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David Lynch Directs a New Music Video for Donovan

I often feel Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan has been misunderstood. When he shows up these days, it’s in songs like his creepy “Hurdy Gurdy Man” and “Season of the Witch,” in films and TV series about serial killers. This may leave younger viewers with the impression that the psychedelic folk hero went down some scary musical paths. But those who remember Donovan in his heyday remember him as the singer of “Sunshine Superman,” his biggest hit, and “Mellow Yellow,” which hit Number 2 ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Film, College, David, Lou Reed, David Lynch, Syd Barrett, Lynch, Mandy, Donovan, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Donovan Leitch, Jeremiah Sand


Pink Floyd’s First Masterpiece: An Audio/Video Exploration of the 23-Minute Track, “Echoes” (1971)

Of the many things that can and have been said of Pink Floyd’s 1973 masterpiece, The Dark Side of the Moon, one consistently bears repeating: it set a standard for how a rock album could function as a seamless, unified whole. There have been few releases since that meet this standard. Even Floyd themselves didn’t seem like they could measure up to Dark Side’s maturity just a few years earlier. But they were well on their way with 1971’s Meddle. “Meddle is really the album where all four ...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Pink Floyd, Kubrick, Pompeii, Wright, Floyd, Hendrix, Josh Jones, David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Gilmour, Mojo, LeFevre, Nick Mason


The History of the Guitar: See the Evolution of the Guitar in 7 Instruments

A thoroughly modern instrument with an ancient heritage, the history of the guitar dates back some 500-plus years. If we take into account similar stringed instruments with similar designs, we can push that date back a few thousand years, but there is some scholarly disagreement over when the guitar emerged as an instrument distinct from the lute. In any case, stringed instrument historian Brandon Acker is here to walk us through some of the significant differences, with “seven checkpoin...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Spain, History, Portugal, Keith Richards, North Africa, Les Paul, Josh Jones, Mesopotamia, Rob Scallon, John Dowland, Acker, Durham NC Follow, Circuit Board


Watch a New Director’s Cut of Prince’s Blistering “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” Guitar Solo (2004)

Recently, I was walking with a young relative who, upon passing a mural of the late Prince Rogers Nelson, looked up at me and asked, “who is that?,” whereupon my eyes grew wide as saucers and I began the tale of a musical hero who conquered every instrument, every musical style, every chord and scale, etc. It was a story fit for young ears, mind you, but mythic enough, I guess, that it inspired my relative to stop me mid-sentence and ask in awe, “was he a god?” To which I stammered, caug...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, George Harrison, New York Times, Prince, Tom, Jeff, Clapton, Dunn, Tom Petty, Josh Jones, Jeff Lynne, Gallen, Durham NC Follow, ROGERS NELSON


Keith Richards Demonstrates His Famous 5-String Technique (Used on Classic Stones Songs Like “Start Me Up,” “Honky Tonk Women” & More)

For the guitarist, alternate tunings expand the sonic possibilities of the instrument. But where, say, a progressive metal player will add a seventh or eighth string, pitch everything down, and get technical, the opposite is the case with “open” tunings in folk and blues. They are an ideal basis for slide guitar and three-chord, 12-bar vamps, and became the perfect platform for Keith Richards, giving him the room he needed to translate the music of his folk heroes into the gritty, distor...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, Chicago, Rolling Stone, Keith Richards, Huffington Post, Thompson, Ry Cooder, Keith, Martin, Zeppelin, Richards, Keef, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow


How the Clash Embraced New York’s Hip Hop Scene with Their Single “The Magnificent Seven” & “The Magnificent Dance”

“Before playing guitar for Captain Beefheart and Jeff Buckley,” John Kruth writes at the Observer, “Gary Lucas worked as a copywriter for CBS/Epic Records,” where he fell in love with a punk band called the Clash, just signed to the label in 1977. “They weren’t easy to work with,” he remembered. “Like Frank Zappa, they spoke about politics, government and corporate interference with radio. They were, as I said, when I came up with the slogan to promote the album: ‘The only group that mat...
Tags: Facebook, Chuck, Music, New York, College, New York City, US, Bronx, Public Enemy, Frank Zappa, ESG, Jones, Jeff Buckley, Gary Lucas, Blondie, Rage Against The Machine


How the Clash Embraced New York’s Hip Hop Scene and Released the Dance Track, “The Magnificent Dance” (1981)

“Before playing guitar for Captain Beefheart and Jeff Buckley,” John Kruth writes at the Observer, “Gary Lucas worked as a copywriter for CBS/Epic Records,” where he fell in love with a punk band called the Clash, just signed to the label in 1977. “They weren’t easy to work with,” he remembered. “Like Frank Zappa, they spoke about politics, government and corporate interference with radio. They were, as I said, when I came up with the slogan to promote the album: ‘The only group that mat...
Tags: Facebook, Chuck, Music, New York, College, New York City, US, Bronx, Public Enemy, Frank Zappa, ESG, Jones, Jeff Buckley, Gary Lucas, Blondie, Rage Against The Machine


Watch a Newly-Restored Peter Gabriel-Era Genesis Concert Film From 1973 in Stunning 4K Quality

There are two late-20th century rock bands named Genesis and both of them featured Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks. The second Genesis we know of as one of the biggest-selling bands of all time and authors of such massive hits as “Land of Confusion,” “In Too Deep,” and “Throwing It All Away.” The first we may not know at all, except indirectly by way of its frontman, Peter Gabriel, better known as… solo artist Peter Gabriel. One reason Genesis, the second, is more famous th...
Tags: Google, Music, England, College, Mtv, Paris, Broadway, Kate Bush, Rolling Stone, Collins, Bataclan, Facebook Twitter, Peter Gabriel, Gabriel, Josh Jones, Steve Hackett


Watch “Hi-Fi-Fo-Fum,” a Short Satirical Film About the Invention of the Audiophile (1959)

Sometime in the mid-1990s, my father gave me his hi-end, hi-fi stereo system from the mid-1970s: a vacuum tube-powered amplifier, pair of stereo speakers in walnut cabinets, and a turntable. Heavy, bulky, and built with hardly an ounce of plastic between them, these components lacked all of the functionality we look for in consumer audio today: no 4K HDMI, no Bluetooth, no surround sound of any kind. As such features became de rigeur, my stereo migrated to the closet, piece by piece, then out th...
Tags: Google, Music, Television, College, Bbc, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Ted Gioia, Durham NC Follow, Typewriters Electric Shavers, Cadeddu, Audiophilia, Lucio Cadeddu


Watch Metallica Play “Enter Sandman” Before a Crowd of 1.6 Million in Moscow, During the Final Days of the Soviet Union (1991)

In the years following the collapse of the Soviet Union a “triumphalist discourse” arose in the U.S., writes historian Richard Sakwa, “which suggests that the Soviet demise was a deliberate act plotted and executed by president Ronald Reagan” with massive military budgets and nuclear threats. This narrative has less exclusive currency today. There are as many theories as theorists of Soviet demise, among them the “compelling argument,” says Jim Brown, producer of a documentary called Fre...
Tags: Google, Music, Time Warner, College, Gorbachev, Atlantic, Ronald Reagan, Mtv, New York Times, Metallica, Moscow, Cia, Motley Crue, Soviet Union, Brown, Facebook Twitter


Watch 4 Music Videos for Songs from Leonard Cohen’s Final Album, Thanks for the Dance

Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker is a bleak masterpiece. Released just 19 days before his death, the album sounds like a warning from beyond, one Cohen seemed to know we’d never heed. His sympathy for human failure reached its denouement in the posthumous Thanks for the Dance, a project “much less apocalyptic” in tone than its predecessor, writes Thomas Hobbs at NME. Unlike many a posthumous album, “this point of difference more than justifies the record’s release,” even if the materia...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Npr, Leonard Cohen, Nme, Cohen, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Adam, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Leonard Cohen David Bowie, Thomas Hobbs, Javier Mas, Beck Feist Bryce Dessner


Watch 4 Music Videos That Bring to Life Songs from Leonard Cohen’s Final Album, Thanks for the Dance

Leonard Cohen’s You Want It Darker is a bleak masterpiece. Released just 19 days before his death, the album sounds like a warning from beyond, one Cohen seemed to know we’d never heed. His sympathy for human failure reached its denouement in the posthumous Thanks for the Dance, a project “much less apocalyptic” in tone than its predecessor, writes Thomas Hobbs at NME. Unlike many a posthumous album, “this point of difference more than justifies the record’s release,” even if the materia...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Npr, Leonard Cohen, Nme, Cohen, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Adam, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Leonard Cohen David Bowie, Thomas Hobbs, Javier Mas, Beck Feist Bryce Dessner


Watch Radiohead Perform In Rainbows & The King of Limbs in Intimate Live Settings, with No Host or Audience

Over the past twenty years Radiohead managed to achieve something no other rock band ever has: enduring outsider art rock credibility that shielded them from the media machinery they came to loathe at the end of the millennium, and enduring popularity that meant they could drop their last, 2016 LP, A Moon Shaped Pool “without doing a single interview and it still topped the charts all over the world,” Rolling Stone writes,” even if Drake and Beyonce kept them stuck at Number Three in Ame...
Tags: Google, Music, Beyonce, College, America, Radiohead, Drake, Thom Yorke, Ross, Alex Ross, Facebook Twitter, Selway, Josh Jones, Nigel Godrich, Durham NC Follow, Phil Selway


The Digital Lomax Archive Provides Free Access to the Pioneering Recordings of John & Alan Lomax, Compiled Across 7 Decades

The work of ethnomusicologist father and son team John and Alan Lomax was intended to preserve the local musical cultures of the United States and regions around the world against an encroaching mass media threatening to erase them. But the thousands of Lomax recordings, films, books, articles, and other documents not only conserved regional music; they also helped transform mass culture by introducing local forms that have since become part of a global musical grammar. Lomax and his son...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, Mississippi, College, Kentucky, Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, History, United States, Cbs, Columbia University, John, Alan, Facebook Twitter, Dylan


Is “Rain” the Perfect Beatles Song?: A New Video Explores the Radical Innovations of the 1966 B-Side

“That one was the gift of God… of Ja actually—the god of marijuana, right? So Ja gave me that one.” The Beatles 1966 Revolver, a mini-masterpiece, contains all the elements that would inform the band’s revolutionary late-60s sound on Sgt. Pepper’s, Abbey Road, The White Album, and Let it Be. The album’s first track, “Taxman,” announced “a sweeping shift in the essential nature of the Beatles’ sound,” writes music historian Kenneth Womack. Its ultimate track, “Tomorrow Never Knows,” was “...
Tags: Google, Music, College, John Lennon, Paul Mccartney, Playboy, Ringo, Mccartney, Lennon, Robert Rodriguez, PAUL, Facebook Twitter, EMI, Josh Jones, George Martin, Durham NC Follow


Hear the First Song Recorded on the Yazh, a 2,000 Year-Old Indian Instrument

In ancient Hindu mythology, the Yali appears as a chimera, part lion, part horse, part elephant. It was carved into stone pillars to guard temples, and its form adorned an instrument called the yazh, whose sound “once filled the halls and temples of southern India,” Livia Gershon writes at Smithsonian. “Over time, however, the Tamil musical tradition all but vanished,” along with the royalty who filled those ancient halls. “A distant cousin of the harp,” notes Atlas Obscura, the yazh was...
Tags: Google, Music, College, India, History, Smithsonian, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Chennai, Bach, Josh Jones, Sangam, BCE, Sekar, Gershon, Yali


Hear the First Recorded on the Yazh, a 2,000 Year-Old Indian Instrument

In ancient Hindu mythology, the Yali appears as a chimera, part lion, part horse, part elephant. It was carved into stone pillars to guard temples, and its form adorned an instrument called the yazh, whose sound “once filled the halls and temples of southern India,” Livia Gershon writes at Smithsonian. “Over time, however, the Tamil musical tradition all but vanished,” along with the royalty who filled those ancient halls. “A distant cousin of the harp,” notes Atlas Obscura, the yazh was...
Tags: Google, Music, College, India, History, Smithsonian, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Chennai, Bach, Josh Jones, Sangam, BCE, Sekar, Gershon, Yali


Watch Preciously Rare Footage of Paul McCartney Recording “Blackbird” at Abbey Road Studios (1968)

Paul McCartney’s “Blackbird” competes with Lennon’s “Julia” as the most tender song on the Beatles’ White Album and maybe in the band’s entire catalogue. Inspired by a Bach piece that McCartney and George Harrison learned to play when they were young, its finger-picked acoustic guitar has the sound of a folk lullaby. But the song’s shifting time signatures and delicate melody make it something of a tricky one: recording sessions at Abbey Road involved a series of 32 takes, most of them f...
Tags: Google, Music, College, George Harrison, Paul Mccartney, Civil Rights, States, Mccartney, Lennon, PAUL, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Josh Jones, Abbey Road, Tony Bramwell, Durham NC Follow


How The Wrecking Crew Secretly Recorded Some of the Biggest Hits of the 1960s & 70s

The top flight crew of L.A. studio musicians known as The Wrecking Crew acquired their name, legend has it, because they “were wrecking the business for everyone else,” writes Janet Maslin at The New York Times­, meaning older session players who couldn’t keep up. Drummers like Hal Blaine (“who justifiably calls himself ’10 of Your Favorite Drummers’ on his Web site”) and guitarists like Tommy Tedesco and Carol Kaye could play anything put in front of them perfectly, in one take, with th...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Glen Campbell, Hawaii, New York Times, Brian Wilson, Monkees, Pasadena, Phoenix, Facebook Twitter, Blaine, Motown, Simon Garfunkel, Josh Jones, Leon Russell


AI Software Creates “New” Nirvana, Jimi Hendrix, Doors & Amy Winehouse Songs: Hear Tracks from the “Lost Tapes of the 27 Club”

What would pop music sound like now if the musicians of the 27 club had lived into maturity? Can we know where Amy Winehouse would have gone, musically, if she had taken another path? What if Hendrix’s influence over guitar heroics (and less obvious styles) came not only from his sixties playing but from an unimaginable late-career cosmic blues? Whether questions like these can ever be given real flesh and blood, so to speak, by artificial intelligence may still be very much undecided. O...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Toronto, Atlanta, Amy Winehouse, Computer Science, Rolling Stone, Beatles, Kurt Cobain, Magenta, Nme, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Hendrix, Josh Jones


Tina Turner Delivers a Blistering Live Performance of “Proud Mary” on Italian TV (1971)

John Fogerty once said that he conceived the opening bars of “Proud Mary” in imitation of Beethoven’s Fifth symphony. It’s an unusual association for a song about a steamboat, but it works as a classic blues rock hook. Most people would say, however, that the song didn’t truly come into its own until Tina Turner began covering it in 1969. “Proud Mary” helped Turner come back after a suicide attempt the previous year. Her version, released as a single in January 1971,“planted the seeds of...
Tags: Google, Music, Hbo, College, Atlantic, Beethoven, Turner, Tina Turner, Facebook Twitter, Ike, Otis Redding, Franklin, Tina, Josh Jones, John Fogerty, CCR


Meet Les Rallizes Dénudés, the Mysterious Japanese Psych-Rock Band Whose Influence Is Everywhere

For those young people – including you – who live this modern agonising adolescence and who are wanting the true radical music, I sincerely wish the dialogue accompanied by piercing pain will be born and fill this recital hall. – text from late 60s’ Les Rallizes Dénudés concert flyers In Spanish writer Carlos Ruiz Zafón’s bestselling novel The Shadow of the Wind, narrator Daniel Sempere spends his adolescence trying to solve the mystery of an obscure dead novelist. Fans of the book might...
Tags: Google, Music, Japan, College, North Korea, Tokyo, Zambia, Sam, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Red Army Faction, Cummings, Josh Jones, Cope, Brian Jonestown Massacre, University of London


How Bob Marley Came to Make Exodus, His Transcendent Album, After Surviving an Assassination Attempt in 1976

“The people who are trying to make this world worse aren’t taking a day off. How can I?,” said Bob Marley after a 1976 assassination attempt at his home in Jamaica in which Marley, his wife Rita, manager Don Taylor, and employee Louis Griffiths were all shot and, incredibly, all survived. Which people, exactly, did he mean? Was it Edward Seaga’s Jamaican Labour Party, whose hired gunmen supposedly carried out the attack? Was it, as some even conspiratorially alleged, Michael Manley’s Peo...
Tags: Google, Music, England, London, College, Time, Npr, Jamaica, Cia, Marley, Bob Marley, Taylor, Goldman, Lazarus, Facebook Twitter, Rita


Hear the Beautiful Isolated Vocal Harmonies from the Beatles’ “Something”

How many songs did Pattie Boyd — fashion model, photographer, muse, and wife of George Harrison and Eric Clapton — inspire? It’s hard to say, since some of the lyrics purportedly written for her, like those in Harrison’s breakout “Something,” may have been for someone else, then diplomatically attributed to Boyd. Or, in the case of “Something” — the first Harrison song to come out as a Beatles A-side single and the song that convinced the world of his formidable songwriting talents — the...
Tags: Google, Music, College, John Lennon, US, George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Liverpool, Paul Mccartney, Frank Sinatra, Joe Cocker, Eric Clapton, Ray Charles, George, Facebook Twitter, Harrison


Hear Marianne Faithfull’s Three Versions of “As Tears Go By,” Each Recorded at a Different Stage of Life (1965, 1987 & 2018)

When a 17-year-old Marianne Faithfull finished the final take of her 1965 hit “As Tears Go By” — penned by a young duo of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards as one of their first original songs — Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham “came and gave me a big hug,” she recalled “‘Congratulations darling. You’ve got yourself a number six,’ he said.” Richards remembered the song in his autobiography as “a terrible piece of tripe” and “money for old rope,” but it actually peaked at number 22 ...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Keith Richards, Nico, Jagger, Keith, Andrew Loog Oldham, Facebook Twitter, Mick, Richards, Jean Luc Godard, Josh Jones


Brian Eno Explains the Origins of Ambient Music

When William Basinski released The Disintegration Loops in the years after the September 11, 2001 attacks, it was the sound of decay preserved for posterity — recordings of decades-old tape loops literally falling apart on their reels, as the World Trade Center ruins smoldered across the river from the composer’s Brooklyn studio. The piece was performed ten years later by an orchestra at the Temple of Dendur, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, for the tenth anniversary of the attacks. An...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Brian Eno, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Williamsburg, Antony, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Johnsons, William Basinski, Josh Jones, Pachelbel, Sasha Frere Jones


The Story Behind the Iconic Bass-Smashing Photo on the Clash’s London Calling

Pennie Smith was not a fan. Maybe that’s what made her the perfect photographer for The Clash. “She was never particularly into rock music,” writes Rob Walker at The Guardian; she wasn’t starstruck or overawed by her subjects; and she also wasn’t even particularly in love with the most famous shot of her career — the iconic photo of bassist Paul Simonon raising his Fender Precision at New York’s Palladium, seconds before smashing it to bits. “I said, ‘it’s completely out of focus,’” Smit...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, London, College, The Guardian, Tokyo, Public Enemy, Smith, Elvis, Joe, PAUL, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Chuck D, Mick Jones


Intimate Live Performances of Radiohead, Sonic Youth, the White Stripes, PJ Harvey & More: No Host, No Audience, Just Pure Live Music

It should be clear by now that rock and roll poses no danger to the status quo. Fair enough: It’s going on 70 years since Elvis and Chuck Berry freaked out parents of screaming teens, and 50 years since Iggy and the Stooges ripped up stages in Detroit and the denizens of CBGB made rock subversive again. That’s a long time for an edge to dull, and dull it has. Perhaps nowhere is this more in evidence than rock films like CBGB, which “somehow manages to make punk rock boring,” and Netflix’...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Radiohead, Netflix, John Peel, Detroit, Thom Yorke, Elvis, PJ Harvey, Iggy, Cbgb, Facebook Twitter, Harvey, Chuck Berry, Josh Jones


B.B. King Plays “The Thrill is Gone” with Slash, Ron Wood & Other Legends

How many generations of guitarists have come and gone since B.B. King emerged on the Beale Street blues scene in the late 1940s? 60s blues-rock giants, 70s hard rockers, 80s metal shredders… at least two generations between B.B. and Slash, who is probably himself a guitar grandfather by now. Whether they know it or not, every rock and blues player descends from the Kings of the blues (B.B., Albert, Freddie, and guitarists who bore the title but not the surname). Slash knows it well. ...
Tags: Google, Music, Bono, College, Slash, King, John Mayer, Facebook Twitter, Rolling Stones, Ron Wood, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Mick Hucknall, Derek Trucks, Josh Jones, Royal Albert Hall, Beale Street


Metallica Plays Antarctica, Setting a World Record as the First Band to Play All 7 Continents: Watch the Full Concert Online

Unless they’ve got fans among penguins, there’s no practical reason for a band to make the journey to Antarctica to play. So why did Metallica do exactly that in 2013? Because they could, and because it made them the first musical act to play all seven continents — a Guinness World Record — doing it all in the same calendar year, no less. They’re also the only rock band to travel to Antarctica. (With the exception of Nunatak, an indie rock band made up of British climate scientists, who ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Antarctica, Metallica, Argentina, Coca Cola, Latin America, Rodrigo, Antarctic, Robert Trujillo, Burton, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Durham NC Follow, Nunatak



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