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Philosopher of the Month: Plato [infographic]

This February, the OUP Philosophy team honours Plato (c. 429 BC – c. 347 BC) as their Philosopher of the Month. Plato is recognised as one of the most influential figures in the history of Western thought, along with his mentor Socrates, and his student Aristotle. Born into a noble and politically active family, he grew up in the shadow of the great Peloponnesian war which caused social and political upheavals for Athens. The Greek philosopher Socrates (469-399 B.C.) was an important formative i...
Tags: Infographics, Books, Featured, Athens, Philosophy, Multimedia, Aristotle, Plato, Socrates, Arts & Humanities, Philosopher of the Month, Platonism, OUP Philosophy, Socrates Plato, Egypt Italy, Neoplatonism


Philosopher of the Month: Plato

This February, the OUP Philosophy team honours Plato (c. 429 BC – c. 347 BC) as their Philosopher of the Month. Plato is recognised as one of the most influential figures in the history of Western thought, along with his mentor Socrates, and his student Aristotle. Born into a noble and politically active family, he grew up in the shadow of the great Peloponnesian war which caused social and political upheavals for Athens. The Greek philosopher Socrates (469-399 B.C.) was an important formative i...
Tags: Books, Featured, Athens, Philosophy, Aristotle, Plato, Socrates, Arts & Humanities, Philosopher of the Month, Platonism, OUP Philosophy, Socrates Plato, Egypt Italy, Neoplatonism, School of Athens, Regular Slot: Philosopher Of The Month


Some value safety, others value risk

No one has ever crossed the Antarctic by themselves and without help from other people or engines. To me, this is very unsurprising and uninteresting. No one (outside of superhero movies) has ever shrunk themselves to the size of an ant, or turned back time by causing the earth to rotate backwards either. Big deal. But to Colin O’Brady (a 33-year-old American adventure athlete) and Louis Rudd (a 49-year-old British Army Captain) the fact that no one has ever crossed the Antarctic unsupported is ...
Tags: Books, Featured, Happiness, Risk, Ethics, Everest, British Army, Philosophy, Rudd, Henry Worsley, Antarctic, Meaning Of Life, El Capitan, Louis, Moral Philosophy, Arts & Humanities


Why some value safety, others value risk

No one has ever crossed the Antarctic by themselves and without help from other people or engines. To me, this is very unsurprising and uninteresting. No one (outside of superhero movies) has ever shrunk themselves to the size of an ant, or turned back time by causing the earth to rotate backwards either. Big deal. But to Colin O’Brady (a 33-year-old American adventure athlete) and Louis Rudd (a 49-year-old British Army Captain) the fact that no one has ever crossed the Antarctic unsupported is ...
Tags: Books, Featured, Happiness, Risk, Ethics, Everest, British Army, Philosophy, Rudd, Henry Worsley, Antarctic, Meaning Of Life, El Capitan, Louis, Moral Philosophy, Arts & Humanities


Ice Cube and the philosophical foundations of community policing

The recent “The post Ice Cube and the philosophical foundations of community policing appeared first on OUPblog.
Tags: Books, Featured, Law Enforcement, Philosophy, Criminal Justice, Rule Of Law, Arts & Humanities, Community Policing, Luke Hunt, Philosophy And Law, Public Reason, The Retrieval Of Liberalism In Policing, The Role Of Police


Congratulations to Cyberwar

Oxford University Press has won the 2018 R. R. Hawkins Award, which is awarded by the Association of American Publishers to a single book every year to “recognize outstanding scholarly works in all disciplines of the arts and sciences.”  This year’s winner is Kathleen Hall-Jamieson’s Cyberwar:  How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President. Kathleen Hall Jamieson. Image Credit: The Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands In Cyberwar, Kathleen Hall Jamieson marshals the troll posts, ...
Tags: Books, Politics, Featured, History, Fbi, United States, Biography, Philosophy, Clinton, James Comey, Social Sciences, Sunnylands, Oxford University Press, Association of American Publishers, Science & Medicine, Arts & Humanities


Black History Month: a reading list

February marks the celebration of Black History Month in the United States and Canada, an annual celebration of achievements by Black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in US history.The first variation of Black History Month was initiated by Dr. Carter G. Woodson (founder of the Association for the Study of Negro Life) in 1926 titled Negro History Week, which took place during the second week of February. The Association for the Study of Negro Life and Hi...
Tags: Books, Featured, Lorde, Australia, Nigeria, Africa, US, America, History, Reading List, Canada, United States, New Orleans, Journals, Paul Robeson, Alice Walker


What the Paris Peace Conference can teach us about politics today

One hundred years ago, the treaty of Versailles, the centerpiece of a set of treaties and agreements collectively known as the Paris Peace Settlements, was signed in the glittering hall of mirrors in the former home of France’s Sun King. For some, the war it brought to an end marked the final chapter of a distinct period in international relations, one dominated by a European states system that had endured since the Middle Ages and in which military conflict was relatively commonplace.Anniversar...
Tags: Europe, Books, Politics, Featured, France, US, History, World, United States, Paris, World War One, Journals, Donald Trump, International Relations, Social Sciences, Versailles


Photography and sex in Amos Badertscher’s Baltimore

The Baltimore photographer Amos Badertscher has been cataloguing queer lives in his city since the 1960s: male sex workers and their girlfriends, the 1990s Baltimore and Washington club culture, transgender people, crack and heroin addiction, and the impact of AIDS. His is the largest extant photographic record of the short lives of hustlers (male sex workers) that I know of. Though he could by no means be described as famous, Badertscher enjoyed a brief period of academic notice with the public...
Tags: Art, Books, Photography, New York, Featured, Washington, US, San Francisco, Chicago, Nikon, New York Public Library, Baltimore, Amos, 1990s, History Center, University of Chicago Library


Simone de Beauvoir at the movies

Say you’re an intellectual, a writer.  You love going to the movies and are a devoted student of cinematic culture.  You also identify as a woman.  Over the years, you have had to deal with the fact that the women you see onscreen often appear in the service of male desire; they are meant to be spanked, to be kissed, to oblige and to support men.  The rehearsal of this asymmetrical gender dynamic disturbs you, but as a student of cinematic culture, you’ve learned to hold your nose and keep watch...
Tags: Books, Featured, Media, Film, Film criticism, Women In Film, Simone de Beauvoir, Arts & Humanities, TV & Film, Beauvoir, Gender studies, Gender Theory, Film theory, Feminist Theory, Feminist Criticism, Feminist Film Theory


Happy Chinese New Year!

This year, the Chinese New Year begins today, February 5th, and people all around the world will be ringing in the year of the Pig.  Oxford Chinese Dictionary editor Julie Kleeman shares some insight into the traditions associated with the Chinese New Year celebrations.Chinese New Year, or the Spring Festival (春节 chunjie) is a fifteen-day celebration beginning on the second new moon after the winter solstice and ending on the full moon fifteen days later.Sounds complicated? That’s because when m...
Tags: Asia, Books, Featured, China, History, Language, Chinese New Year, Lunar New Year, Dictionaries & Lexicography, Arts & Humanities, Chinese history, Julie Kleeman, Pig Oxford Chinese Dictionary, Humphrey Muleba Public Domain


Based on a true story [podcast]

In the world of film, members of the audience perceive what they see on screen as realistic, even if what they’re seeing is not actually real. The role and influence of academic consultants has been debated as the impact of historical films in the lens of educating a populous is in question.On this episode, we examine the significant role of academic consultants within television and movies, particularly historical and science fiction films. The use of consultants on set has steadily increased s...
Tags: Books, Science Fiction, Featured, Television, Film, Historical Accuracy, Arts & Humanities, The Oxford Comment, Based On A True Story, TV & Film, The Conjuring, Accuracy, American Cosmic, Diana Walsh Pasulka, Historical Films, Felix Mooneeram


The challenges of representing history in comic book form

When I wrote my first graphic history, based on the 1876 court transcript of a West African woman who was wrongfully enslaved and took her case to court, in 2012, I received a diverse and gratifying range of feedback from my fellow historians. Their response was overwhelmingly but not universally positive. One colleague in particular tried to explain to me why she regretted the emergence of comic book style histories.  “It’s too bad students just don’t read any more”, she sighed, implying that c...
Tags: Books, Comics, Featured, Comic Books, History, Journals, American Historical Association, Ahr, Art Spiegelman, Arts & Humanities, Kate Evans, John Lewis Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell, History Journals, American Historical Review, Ahrrev


Are our fantasies immune from morality?

Immoral fantasies are not uncommon, nor are they necessarily unhealthy. Some are silly and unrealistic, though others can be genuinely disturbing. You might fantasize about kicking your boss in the shins, or having an affair with your best friend’s spouse, or planning the perfect murder. Everyone enjoys a dark little fantasy at some time. Which leads us to wonder, is it ever morally wrong to do so? Or, a better way to put the question, under what conditions is it morally wrong to fantasize about...
Tags: Books, Featured, Fantasy, Ethics, Philosophy, Morality, Moral Philosophy, Arts & Humanities, Efe Kurnaz, Aesthej, Anna Cremaldi, Christopher Bartel, Personal And Sexual Morality, The British Journal of Aesthetics


The rightful heirs to the British crown: Wales and the sovereignty of Britain

The Mabinogion is a collective name given to eleven medieval Welsh tales found mainly in two manuscripts – the White Book of Rhydderch (c. 1350), and the Red Book of Hergest (dated between 1382 and c.1410). The term is a scribal error for mabinogi, derived from the Welsh word mab meaning ‘son, boy’; its original meaning was probably ‘youth’ or ‘story of youth’, but finally it meant no more than ‘tale’ or ‘story’. The title was popularized in the nineteenth century when Lady Charlotte Guest trans...
Tags: Books, Featured, Wales, History, Britain, Literature, Cornwall, Norman, Tolkien, Tennyson, Arthur, Lloyd Alexander, Gwynedd, Wikimedia Commons, Usk, Arts & Humanities


The tortures of adapting Samuel Richardson’s ‘Pamela’

The term “bestseller” is a bit of a stretch for the eighteenth century, when books were expensive (though widely shared), and information about print-runs is hard to come by. But if any early novel deserves the title, it’s Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, which on publication in 1740 rapidly caught the imagination of Britain, Europe, and indeed America (the Philadelphia printing by Benjamin Franklin was the first unabridged American edition of any novel).The author of this innovative novel was a lead...
Tags: Books, London, Featured, Theatre, America, Paris, Adaptation, Literature, Philadelphia, National Theatre, Dublin, Benjamin Franklin, Richard III, Cate Blanchett, OWC, Carlo Goldoni


Music in history: overcoming historians’ reluctance to tackle music as a source

Despite their enthusiasm for borrowing from other fields and incorporating new types of source material, many historians remain reluctant to analyze music. For example, when the American Historical Association dedicated its 2015 Annual Meeting to “History and Other Disciplines,” organizers called for work that engaged with anthropology, material culture, archaeology, visual studies, and museum studies, but they were noticeably silent about music and musicology. What explains this aversion?First,...
Tags: Books, Music, Featured, History, Britain, Music History, Academic Research, Journal, American Historical Association, McGraw, Arts & Humanities, Music Research, Music analysis, Journal of Social History, Thomas Brothers, James Millward


Protest songs and the spirit of America [playlist]

In a rare television interview, Jimi Hendrix appeared on a network talk show shortly after his historic performance at the Woodstock Music & Art Fair. When host Dick Cavett asked the guitarist about the “controversy” surrounding his wild, feedback-saturated version of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” Hendrix gently demurred.His performance wasn’t “unorthodox,” he protested. “I thought it was beautiful.”But Hendrix’s ominous, bombs-bursting version of our national anthem, in fact, would be interpreted...
Tags: Books, Music, Politics, Featured, White House, America, History, Jimi Hendrix, United States, Bob Dylan, Civil Rights, Ferguson, Protest Songs, Vietnam, Vietnam War, Dick Cavett


How sibling rivalry impacts politics

Was Ed Miliband right to stand against his brother David for the leadership of the Labour party in 2010? Or should he have stepped aside to give his elder brother a clear run? There was much media debate over his decision to challenge David, and relations between the brothers have remained cool and distant to this day. Half a century earlier, John Kennedy and his brothers Robert and Ted were all viewed as potential American presidential candidates. But Robert waited until after his elder brother...
Tags: Books, Politics, Featured, History, Ted, David, Britain, Labour party leadership, Ed Miliband, Harry, Catholic, British, Shakespeare, Election, Labour Party, Edward


The continuing life of science fiction

In 1998, Thomas M. Disch boldly declared in The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World that science fiction had become the main kind of fiction which was commenting on contemporary social reality. As a professional writer, we could object that Disch had a vested interest in making this assertion, but virtually every day news items confirm his argument that science fiction connects with an amazingly broad range of public issues.Take the ongoing debate over different ...
Tags: Star Wars, Books, Science Fiction, Usa, UK, Featured, Film, Nasa, Avatar, Cameron, Literature, Sci Fi, Scifi, Philip K Dick, James Cameron, Neal Stephenson


Philosophy in 2018: a year in review [timeline]

2018 has been another significant year for the philosophy world and,  as it draws to a close,  the OUP Philosophy team reflects on what has happened in the field. We’ve compiled a selection of key events, awards, and anniversaries, from the bicentenary of the birth of Karl Marx to Martha Nussbaum winning the Berggruen Prize and the death of the philosopher Mary Midgley. Take a look through our interactive timeline.Which key events would you add to our timeline of philosophy in 2018? Let us know ...
Tags: Books, Featured, Anniversaries, Philosophy, Karl Marx, Martha Nussbaum, Arts & Humanities, Pixabay, Philosopher of the Month, OUP Philosophy, OUPPhilosophy, Panumas King, World Philosophy Day, Philosophy Year In Review, 2018 Philosophy, Book Award Winners


The history of holiday traditions [podcast]

One of the best parts of the holiday season is that everyone celebrates it in their own unique way. Some traditions have grown out of novelty, such as eating Kentucky Fried Chicken dinners on Christmas in Japan. Others date back centuries, like hiding your broom on Christmas Eve in Norway to prevent witches and evil spirits from stealing it to ride on. Holiday traditions can stir up feelings of nostalgia and spark interest in exploring one’s ancestral past. We start to wonder where did these tra...
Tags: Books, Japan, Featured, Holidays, Christmas, Sociology, Happy Holidays, Norway, Xmas, Traditions, Social Sciences, Holiday Traditions, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Arts & Humanities, The Oxford Comment, OUP Podcast


Dancing politics in Argentina

Argentina’s rich history of 20th and 21st century social, political, and activist movements looms large in popular imagination and scholarly literature alike. Well-known images include the masses gathered in the Plaza de Mayo outside the iconic pink presidential palace during populist President Juan Domingo Perón’s first terms (1946-1955). This scene was imprinted in popular culture, for better or worse, by Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Evita. The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo famously held weekly demons...
Tags: Books, Featured, Dance, Brazil, Argentina, Violence, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Latin America, Mauricio Macri, Zimmermann, Trelew, Arts & Humanities, Theatre & Dance, Contemporary Dance, Jair Bolsonaro, Juan Domingo Perón


On observing one’s past

Let me share a memory with you. It’s a childhood memory, about an event from when I was around 13 or 14 years old. My father and I are playing soccer together. He is the goalkeeper, standing between the posts, I am the striker, taking shots from outside the box. My dad has been encouraging me to shoot with my weaker left foot, to develop the skills that come more easily on my more natural right side. He throws the ball to me, I control it on my chest, let it drop, and hit a sweetly-timed volley ...
Tags: Art, Books, Featured, Language, Philosophy, Psychoanalysis, Arts & Humanities, Pixabay, Philosophy Of Mind, 20th Century Philosophy, Philosophy Of Language, Christopher McCarroll, Human Memory


A European peace plan turns 325

2018 marks the 325th anniversary of the publication of William Penn’s Essay towards the Present and Future Peace of Europe, which proposed, among other things, the establishment of a European Parliament. Best remembered as the founder of Pennsylvania, Penn spent most of his life in England and remained deeply concerned about the fate of religious and political liberty across Europe. He proposed his “European Diet, Parliament, or Estates” as a way of promoting peaceful coexistence and breaking ou...
Tags: Europe, Books, Politics, England, Featured, History, Hungary, Poland, Benjamin Franklin, European Parliament, Brexit, Penn, Social Sciences, Cicero, Quaker, Quakers


Brian Eno’s Music for Airports 40 years later

Forty years ago, Brian Eno released Ambient 1: Music for Airports and Virgin-EMI has just given it a deluxe vinyl re-issue. The first work to formally identify itself as “ambient,” it garnered modest attention and a bit of derision; Rolling Stone referred to it as “aesthetic white noise.” But over time, it has become the work in the evolving genre of ambient music, topping lists of the most important ambient works, and receiving acoustic and electric performances from artists as varied as the ne...
Tags: Books, Music, Featured, History, Steve Reich, Airport, Rolling Stone, Brian Eno, Eno, John Cage, Erik Satie, Virgin EMI, Music for Airports, Arts & Humanities, Music Theory, Ambient Music


The merits of and case for Land Value Taxation

Politics matters for tax as tax matters for politics. The high-minded Scottish economist Adam Smith had four maxims of taxation:Tax should be progressive.Tax should be certain, not arbitrary.Tax should be paid at the time most convenient to the contributor.Tax should take as little from the contributors as possible to pay for the state.In contrast, Jean-Baptiste Colbert reportedly said “the art of taxation consists in so plucking the goose as to obtain the largest possible amount of feathers wit...
Tags: Books, UK, London, Featured, Law, Scotland, Economics, Institute for Fiscal Studies, Winston Churchill, Philosophy, Colbert, Smith, Property Tax, Council Tax, Taxation, Adam Smith


A timeline of American music in 1917

The year 1917 witnessed a dramatic shift in American musical life, as the United States’ entry into World War I forced Americans to reevaluate their musical tastes. The Austro-German musicians who had dominated classical music for generations came under suspicion, and the new genre of jazz proved ideally suited to the anxious mood of wartime. Aiding this transformation were major improvements in recording technology of both classical and popular music. Featured image credit: Lieutenant James Re...
Tags: Books, Music, Featured, United States, First World War, Jazz, Richard Wagner, George M Cohan, Arts & Humanities, World War 1, Livery Stable Blues, 1917, Jazz Band, Dixieland, James Reese Europe, Bomberger


Bob Chilcott shares his memories of Sir David Willcocks

I joined King’s College Choir as a boy treble in 1964. This was a time of real energy in the media, recording and concert world, and this possibly brought a different kind of perspective to David’s work with the choir. There were a number of firsts for the choir around this time. In 1965 we made our first stereo recording for EMI Records. The album, Sing Praises, included carols from a new publication entitled The Cambridge Hymnal. David turned up with brown Xeroxed copies of a new arrangement o...
Tags: Books, Music, England, Featured, Sweden, Germany, David, Holland, Benjamin Britten, King, Vaughan, Choir, Choral, Britten, Andrew, Haydn


The evolution of the word “terror”

Terror comes into English in the late fourteenth century, partly from Middle French terreur, and partly directly from Latin terror. The word means both “the state of being greatly frightened” and “the cause of that state,” an ambiguity that is central to its future political meanings. In Early Modern English, terror comes to stand for a state of fear provoked on the very edge of the social. That state is associated with the god Pan and the fear that grips men when they feel themselves removed fr...
Tags: Books, Politics, Featured, Russia, US, Post Office, History, Munich, Terrorism, Language, Linguistics, Terrorist, George W Bush, Stalin, Franz Ferdinand, Social Sciences



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