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Posts filtered by tags: Johns Hopkins Medicine[x]


 

Researchers develop a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth

In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Rotten egg gas may help protect aging brain cells from Alzheimer’s disease

Typically characterized as poisonous, corrosive and smelling of rotten eggs, hydrogen sulfide's reputation may soon get a face-lift thanks to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Psilocybin may be effective in patients suffering from major depression

In a small study of adults with major depression, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that two doses of the psychedelic substance psilocybin, given with supportive psychotherapy, produced rapid and large reductions in depressive symptoms, with most participants showing improvement and half of study participants achieving remission through the four-week follow-up.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Researchers identify distinct link between autism and brain cell abnormalities

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that new experiments with genetically engineered mice have found clear connections among a range of autism types and abnormalities in brain cells whose chemical output forges platonic (non-sexual) feelings of love and sociability.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Study analyzes racial disparities in end-of-life care

In a new medical records analysis of racial disparities in end-of-life care, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and three collaborating institutions report that Black patients voluntarily seek substantially more intensive treatment.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Study: BIRC2 overexpression could be a key marker for immunotherapy resistance

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a gene responsible for turning off a cell's natural "suicide" signals may also be the culprit in making breast cancer and melanoma cells resistant to therapies that use the immune system to fight cancer.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Cells lining the nose are key entry point for coronavirus, shows study

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, experimenting with a small number of human cell samples, report that the "hook" of cells used by SARS-CoV-2 to latch onto and infect cells is up to 700 times more prevalent in the olfactory supporting cells lining the inside of the upper part of the nose than in the lining cells of the rest of the nose and windpipe that leads to the lungs.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Ratio of two proteins in urine could help identify deceased donor kidneys suitable for transplant

Earlier this year, a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine provided strong evidence that hundreds of deceased donor kidneys with acute kidney injury (AKI) -- traditionally discarded as unsuitable for transplantation -- could be safely and successfully used.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Pilot study shows cholesterol-lowering medication improves function of coronary arteries

In a pilot study of people living with HIV or high levels of cholesterol, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that a six-week course of a cholesterol-lowering medication improved the function of the coronary arteries that provide oxygen to the heart.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Scientists use CRISPR tool to make rapid, precise cuts in genomic material

In a series of experiments using human cancer cell lines, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used light as a trigger to make precise cuts in genomic material rapidly, using a molecular scalpel known as CRISPR, and observe how specialized cell proteins repair the exact spot where the gene was cut.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


AI can be used to expand the role of chest X-ray imaging in COVID-19 diagnosis

According to a recent report by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, artificial intelligence (AI) should be used to expand the role of chest X-ray imaging -- using computed tomography, or CT -- in diagnosing and assessing coronavirus infection so that it can be more than just a means of screening for signs of COVID-19 in a patient's lungs.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Study: Workplace strategies can promote employment for drug addicts

After a yearlong study of people with opioid dependence, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that adding $8 an hour to their paychecks may help those in recovery stay drug free longer, as well as encourage them to get and hold regular jobs.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Badges that help locate nurses repurposed to monitor patient mobility

By repurposing badges originally designed to locate nurses and other hospital staff, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they can precisely monitor how patients in the hospital are walking outside of their rooms, a well-known indicator and contributor to recovery after surgery.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Researchers uncover clues to how statins kill cancer cells

More than 35 million Americans take statin drugs daily to lower their blood cholesterol levels. Now, in experiments with human cells in the laboratory, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have added to growing evidence that the ubiquitous drug may kill cancer cells and have uncovered clues to how they do it.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


'Primitive' stem cells shown to replace and repair damaged blood vessels in the retina

Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have successfully turned back the biological hands of time, coaxing adult human cells in the laboratory to revert to a primitive state, and unlocking their potential to replace and repair damage to blood vessels in the retina caused by diabetes.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Researchers create new computer program to map the entire 'hemodynamic landscape' of tumors

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have created a computer program for scientists at no charge that lets users readily quantify the structural and functional changes in the blood flow networks feeding tumors.
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New way to chart human genome with CRISPR/nanopore sequencing technique

In search of new ways to sequence human genomes and read critical alterations in DNA, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used the gene cutting tool CRISPR to make cuts in DNA around lengthy tumor genes, which can be used to collect sequence information.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Study may help develop new treatments for abnormal nerve growth in the spine

In experiments with genetically engineered and old mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the vast majority of low back pain in people may be rooted in an overgrowth of pain-sensing nerves into spinal cartilaginous tissue.
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Study: Hundreds of discarded kidneys can be transplanted safely and effectively

A new Johns Hopkins Medicine-led study provides the strongest evidence to date that hundreds of deceased donor kidneys, discarded each year after being deemed not suitable under current medical criteria, can be transplanted safely and effectively.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Researchers report evidence linking 'vaping' to increased likelihood of asthma and COPD

Using data from a large federal government telephone survey of adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that inhaling heated tobacco vapor through e-cigarettes was linked to increased odds of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, conditions long demonstrated to be caused by smoking traditional, combustible cigarettes.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Being around dogs from early age may lessen chance of developing schizophrenia as adult

Ever since humans domesticated the dog, the faithful, obedient and protective animal has provided its owner with companionship and emotional well-being. Now, a study from Johns Hopkins Medicine suggests that being around "man's best friend" from an early age may have a health benefit as well -- lessening the chance of developing schizophrenia as an adult.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Helper protein exacerbates diabetic macular edema

In a recent study using mice, lab-grown human retinal cells and patient samples, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they found evidence of a new pathway that may contribute to degeneration of the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Higher number of live births associated with poorer cardiovascular health

Using medical record and survey data collected from more than 3,400 women, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that women who have given birth five or more times were more likely than those who had fewer births to have more risk factors for heart disease, including obesity, high blood pressure and inadequate physical activity.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Screening tool in pediatric ER accurately estimates suicide risk among youth

A suicide risk screening tool that Johns Hopkins Medicine implemented in its pediatric emergency department six years ago appears to provide an accurate gauge of which youth are most vulnerable and has identified more than 2,000 patients who might benefit from mental health treatment and resources, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Johns Hopkins Medicine.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Researchers identify genes linked to most severe symptoms of multiple sclerosis

In a bid to determine factors linked to the most debilitating forms of multiple sclerosis, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have identified three so-called "complement system" genes that appear to play a role in MS-caused vision loss.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Wearable accelerometers are reliable predictors of mortality risk in older adults

A federally funded study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers shows that wearable accelerometers - mechanical sensors worn like a watch, belt or bracelet to track movement - are a more reliable measure of physical activity and better than patient surveys and other methods used by physicians at assessing five-year risk of death in older adults.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Get vaccinated to protect yourself from flu, say Johns Hopkins experts

Cases of the flu are already on the rise around the nation as flu season begins. Johns Hopkins Medicine experts say now is the time to fight against the flu as the number of people getting sick from the potentially life-threatening virus will increase in the coming months.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Surgery can be beneficial for one type of primary central nervous system lymphoma

Through a systematic review of published studies going back 50 years, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have identified a distinct subtype of primary central nervous system lymphoma that should be considered for surgical removal, suggesting a major shift in how this type of tumor is evaluated and managed.
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Johns Hopkins researchers develop method to map retinal cell development

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have created a method of mapping how the central nervous system develops by tracking the genes expressed in cells.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins Medicine


Online community for women with diabetes engages patient sharing and guides research

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers created an online patient community for women living with all types of diabetes to test whether online communities can engage patients and provide information that can guide research and patient care.
Tags: Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine



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