Music


Posts filtered by tags: Facebook Twitter[x]


 

DOWNLOAD West Ham Have Reportedly Held Extensive Talks With The Entourage Of Midfielder Alex Kral

Download another latest track by West Ham Have Reportedly Held Extensive Talks With The Entourage Of Midfielder Alex Kral West Ham have reportedly held extensive talks with the entourage of midfielder Alex Kral as they look to snap up the Czech Republic international this summer. The Hammers want to build on a strength, as they look to add additional cover for outstanding midfield duo both Declan Rice and Tomas Soucek respectively. And Kral is keen to follow his international teammates Soucek a...
Tags: Music, England, London, Czech Republic, David Moyes, Daily Express, Jazz, Spartak Moscow, West Ham, Hammers, Alex, Facebook Twitter, Sébastien Haller, Slavia Prague, Kral, Teplice


Freddie Mercury & Rami Malek’s Live Aid Performance: A Side-By-Side Comparison

All Hollywood musicals need a big final set piece, one final rousing number to bring all the narrative threads back together, and provide redemption to our fallen hero. Bohemian Rhapsody, the 2018 biopic about Freddie Mercury and the band Queen, uses Live Aid as its final number. We’ve written elsewhere about how this was not really the final hurrah for the band, nor was this some kind of triumphant return after years in the Wilderness. (“Radio Gaga” and “I Want to Break Free” had been i...
Tags: Google, Music, Hollywood, College, Bob Geldof, Queen, Wembley, Freddie Mercury, Bryan Singer, George, Facebook Twitter, Rami Malek, Malek, KCRW, Brendan Fletcher, Brian May Gwilym Lee


Watch a Newly-Restored Peter Gabriel-Era Genesis Concert Film From 1973 in Stunning 4K Quality

There are two late-20th century rock bands named Genesis and both of them featured Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks. The second Genesis we know of as one of the biggest-selling bands of all time and authors of such massive hits as “Land of Confusion,” “In Too Deep,” and “Throwing It All Away.” The first we may not know at all, except indirectly by way of its frontman, Peter Gabriel, better known as… solo artist Peter Gabriel. One reason Genesis, the second, is more famous th...
Tags: Google, Music, England, College, Mtv, Paris, Broadway, Kate Bush, Rolling Stone, Collins, Bataclan, Facebook Twitter, Peter Gabriel, Gabriel, Josh Jones, Steve Hackett


Watch “Hi-Fi-Fo-Fum,” a Short Satirical Film About the Invention of the Audiophile (1959)

Sometime in the mid-1990s, my father gave me his hi-end, hi-fi stereo system from the mid-1970s: a vacuum tube-powered amplifier, pair of stereo speakers in walnut cabinets, and a turntable. Heavy, bulky, and built with hardly an ounce of plastic between them, these components lacked all of the functionality we look for in consumer audio today: no 4K HDMI, no Bluetooth, no surround sound of any kind. As such features became de rigeur, my stereo migrated to the closet, piece by piece, then out th...
Tags: Google, Music, Television, College, Bbc, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Ted Gioia, Durham NC Follow, Typewriters Electric Shavers, Cadeddu, Audiophilia, Lucio Cadeddu


Hear Joni Mitchell’s Earliest Recording, Rediscovered After More than 50 Years

How excited would you be to listen to a recording, made at an AM radio station in 1963, labeled “JONI ANDERSON AUDITION TAPE”? If you know much about the singer-songwriters of the mid-20th century, you’d be quite excited indeed. For Joni Anderson is none other than Joni Mitchell, who under that married name would go on to become one of the most influential solo performers to come out of the folk-music scene. Not that she prized the designation that thus accompanied her to stardom: “I was...
Tags: Google, Music, California, College, Toronto, Joni Mitchell, Seoul, Anderson, Mitchell, Saskatoon, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Bob Dylan Roger McGuinn Gordon Lightfoot, Joni Anderson, Barry Bowman


Watch Metallica Play “Enter Sandman” Before a Crowd of 1.6 Million in Moscow, During the Final Days of the Soviet Union (1991)

In the years following the collapse of the Soviet Union a “triumphalist discourse” arose in the U.S., writes historian Richard Sakwa, “which suggests that the Soviet demise was a deliberate act plotted and executed by president Ronald Reagan” with massive military budgets and nuclear threats. This narrative has less exclusive currency today. There are as many theories as theorists of Soviet demise, among them the “compelling argument,” says Jim Brown, producer of a documentary called Fre...
Tags: Google, Music, Time Warner, College, Gorbachev, Atlantic, Ronald Reagan, Mtv, New York Times, Metallica, Moscow, Cia, Motley Crue, Soviet Union, Brown, Facebook Twitter


Watch 4 Music Videos That Bring to Life Songs from Leonard Cohen’s Final Album, Thanks for the Dance

Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker is a bleak masterpiece. Released just 19 days before his death, the album sounds like a warning from beyond, one Cohen seemed to know we’d never heed. His sympathy for human failure reached its denouement in the posthumous Thanks for the Dance, a project “much less apocalyptic” in tone than its predecessor, writes Thomas Hobbs at NME. Unlike many a posthumous album, “this point of difference more than justifies the record’s release,” even if the materia...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Npr, Leonard Cohen, Nme, Cohen, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Adam, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Leonard Cohen David Bowie, Thomas Hobbs, Javier Mas, Beck Feist Bryce Dessner


Watch 4 Music Videos for Songs from Leonard Cohen’s Final Album, Thanks for the Dance

Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker is a bleak masterpiece. Released just 19 days before his death, the album sounds like a warning from beyond, one Cohen seemed to know we’d never heed. His sympathy for human failure reached its denouement in the posthumous Thanks for the Dance, a project “much less apocalyptic” in tone than its predecessor, writes Thomas Hobbs at NME. Unlike many a posthumous album, “this point of difference more than justifies the record’s release,” even if the materia...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Npr, Leonard Cohen, Nme, Cohen, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Adam, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Leonard Cohen David Bowie, Thomas Hobbs, Javier Mas, Beck Feist Bryce Dessner


Watch Radiohead Perform In Rainbows & The King of Limbs in Intimate Live Settings, with No Host or Audience

Over the past twenty years Radiohead managed to achieve something no other rock band ever has: enduring outsider art rock credibility that shielded them from the media machinery they came to loathe at the end of the millennium, and enduring popularity that meant they could drop their last, 2016 LP, A Moon Shaped Pool “without doing a single interview and it still topped the charts all over the world,” Rolling Stone writes,” even if Drake and Beyonce kept them stuck at Number Three in Ame...
Tags: Google, Music, Beyonce, College, America, Radiohead, Drake, Thom Yorke, Ross, Alex Ross, Facebook Twitter, Selway, Josh Jones, Nigel Godrich, Durham NC Follow, Phil Selway


The Digital Lomax Archive Provides Free Access to the Pioneering Recordings of John & Alan Lomax, Compiled Across 7 Decades

The work of ethnomusicologist father and son team John and Alan Lomax was intended to preserve the local musical cultures of the United States and regions around the world against an encroaching mass media threatening to erase them. But the thousands of Lomax recordings, films, books, articles, and other documents not only conserved regional music; they also helped transform mass culture by introducing local forms that have since become part of a global musical grammar. Lomax and his son...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, Mississippi, College, Kentucky, Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, History, United States, Cbs, Columbia University, John, Alan, Facebook Twitter, Dylan


Watch Blondie’s Debbie Harry Perform “Rainbow Connection” with Kermit the Frog on The Muppet Show (1981)

Do you dig songs about rainbows? The host of one of the very last episodes of The Muppet Show — Debbie Harry, lead singer of Blondie – does, and in 1981, she seized the opportunity to duet with Kermit the Frog on his signature tune, “The Rainbow Connection” — its only performance in the series’ five season run. Many of us associate the folksy number with The Muppet Movie‘s pastoral opening scene. This rendition transfers the action backstage to the kimono-clad Harry’s dressing room. ...
Tags: Google, Music, Comedy, Television, College, Muppets, K-12, Harry, Brian, Sam, Teeth, Kermit, Blondie, Facebook Twitter, Debbie Harry, Jim Henson


Grateful Dead Fan Creates a Faithful Mini Replica of the Band’s Famous “Wall of Sound” During Lockdown

A few years ago . Not the one created in the studio by Phil Spector, but the one created by Grateful Dead tech engineer Owsley “Bear” Stanley out of over 600 speakers. Before the Dead worked to revolutionize how rock concerts could sound, the speakers at live shows were trebly, underpowered things, having not been designed for the sudden change in musical texture and sound during the 1960s. In the early days, speakers were mostly used to make sure the drums didn’t drown out the other band memb...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Columbia University, Grateful Dead, Phil Spector, Cancun, Facebook Twitter, Stanley, KCRW, Bob Weir, Dead Company, Jerry Garcia, Winterland, Ted Mills, Coscia


Listen to ABBA’s “Dancing Queen” Played on a 1914 Fairground Organ

To truly appreciate the spectacle of ABBA’s “Dancing Queen” played on a 1914 Hooghuys fairground organ, we recommend you read Angus Harrison’s 2016 VICE essay, “Why Abba’s ‘Dancing Queen’ Is the Saddest Record Ever Made“: Make no mistake. This song is about the dancing queen, but it is most definitely not sung by her. Herein lies the tragedy. Our narrator has realized that she is no longer the Dancing Queen. She is no longer young, no longer sweet, no longer 17. Now, instead, she watches...
Tags: Google, Music, Technology, College, History, Abba, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Marenghi, Alexey Rom, Angus Harrison, Below Rom


Stream a Massive Archive of Grateful Dead Concerts from 1965-1995

Image by Herb Greene, via Wikimedia Commons “Once we’re done with it, the audience can have it.” — Jerry Garcia It so happens that one of the greatest things about the Internet is also one of the not-so-greatest things: you hardly ever have to leave the house anymore. Of course, for traders and collectors of bootlegs, this has been a major boon. Obscure tapes a fan might spend years tracking down in previous times can now be searched, found, and downloaded with ease. And — as a special a...
Tags: Google, Music, College, San Francisco, Grateful Dead, Facebook Twitter, Wikimedia Commons, Jerry Garcia, Nick Paumgarten, Durham NC Follow, Donna Jean Godchaux, Cornell University Ithaca NY, West San Francisco, Paumgarten, Veneta, Herb Greene


Is “Rain” the Perfect Beatles Song?: A New Video Explores the Radical Innovations of the 1966 B-Side

“That one was the gift of God… of Ja actually—the god of marijuana, right? So Ja gave me that one.” The Beatles 1966 Revolver, a mini-masterpiece, contains all the elements that would inform the band’s revolutionary late-60s sound on Sgt. Pepper’s, Abbey Road, The White Album, and Let it Be. The album’s first track, “Taxman,” announced “a sweeping shift in the essential nature of the Beatles’ sound,” writes music historian Kenneth Womack. Its ultimate track, “Tomorrow Never Knows,” was “...
Tags: Google, Music, College, John Lennon, Paul Mccartney, Playboy, Ringo, Mccartney, Lennon, Robert Rodriguez, PAUL, Facebook Twitter, EMI, Josh Jones, George Martin, Durham NC Follow


Mick Jagger Takes Shots at Conspiracy Theorists & Anti-Vaxxers in a New Song, “Eazy Sleazy” (with Dave Grohl on Drums, Bass & Guitar)

Follow along with the lyrics below, or in the video above. W’e took it on the chin The numbers were so grim Bossed around by pricks Stiffen upper lips Pacing in the yard You’re trying to take the mick You must think i’m really thick Looking at the graphs with a magnifying glass Cancel all the tours footballs fake applause No more travel brochures Virtual premieres Ive got nothing left to wear Looking out from these prison walls You got to rob peter if you’re paying paul But its easy easy...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Current Affairs, Mick Jagger, Dave Grohl, Facebook Twitter, Ive, Anti Vaxxers


The Evolution of Dance from 1950 to 2019: A 7-Decade Joy Ride in 6 Minutes

I see Michael Jackson as a dance style, okay? — Ricardo Walker  Ricardo Walker and his Crew’s The Evolution of Dance, 1950 to 2019 will make you regret every minute spent hugging the wall in middle school. The breakneck, 6-minute romp led by dancer, choreographer, and Michael Jackson impersonator Ricardo Walker, not only showcases the all-male Brazilian crew’s talent, it makes a strong case for throwing yourself into some serious dance floor silliness. The Crew, formed by a mutual pa...
Tags: Google, Music, Beyonce, College, James Brown, Dance, Katy Perry, Vogue, Madonna, Elvis Presley, Drake, Jackson, Michael Jackson, Justin Timberlake, Richard, Tom Jones


Hear the First Recorded on the Yazh, a 2,000 Year-Old Indian Instrument

In ancient Hindu mythology, the Yali appears as a chimera, part lion, part horse, part elephant. It was carved into stone pillars to guard temples, and its form adorned an instrument called the yazh, whose sound “once filled the halls and temples of southern India,” Livia Gershon writes at Smithsonian. “Over time, however, the Tamil musical tradition all but vanished,” along with the royalty who filled those ancient halls. “A distant cousin of the harp,” notes Atlas Obscura, the yazh was...
Tags: Google, Music, College, India, History, Smithsonian, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Chennai, Bach, Josh Jones, Sangam, BCE, Sekar, Gershon, Yali


Hear the First Song Recorded on the Yazh, a 2,000 Year-Old Indian Instrument

In ancient Hindu mythology, the Yali appears as a chimera, part lion, part horse, part elephant. It was carved into stone pillars to guard temples, and its form adorned an instrument called the yazh, whose sound “once filled the halls and temples of southern India,” Livia Gershon writes at Smithsonian. “Over time, however, the Tamil musical tradition all but vanished,” along with the royalty who filled those ancient halls. “A distant cousin of the harp,” notes Atlas Obscura, the yazh was...
Tags: Google, Music, College, India, History, Smithsonian, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Chennai, Bach, Josh Jones, Sangam, BCE, Sekar, Gershon, Yali


Watch Preciously Rare Footage of Paul McCartney Recording “Blackbird” at Abbey Road Studios (1968)

Paul McCartney’s “Blackbird” competes with Lennon’s “Julia” as the most tender song on the Beatles’ White Album and maybe in the band’s entire catalogue. Inspired by a Bach piece that McCartney and George Harrison learned to play when they were young, its finger-picked acoustic guitar has the sound of a folk lullaby. But the song’s shifting time signatures and delicate melody make it something of a tricky one: recording sessions at Abbey Road involved a series of 32 takes, most of them f...
Tags: Google, Music, College, George Harrison, Paul Mccartney, Civil Rights, States, Mccartney, Lennon, PAUL, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Josh Jones, Abbey Road, Tony Bramwell, Durham NC Follow


Dave Grohl Tells the Story of How He Wrote “Everlong”

Dave Grohl, like many rock musicians, does not come from a classically trained background. Instead he has an ability to write according to what sounds good, and where noodling around in the studio can bring great rewards. That’s where The Foo Fighters’ best song “Everlong” originates. In this 2020 clip from Oates Song Fest, Grohl tells the story of “Everlong,” and how it came to him in the studio one day in between working on the band’s second album. It started with a chord. “I’m not...
Tags: Google, Post, Music, College, Paul Simon, David Letterman, Chicago, Dave Grohl, Amy Winehouse, Howard Stern, Grohl, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Louise Post, Ted Mills, Kerrang


How The Wrecking Crew Secretly Recorded Some of the Biggest Hits of the 1960s & 70s

The top flight crew of L.A. studio musicians known as The Wrecking Crew acquired their name, legend has it, because they “were wrecking the business for everyone else,” writes Janet Maslin at The New York Times­, meaning older session players who couldn’t keep up. Drummers like Hal Blaine (“who justifiably calls himself ’10 of Your Favorite Drummers’ on his Web site”) and guitarists like Tommy Tedesco and Carol Kaye could play anything put in front of them perfectly, in one take, with th...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Glen Campbell, Hawaii, New York Times, Brian Wilson, Monkees, Pasadena, Phoenix, Facebook Twitter, Blaine, Motown, Simon Garfunkel, Josh Jones, Leon Russell


AI Software Creates “New” Nirvana, Jimi Hendrix, Doors & Amy Winehouse Songs: Hear Tracks from the “Lost Tapes of the 27 Club”

What would pop music sound like now if the musicians of the 27 club had lived into maturity? Can we know where Amy Winehouse would have gone, musically, if she had taken another path? What if Hendrix’s influence over guitar heroics (and less obvious styles) came not only from his sixties playing but from an unimaginable late-career cosmic blues? Whether questions like these can ever be given real flesh and blood, so to speak, by artificial intelligence may still be very much undecided. O...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Toronto, Atlanta, Amy Winehouse, Computer Science, Rolling Stone, Beatles, Kurt Cobain, Magenta, Nme, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Hendrix, Josh Jones


Tina Turner Delivers a Blistering Live Performance of “Proud Mary” on Italian TV (1971)

John Fogerty once said that he conceived the opening bars of “Proud Mary” in imitation of Beethoven’s Fifth symphony. It’s an unusual association for a song about a steamboat, but it works as a classic blues rock hook. Most people would say, however, that the song didn’t truly come into its own until Tina Turner began covering it in 1969. “Proud Mary” helped Turner come back after a suicide attempt the previous year. Her version, released as a single in January 1971,“planted the seeds of...
Tags: Google, Music, Hbo, College, Atlantic, Beethoven, Turner, Tina Turner, Facebook Twitter, Ike, Otis Redding, Franklin, Tina, Josh Jones, John Fogerty, CCR


The Beatles’ ‘Blackbird’ Sung in the Indigenous Mi’kmaq Language

To raise awareness of her native language, 16-year-old Emma Stevens sang a version of The Beatles’ 1968 classic “Blackbird” in the Mi’kmaq language, an Eastern Algonquian language spoken by nearly 11,000 in Canada and the United States. A member of the Eskasoni First Nation, the Nova Scotia student sang lyrics that were painstakingly translated by Katani Julian, a teacher who works in language revitalization. Julian told WBUR. “My language is very different from other ones.” “There’s a l...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Canada, United States, Facebook Twitter, Julian, WBUR, Emma Stevens, Katani Julian


Meet Les Rallizes Dénudés, the Mysterious Japanese Psych-Rock Band Whose Influence Is Everywhere

For those young people – including you – who live this modern agonising adolescence and who are wanting the true radical music, I sincerely wish the dialogue accompanied by piercing pain will be born and fill this recital hall. – text from late 60s’ Les Rallizes Dénudés concert flyers In Spanish writer Carlos Ruiz Zafón’s bestselling novel The Shadow of the Wind, narrator Daniel Sempere spends his adolescence trying to solve the mystery of an obscure dead novelist. Fans of the book might...
Tags: Google, Music, Japan, College, North Korea, Tokyo, Zambia, Sam, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Red Army Faction, Cummings, Josh Jones, Cope, Brian Jonestown Massacre, University of London


Don’t Die Curious: An Animated Lyric Video

Chloe Jackson was asked to create a lyric video for Tom Rosenthal’s wonderful song, ‘Don’t Die Curious’. And she delivered. Enjoy… Would you like to support the mission of Open Culture? Please consider making a donation to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere. Also consider following Open Culture on Facebook and   Twitter and  sharing intelligent media w...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Bob Marley, Tom, Facebook Twitter, Tom Rosenthal, Chloe Jackson


Hear J.S. Bach’s Music Performed on the Lautenwerck, Bach’s Favorite Lost Baroque Instrument

If you want to hear the music of Johann Sebastian Bach played on the instruments that actually existed during the stretch of the 17th and 18th centuries in which he lived, there are ensembles specializing in just that. But a full musical revival isn’t quite as simple as that: while there are baroque cellos, oboes, and violas around, not every instrument that Bach knew, played, and composed for has survived. Take the lautenwerck, a category of “gut-stringed instruments that resemble the h...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Germany, History, Npr, Seoul, Johann Sebastian Bach, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Shin, Neda Ulaby, Colin Marshall, Johann Sebastian, 21st Century Los Angeles, Lautenwerck Bach


How Bob Marley Came to Make Exodus, His Transcendent Album, After Surviving an Assassination Attempt in 1976

“The people who are trying to make this world worse aren’t taking a day off. How can I?,” said Bob Marley after a 1976 assassination attempt at his home in Jamaica in which Marley, his wife Rita, manager Don Taylor, and employee Louis Griffiths were all shot and, incredibly, all survived. Which people, exactly, did he mean? Was it Edward Seaga’s Jamaican Labour Party, whose hired gunmen supposedly carried out the attack? Was it, as some even conspiratorially alleged, Michael Manley’s Peo...
Tags: Google, Music, England, London, College, Time, Npr, Jamaica, Cia, Marley, Bob Marley, Taylor, Goldman, Lazarus, Facebook Twitter, Rita


Hear the Beautiful Isolated Vocal Harmonies from the Beatles’ “Something”

How many songs did Pattie Boyd — fashion model, photographer, muse, and wife of George Harrison and Eric Clapton — inspire? It’s hard to say, since some of the lyrics purportedly written for her, like those in Harrison’s breakout “Something,” may have been for someone else, then diplomatically attributed to Boyd. Or, in the case of “Something” — the first Harrison song to come out as a Beatles A-side single and the song that convinced the world of his formidable songwriting talents — the...
Tags: Google, Music, College, John Lennon, US, George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Liverpool, Paul Mccartney, Frank Sinatra, Joe Cocker, Eric Clapton, Ray Charles, George, Facebook Twitter, Harrison



Filters
April - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  
May - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      
June - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930