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An Introduction to the Neuroscience Behind Creating Your Reality

Have you ever wondered why two people can share the exact same situation, yet experience it differently? Neural pathways are often described as a type of super-highway of nerve cells, the function of which is to transmit messages. Much like a walking track in the bush, the more you walk over it, the more trodden and clear it becomes. The same thing happens when we engage in behaviors such as thinking certain thoughts with a high degree of regularity. You see the brain consumes between 2...
Tags: Psychology, Habits, US, Neuroscience, Reality, Brain And Behavior, Anxiety And Panic, Neuroplasticity, Ras, Goldstein, Conscious Mind, Human Perception, Linda Schreiber Ganster Liou, Thomson Brooks Cole Publishing Co


New study finds strength of imagination not associated with creative ability or achievement

Imagination is sometimes claimed to be a uniquely human ability, and it has long intrigued psychologists. "Nevertheless, our understanding of the benefits and risks that individual differences in imagination hold for psychological outcomes is currently limited," note two researchers who have created a new psychometric test – the Imaginative Behaviour Engagement Scale (IBES) – for measuring how much imagination a person has, and then used it to investigate whether, as some earlier work hinted, ha...
Tags: Psychology, Success, Neuroscience, Personality, Creativity, Innovation, Ucl, Scott, BPS Research Digest, University of York, British Journal of Psychology, Sophie von Stumm, Von Stumm, Stumm, Cognitive Science, Hannah Scott


Neuromyth: “Brain Training” Is Supported by Neuroscience

Online computer games promise to improve “memory, problem solving, concentration, speed of thinking, language, and visual-spatial recognition.” They further promise that they “work your social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control” while you’re having fun. These are tempting offers, and this is a very lucrative and growing business in the United States as people age and many older adults seek out ways to maintain cognitive functioning. “Brain training” grew from $600 milli...
Tags: Psychology, Stanford, Neuroscience, United States, Problem Solving, Federal Trade Commission, Brain Training, Brain And Behavior, Concentration, University Of North Carolina, Wright, Posner, Greensboro, Ferrero, Michael Kane, Association for Psychological Sciences


“Brain Training” Is Supported by Neuroscience

Online computer games promise to improve “memory, problem solving, concentration, speed of thinking, language, and visual-spatial recognition.” They further promise that they “work your social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control” while you’re having fun. These are tempting offers, and this is a very lucrative and growing business in the United States as people age and many older adults seek out ways to maintain cognitive functioning. “Brain training” grew from $600 milli...
Tags: Psychology, Stanford, Neuroscience, United States, Problem Solving, Federal Trade Commission, Brain Training, Brain And Behavior, Concentration, University Of North Carolina, Wright, Posner, Greensboro, Ferrero, Michael Kane, Association for Psychological Sciences


Gene therapy could treat rare brain disorder in unborn babies

Doctors could use Crispr tool to inject benign virus into foetus’s brain to ‘switch on’ key genesScientists are developing a radical form of gene therapy that could cure a devastating medical disorder by mending mutations in the brains of foetuses in the womb.The treatment, which has never been attempted before, would involve doctors injecting the feotus’s brain with a harmless virus that infects the neurons and delivers a suite of molecules that correct the genetic faults. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Neuroscience, Society, World news, Genetics, Ethics, Gene Editing


Scientists are creating music to unlock your brain’s potential

Instead of prescribing medications to kids with ADD or ADHD, Clark and his team at Brain.fm are looking to music as another option for treatment. Through a grant from the National Science Foundation, the company is developing music that features "neural-phase locking" — a combination of different principles that create specific characteristics in the brain, such as increased concentration or relaxation. As long as they're listening to the music, the neural phase-locking aspect of Brain.fm's tun...
Tags: Health, Productivity, Technology, Startup, Neuroscience, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Mind, National Science Foundation, Clark, Dan Clark


The Brain Continues to Develop in Young People with Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia continues to be one of the lesser understood disorders of brain development. It is generally believed to involve both genetic and environmental influence and shares many risk factors with other brain disorders such as autism and intellectual disability. However, determining the exact path schizophrenia follows is difficult, to say the least. In an August 2018 study , researchers gathered enough data to describe brain development patterns associated with schizophrenia. Specifi...
Tags: Psychology, Neuroscience, Research, Schizophrenia, Psychosis, Young People, Foundation Scientific Council, Sinead Kelly


New drug raises hopes of reversing memory loss in old age

Toronto researchers believe the drug can also help those with depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s An experimental drug that bolsters ailing brain cells has raised hopes of a treatment for memory loss, poor decision making and other mental impairments that often strike in old age.The drug could be taken as a daily pill by over-55s if clinical trials, which are expected to start within two years, show that the medicine is safe and effective at preventing memory lapses. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Drugs, Memory, Americas, Toronto, Neuroscience, Society, World news, Mental Health, Depression, Schizophrenia, Medical Research, Canada, Alzheimer's, Ageing


Microdoses of LSD change how you perceive time

A new study offers some of the first evidence that microdosing – taking tiny, regular doses of LSD – does have measurable effects.Subjects taking LSD were less accurate when estimating how long an image appeared on a screen than subjects who were sober. The mechanism that causes this effect remains unknown, but several ideas have been put forward. None LSD is known to severely warp not only how takers perceive what they hear and see, but also how time and space are experienced. The incredible p...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Drugs, Time, Memory, Neuroscience, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Mind, Cognitive Science, Devin Terhune, Manoj Doss


Brain-zapping implants that change mood and lift depression

Teams of researchers are developing sesame seed-size neuro-implants that detect brain activity that signals depression and then deliver targeted electrical zaps to elevate your mood. It's very early days in the science and technology but recent studies suggest that we're on the path. Links to scientific papers below. Fortunately, the goal is to develop tools and a methodology more precise than the horrifically blunt "shock therapy" of last century. From Science News: DARPA, a Department of...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Minneapolis, Neuroscience, Department Of Defense, Mental Health, Depression, Darpa, Brains, Ucla, Massachusetts General Hospital, UCSF, University of Minnesota, Justin Sanchez, Widge


Women’s Brains Have This Major Advantage (M)

Brain scans examined how men and women's brains were processing oxygen and sugar. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Tags: Psychology, Neuroscience, Jeremy Dean, Subscribers-only


Tweak your brain chemistry toward happiness, purpose, meaning

The body influences the mind: physical activity changes our brain chemistry.More activity in the body, and therefore in the brain, reorients us toward happiness, purpose, and meaning.Neuroplasticity suggests we can program ourselves to be more optimistic and hopeful. The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty by now at amazone --> List Price: $28.00 New F...
Tags: Motivation, Neuroscience, Mindfulness, Mental Health, Brain, Depression, Innovation, Emotions, Mind, Jillian Michaels, Self, Personal Growth, Ageless Strength Health


Women’s brains are four years younger than men’s, study finds

Analysis of metabolic brain age may explain differences in cognitive decline rate Women’s brains are nearly four years younger than men’s, at least in how they burn fuel, according to scans performed by US researchers.Scientists found that healthy women have a “metabolic brain age” that is persistently younger than men’s of the same chronological age. The difference is apparent from early adulthood and remains into old age. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Gender, Science, Biology, US, Neuroscience, Society, UK News, World news, Medical Research


The Device That Can ‘Read Minds’ And Convert To Words (M)

The system could eventually translate thoughts into words automatically. → There is now a small membership fee for accessing some articles. Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Tags: Psychology, Neuroscience, Jeremy Dean, Subscribers-only


Habits come from what we do, not what we want to do

A new study suggests repetition is the key to developing a new habit. The study bases its conclusions on the habits of digital rodents. Just keep at it — go to the gym, floss — and the desired habit will eventually stick. None A paper, "Habits Without Values," recently published in Psychological Review suggests that forming habits is a matter of simply repeating the desired behavior until it sticks, not matter how little pleasure you derive from it. This conclusion comes from observing the ha...
Tags: Psychology, Motivation, Neuroscience, Computers, Brain, Testing, Innovation, Mind, Gretchen Rubin, Charles Duhigg, Ludvig, Cognitive Science, Elliot Ludvig, University of Warwick s Department of Psychology, Warwick News Events Much, Amitai Shenhav


Germ Communities in Our Gut Talk to Our Brain

There are trillions of microbes inside the human body, and University College Cork professor Dr John Cryan’s studies indicate that these germ communities appear to influence both the brain and its behaviors. Since that groundbreaking and contested 2014 announcement, much more research has continued to support the idea that the human microbiome impacts depression, dementia, autism, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s and even Parkinson’s disease. All of this …
Tags: Health, Science, Design, Medicine, Neuroscience, Tech, Microbiology, Brains, Germs, Linkaboutit, John Cryan, University College Cork


10 books to check out from Jordan Peterson's 'Great Books' list

Peterson's Great Books list features classics by Orwell, Jung, Huxley, and Dostoevsky. Categories include literature, neuroscience, religion, and systems analysis. Having recently left Patreon for "freedom of speech" reasons, Peterson is taking direct donations through Paypal (and Bitcoin).We like to know what informed thinkers we respect, to better understand what shaped their worldview. On his website, Jordan Peterson offers his Great Books list, granting insight into the turning of his own mi...
Tags: Psychology, Amazon, Books, England, Russia, Religion, America, Neuroscience, Paypal, World, George Orwell, Paris, Innovation, Burma, Consciousness, Literature


10 incredible books from Jordan Peterson's 'Great Books' list

Peterson's Great Books list features classics by Orwell, Jung, Huxley, and Dostoevsky. Categories include literature, neuroscience, religion, and systems analysis. Having recently left Patreon for "freedom of speech" reasons, Peterson is taking direct donations through Paypal (and Bitcoin).We like to know what informed thinkers we respect, to better understand what shaped their worldview. On his website, Jordan Peterson offers his Great Books list, granting insight into the turning of his own mi...
Tags: Psychology, Amazon, Books, England, Russia, Religion, America, Neuroscience, Paypal, World, George Orwell, Paris, Innovation, Burma, Consciousness, Literature


Why Do We Forget?

To live is to forget—account numbers, names, the precise locations of keys and wallets, friends from childhood, peripheral characters from prestige TV shows, inside jokes, past ambitions, U.S. history, much else. Goldfish with guns: that’s the human race. But every frailty, we know, serves some larger adaptive…Read more...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Memory, Neuroscience, Brain


Attention is not a resource but a way of being alive to the world

'We are drowning in information, while starving for wisdom.' Those were the words of the American biologist E O Wilson at the turn of the century. Fastforward to the smartphone era, and it's easy to believe that our mental lives are now more fragmentary and scattered than ever. The 'attention economy' is a phrase that's often used to make sense of what's going on: it puts our attention as a limited resource at the centre of the informational ecosystem, with our various alerts and notifications l...
Tags: Japan, Life, Happiness, Neuroscience, Mindfulness, Mental Health, Brain, Work-life balance, Innovation, Attention, Philosophy, Tokyo, Mind, Wilson, William James, Shibuya


The neuroscience of creativity (and yes, right brain/left brain is mostly bullshit)

Anna Abraham literally wrote the book on creativity and the brain. The Leeds Beckett University psychology professor is the author of a new textbook titled The Neuroscience of Creativity. From an interview with Abraham by psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman in Scientific American: SBK: Why does the myth of the “creative right brain” still persist? Is there any truth at all to this myth? AA: Like most persistent myths, even if some seed of truth was associated with the initial development ...
Tags: Psychology, Post, News, Neuroscience, Creativity, Brains, Abraham, Scott Barry Kaufman, Leeds Beckett University, Science Museum London, Arthur Koestler, Anna Abraham


Constant cravings: is addiction on the rise?

From sex to sugar to social media, people are in the grip of a wider range of compulsive behaviours. But what is driving them – and what can be done?Addiction was once viewed as an unsavoury fringe disease, tethered to substances with killer withdrawal symptoms, such as alcohol and opium. But now the scope of what humans can be addicted to seems to have snowballed, from sugar to shopping to social media. The UK’s first NHS internet-addiction clinic is opening this year; the World Health Organiza...
Tags: Psychology, UK, Hollywood, Science, Neuroscience, Life and style, Health & wellbeing, NHS, Michael Douglas, Douglas, World Health Organization WHO


Does manual labor boost happiness?

Working with your hands affects brain chemistry in a positive way. Automation technologies can strip away a sense of agency and meaning in our lives. Using your hands connects you with your environment in a way that most technologies cannot. None Violence has become such a part of the fabric of American society that many stories pass without much commentary. Mass shootings need to be bigger and grander than ever to stay in the headlines; solo homicides rarely receive a glance. We pass over news...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Work, Happiness, Neuroscience, Innovation, Brazil, Cbs, Tim Ferriss, Derek, Carl Jung, Crawford, Lambert, Chandler, Kevin Kelly, Century City


How your brain makes you overeat

The brain's reward system releases dopamine when tasting food.Researchers at Max Planck discovered a second dopamine release in the stomach, affecting higher cognitive functions. The more we desire a food, the weaker the second release, which might lead to overeating. None As if losing weight wasn't hard enough. A new study from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research reveals that we're rewarded twice when eating. The first dopamine kick occurs when tasting food; the sec...
Tags: Health, Food, Biology, Obesity, Neuroscience, Innovation, Addiction, Derek, Max Planck, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Human body, Marc Tittgemeyer, Heiko Backes


7 exercises to master in 2019

Diversity in exercise is an essential component of a good fitness diet. Constantly pushing your physical boundaries provides equally valuable neurological benefits. These seven exercises and tools are worth integrating into your regimen in 2019. None There are two responses when seeing a new exercise: "No" and "I'll give it a shot." I've watched both play out often. Sometimes the "no" is justified. You see a movement pattern that is tough on the knees after recently having knee surgery. That's ...
Tags: Health, Motivation, Instagram, Obesity, New York City, Neuroscience, Innovation, Personal Growth, Tim Ferriss, Derek, Goal-setting, Marc, Ferriss, Equinox Fitness, Tools of Titans, Christopher Sommer


The science behind why our brains make us cooperate (or disagree)

Neuroscientists identify the parts of the brain that affect our social decision-making.Guilt has a large affect on social interactions, find the researchers.To find ways to cooperate, people need to let go of fear and anxiety, suggest studies None Why do we decide to work on a project or pursue a goal with someone? Or why do we treat some people like there's no way we can find any common language? Neuroscience says that the human brain contains underlying causes to all human cooperation and soci...
Tags: Health, Communication, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Community, Emotions, University Of Arizona, Cooperation, Society For Neuroscience, University of Texas, University of Southern Mississippi, Bowdoin College, Robert Greene, Charles Koch Institute, Charles Koch Foundation


Wired that way: genes do shape behaviors but it’s complicated

Many of our psychological traits are innate in origin. There is overwhelming evidence from twin, family and general population studies that all manner of personality traits, as well as things such as intelligence, sexuality and risk of psychiatric disorders, are highly heritable. Put concretely, this means that a sizeable fraction of the population spread of values such as IQ scores or personality measures is attributable to genetic differences between people. The story of our lives most definit...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Biology, Dna, Neuroscience, Brain, Genetics, Personality, Innovation, Genes, Kevin Mitchell, Princeton University Press Kevin MitchellThis


Jazz Musician Plays Acoustic Guitar While Undergoing Brain Surgery, Helping Doctors Monitor Their Progress

Unlike many colorful expressions in English whose origins are lost to us, the comparison of majorly consequential tasks to brain surgery makes perfect sense. One false move or miscalculation can result in instant death. The chances of irreversible, life-altering damage are high, should a scalpel slip or a surgeon mistake healthy brain tissue for diseased. This can happen more readily than we might like to think. “It can be very difficult to tell the difference between the tumor and norma...
Tags: Health, Google, Science, College, Neuroscience, Spain, South Africa, The New York Times, Facebook Twitter, Schubert, Josh Jones, Oliver Sacks, Carlos Aguilera, Manzini, Robert Alvarez, Durham NC Follow


Can Humor Alter Your Brain Chemistry?

“If I had no sense of humor, I would long ago have committed suicide.”   ~ Mahatma Gandhi Do you know why everyone isn’t in a mental hospital? Because there isn’t enough room. Philosophers have long observed a dearth of happiness among humanity. Henry David Thoreau said, “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation.” John Stuart Mill observed, “Unquestionably, it is possible to do without happiness; it is done involuntarily by nineteen-twentieths of mankind.” Abd ar-Rahman III, who reigned...
Tags: Psychology, Books, Neuroscience, Self-help, Depression, United States, Humor, Sadness, Iberia, Laughter, Henry David Thoreau, University of Montreal, David Sedaris, Mahatma Gandhi, John Stuart Mill, Centers for Disease Control CDC


10 atheist quotes that will make you question religion

Belief systems arise to address the time and social conditions of each era and culture. Your relationship to your community and environment is very influential in what you believe. Neuroscience explains many of the questions as to why we believe in the first place. None When I was studying for my degree in religion, I was most fascinated by what people believe. The fact that members of the same species could invent such diverse ideas about the invisible speaks volumes about the human imaginatio...
Tags: Psychology, Biology, Religion, America, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Consciousness, Atheism, God, Mind, Derek, Buddhist, Bach, Stephen Batchelor, Stanislas Dehaene



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