Music


Posts filtered by tags: History[x]


 

How the Internet Archive Has Digitized More than 250,000 78 R.P.M. Records: See the Painstaking Process Up-Close

In the history of recorded music, no medium has demonstrated quite the staying power of the phonograph record. Hearing those words, most of us envision a twelve-inch disc designed to play at 33  1 ⁄ 3 revolutions per minute, the kind still manufactured today. But like every other form of technology, that familiar vinyl LP didn’t appear ex nihilo: on its introduction in 1948, it was the latest in a series of phonograph records of different sizes and speeds. The first dominant record form...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, History, Internet Archive, Seoul, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Boston Public Library Will Digitize Put Online, Alex Steinweiss Father, Kait Sanchez, George Blood LP, Columbia RCA Victor Decca Capitol


The Story of the Rolling Stones: A Selection of Documentaries on the Quintessential Rock-and-Roll Band

The Rolling Stones define the rock-and-roll band, as they have for nearly six decades now. Exactly how they’ve done so is thoroughly documented, not least by the band’s own expansive and still-growing catalog of songs and albums (all of which I happen to have spent the last few months listening through). But the story of the Stones continues to compel, told and re-told as it is in every form of media produced by each era through which the band has passed: books, articles, podcasts, and a...
Tags: Facebook, Music, London, College, Beach Boys, History, Mick Jagger, Kent, Seoul, Keith Richards, Jagger, Watts, Andrew Loog Oldham, Richards, Rolling Stones, Brian Jones


The Digital Lomax Archive Provides Free Access to the Pioneering Recordings of John & Alan Lomax, Compiled Across 7 Decades

The work of ethnomusicologist father and son team John and Alan Lomax was intended to preserve the local musical cultures of the United States and regions around the world against an encroaching mass media threatening to erase them. But the thousands of Lomax recordings, films, books, articles, and other documents not only conserved regional music; they also helped transform mass culture by introducing local forms that have since become part of a global musical grammar. Lomax and his son...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, Mississippi, College, Kentucky, Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, History, United States, Cbs, Columbia University, John, Alan, Facebook Twitter, Dylan


Listen to ABBA’s “Dancing Queen” Played on a 1914 Fairground Organ

To truly appreciate the spectacle of ABBA’s “Dancing Queen” played on a 1914 Hooghuys fairground organ, we recommend you read Angus Harrison’s 2016 VICE essay, “Why Abba’s ‘Dancing Queen’ Is the Saddest Record Ever Made“: Make no mistake. This song is about the dancing queen, but it is most definitely not sung by her. Herein lies the tragedy. Our narrator has realized that she is no longer the Dancing Queen. She is no longer young, no longer sweet, no longer 17. Now, instead, she watches...
Tags: Google, Music, Technology, College, History, Abba, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Marenghi, Alexey Rom, Angus Harrison, Below Rom


Hear the First Song Recorded on the Yazh, a 2,000 Year-Old Indian Instrument

In ancient Hindu mythology, the Yali appears as a chimera, part lion, part horse, part elephant. It was carved into stone pillars to guard temples, and its form adorned an instrument called the yazh, whose sound “once filled the halls and temples of southern India,” Livia Gershon writes at Smithsonian. “Over time, however, the Tamil musical tradition all but vanished,” along with the royalty who filled those ancient halls. “A distant cousin of the harp,” notes Atlas Obscura, the yazh was...
Tags: Google, Music, College, India, History, Smithsonian, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Chennai, Bach, Josh Jones, Sangam, BCE, Sekar, Gershon, Yali


Hear the First Recorded on the Yazh, a 2,000 Year-Old Indian Instrument

In ancient Hindu mythology, the Yali appears as a chimera, part lion, part horse, part elephant. It was carved into stone pillars to guard temples, and its form adorned an instrument called the yazh, whose sound “once filled the halls and temples of southern India,” Livia Gershon writes at Smithsonian. “Over time, however, the Tamil musical tradition all but vanished,” along with the royalty who filled those ancient halls. “A distant cousin of the harp,” notes Atlas Obscura, the yazh was...
Tags: Google, Music, College, India, History, Smithsonian, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Chennai, Bach, Josh Jones, Sangam, BCE, Sekar, Gershon, Yali


Hear J.S. Bach’s Music Performed on the Lautenwerck, Bach’s Favorite Lost Baroque Instrument

If you want to hear the music of Johann Sebastian Bach played on the instruments that actually existed during the stretch of the 17th and 18th centuries in which he lived, there are ensembles specializing in just that. But a full musical revival isn’t quite as simple as that: while there are baroque cellos, oboes, and violas around, not every instrument that Bach knew, played, and composed for has survived. Take the lautenwerck, a category of “gut-stringed instruments that resemble the h...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Germany, History, Npr, Seoul, Johann Sebastian Bach, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Shin, Neda Ulaby, Colin Marshall, Johann Sebastian, 21st Century Los Angeles, Lautenwerck Bach


Family secrets and the demise of Erard pianos and harps

Musicians from Haydn to Liszt were captivated by the rich tone and mechanical refinement of the pianos and harps invented by Sébastien Erard, whose firm dominated nineteenth-century musical life. Erard was the first piano builder in France to prioritise the grand piano model, a crucial step towards creating a modern pianistic sonority. His 1822 invention of the double-escapement action allowed pianists to repeat notes more rapidly and improved the instrument’s response while at the same time pro...
Tags: Europe, Books, Music, Featured, France, History, Paris, Camille, Pierre, Haydn, Sebastien, Jean Baptiste, Arts & Humanities, Erard, Steinway, Subtopics


All Praise Lou Ottens: The Inventor of the Cassette Tape Dies at Age 94

The cassette tape is so ubiquitous, so much a part of my life since I can even remember music as a thing, that it was a shock to find out that the man who invented it, Lou Ottens, passed away at the age of 94. Of course, somebody did have to invent the cassette tape, but in all these years I never thought to look the person up. Such an invention first makes you think of the world before it: records (dearly beloved, still around), and reel-to-reel tape (not so dearly beloved). The former ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, History, Philips, Keith Richards, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Allen Ginsberg, Ted Mills, Ottens, Hasselt Belgium, Andy Warhol Marcel Duchamp, Lou Ottens


A Short Biography of Keith Haring Told with a Comic Book Illustrations & Music

Singer-songwriter-cartoonist Jeffrey Lewis is a worthy exemplar of NYC street cred. Born, raised, and still residing on New York City’s Lower East Side, he draws comics under the “judgmental” gaze of The Art of Daniel Clowes: Modern Cartoonist and writes songs beneath a poster of The Terminator onto which he grafted the face of Lou Reed from a stolen Time Out New York promo. Billing himself as “among NYC’s top slingers of folk / garagerock / antifolk,” Lewis pairs his songs with comics d...
Tags: Travel, Google, Art, Music, College, New York City, History, Museums, Marco Polo, Lou Reed, Keith Haring, Times Square, Daniel Clowes, Lewis, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter


A Short Biography of Keith Haring Told with Comic Book Illustrations & Music

Singer-songwriter-cartoonist Jeffrey Lewis is a worthy exemplar of NYC street cred. Born, raised, and still residing on New York City’s Lower East Side, he draws comics under the “judgmental” gaze of The Art of Daniel Clowes: Modern Cartoonist and writes songs beneath a poster of The Terminator onto which he grafted the face of Lou Reed from a stolen Time Out New York promo. Billing himself as “among NYC’s top slingers of folk / garagerock / antifolk,” Lewis pairs his songs with comics d...
Tags: Travel, Google, Art, Music, College, New York City, History, Museums, Marco Polo, Lou Reed, Keith Haring, Times Square, Daniel Clowes, Lewis, Soviet Union, Facebook Twitter


Digging into the vaults of the unknown: the “Transcending Dystopia” research diaries

Research for Transcending Dystopia over the course of almost a decade was truly a journey, piecing together disparate snippets that have been transmitted in different repositories to gain insight into the musical practices and lives of Jews in postwar Germany. Among the 26 archives and private collections I consulted, two experiences stand out—the first being somewhat unusual, the second being quite extraordinary. The Stasi Archive During its 40-year existence, the East German Ministry for State...
Tags: Europe, Books, Music, New York, Milan, Featured, Germany, Massachusetts, Berlin, History, World, United States, Stasi, Wwii, Leipzig, James


Ten empowering books to read in celebration of Black History Month

Anna J. Cooper once said: “the cause of freedom is not the cause of a race or a sect, a party or a class—it is the cause of human kind, the very birthright of humanity.”In observance of Black History Month, we are celebrating our prize-winning authors and empowering scholarship spanning a variety of topics across African American history, the civil rights movement, Black Lives Matter, the Harlem Renaissance, jazz, and more. Explore our reading list and update your bookshelf with the most recent ...
Tags: Books, Music, Featured, Africa, America, History, Biography, Louis Armstrong, Black History Month, Trump, Angela Davis, Nat King Cole, Editor's Picks, Stewart, Armstrong, Locke


Childhood pal recalls Ritchie Valens as ‘sweet,’ ‘tough’ from Murrieta home

Bob Munson got in touch to tell me that he and Ritchie Valens had been pals back in junior high. Not only did Munson have stories, he had photos. Days later, I was in Munson’s kitchen in the Murrieta Hot Springs neighborhood of Murrieta, looking at snapshots. There was Valens in a dark suit for eighth grade prom at Pacoima Junior High, standing behind a girl in a dress, arms around her waist from behind. In fact, there were three similar photos, with three different girls. “Ritchie had no proble...
Tags: Facebook, Music, La, Sport, History, Soccer, Iowa, Bob, Local News, Riverside County, Nancy, Brownie, Midwest, Pomona, San Bernardino, Dion


Hear a Prehistoric Conch Shell Musical Instrument Played for the First Time in 18,000 Years

Photo by C. Fritz, Muséum d’Histoire naturelle de Toulouse Brian Eno once defined art as “everything you don’t have to do.” But just because humans can live without art doesn’t mean we should—or that we ever have—unless forced by exigent circumstance. Even when we spent most of our time in the business of survival, we still found time for art and music. Marsoulas Cave, for example, “in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, has long fascinated researchers with its colorful paintings depicting bi...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Life, Spain, History, New Zealand, Smithsonian, Peru, The New York Times, University Of California, Toulouse, Walter, Atlantic Ocean, First Time, Facebook Twitter


Björk's home studio (1994)

Singer, songwriter and artist Björk Guðmundsdóttir gave a tour of her home studio in 1994, about the time she moved to London and released her spectacular Debut [Amazon]. She's upgraded since. The interview is in Icelandic. I see a Tascam Portastudio and a Casio SA-10 (common), and a Yamaha QY-20 sequencer (Rare? — Read the rest
Tags: Video, Music, London, News, History, Bjork, Yamaha, Casio SA, Home Studios, Björk Guðmundsdottir


A lot of sea shanties on TikTok may not actually be sea shanties, according to old scholarship

Given the mayfly-brief half-life of memes, by the time you read this post, the sea-shanty trend on TikTok (previously and previously) may already be fading. But over at Jstor Daily, Jess Romeo adds some fun controversy to Shantytok. She unearthed a couple of scholarly pieces from the 1920s and 1930s which argue that many of the songs we landlubbers think of as sea shanties aren't actually sea shanties. — Read the rest
Tags: Post, Music, News, History, Tiktok, Shantytok, Jess Romeo


Niger museum is eclectic national ‘mirror’

It has displays covering art, history, dinosaurs, nuclear energy, craftwork and music as well as live animals, for it is also a zoo The post Niger museum is eclectic national ‘mirror’ appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Art, Music, Africa, Diversity, History, Zoo, Dinosaurs, Niger, Openaccess, Sahel, Nuclear Energy, Top Six, National museum of Niger


Animation Pioneer Lotte Reiniger Adapts Mozart’s The Magic Flute into an All-Silhouette Short Film (1935)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4uUchB429M When Lotte Reiniger began making animation in the late 1910s, her work looked like nothing that had ever been shot on film. In fact, it also resembles nothing else achieved in the realm of cinema in the century since. Even the enormously budgeted and staffed productions of major studios have yet to replicate the stark, quavering charm of her silhouette animations. Those studios do know full well, however, what Reiniger realized long before: tha...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Indonesia, College, Germany, History, Animation, Seoul, Mozart, Gretel, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Eastern, Colin Marshall, Papageno


21 things to look forward to in 2021 – from meteor showers to the Olympics

From finally seeing the back of Donald Trump to being in a football stadium – the new year is full of promiseYou probably found a few things to enjoy about last year: you rediscovered your bicycle, perhaps, or your family, or even both, and learned to love trees. And don’t forget the clapping. Plus some brilliant scientists figured out how to make a safe and effective vaccine for a brand new virus in record time. Continue reading...
Tags: Travel, Food, Space, Music, Politics, Science, Television, Film, Sport, Life and style, UK News, World news, US news, History, Culture, US politics


The evolution of the guitar over the centuries

YouTuber Rob Scallon invites guitar historian Brandon Acker on to discuss the history of the guitar from the 1400s through current models: "We learn about and play 7 instruments along the path of the guitar's evolution, from the Arabic Oud to the modern acoustic as we know it today." — Read the rest
Tags: Video, Music, News, History, Guitars, Guitar, Luthiers, Youtuber Rob Scallon, Brandon Acker


A prayer without words: The story of the wanderer

A tale of silence, an icon of human solitude in the face of the forces of nature, or perhaps a memento of the great artist? I come down from the mountains,The valley dims, the sea roars.I wander silently and am somewhat unhappy,And my sighs always ask "Where?"This is the lamenting of the Wanderer from a song composed by 19-year-old Franz Schubert to the words of G.P. Schmidt. The stranger looks for a spiritual home everywhere, but is condemned to wander forever. Schubert's music was composed in ...
Tags: Art, Music, History, Nature, Innovation, Philosophy, Mind, Jesus Christ, Franz Schubert, SCHMIDT, Schubert, Greifswald, Friedrich Schiller, Friedrich, Der Spiegel, John Updike


The best history podcasts for Android and iOS

Listen to our pick of the best history podcasts for bizarre true histories that put fiction to shame and in-depth analysis of famous events and characters.
Tags: Apple, Android, Mobile, Music, Podcasts, Trends, Web, History, Best Of, American History, Best Podcasts, Tier 4


15+ inspired gift ideas for the most devoted The Crown fans

I know I’m not alone when I say I’m obsessed with The Crown. And I would happily take any The Crown gift this Christmas, because escaping to 80s London, if only through my screen, has been a very nice retreat from our home these days. (Even if we all have strong…feelings about what’s his name, […]
Tags: London, Shopping, Entertainment, Christmas, History, Holiday Gift Guide, Pop Culture, Handmade, Holiday Gift Ideas, Gifts For Women, Food Gifts, Holiday Picks, Gift Ideas For Moms, Christmas Ornaments + Decorations


Experience Blade Runner Like You Never Have Before Through a Feature-Length Remastered Soundtrack

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3fz6CC45ok There is no one Blade Runner. Ridley Scott’s influential “neo-noir” has appeared in several different versions over the past 38 years, both official — the “director’s cut,” the “final cut,” and lest we forget, the now-derided first theatrical cut — and unofficial. So has Blade Runner‘s soundtrack, the first official release of which lagged the film by about a dozen years, and even then didn’t include all the music so integral to the unprecedent...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Film, College, Los Angeles, San Francisco, History, Ridley Scott, Philip K Dick, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Vangelis, Douglas Trumbull, Colin Marshall, Syd Mead


How the Beach Boys Created Their Pop Masterpieces: “Good Vibrations,” Pet Sounds, and More

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPcPkc6KD7k If you ever decide to listen through the Beach Boys’ entire studio discography, one album per week, it will take about six months. I know because I just finished doing it myself, beginning with their simple celebration/exploitation of early-60s youth beach-and-car culture Surfin’ Safari and ending, six months yet half a century later, with the lushly elegiac That’s Why God Made the Radio. Between those points, of course, came the songs everyone...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Beach Boys, America, History, Paul Mccartney, Brian Wilson, Seoul, Beatles, Wilson, Facebook Twitter, Carl, Mike Love, John Belushi


Sydney Barber Makes History As First Black Woman to Serve As U.S. Naval Academy Brigade Commander

After a historic weekend that saw the first Black woman becoming elected vice president of the United States comes news that a Black woman named Sydney Barber will serve as U.S. Naval Academy Brigade Commander for the first time ever. Via USA Today: Midshipman 1st Class Sydney Barber will be the first Black woman to serve as brigade commander at the U.S. Naval Academy, officials announced Monday. Barber will hold the highest leadership position within the brigade for the spring semester, the 16t...
Tags: News, Navy, History, United States, Sydney, Army, Jazz, Department Of Energy, Good News, Black, Barber, Black Women, Mines, Chapman, Lawrence Livermore, Naval Academy


When Louis Armstrong Stopped a Civil War in The Congo (1960)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsGrqCOxW3U When Louis Armstrong appeared in his hometown of New Orleans for the first time in nine years in 1965, it was, Ben Schwarz writes, “a low point for his critical estimation.” A younger generation saw his refusal to march on the front lines of the civil rights movement, risking life and limb, as a “racial cop-out,” as journalist Andrew Kopkind wrote at the time. Armstrong was seen as “a breezy entertainer with all the gravitas of a Jimmy Durante ...
Tags: Google, Music, Politics, College, Ap, History, Moscow, New Orleans, Un, Congo, Npr, State Department, Pepsico, Louis Armstrong, Eisenhower, Martin


The Legend of How Bluesman Robert Johnson Sold His Soul to the Devil at the Crossroads

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaKkzNqCPnc We remember the bluesman Robert Johnson as the Jimi Hendrix of the 1930s, a guitarist of staggering skill who died before age thirty. Both found mainstream success, but Johnson’s came posthumously: in fact, his music and Hendrix’s first music hit it big in the same decade, the 1960s. King of the Delta Blues Singers, an album of Johnson’s songs released by Columbia Records in 1961, had a great influence on the likes of Bob Dylan, Keith Richards,...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, London, Mississippi, College, History, Jimi Hendrix, New York Times, Johnson, Seoul, South, Eric Clapton, Columbia Records, Facebook Twitter, Robert Johnson


When Billy Idol Went Cyberpunk: See His Tribute to Neuromancer, His Recording Session with Timothy Leary, and His Limited-Edition Floppy Disk (1993)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fu40YANO1M Billy Idol has long evaded straightforward musical classification, being a full-on star but one fully belonging to neither rock nor pop. He may have come up in the 1970s as the frontman of Generation X, the first punk band to play Top of the Pops , but the hits he went on to make as an MTV-optimized solo artist in the 80s and 90s — “Eyes Without a Face,” “Cradle of Love” — sit less than easily with those origins. But as the end of the millen...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Technology, College, Los Angeles, History, Mtv, David Bowie, William Gibson, Seoul, Kathryn Bigelow, Keith Haring, Billy, Pete Townshend, Donald Fagen



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