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When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: Read the 1,288-Word Sentence from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: 1,288 Words from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


10 Tips on How to Write a Great Screenplay from Billy Wilder: Pearls of Wisdom from the Director of Sunset Boulevard, Some Like It Hot, Double Indemnity & More

Image via Wikimedia Commons There's an old story -- Orson Welles called it "the greatest Hollywood one-liner ever made" -- that when someone attending the 1958 funeral of Harry Cohn, the fearsome president of Columbia Pictures, asked how it was possible that such a huge crowd would show up for Cohn's funeral, Billy Wilder quipped: "Well, give the people what they want." The story is almost certainly apocryphal. The line may have been spoken by someone else, at a different Hollywood mogul's fune...
Tags: Google, Hollywood, Film, College, Germany, Orson Welles, Npr, Adolf Hitler, Cameron Crowe, Raymond Chandler, Billy Wilder, Don, Facebook Twitter, Tarkovsky, Paris Review, Wilder


Isaac Asimov Predicts in 1983 What the World Will Look Like in 2019: Computerization, Global Co-operation, Leisure Time & Moon Mining

Painting of Asimov on his throne by Rowena Morill, via Wikimedia Commons “It’s difficult to make predictions,” they say, “especially about the future.” The witticism has been variously attributed. If Yogi Berra said it, it's adorable nonsense, if Mark Twain, dry plainspoken irony. If Niels Bohr, however, we have a statement that makes us wonder what exactly “the future” could mean in a radically uncertain universe. If scientists can’t predict the future, who can? Science fiction writers, of cou...
Tags: Google, Science, College, New York Times, Literature, Clarke, Sci Fi, Mark Twain, Philip K Dick, Facebook Twitter, Yogi Berra, Josh Jones, Isaac Asimov, Wikimedia Commons, New York World, Niels Bohr


Hunter S. Thompson, Existentialist Life Coach, Presents Tips for Finding Meaning in Life

Image by Steve Anderson, via Wikimedia Commons At first blush, Hunter S. Thompson might be the last person you would want to ask for advice. After all, his daily routine involved copious amounts of cocaine, LSD and Chivas Regal. He once raked a neighbor’s house with gunfire. And he once almost accidentally blew up Johnny Depp. Yet beneath his gonzo persona lay a man who thought deeply and often about the meaning of it all. He was someone who spent a lifetime staring into the abyss. So in 1958, ...
Tags: Google, Yahoo, College, Kentucky, Life, Los Angeles, Philosophy, Johnny Depp, Shakespeare, Thompson, Hunter, Facebook Twitter, Sartre, Hollywood Reporter, Dostoyevsky, Wikimedia Commons


The Journal of Controversial Ideas, Co-Founded by Philosopher Peter Singer, Will Publish & Defend Pseudonymous Articles, Regardless of the Backlash

Photo of Peter Singer by Mat Vickers, via Wikimedia Commons Australian bioethicist Peter Singer has made headlines as few philosophers do with claims about the moral status of animals and the “Singer solution to world poverty,” and with far more controversial positions on abortion and disability. Many of his claims have placed him outside the pale for students at Princeton, his current employer, where he has faced protests and calls for his termination. “I favor the ability to put new ideas out...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, Bbc, Current Affairs, Oxford, Philosophy, Princeton, Facebook Twitter, Peter Singer, Quartz, Chronicle of Higher Education, Josh Jones, Wikimedia Commons, Weinberg, Durham NC Follow


Iggy Pop’s Totally Bonkers Contract Rider for Concerts

Photo by Man Alive!, via Wikimedia Commons “There’s only a couple of people I’ve felt genuinely frightened taking photos in front of live because the person is out of control,” says Manchester-based rock photographer Kevin Cummins. The first was Joy Division’s Ian Curtis, “and Iggy Pop was another.” Iggy’s onstage mania rivals any lead singer, living or dead. The intimidating Henry Rollins tells a story about his one and only attempt to upstage his idol. He describes Iggy as “two guys. There’s ...
Tags: Google, Music, Hollywood, College, La, Panda, Bbc, Manchester, Cinderella, John Peel, Henry Rollins, Walt Disney, Iggy, Pepys, Mike Watt, Van Halen


The Emperor of Japan, Akihito, Is Still Publishing Scientific Papers in His 80s

State Department photo by William Ng, via Wikimedia Commons On April 30, 2019, Emperor Akihito of Japan will abdicate, and pass the throne to his son, Crown Prince Naruhito. What will he do in his retirement? Probably the same thing he has done most of his life: make “taxonomic studies of gobies,” as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan reports, “small fish found in fresh, brackish and marine waters.” Akihito has been a member of Japan’s Ichthyological Society of Japan for decades and “publ...
Tags: Google, Japan, Science, College, Thailand, State Department, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Akihito, Wikimedia Commons, Naruhito, Durham NC Follow, St John 's College Oxford, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, Fumihito, William Ng


Charles Bukowski Explains How to Beat Depression: Spend 3-4 Days in Bed and You’ll Get the Juices Flowing Again (NSFW)

Image by Graziano Origa, via Wikimedia Commons I felt like sleeping for five years but they wouldn’t let me —Charles Bukowski, Ham on Rye I don’t know about you, but the grind gets me down. Day in, day out, the same routine, never a break but the odd vacation. And you know what they say about vacations; when you get back, you need another one. Used to be days were more regular, in the heydays of the unions. You put in your time and you get some back, enough at least for a good night’s sleep. ...
Tags: Health, Google, College, Life, Literature, Facebook Twitter, Charles Bukowski, Wikimedia Commons, Bukowski, Durham NC Follow, Graziano Origa, Charles Bukowski Ham, John Martin Bukowski, Charles Bukowski Josh Jones


“The Matilda Effect”: How Pioneering Women Scientists Have Been Denied Recognition and Written Out of Science History

Photo via Wikimedia Commons The history of science, like most every history we learn, comes to us as a procession of great, almost exclusively white, men, unbroken but for the occasional token woman—well-deserving of her honors but seemingly anomalous nonetheless. “If you believe the history books,” notes the Timeline series The Matilda Effect, “science is a guy thing. Discoveries are made by men, which spur further innovation by men, followed by acclaim and prizes for men. But too often, there...
Tags: Google, Gender, Science, College, America, History, United States, Albert Einstein, Nazi, Marie Curie, Cornell University, Ball, Facebook Twitter, Dean, University of Hawaii, Josh Jones


Noam Chomsky Defines The Real Responsibility of Intellectuals: “To Speak the Truth and to Expose Lies” (1967)

Image by Andrew Rusk, via Wikimedia Commons The novel medium of social media—and the novel use of Twitter as the official PR platform for public figures—allows not only for endless amounts of noise and disinformation to permeate our newsfeeds; it also allows readers the opportunity to refute statements in real time. Whether corrections register or simply get drowned in the sea of information is perhaps a question for a 21st century Marshall McLuhan to ponder. Another prominent theorist of older...
Tags: Google, Politics, Putin, College, Iraq, Russia, America, Nazi, Vietnam, Yemen, Noam Chomsky, Facebook Twitter, Best Way, Chomsky, Henry Kissinger, U S administration


Noam Chomsky’s Defines The Real Responsibility of Intellectuals: “To Speak the Truth and to Expose Lies” (1967)

Image by Andrew Rusk, via Wikimedia Commons The novel medium of social media—and the novel use of Twitter as the official PR platform for public figures—allows not only for endless amounts of noise and disinformation to permeate our newsfeeds; it also allows readers the opportunity to refute statements in real time. Whether corrections register or simply get drowned in the sea of information is perhaps a question for a 21st century Marshall McLuhan to ponder. Another prominent theorist of older...
Tags: Google, Politics, Putin, College, Iraq, Russia, America, Nazi, Vietnam, Yemen, Noam Chomsky, Facebook Twitter, Best Way, Chomsky, Henry Kissinger, U S administration


A New Scientific Study Supports Putting Two Spaces After a Period … and a Punctuation War Ensues

Photo via Wikimedia Commons In former ages, wars erupted over the finer points of religious doctrine, a historical phenomenon that can seem perplexing to modern secularists. We’re past such things, we think. But then let someone bring up the Oxford comma or the number of spaces one should put after a period, and you may see writers, editors, and teachers pick sides and maybe come to blows in their defense of seemingly trivial grammatical and typographical standards. These debates approach the v...
Tags: Google, Writing, College, Ars Technica, Oxford, Cormac Mccarthy, Facebook Twitter, Chin, Chen, Josh Jones, Gallagher, Wikimedia Commons, Sean Gallagher, Angela Chen, Durham NC Follow, Skidmore College


On Its 25th Anniversary, Hear Liz Phair’s Groundbreaking Exile in Guyville Juxtaposed Song-By-Song With the Album That Inspired It, the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street

Images via Wikimedia Commons. Liz Phair left, Mick Jagger right In 1971, post-Altamont fiasco, the Rolling Stones went into exile... not on some dusty small town drag, but on the French Riviera, where the band decamped for purposes of tax evasion and began recording in Keith Richards’ rented villa near Nice. Everyone knows what happened next—a sloppy, soupy, ragged, glorious hash of country, blues, and country-blues, filtered through a haze of booze and heroin and the Stones’ devotion to rock a...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Atlantic, Mick Jagger, Npr, Rolling Stone, Chrissie Hynde, Keith Richards, The Washington Post, Liz Phair, Stewart, Facebook Twitter, Richards, Rolling Stones


J.R.R. Tolkien Expressed a “Heartfelt Loathing” for Walt Disney and Refused to Let Disney Studios Adapt His Work

Image via Wikimedia Commons I’ve just started reading J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit to my 6-year-old daughter. While much of the nuance and the references to Tolkienian deep time are lost on her, she easily grasps the distinctive charms of the characters, the nature of their journey, and the perils, wonders, and Elven friends they have met along the way so far. She is familiar with fairy tale dwarfs and mythic wizards, though not with the typology of insular, middle-class, adventure-averse countr...
Tags: Google, College, Disney, Animation, Oxford, Literature, Brothers Grimm, Tolkien, Walt Disney, Lewis, Facebook Twitter, J R R Tolkien, Josh Jones, Wikimedia Commons, Disney Studios, National Catholic Register


The Feynman Lectures on Physics, The Most Popular Physics Book Ever Written, Is Now Completely Online

Image by Tamiko Thiel, via Wikimedia Commons In years past, we let you know that Caltech and The Feynman Lectures Website joined forces to create an online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics. They started with Volume 1. And they've since followed up with Volume 2 and Volume 3, making the collection complete. First presented in the early 1960s at Caltech by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, the lectures were eventually turned into a book by Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, a...
Tags: Google, College, Physics, Feynman, E-books, Cornell, Richard Feynman, Caltech, Facebook Twitter, Wikimedia Commons, Tamiko Thiel, Feynman Lectures Website, Feynman Lectures, Feynman Robert B Leighton, Matthew Sands, Feynman Lectures on Physics


The Case for Writing in Coffee Shops: Why Malcolm Gladwell Does It, and You Should Too

Photo by Kris Krüg via Wikimedia Commons I passed Malcolm Gladwell on the street a few years ago, on the final stop of a road trip I took from Los Angeles to Raleigh, North Carolina. At the time I wondered why the unmistakable New York-based writer, speaker, and interpreter of big ideas had come to town. But now that I know a little bit about his personal and professional habits, I can at least say with some confidence where he was going: a coffee shop. That Gladwell's work has, over the years,...
Tags: Google, Facebook, New York, London, Writing, College, Toronto, Los Angeles, Food & Drink, Paris, Manhattan, Elvis Costello, Seoul, Tyler Cowen, Malcolm Gladwell, Zurich


David Sedaris Creates a List of His 10 Favorite Jazz Tracks: Stream Them Online

Image by WBUR, via Wikimedia Commons You can't read far into David Sedaris' writing without encountering his father Lou, a curmudgeonly, decades-and-decades-retired IBM engineer with a stiffly practical mind and a harsh word for everybody — especially his misfit son, dedicating his life as he has to the quasi-occupation of writing while living in far-flung places like Paris and rural England. Even now, solidly into his nineties, Sedaris père keeps on providing the sixtysomething Sedaris fils wi...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Spotify, Music, England, College, Los Angeles, David, Radio, Paris, Jazz, Ibm, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Diana Ross, Charles Mingus


A Big 44-Hour Chronological Playlist of Rolling Stones Albums: Stream 613 Tracks

Image by Jim Pietryga, via Wikimedia Commons “Would you let your daughter marry a Rolling Stone?” From the start, the Rolling Stones were promoted as the more debauched, dangerous alternative to the Beatles, prompting the above rather-famous tabloid headline from their first years of fame. The Spotify playlist below collects a whopping 613 tracks from this seminal rock band, all placed for the most part in chronological order. (At 44 hours, there's still whole albums--not major one mind you--mi...
Tags: Google, Music, College, US, James Brown, Mick Jagger, Lou Reed, Beatles, Ed Sullivan, Cilla Black, Wolf, Andrew Loog Oldham, Facebook Twitter, Rolling Stones, Ron Wood, Willie Dixon


A Majestic 44-Hour Chronological Playlist of Rolling Stones Songs: Stream 613 Tracks

Image by Jim Pietryga, via Wikimedia Commons “Would you let your daughter marry a Rolling Stone?” From the start, the Rolling Stones were promoted as the more debauched, dangerous alternative to the Beatles, prompting the above rather-famous tabloid headline from their first years of fame. The Spotify playlist below collects a whopping 613 tracks from this seminal rock band, all placed for the most part in chronological order. (At 44 hours, there's still whole albums--not major one mind you--mi...
Tags: Google, Music, College, US, James Brown, Mick Jagger, Lou Reed, Beatles, Ed Sullivan, Cilla Black, Wolf, Andrew Loog Oldham, Facebook Twitter, Rolling Stones, Ron Wood, Willie Dixon


How well do you know Confucius? [quiz]

This October, the OUP Philosophy team honors Confucius (551 BC–479 BC) as their Philosopher of the Month. Recognized today as China’s greatest teacher, Confucius was an early philosopher whose influence on intellectual and social history extended well beyond the boundaries of China. His lessons emphasized moral cultivation, stressed literacy, and demanded that his students be enthusiastic, serious, and self-reflective. How much do you know about Confucius and his teachings? Test your knowledge w...
Tags: Asia, Books, Featured, Education, China, Philosophy, Quiz, Literacy, Social history, Potm, Wikimedia Commons, Confucius, Arts & Humanities, Morals, Quizzes & Polls, Wikimedia Commons Featured


Hear Florence Welch’s Radio Documentary About the Making of David Bowie’s Heroes (Free for a Limited Time)

Image by AVRO and Becky Sullivan, via Wikimedia Commons As of this moment, you have 22 days left to stream a one-hour radio documentary hosted by Florence Welch (of Florence + The Machine). It takes a close look at the making of David Bowie's landmark album Heroes, released 40 years ago. The documentary (streamable here) explores "the personal and musical factors that influenced the album’s writing and recording in Berlin in 1977." It also covers,  according to the BBC, the following ground: Fl...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Berlin, Bbc, David, David Bowie, Brian Eno, Florence, Florence Welch, Nme, Bowie, Iggy Pop, Tony Visconti, Don, Facebook Twitter


An Oral History of the Bauhaus: Hear Rare Interviews (in English) with Walter Gropius, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe & More

Image by Detief Mewes, via Wikimedia Commons The Bauhaus, which operated as an influential school in Germany between 1919 and 1933 but lives on as a kind of aesthetic ideal, has its strongest associations with highly visual work, like textiles, graphic design, industrial design, and especially architecture. But a good deal of thought went into establishing the kind of rationality- and functionality-oriented philosophical basis that would produce all that visual work, and you can hear some of th...
Tags: Google, Art, Spotify, Design, College, Germany, History, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Josef Albers, Wikimedia Commons, Ludwig, Mies, Mies van der Rohe, James Nice, Colin Marshall


Curiosity, cognition and content

Image from Wikimedia Commons Where does knowledge come from? As teachers we trade in knowledge on a daily basis, but how often do we think about its provenance? We could argue that the majority of what we 'know' derives from our ability to be able to think, to reason, to reflect, to ask questions - our higher cognitive processes. Curiosity provides the impetus for us to be able to investigate the universe we are in. Exploration and discovery have formed the basis of all scientific endeavo...
Tags: Technology, Learning, Education, Knowledge, Wikipedia, New Zealand, Pedagogy, eLearning, Provenance, Wikimedia Commons, Auckland University of Technology, Digital Age, Steve Wheeler, Plymouth England, Metacognition, Wikimedia Commons Where


A Master List of 1,300 Free Courses From Top Universities: 45,000 Hours of Audio/Video Lectures

Image by Carlos Delgado, via Wikimedia Commons For the past 11 years, we've been busy rummaging around the internet and adding courses to an ever-growing list of Free Online Courses, which now features 1,300 courses from top universities. Let's give you the quick overview: The list lets you download audio & video lectures from schools like Stanford, Yale, MIT, Oxford and Harvard. Generally, the courses can be accessed via YouTube, iTunes or university web sites, and you can listen to the lectur...
Tags: Google, Greece, College, Harvard, Online Courses, William, UC Berkeley, Richard Dawkins, Richard Feynman, Facebook Twitter, Michael Pollan, Wikimedia Commons, Carlos Delgado, Richard Muller, John Searle, Hubert Dreyfus


Will the real Robinson Crusoe please stand up?

It is difficult to think of a literary narrative, other than Robinson Crusoe, that economists have so enthusiastically appropriated as part of their cultural heritage. The image of Robinson, shipwrecked, alone, and forced to decide how to use his finite resources, has become almost emblematic in the teaching of the problem of choice in economics. But does Robinson Crusoe still have anything to offer economics students in a post-crash world? It would seem not. When economics teaching came under a...
Tags: Books, Featured, Education, Finance, The Economy, Economics, Higher Education, Brazil, Literature, Core, Adam Smith, Social Sciences, Robinson, Robinson Crusoe, Defoe, Wikimedia Commons


When Albert Einstein Championed the Creation of a One World Government (1945)

Image by Ferdinand Schmutzer, via Wikimedia Commons The concept of one-world government has long been a staple of violent apocalyptic prophecy and conspiracy theories involving various popes, the UN, FEMA, the Illuminati, and lizard people. In the real world, one-world government has been a goal of the global Comintern and many of the corporate oligarchs who triumphed over the Soviets in the Cold War. For good reason, perhaps—with the exception of sci-fi utopias like Gene Roddenberry’s Star Tre...
Tags: Google, Politics, College, America, History, Atlantic, Un, Albert Einstein, Einstein, Hiroshima, Aristotle, Gene Roddenberry, Facebook Twitter, Gandhi, Josh Jones, General Assembly of the United Nations


10 Longevity Tips from Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara, Japan’s 105-Year-Old Longevity Expert

Photo by Karsten Thormaehlen, via Wikimedia Commons Robert Browning’s poem “Abt Vogler” imagines composer Georg Joseph Vogler as an old man reflecting on his diminishing powers and the likelihood that his life’s work would not survive in the public’s memory. Let us overlook the fact that Vogler was 65 when he died, or that Browning, who lived to 77, was 52 when he composed the poem. What’s most striking these days is its significance to longevity expert, physician, and chairman emeritus of St. ...
Tags: Health, Google, Japan, College, Life, Rome, Clint Eastwood, Tokyo, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Browning, St Luke, Facebook Twitter, Marie Kondo, Fred Rogers, Duke University, Solomon


89 Essential Songs from The Summer of Love: A 50th Anniversary Playlist

Image by Bryan Costales, via Wikimedia Commons The Summer of Love was not just a season of great music and the zenith of the flower child, but the culmination of a movement that started back on a chillier Bay Area day, on January 14, 1967. That was the month of the Human Be-In, and what must have looked like a full on invasion of the counterculture into Golden Gate Park. The backdrop of this outpouring of good vibrations was anything but loving: Vietnam, inner city riots, Civil Rights, and a hu...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Aretha Franklin, Jimi Hendrix, James Brown, Dave, Atlantic, Paul Mccartney, Las Vegas, Vietnam, Sam, Marvin Gaye, Joe, Thompson, Bay Area


Albert Einstein Writes the 1949 Essay “Why Socialism?” and Attempts to Find a Solution to the “Grave Evils of Capitalism”

Image by Ferdinand Schmutzer, via Wikimedia Commons Albert Einstein was a complicated human being, with a wide range of interests. His personality seemed balanced between a certain chilliness when it came to personal matters, and a great deal of warmth and compassion when it came to the wider human family. The physicist struck up friendships with famed American activists Paul Robeson, Marian Anderson, and W.E.B. Du Bois, and he championed the cause of Civil Rights in the U.S. He professed a dee...
Tags: Google, Politics, Science, College, Economics, Albert Einstein, Karl Marx, Einstein, Aristotle, Wilson, Marx, Facebook Twitter, Gandhi, Josh Jones, Wikimedia Commons, Mahatma Gandhi



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