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Similar ideas between Buddhism and Western psychology

Modern psychologists attribute less power to the conscious self. Buddhism has significant insight on how to counter listless states of desire. Doubting the ego just might be good for the ego itself. Many Western philosophers and scientists have for some time neglected Buddhist thought. As they saw it as either pure mysticism or couldn't wrap their heads around the seemingly contradictory nature of its teachings. Due to this incomprehension, much has been lost from ignoring this rich body of tho...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Innovation, Philosophy, Buddhism, Sigmund Freud, Buddha, Buddhist, Wright, Epstein, Robert Wright, Nagarjuna, Alan Watts, West Watts, Mark Epstein, Buddhism and Modern Psychology


Think you’re bad at math? You may suffer from ‘math trauma’

I teach people how to teach math, and I've been working in this field for 30 years. Across those decades, I've met many people who suffer from varying degrees of math trauma – a form of debilitating mental shutdown when it comes to doing mathematics.When people share their stories with me, there are common themes. These include someone telling them they were “not good at math," panicking over timed math tests, or getting stuck on some math topic and struggling to move past it. The topics can be ...
Tags: Psychology, Memory, Intelligence, Brain, Maths, Innovation, Fear, Emotions, Mind, Cognitive Science, Shannon Sweeny, Chris Willingham, Jennifer Ruef, Education Studies University of OregonThis


Why avoiding logical fallacies is an everyday superpower

Many an otherwise-worthwhile argument has been derailed by logical fallacies. Sometimes these fallacies are deliberate tricks, and sometimes just bad reasoning. Avoiding these traps makes disgreeing so much better. Logical-fallacy traps are all around us, and we get caught in them all the time. They trap us during discussions — okay, arguments — and make our heads want to burst. Sometimes we get derailed while we're trying to sort out important issues, and sometimes it's simply trying to adjud...
Tags: Psychology, Politics, Texas, Marketing, Communication, Hack, Bill Clinton, Innovation, Nice, Debate, Don, Monica Lewinsky, Decision-making, Arguing, Fallacy, Aristotle The Logical Place


Attention is not a resource but a way of being alive to the world

'We are drowning in information, while starving for wisdom.' Those were the words of the American biologist E O Wilson at the turn of the century. Fastforward to the smartphone era, and it's easy to believe that our mental lives are now more fragmentary and scattered than ever. The 'attention economy' is a phrase that's often used to make sense of what's going on: it puts our attention as a limited resource at the centre of the informational ecosystem, with our various alerts and notifications l...
Tags: Japan, Life, Happiness, Neuroscience, Mindfulness, Mental Health, Brain, Work-life balance, Innovation, Attention, Philosophy, Tokyo, Mind, Wilson, William James, Shibuya


How pharmaceutical companies game the patent system

When a company reaches the top of the ladder, they typically kick it away so that others cannot climb up on it. The aim? So that another company can't compete. When this happens in the pharmaceutical world, certain companies stay at the top of the ladder, through broadly-protected patents, at the cost of everyday people benefitting from increased competition. Since companies have worked out how to legally game the system, Amin argues we need to get rid of this "one size fits all" system, which t...
Tags: Health, Public Health, Innovation, Health Care, Pharmaceuticals, Social Change, Amin


What’s behind our appetite for self-destruction?

Each new year, people vow to put an end to self-destructive habits like smoking, overeating or overspending.And how many times have we learned of someone – a celebrity, a friend or a loved one – who committed some self-destructive act that seemed to defy explanation? Think of the criminal who leaves a trail of evidence, perhaps with the hope of getting caught, or the politician who wins an election, only to start sexting someone likely to expose him. Why do they do it? Edgar Allan Poe, one of Am...
Tags: Psychology, Washington, Boston, Happiness, Edgar Allan Poe, America, Mental Health, Innovation, Albert Einstein, Emotions, Mind, Sigmund Freud, Freud, Poe, Edgar Allen Poe, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


Why are women more religious than men? Because men are more willing to take risks.

Sociologists have long observed a gap between the religiosity of men and women.A recent study used data from several national surveys to compare religiosity, risk-taking preferences and demographic information among more than 20,000 American adolescents.The results suggest that risk-taking preferences might partly explain the gender differences in religiosity. None In virtually all countries in the world, women tend to be more religious than men. In the U.S., recent surveys show a sizeable 12-po...
Tags: Psychology, Gender, Religion, Sociology, Innovation, Pew Research Center, Brigham Young University, Hoffman, Hoffmann, Catholic University of America, Blaise Pascal, John P Hoffmann, Pascal s Wager, PsyPost Hoffman, Omar Lizardo, Jessica L Collett


7 best Alan Watts books on philosophy and life

Alan Watts wrote more than 25 books on the subject of philosophy and religion. He was among the first to bring Zen Buddhist thought to the west. Subjects ranged from dualism in philosophy to the troubles of modern man.Alan Watts was a gifted philosopher who tasked himself with the near impossible, putting that which transcended the knowable into words. A counterculture mystic and a spiritual entertainer with an eye on the divine, it's no surprise that Watt's philosophy and wisdom filled a numbe...
Tags: Psychology, Books, England, Zen, Life, West, Spirituality, Innovation, Literature, Philosophy, East, Watts, Watt, Zen Buddhist, Alan Watts, Zen Watts


Can the keto diet help treat depression? Here’s what the science says so far

The keto diet is known to be an effective tool for weight loss, however its effects on mental health remain largely unclear.Recent studies suggests that the keto diet might be an effective tool for treating depression, and clearing up so-called "brain fog," though scientists caution more research is necessary before it can be recommended as a treatment.Any experiments with the keto diet are best done in conjunction with a doctor, considering some people face problems when transitioning to the lo...
Tags: Health, Food, Mental Health, Depression, Harvard University, Innovation, Keto, Ketogenic Diet, Human body, Susie Neilson, Georgia Ede


Want to age gracefully? A new study says live meaningfully

A new study finds that adults who feel their lives are meaningful have better health and life outcomes. Adults who felt their lives were worthwhile tended to be more social and had healthier habits. The findings could be used to help improve the health of older adults. The need for meaning seems to be intrinsic to human beings. The question of what meaning life has, if any, and how to live a life in accordance with that goes back to the earliest days of philosophy and defined the work of some of...
Tags: Health, UK, England, Money, Aging, Innovation, Philosophy, Friendships, National Academy of Sciences, Viktor Frankl, Steptoe, Daisy Fancourt, Andrew Steptoe


Wealth inequality is literally killing us. The economy should work for everyone.

Economic hardship is linked to physical and psychological illness, resulting in added healthcare expenses people can't afford.The gig economy – think Uber, Lyft, TaskRabbit, Handy – is marketed as a 'be your own boss' revolution, but it can be dehumanizing and dangerous; every worker is disposable.The cooperative business model can help reverse wealth inequality. Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America by now at amazo...
Tags: Security, Work, Uber, Journalism, Economics, Teaching, Mental Health, Work-life balance, Innovation, Inequality, Afford America


People who engage in fat-shaming tend to score high in this personality trait

The study compared personality traits and obesity views among more than 3,000 mothers.The results showed that the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are linked to more negative views and behaviors related to obesity.People who scored high in conscientiousness are more likely to experience "fat phobia. None A new study explores the relationship between personality traits and attitudes toward obesity, revealing that one's level of neuroticism is linked to anti-obesity views.It's long ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Obesity, Mental Health, Personality, Innovation, Individual Differences, Sutin, Angelina Sutin, FSU s College of Medicine, Florida State University News People, FSU News Even


A map of London's most toxic breathing spots

Dirty air is an invisible killer, but an effective one.More than 9,000 people die prematurely in London each year due to air pollution, a recent study estimates.This map visualizes the worst places to breathe in Central London. The Great Smog of 1952 London used to be famous for its 'pea-soupers': combinations of smoke and fog caused by burning coal for power and heating. All that changed after the Great Smog of 1952, when weather conditions created a particularly dense and persistent layer...
Tags: Health, Google, UK, New York, London, Thames, Eu, History, Beijing, Pollution, United Kingdom, Innovation, Environmentalism, Air, Victoria, Khan


Extreme opponents of GM foods know the least science, but think they know the most

A recent study compared the public's scientific literacy with their attitudes on GM foods.The results showed that "as the extremity of opposition increased, objective knowledge went down, but self-assessed knowledge went up."The results also suggest that, in terms of policy efforts to boost scientific literacy, education about a given topic alone isn't going to be enough. None In 1999, the social psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger published a study that uncovered a darkly comical cogn...
Tags: Psychology, Food, Science, Learning, Intelligence, Innovation, Gm, Bill Nye, France Germany, Justin Kruger, Dunning Kruger, David Dunning, Fernbach, Philip Fernbach


Are screens really destroying young people’s brains?

Leading pediatricians say the assumption that screen time is behind problems is not really supported by research. The danger has more to do with a screen being a gateway for unwanted intrusions into a child's life. While recommendations are difficult based on the limited amount of research that has been done, the report offers a few. None It's impossible to be a perfect parent, however hard you try. One thing that has a lot of parents feeling continually guilty is the amount of time their kids...
Tags: Health, Gaming, Family, UK, Television, Parenting, Internet, Social Media, Innovation, Screen Time, RCPCH


​Americans now more likely to die from opioids than car crashes

Each American has about a 1 in 7,569 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to a National Safety Council report. The probability of dying in a motor vehicle accident is 1 in 8,096.The death rate for opioids is now six times higher than it was in 1999, with about 130 Americans dying every day from the drugs.Narcan is a life-saving drug that can stop opioid overdoses in their tracks, however factors like stigma and cost are preventing this antidote from becoming more accessible. None F...
Tags: Health, Drugs, Policy, Mental Health, Public Health, United States, Innovation, Addiction, Associated Press, Npr, Council, Wood, Narcotics, Adams, Harvard Law School, Stephen Wood


Psychology’s five revelations for finding your true calling

Look. You can't plan out your life. What you have to do is first discover your passion – what you really care about.Barack ObamaIf, like many, you are searching for your calling in life – perhaps you are still unsure which profession aligns with what you most care about – here are five recent research findings worth taking into consideration. First, there's a difference between having a harmonious passion and an obsessive passion. If you can find a career path or occupational goal that fires yo...
Tags: Psychology, Career, New York, Happiness, Mental Health, Work-life balance, Innovation, University of Pennsylvania, Mind, Oprah Winfrey, Duckworth, University of South Florida, Felipe Calderon, Columbia Business School, Angela Duckworth, Barack ObamaIf


5 types of climate change deniers, and how to change their minds

Climate change is easily one of humanity's greatest threats, and a mountain of data and evidence support this assertion.Despite the evidence, only 71% of Americans believe that climate change is real and primarily driven by human activities.People can and do change their minds about climate change. Trying to convince people to change their minds is often more about picking the right target than it is providing the right arguments. None Do facts matter? In an objective sense, yes, of course they ...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Identity, Climate Change, Iraq, Environment, Earth, Nature, Innovation, Reddit, North Carolina, Carl Sagan, Don, Michael Shermer, Shermer, Tali Sharot


It's time to redefine 'masculinity'

APA Guidelines for the Psychological Practice of Boys and Men represents the first time the association has published rules specifically for treating white, Western males. Though the guidelines are data-driven and therapeutically sound, a corner of the American Right (and some on the Left) has taken offense. Men still dominate statistics in a number of categories, including suicide rates, substance abuse, and violence. None Many men don't like their power being questioned, a difficult situation...
Tags: Psychology, Biology, Stanford, Mental Health, Innovation, Fear, Men, Catholic Church, Emotions, Derek, Ny Times, Don, APA, American Psychological Association, Michael Meade, Robert Bly


Researchers have identified an area of the dog brain dedicated to processing human faces

If you want to know about the special relationship between human and canine you need only watch a dog owner slavishly feed, cuddle and clean up after her furry companion, day after day after day. But is this unique cross-species relationship also reflected at a deeper level, in the workings of the canine brain? A recent study in Learning and Behavior suggests so, finding that highly trained dogs have a dedicated neural area for processing human faces, separate from the area involved in processin...
Tags: Psychology, Dogs, Animals, Intelligence, Brain, Nature, Innovation, Evolution, Emotions, BPS Research Digest, Auburn University, Andie Thompkins


Want your kid to cut down screen-time? Put away your phone, study suggests

A recent study tracked the media habits of families with preschool-age children.The results found that the screen-time of mothers was positively associated with the screen-time of their children, and that offering screens as a reward for good behavior is also linked to increased screen-time among kids.It's important to study the effects of technology on preschool-age children because they're at a stage in development when it's especially easy to form habits and routines that carry on into adulth...
Tags: Health, Science, Technology, Parenting, Mental Health, Canada, Innovation, BMC Obesity, Paediatrics Child Health


These new keto diet tortillas are made of 100% cheese

To help keto dieters stay the course, Lotito Foods has developed the Folios cheese wrap, a tortilla made entirely of cheese.These cheese wraps can be part of a healthy diet, but only if eaten in extreme moderation and alongside low-fat, low-salt foods. Research shows that replacing grains and fiber with fat and salts in the long term can be dangerous. None Now they've gone and done it. Keto diet enthusiasts have concocted all manner of unsettling dishes to kick the carbs: coffee with butter inst...
Tags: Health, Cancer, Happiness, Choice, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Agriculture, Disease, Keto, European Society of Cardiology, Bonnie Taub Dix, Taub Dix, Jaha, Human body, Keto Diet


The 12 high-school cliques that exist today, and how they differ from past decades

Researchers conducted focus groups with students who recently graduated from high school to ask them about their experience with peer groups.Altogether, the participants identified 12 distinct "peer crowds" and ranked them in a social hierarchy.The results show that, compared to past decades, some groups have risen or fallen in the hierarchy, and a couple new groups have emerged. None How do modern high-school peer groups compare to the familiar cliques of past decades — jocks, stoners, brains? ...
Tags: Psychology, Hollywood, Education, Children, Chicago, Atlantic, Innovation, Community, Derek Thompson, University Of Illinois, Gordon, UIC, University of Texas at Austin, Rachel Gordon, Mark Prigg, Journal of Adolescent Research


To Succeed You Must Hit Rock Bottom First

None of us ask for life’s greatest challenges, but that doesn’t mean we can’t benefit from them. I’m going to ask you to recollect what you consider to be your greatest challenge to date. Not one that simply stretched your mind but one that drained your soul. Got it? Good. If it’s not one you’re ...
Tags: Psychology, Leadership, Innovation


How the Nazi’s inhumane parenting guidelines may still be affecting German children

In 1934, a German pulmonologist wrote a book that contained child-rearing advice that promoted extreme forms of neglect in order to encourage toughness in children. The Nazis later incorporated these principles into a mothers' training program that millions of German women undertook. Some German therapists suggest that the effects of these harsh parenting styles are still being felt by German adults and their children today. None In 1934, the German pulmonologist Johanna Haarer wrote a bestselli...
Tags: Psychology, Parenting, Children, Relationships, Germany, Innovation, Dalhousie University, Grossmann, McLean Hospital, Jonathan Haidt, John Bowlby, Evolutionary pscyhology, Johanna Haarer, Haarer, Hartmut Radebold, Martin Teicher


Having a second child worsens parents’ mental health: new research

Children are a wonderful gift, bringing joy, laughter, and love. But, then there are the toys, the sleepless nights, the constant barrage of “why?" questions and the plethora of sticky handprints.For many parents, the decision to have a second child is made with the expectation that two can't be more work than one. But our research on Australian parents shows this logic is flawed: second children increase time pressure and deteriorate parents' mental health. Our study used data from the Househol...
Tags: Parenting, Children, Australia, Happiness, Mental Health, Innovation, University Of Queensland, Labour Dynamics, Janeen Baxter, Leah Ruppanner, Sociology University of Melbourne, University of QueenslandThis


Sparkling water: Healthy alternative or millennial fad?

Sparkling waters are en vogue as a healthy, refreshing alternative to soft drinks and alcohol.Some claim sparkling water has injurious effects, such as reducing bone mineral density, but research shows such claims are overstated or outright myths.Not all sparkling waters are created equal, though. While some are just as hydrating as plain water, others can be unhealthy if not consumed in moderation. None Sparkling waters are the latest in health chic, providing all the fizzy refreshment of a sof...
Tags: Health, Food, Water, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Food And Drug Administration, Disease, Starbucks, Illness, Pepsi, Heart Association, Birmingham Alabama, American Dental Association, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition


Study of lookalikes refutes popular personality theory

Scientists looked at pairs of people who looked like each other but were not twins.The results showed that genetics plays a stronger role in personality formation than how alike people were treated by others.Behaving similarly is a stronger social glue than physical resemblance. None People have many misconceptions and strange theories about twins and people who look alike. One great one courtesy of the Internet claimed that Nic Cage is actually a vampire on account of a Civil-War-era photo of a...
Tags: Psychology, Identity, Memory, Mental Health, Brain, Genetics, Personality, Innovation, Emotions, Rosenberg, University of Connecticut, California State University Fullerton, Segal, University of Texas at Austin, Nic Cage, Nancy L Segal


Study: Americans have become less biased—explicitly and implicitly—since 2004

The study examined the results of more than 4 million tests designed to measure implicit and explicit biases.The tests measured attitudes toward groups defined by age, disability, body weight, race, skin tone, and sexuality.All explicit biases decreased during the study's timeframe, while several categories of implicit bias diminished. None In an era when identity is brought to the forefront of nearly every cultural conversation, a new study highlights a somewhat counterintuitive trend: Since 20...
Tags: Psychology, Gender, Nbc, Lgbt, Brain, Harvard University, Innovation, Gender Equality, Inequality, Pew Research Center, Association, Charlesworth, Psychological Science, Associated Press NORC Center, Tessa E S Charlesworth


Freud versus Jung: a bitter feud over the meaning of sex

On 27 February 1907, at Berggasse 19 in Vienna, Sigmund Freud fell in love. The object of his affection was Carl Gustav Jung: 19 years younger than Freud, the young psychiatrist was already the clinical director of the prestigious Burghölzli Hospital and a professor at the University of Zurich. Jung had gained international recognition for his invention of the word-association test, and his practice was renowned for its gentle incisiveness. But when Jung read Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams...
Tags: Psychology, Sex, US, Mental Health, Brain, Vienna, Munich, United States, Judaism, Innovation, Consciousness, Mind, Sigmund Freud, Freud, Psychoanalysis, Clark University



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