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When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: Read the 1,288-Word Sentence from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: 1,288 Words from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


William Faulkner’s Review of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea (1952)

Images via Wikimedia Commons In the mid-20th century, the two big dogs in the American literary scene were William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. Both were internationally revered, both were masters of the novel and the short story, and both won Nobel Prizes. Born in Mississippi, Faulkner wrote allegorical histories of the South in a style that is both elliptical and challenging. His works were marked by uses of stream-of-consciousness and shifting points of view. He also favored titanically lo...
Tags: Google, Books, Mississippi, Yahoo, College, Washington, Time, Los Angeles, New York Times, Paris, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Lee University, FAULKNER


Behold The Drawings of Franz Kafka (1907-1917)

Runner 1907-1908 UK-born, Chicago-based artist Philip Hartigan has posted a brief video piece about Franz Kafka’s drawings. Kafka, of course, wrote a body of work, mostly never published during his lifetime, that captured the absurdity and the loneliness of the newly emerging modern world: In The Metamorphosis, Gregor transforms overnight into a giant cockroach; in The Trial, Josef K. is charged with an undefined crime by a maddeningly inaccessible court. In story after story, Kafka showed his...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, UK, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Chicago, Literature, Kafka, Vladimir Nabokov, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Hartigan, Franz Kafka, William Faulkner


The Books That Samuel Beckett Read and Really Liked (1941-1956)

Samuel Beckett, Pic, 1" by Roger Pic. Via Wikimedia Commons Clad in a black turtleneck and with a shock of white hair, Samuel Beckett was a gaunt, gloomy high priest of modernism. After the 1955 premiere of Samuel Beckett’s play Waiting for Godot (watch him stage a performance here), Kenneth Tynan quipped, ''It has no plot, no climax, no denouement; no beginning, no middle and no end.'' From there, Beckett’s work only got more austere, bleak and despairing. His 1969 play Breath, for instance,...
Tags: Google, Books, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Literature, Around The World, Albert Camus, Samuel Beckett, Agatha Christie, Christie, Facebook Twitter, Beckett, Hollywood Reporter, Theodor Fontane, Suzanne


An Atlas of Literary Maps Created by Great Authors: J.R.R Tolkien’s Middle Earth, Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island & More

Plot, setting, character… we learn to think of these as discrete elements in literary writing, comparable to the strategy, board, and pieces of a chess game. But what if this scheme doesn’t quite work? What about when the setting is a character? There are many literary works named and well-known for the unforgettable places they introduce: Walden, Wuthering Heights, Howards End…. There are invented domains that seem more real to readers than reality: Faulkner’s Yoknapatowpha, Thomas Hardy’s Wes...
Tags: Google, Books, Maps, College, Literature, Jack Kerouac, David Mitchell, Philip Pullman, Robert Louis Stevenson, Tolkien, Lewis, Robinson, Facebook Twitter, Wessex, Josh Jones, FAULKNER


Joseph Heller’s Handwritten Outline for Catch-22, One of the Great Novels of the 20th Century

We remember Catch-22, more than half a century after its publication, as a rollicking satire of American military culture in wartime. But those of us who return to Joseph Heller's debut novel, a cult favorite turned bestseller turned pillar of the modern canon, find a much more complex piece of work. Heller began writing the manuscript in 1953, while still employed as a copywriter at a small advertising agency. The project grew in ambition over the next eight years he spent working on it, event...
Tags: Google, Books, Snowden, College, Harvard, Literature, Joseph Heller, Seoul, Evelyn Waugh, J K Rowling, Facebook Twitter, Milo, Orr, Cathcart, Heller, William Faulkner


The Mother of All Maps of the “Father of Waters”: Behold the 11-Foot Traveler’s Map of the Mississippi River (1866)

Image courtesy of the David Rumsey Map Center Everybody knows a fact or two about the United States of America, even those who've never set foot there. At the very least, they know the US is a big country, but it's one thing to know that and another to truly understand the scale involved. Today we offer you an artifact from cartographic history that illustrates it vividly: a 19th-century traveler's map of the Mississippi River that, in order to display the length of that mighty 2,320-mile water...
Tags: Google, Maps, Mississippi, Congress, College, US, America, History, St Louis, Seoul, Gulf of Mexico, Mississippi River, United States of America, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Sidney


Philip Roth (RIP) Creates a List of the 15 Books That Influenced Him Most

Image by Thierry Ehrmann, via Flickr Commons We stand at a pivotal time in history, and not only when it comes to presidential politics and other tragedies. The boomer artists and writers who loomed over the last several decades—whose influence, teaching, or patronage determined the careers of hundreds of successors—are passing away. It seems that not a week goes by that we don’t mourn the loss of one or another towering figure in the arts and letters. And along with the eulogies and tributes c...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Wikipedia, New York Times, Literature, Philip Roth, Gustave Flaubert, Paul Auster, Albert Camus, Leo Tolstoy, Colette, Trump, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Roth


Gustave Flaubert Tells His Mother Why Serious Writers Shouldn’t Bother with Day Jobs (1850)

We are what we do — or in other words, we are what we choose to spend our time doing. By this logic, a "musician" who spends one quarter of his time with his instruments and three quarters with Excel, though he counts as no less a human being for it, should by rights call himself a maker of spreadsheets rather than a maker of music. This view may sound stark, but it has its adherents, some of them successful and respected artists. We can rest assured that no less a creator than Gustave Flaubert...
Tags: Google, Writing, College, France, Life, Los Angeles, Middle East, Letters, Gustave Flaubert, Brian Eno, Seoul, Anthony, Tom, Facebook Twitter, Charles Bukowski, Flaubert


Brian Eno’s Advice for Those Who Want to Do Their Best Creative Work: Don’t Get a Job

"Once upon a time, artists had jobs," writes Katy Waldman in a recent New York Times Magazine piece. "Think of T.S. Eliot, conjuring 'The Waste Land' (1922) by night and overseeing foreign accounts at Lloyds Bank during the day, or Wallace Stevens, scribbling lines of poetry on his two-mile walk to work, then handing them over to his secretary to transcribe at the insurance agency where he supervised real estate claims." Or Willem de Kooning painting signs, James Dickey writing slog...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, College, Los Angeles, Economics, Brian Eno, Seoul, Coca Cola, New York Times Magazine, Philip Glass, Willem De Kooning, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Lloyds Bank, Charles Bukowski


Japanese Designer Creates Incredibly Detailed & Realistic Maps of a City That Doesn’t Exist

When he first spent time in Japanese cities, urban design and history professor Barrie Shelton "was baffled, irritated, and even intimidated by what I saw. Yet at the same time I found myself energized, animated, and indeed inspired by them. The effect was liberating and my intuition was quick to suggest that further exploration of their chaotic vitality might be extremely rewarding." That exploration involved visits to "alleys, shrine and temple precincts, highways, railway stations (and th...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Japan, Maps, College, Los Angeles, Seoul, Tolkien, Facebook Twitter, Roland Barthes, Barthes, Shelton, William Faulkner, Italo Calvino, Colin Marshall, Every City


How I Spent the Ultimate Girls' Getaway in NOLA

5 girls + 4 days of unadulterated fun = 1 unforgettable spring break in the Big Easy. Overlooking Jackson Square. New Orleans — the U.S. city so popular and established that it has not one but six different nicknames — is a bucket list spot for jazz lovers and spring breakers alike. It hosts a spectacular array of music, entertainment, and culture, the likes of which are unparalleled throughout Louisiana.Not immune to NOLA’s charm, I traveled to this little slice of heaven with an intimate gro...
Tags: Travel, College, Oxford, Showtime, New Orleans, Louisiana, Travel Tips, Orlando, Southern, South Florida, Mike, NOLA, Jackson Square, Preservation Hall, Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, Decatur


Virginia Woolf’s Personal Photo Album Digitized & Put Online by Harvard: See Candid Snapshots of Woolf, Her Family, and Friends from the Bloomsbury Group

Some writers are restless by nature, roaming like Ernest Hemingway or Henry Miller, settling nowhere and everywhere. Others are homebodies, like William Faulkner and Virginia Woolf. Their fiction reflects their desire to nest in place. Strolling the grounds of Faulkner’s Rowan Oak one sweltering summer, I swear I saw the author round a corner of the house, lost in thought and wearing riding clothes. Visitors to Virginia Woolf’s home in the village of Rodmell in East Sussex have surely had simil...
Tags: Google, Photography, College, Virginia, Harvard, House, Literature, Virginia Woolf, Yeats, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, Facebook Twitter, John Maynard Keynes, East Sussex, Jacob, Leonard


Watch “Alike,” a Poignant Short Animated Film About the Enduring Conflict Between Creativity and Conformity

From Barcelona comes "Alike," a short animated film by Daniel Martínez Lara and Rafa Cano Méndez. Made with Blender, an open-source 3D rendering program,  "Alike" has won a heap of awards  and clocked an impressive  10 million views on Youtube and Vimeo. A labor of love made over four years , the film revolves around this question: "In a busy life, Copi is a father who tries to teach the right way to his son, Paste. But ... What is the correct path?" To find the answer, they have to let ...
Tags: Google, College, Life, Barcelona, Creativity, Animation, Facebook Twitter, Charles Bukowski, Facebook and Twitter, William Faulkner, Bertrand Russell Buckminster Fuller, Daniel Martínez Lara, Copi


Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner: A Free Yale Course

This course taught by Yale professor Wai Chee Dimock examines major works by three iconic American authors–Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner. Along the way, Dimock explores these authors’ “interconnections on three analytic scales: the macro history of the United States and the world; the formal and stylistic innovations of modernism; and the small details of sensory input and psychic life.” You can access the 24 lectures in Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner on YouTube, o...
Tags: Google, Facebook, College, United States, Yale, Online Courses, Literature, Facebook Twitter, Scott Fitzgerald, Facebook and Twitter, William Faulkner, Dimock


The Employment: A Prize-Winning Animation About Why We’re So Disenchanted with Work Today

What did Argentine filmmaker Santiago Grasso have in mind when he created the prize-winning animation El Empleo (The Job) five years ago? Was it something about the dehumanizing quality of many jobs in the modern service economy? Or the grim shift towards menial labor after the great recession of 2007-08?  Or, nowadays in 2016, could you see a commentary on the work that will be left once automation finishes displacing living, breathing employees–everyone from burger flippers to hedge fu...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Business, College, Animation, Facebook Twitter, Charles Bukowski, Facebook and Twitter, William Faulkner



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