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LA County health officials ID 2nd measles case involving LAX Passenger

LOS ANGELES – Los Angeles County health officials said Wednesday they have confirmed another case of measles involving a passenger who arrived aboard a flight at Los Angeles International Airport. The newest case was a passenger on United Airlines flight 240 that arrived at the airport on March 5 and may have been in the area of Gate 76A at Terminal 7 between 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The person also visited an Enterprise Rent-A-Car location at 1719 Wilshire Blvd. in Santa Monica the following day s...
Tags: Health, News, Sport, Public Health, Soccer, Local News, United Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Lax, Santa Monica, Los Angeles International Airport, Department of Public Health, Los Angeles Los Angeles County, LA County, Wilshire Blvd, China Eastern


Teens should be able to get vaccines without consent from parents, say NY lawmakers

Teens 14 and older should be able to get vaccinated on their own, says a new bill in New York.Lawmakers were inspired by Ethan Lindenberger, an Ohio teen who fought to take vaccines against his mom's wishes.Anti-vaccination attitudes have been blamed for recent measles outbreaks. None Should kids who are old enough be allowed to make their own vaccination decisions? Such is the proposal being considered in New York, where a new bill would allow teens over 14 to get some vaccines without having t...
Tags: Health, New York, Medicine, Congress, Government, Virus, Public Health, Pennsylvania, Innovation, Population, Disease, Ohio, Illness, Vaccines, Washington State, Abc News


Urban African Americans are 'startlingly' more likely to live in trauma deserts, researchers say

Chicago's South Side didn't have a trauma care unit until last year; the last closed in 1991.Whether immediate trauma care or long-term mental health care, access to facilities is limited in minority neighborhoods. Since the University of Chicago's Level 1 Trauma Center opened, there's been a seven-fold reduction in the disparity in the city's access to care. None Imagination is one of our most fertile sources of creativity and positive emotional health. The ability to imagine many possibilitie...
Tags: Health, New York, Resources, Race, America, Los Angeles, Poverty, Chicago, Public Health, Innovation, University Of Chicago, Health Care, Hyde Park, Derek, American Medical Association, South Side


Urban African Americans are 'startling' more likely to live in trauma deserts, researchers say

Chicago's South Side didn't have a trauma care unit until last year; the last closed in 1991.Whether immediate trauma care or long-term mental health care, access to facilities is limited in minority neighborhoods. Since the University of Chicago's Level 1 Trauma Center opened, there's been a seven-fold reduction in the disparity in the city's access to care. None Imagination is one of our most fertile sources of creativity and positive emotional health. The ability to imagine many possibilitie...
Tags: Health, New York, Resources, Race, America, Los Angeles, Poverty, Chicago, Public Health, Innovation, University Of Chicago, Health Care, Hyde Park, Derek, American Medical Association, South Side


Study tracking people who ate zombie deer meat found no ill-effects, so far

Zombie deer disease is a clicktastic term for chronic wasting disease, a spongiform ecephalopathy suffered by ungulates. Much like Mad Cow Disease, Scrapie in sheep, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease in humans, misfolded proteins slowly destroy the brain, causing listlessness, discoordination, dementia and finally death. Now, what if you were to eat Zombie Deer? On March 13, 2005, a fire company in Oneida County, New York, fed the meat of a deer that tested positive for chronic wasting disease to ...
Tags: Health, Post, News, Public Health, Mistakes, Creutzfeldt Jakob, Oneida County New York


Why the Rosenhan Experiment still matters

In 1973, eight experimenters faked insanity to see how easy it was to get into a mental hospital. The hard part was getting out. Their findings sparked a great debate over how psychiatry treated patients and how accurate diagnostic procedures were.In an age marked by a lack of proper mental health care, the finding that it was too easy to get a doctor's attention seems shocking.In the United States, mental health care can be difficult to come by. One-third of Americans live in a "mental health p...
Tags: Psychology, Prison, New York City, Mental Health, Public Health, United States, Innovation, Hunter, Nellie Bly, Robert Spitzer, Rosenhan, Lauren Slater, David Rosenhan, Fred Hunter, Seymour S Kety, Lunatic Asylum


Deputy LA City Attorney in San Pedro goes public with typhus bout, prompting City Hall to take notice

Two months after she came down with typhus and called on City Hall for action, Los Angeles Deputy City Attorney Elizabeth Greenwood must feel she’s finally being heard. After the media picked up on her story in recent days, Los Angeles City Council President Herb Wesson this week called for the city to consider removing old carpeting and taking other steps in light of the diagnosis and what has been an ongoing issue with the presence of rats in city buildings. More needs to be done, said Greenwo...
Tags: Health, Los Angeles, Sport, Public Health, Soccer, Long Beach, Homeless, Pasadena, Local News, San Marino, City Hall, San Pedro, Los Angeles County, Greenwood, Wesson, Department of Public Health


Cannibis use disorder lower in states with liberal policies on cannibis availability

Adolescents and young adults living in states with more liberal policies reported higher average rates of past-year cannabis use than those in states with more conservative policies, according to a new study conducted at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. However, the rates of cannabis use disorder -- abuse or dependence on the drug -- were significantly lower in states with more liberal policies compared to states with more conservative policies, for ages 12 to 17, and ...
Tags: Health, Public Health, Infertility, David G Markham, Social Policy, Cannibis, Substance abuse prevention


Quit kissing adorable hedgehogs, says the CDC

The CDC has identified an outbreak of salmonella caused by contact with hedgehogs. A hedgehog can appear healthy and still carry salmonella. Conscientious hygiene is required for anyone living with a hedgie. None If you live in New York City, Pennsylvania, California, Hawaii, or Washington, D.C., we know you don't own a hedgehog — they're illegal in those places. However, if you live anywhere else…As a society, we've been developing a massive crush on these impossibly cute creatures: 2,752,58...
Tags: Health, Biology, Cdc, Washington, Animals, Public Health, Nature, Innovation, Disease, Illness, Hedgehogs, New York City Pennsylvania California Hawaii


Smoking greatly increases your biological age, says A.I.

A new blood analysis test performed by Artificial Intelligence shows that smoking greatly increases your biological age. Smokers under the age of forty show the greatest increase compared to their chronological age. The study was performed using the anonymized blood chemistry and cell count results of 149,000 people. None Facial creams. Nootropics. Meditation. Cosmetic surgery. Vegan diets. Skin food. Natural oils. Eye recovery masks. Face yoga (seriously). More serums than you ever imagined ex...
Tags: Health, Biology, Cancer, Aging, Artificial Intelligence, Public Health, Innovation, Addiction, Derek, Alberta Canada, InSilico Medicine, United States Denmark Russia Canada, Polina Mamoshina


How pharmaceutical companies game the patent system

When a company reaches the top of the ladder, they typically kick it away so that others cannot climb up on it. The aim? So that another company can't compete. When this happens in the pharmaceutical world, certain companies stay at the top of the ladder, through broadly-protected patents, at the cost of everyday people benefitting from increased competition. Since companies have worked out how to legally game the system, Amin argues we need to get rid of this "one size fits all" system, which t...
Tags: Health, Public Health, Innovation, Health Care, Pharmaceuticals, Social Change, Amin


​Americans now more likely to die from opioids than car crashes

Each American has about a 1 in 7,569 chance of dying from an opioid overdose, according to a National Safety Council report. The probability of dying in a motor vehicle accident is 1 in 8,096.The death rate for opioids is now six times higher than it was in 1999, with about 130 Americans dying every day from the drugs.Narcan is a life-saving drug that can stop opioid overdoses in their tracks, however factors like stigma and cost are preventing this antidote from becoming more accessible. None F...
Tags: Health, Drugs, Policy, Mental Health, Public Health, United States, Innovation, Addiction, Associated Press, Npr, Council, Wood, Narcotics, Adams, Harvard Law School, Stephen Wood


These new keto diet tortillas are made of 100% cheese

To help keto dieters stay the course, Lotito Foods has developed the Folios cheese wrap, a tortilla made entirely of cheese.These cheese wraps can be part of a healthy diet, but only if eaten in extreme moderation and alongside low-fat, low-salt foods. Research shows that replacing grains and fiber with fat and salts in the long term can be dangerous. None Now they've gone and done it. Keto diet enthusiasts have concocted all manner of unsettling dishes to kick the carbs: coffee with butter inst...
Tags: Health, Cancer, Happiness, Choice, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Agriculture, Disease, Keto, European Society of Cardiology, Bonnie Taub Dix, Taub Dix, Jaha, Human body, Keto Diet


Bill Gates wants us to fear mosquitoes, not sharks

Bill Gates has a long, complicated and showy relationship with malaria eradication, and in a new letter, he makes a case that mosquitoes are Earth's deadliest animals, outkilling even the murderous h. sap.. Gates's jeremiad comes as the eradication of disease-transmitting mosquitoes is seemingly within our grasp. There are more than 2,500 species of mosquito, and mosquitoes are found in every region of the world except Antarctica. During the peak breeding seasons, they outnumber every ot...
Tags: Health, Post, News, Public Health, Bill Gates, Antarctica, Panama Canal, Sharks, Malaria, Crispr, Epidemiology, Mosquitoes, Gene Drives, Winner Take All


Children 'exceed recommended sugar limit by age 10'

Ten-year-olds in the UK have already consumed 18 years’ worth of sugar, says Public Health England.
Tags: Health, UK, Public Health


The opioid crisis is profitable. Blockchain tech can end that.

The same way blockchain technology could end the blood diamond trade, it could also stop those profiting from the opioid crisis by removing the traditional opportunities for drug fraud, explains Hyperledger's Brian Behlendorf."I tend not to blame the drug taker because I think they're just medicating to meet their needs, it's really the distributors and those writing fake prescriptions and others who are enabling a lot of this crisis, and I think distributed ledger technology can help us underst...
Tags: Health, Technology, Medicine, Drugs, Data, Public Health, Innovation, Addiction, Health Care, Pharmaceuticals, Narcotics, Blockchain, Hyperledger, Brian Behlendorf


Is wasp venom the next healthcare revolution?

Researchers are looking at the venom of wasps, bees, and arachnids to develop life-saving medical therapies.Researchers at MIT created synthetic variants of a peptide found in wasp venom that proved an effective antibiotic.With the "post-antibiotic era" looming, synthetic peptides could provide a way to maintain global health initiatives.Two of the most common phobias are the fear of insects and fear of needles, so it's little wonder that people with apiphobia and spheksophobia aren't keen for ...
Tags: Health, Animals, Mit, Bacteria, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, World Health Organization, Illness, Insects, AMP, AMR, Molecular Biology, Pseudomonas, Timothy Lu


If you have this condition, you’re more likely to believe “pseudo-profound bullsh*t"

Scientists discover that people who have high apophenia are more likely to believe "pseudo-profound bullshit".Apophenia is a tendency to see patterns and connections that aren't really there.The condition could be a precursor to more serious mental illness. None If you've been feeling snarky about the motivational posts some of your friends keep posting on social media, there's a new study for you. It turns out, as researchers from the University of Melbourne in Australia discovered, there is a ...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Australia, Social Media, Intelligence, Mental Health, Brain, Public Health, Innovation, Mind, Luke, University of Melbourne, Bainbridge, Timothy Bainbridge, Klaus Conrad, Joshua A Quinlan Raymond A Mar


A new study confirms that e-cigs damage your heart

E-cigarettes reduce the amount of nitric oxide being produced, increasing the likelihood of heart damage.Vaping might be "healthier" than smoking traditional cigarettes, but as more research continues to be published, e-cigs are certainly not being shown as "healthy."Juul's recent removal of flavored pods from retail outlets was pre-empting forthcoming FDA regulations. None The notion that e-cigarettes are "healthier" than regular cigarettes quickly created another billion-dollar industry. The ...
Tags: Health, Science, Cancer, Public Health, Medical Research, United States, Innovation, Addiction, Fda, Juul, Nestle, Derek, University of Birmingham, Altria, University of Louisville, Phillip Morris


Throw out your romaine lettuce, CDC declares E.coli outbreak

Romaine lettuce is unsafe to eat … again. The CDC is advising people to throw out and avoid eating all romaine lettuce following an E.coli outbreak that has left 32 people sick and 13 people hospitalized across 11 states in the U.S. so far. The CDC along with public health officials across the U.S. and Canada are investigating another outbreak of E.coli connected to romaine lettuce. The center said that consumers should not eat any romaine lettuce, and restaurants and retailers should not serve...
Tags: Health, Food, Design, News, Safety, Cdc, Public Health, Canada, Illness, Outbreak, E.coli, Eat & Drink, Lettuce, Caesar, Romaine Lettuce


Why the Chickenpox Vaccine Matters

Most of the students at one North Carolina private school didn’t get the chickenpox vaccine, and now that school is the epicenter of the largest chickenpox outbreak in 20 years.Read more...
Tags: Health, Kids, Parenting, Public Health, Lifehacks, Vaccines, North Carolina


Scientists find a horrible new way cocaine can damage your brain

Cocaine cut with anti-worming adulterant levamisole may cause brain damage.Levamisole can thin out the prefrontal cortex and affect cognitive skills.Government health programs should encourage testing of cocaine for purity. None A dangerous new substance that may cause brain damage has been found mixed with cocaine by Swiss researchers.After marijuana, cocaine is the second-most consumed illegal drug around the world. Unlike weed, however, it's usually ingested in an impure "cut" form, with drug...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Drugs, Society, Brain, Cocaine, Public Health, Chemistry, Medical Research, Innovation, Health Care, Psychiatric Hospital, Human body, University of Zurich UZH, Levamisole, Boris Quednow


Why Cancer Is Replacing Heart Disease as the Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.

Heart disease has long been the number one killer in the United States. But a new study out this week is the latest to suggest that it’s only a matter of time before the second leading cause of death—cancer—becomes more commonly fatal for the average person. On the bright side, though, that’s largely because we’ve…Read more...
Tags: Death, Science, Cancer, Heart Disease, Public Health, United States, Disease


How the global health community is fighting the rise of superbugs

Antimicrobial drugs are losing their effectiveness because pathogens change and find ways to resist the effects of antibiotics, leading to the development of superbugs.Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) causes 700,000 deaths annually across the globe, a number that is projected to skyrocket to 10 million by the year 2050 if new interventions are not developed.Antibiotics are crucial in treating minor infections and curing serious infectious diseases, enabling minor and complex surgeries, as well as ...
Tags: Health, Sponsored, Video, Science, Medicine, Atlas, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Health Care, Illness, Pfizer, Pharmaceuticals, Vaccines, Microbes, AMR


How to vaccinate the world’s most vulnerable? Build global partnerships.

Community healthcare workers face many challenges in their work, including often traveling far distances to see their clientsPfizer is helping to drive the UN's sustainable development goals through partnerships.Pfizer partnered with AMP and the World Health Organization to develop a training program for healthcare workers. Community healthcare workers are often the only point of contact with the health system in many underserved areas in the developing world. These noble public servants work wi...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Africa, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, World Health Organization, Un, Zambia, Health Care, Pfizer, Vaccines, AMP, Ghana, Gavi


What it takes to get vaccines from the lab to the field

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) are a set of 17 directives to be completed by a 2030 deadline, with the aim of significantly improving quality of life for all people on Earth. Pfizer has made a commitment to SDG #3: Good health and well-being for all. Africa bears 25% of the world's disease burden yet has just 3% of the world's health workers. So how do you get life-saving vaccines to world's most vulnerable? Pfizer partners with several organizations to help strengthen th...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Africa, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Health Care, Illness, Pfizer, Vaccines, United Nations Sustainable Development Goals SDG, Earth Pfizer


Do doctors warn patients enough about opioids?

More than 130 people die every day from opioid-related overdoses, and some 11.4 million Americans have an opioid disorder.Americans remain wary of opioids and want more guidance; about a third of doctors need to explain options better.Patients have to pro-actively question subscribing physicians.The statistics that describe America's opioid epidemic are sobering. According to Health and Human Services numbers released in May 2018 , more than 130 people die every day from opioid-related overdose...
Tags: Health, America, Infographic, Public Health, Innovation, Visualizations, Pharmaceuticals, Narcotics, Health And Human Services, DrugAbuse


Eating organic food lowers cancer risk by 25%, study reveals

A French study of nearly 70,000 people states that organic foods reduce the risk that you'll develop non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and postmenopausal breast cancer. Agricultural pesticides have been shown to have a toxic effect on the human endocrine system. The high cost of organic food remains a barrier to entry for those wishing to eat a healthier diet. None In 1998, while working as a reporter at a Princeton newspaper, I wrote a story on organic foods, at the time a $3.5 billion business. The feat...
Tags: Health, Food, Cancer, Environment, Public Health, New York Times, Innovation, Disease, Princeton, Derek, Microbes, Ny Times, Bucks County, Rutgers University, JAMA, Hodgkin


100% of people in pilot study had microplastic in their stools

All subjects selected for a pilot program had microplastics in their stools. The types of microplastics found implicate both food and non-food sources. Boutique water may be healthier, but its bottles not so much. It was just a small study from a team of researchers led by gastroenterologist Philipp Schwabl of the Medical University of Vienna, but all eight people selected as subjects in the warm-up experiment for further research were found to have microplastics in their stools. Schwabl tel...
Tags: Health, UK, Environment, Water, Cnn, Public Health, Medical Research, Vienna, Pollution, New York Times, Plastic, Innovation, Medical University of Vienna, Human body, Philipp Schwabl, Schwabl


8 out of 8 people in study have ingested microplastic

All subjects selected for a pilot program had microplastics in their stools. The types of microplastics found implicate both food and non-food sources. Boutique water may be healthier, but its bottles not so much. It was just a small study from a team of researchers led by gastroenterologist Philipp Schwabl of the Medical University of Vienna, but all eight people selected as subjects in the warm-up experiment for further research were found to have microplastics in their stools. Schwabl tel...
Tags: Health, UK, Environment, Water, Cnn, Public Health, Medical Research, Vienna, Pollution, New York Times, Plastic, Innovation, Medical University of Vienna, Human body, Philipp Schwabl, Schwabl



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