, Congress, Cdc, College, Current Affairs, Bill Gates, Vox, Ezra Klein, Gates, Johns Hopkins, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Klein, Durham NC Follow, Robert Redfield


Why New Diseases Like COVID-19 Keep Appearing in China

From Vox comes a short explainer that delves into why viruses like COVID-19 have often first taken off in China. They write: As of early March 2020, a new coronavirus, called COVID-19, is in more than 70 countries and has killed more than 3,100 people, the vast majority in China. That's where the virus emerged back in December 2019. This isn't a new phenomenon for China; in 2003, the SARS virus also emerged there, and under similar circumstances, before spreading around the world and kil...
Tags: Health, Google, Facebook, College, China, Vox, Facebook Twitter, Johns Hopkins Chinese Museums Closed


Deconstructing Bach’s Famous Cello Prelude–the One You’ve Heard in Hundreds of TV Shows & Films

There may be no instrument in the classical repertoire more multidimensional than the cello. Its deep silky voice modulates from moans to exaltations in a single phrase—conveying dignified melancholy and a profound sense of awe. Hearing a skilled cellist interpret great solo music for cello can approach the feeling of a religious experience. And no piece of solo music for cello is greater, or more popularly known, than Johann Sebastian Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major. Better known as...
Tags: Google, Music, College, The New York Times, Vox, Leipzig, Johann Sebastian Bach, Facebook Twitter, Ma, Yo Yo Ma, Bach, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Complete Organ Works of J S Bach, Woolfe, ZACHARY WOOLFE


Why the Soviets Doctored Their Most Iconic World War II Victory Photo, “Raising a Flag Over the Reichstag”

No photograph symbolizes American victory more recognizably than Joe Rosenthal's Pulitzer Prize-winning Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima. Taken on February 23, 1945, it shows six U.S. Marines raising their country's flag during the battle — a bloody one even by the standards of the Second World War — for control of that Japanese island. The Soviet Union had an equivalent image: Yevgeny Khaldei's  Raising a Flag over the Reichstag , which shows a Russian soldier raising the Soviet flag on ...
Tags: Google, Photography, College, Germany, Russia, Berlin, History, Red Army, Vox, Joseph Stalin, Seoul, Stalin, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter, Lowndes, Colin Marshall


How a Philip Glass Opera Gets Made: An Inside Look

Most fever dreams require very little pre-planning and coordination. All it takes is the flu and a pillow, and perhaps a shot of Ny-Quil. A fever dream on the order of composer Philip Glass’ 1984 opera, Akhnaten, is a horse of an entirely different color, as "How An Opera Gets Made," above, makes clear. For those in the performing arts, the revelations of this eyepopping Vox video will come as no surprise, though the formidable resources of New York City’s Metropolitan Opera, where the p...
Tags: Google, Fashion, Music, New York, Design, College, New York City, Egypt, New York Times, Opera, Vox, Public Domain, Facebook Twitter, Luciano Pavarotti, Metropolitan Opera, Anthony Roth Costanzo


The Strange, Spiritual Origins of the Ouija Board

Even as an avid horror movie fan, I find it hard to suspend disbelief when Ouija boards show up, and they show up often enough, in classics like The Exorcist and modern favorites like Paranormal Activity. Ouija boards have always seemed more like wands with plastic flowers in them than telegraphs to the afterlife or the infernal abyss. But I grew up with people who considered it a gateway to hell, just as spiritualists have considered it a portal to the beyond, where their dead relatives...
Tags: Google, College, White House, America, History, Smithsonian, Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle, Vox, Pittsburgh, Ouija, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Mary Todd Lincoln, Ouija Board, Durham NC Follow


Roman Statues Weren’t White; They Were Once Painted In Bright Colors: Vox Explores Why History Has Overlooked This

The idea of the classical period—the time of ancient Greece and Rome—as an elegantly unified collection of superior aesthetic and philosophical cultural traits has its own history, one that comes in large part from the era of the Neoclassical. The rediscovery of antiquity took some time to reach the pitch it would during the 18th century, when references to Greek and Latin rhetoric, architecture, and sculpture were inescapable. But from the Renaissance onward, the classical achieved the ...
Tags: Google, Art, Greece, College, History, Rome, University Of California Berkeley, Vox, Pompeii, Porter, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Johann Joachim Winckelmann, Prima Porta, James I Porter


How Monument Valley Became the Most Iconic Landscape of the American West

The American West has never been a place so much as a constellation of events—incursion, settlement, seizure, war, containment, and extermination in one order or another. These bloody histories, sanitized and seen through anti-indigenous ideology, formed the backdrop for the American Western—a genre that depends for its existence on creating a convincing sense of place. But where most Westerns are supposed to be set—Colorado, California, Texas, Kansas, or Montana—seems less important tha...
Tags: Google, Utah, Hollywood, Texas, Monument Valley, Film, College, Montana, History, Ford, Arizona, Harry, Navajo Nation, John Wayne, Stagecoach, Vox


The Simulation Theory Explained In Three Animated Videos

The idea that we are software emanations in a vast, unimaginably complex computer simulation may carry more dizzying philosophical, ethical, and psychological implications than any other metaphysical assumption. It is not, however, quite a new idea, even if machines sophisticated enough to make worlds are only now conceivable. We see ancient sages speculate that solid matter is no more than some sort of graphical (tactile, etc.) user interface originating from the mind of a master coder....
Tags: Google, Elon Musk, College, SIM, Oxford, Philosophy, Vox, Philip K Dick, University Of Maryland, Dick, Facebook Twitter, Samuel Johnson, Josh Jones, Bishop Berkeley, Eoin Duffy, Nick Bostrom


Would You Go Back to 1889 and Take Out Baby Hitler? Time-Travel Expert James Gleick Answers the Philosophical Question

The vast majority of us have no inclination to kill anyone, much less a small child. But what if we had the chance to kill baby Adolf Hitler, preventing the Holocaust and indeed the Second World War? That hypothetical question has endured for a variety of reasons, touching as it does on the concepts of genocide and infant murder in forms even more highly charged than usual. It also presents, in the words of Time Travel: A History author James Gleick, "two problems at once. There's a scie...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Florida, College, History, United States, New York Times, Jeb Bush, Stephen Hawking, Sci Fi, Charles Darwin, Hitler, Vox, Seoul, Adolf Hitler, Huffington Post


How to Memorize an Entire Chapter from “Moby Dick”: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

Sometimes, when I can’t sleep, I mentally revisit the various homes of my childhood, wandering from room to room, turning on lights and peering in closets until I conk out. Turns out these imaginary tours are also handy mnemonic tools, as Vox’s Dean Peterson explains above. Hey, that’s good news… isn’t the subconscious rumored to do some heavy lifting in terms of processing information? Peterson conquered a self-described bad memory, at least temporarily, by traipsing around his apartmen...
Tags: Google, Books, Science, Education, College, New York City, Neuroscience, Memory Palace, Mark Twain, Vox, Einstein, Dick, Herman Melville, Lombardy, John Waters, Facebook Twitter


Elizabeth Warren's plan to forgive student loan debt could lead to an economic boom

Sen. Elizabeth Warren has just proposed a bold education reform plan that would forgive billions in student debt.The plan would forgive the debt held by more than 30 million Americans. The debt forgiveness program is one part of a larger program to make higher education more accessible. Student loans are a leading cause of debt in the United States. Edging out credit cards for the number two spot, 45 million Americans are into their creditors for at least 1.5 trillion dollars' worth of student l...
Tags: Facebook, Politics, Education, Labor, Elizabeth Warren, Debt, Policy, United States, New York Times, Innovation, Warren, Federal Reserve, Vox, Sam, Cato Institute, Sen Elizabeth Warren



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