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How the Internet Archive Has Digitized More than 250,000 78 R.P.M. Records: See the Painstaking Process Up-Close

In the history of recorded music, no medium has demonstrated quite the staying power of the phonograph record. Hearing those words, most of us envision a twelve-inch disc designed to play at 33  1 ⁄ 3 revolutions per minute, the kind still manufactured today. But like every other form of technology, that familiar vinyl LP didn’t appear ex nihilo: on its introduction in 1948, it was the latest in a series of phonograph records of different sizes and speeds. The first dominant record form...
Tags: Facebook, Music, College, History, Internet Archive, Seoul, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Boston Public Library Will Digitize Put Online, Alex Steinweiss Father, Kait Sanchez, George Blood LP, Columbia RCA Victor Decca Capitol


The Story of the Rolling Stones: A Selection of Documentaries on the Quintessential Rock-and-Roll Band

The Rolling Stones define the rock-and-roll band, as they have for nearly six decades now. Exactly how they’ve done so is thoroughly documented, not least by the band’s own expansive and still-growing catalog of songs and albums (all of which I happen to have spent the last few months listening through). But the story of the Stones continues to compel, told and re-told as it is in every form of media produced by each era through which the band has passed: books, articles, podcasts, and a...
Tags: Facebook, Music, London, College, Beach Boys, History, Mick Jagger, Kent, Seoul, Keith Richards, Jagger, Watts, Andrew Loog Oldham, Richards, Rolling Stones, Brian Jones


Hear Joni Mitchell’s Earliest Recording, Rediscovered After More than 50 Years

How excited would you be to listen to a recording, made at an AM radio station in 1963, labeled “JONI ANDERSON AUDITION TAPE”? If you know much about the singer-songwriters of the mid-20th century, you’d be quite excited indeed. For Joni Anderson is none other than Joni Mitchell, who under that married name would go on to become one of the most influential solo performers to come out of the folk-music scene. Not that she prized the designation that thus accompanied her to stardom: “I was...
Tags: Google, Music, California, College, Toronto, Joni Mitchell, Seoul, Anderson, Mitchell, Saskatoon, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Bob Dylan Roger McGuinn Gordon Lightfoot, Joni Anderson, Barry Bowman


Hear J.S. Bach’s Music Performed on the Lautenwerck, Bach’s Favorite Lost Baroque Instrument

If you want to hear the music of Johann Sebastian Bach played on the instruments that actually existed during the stretch of the 17th and 18th centuries in which he lived, there are ensembles specializing in just that. But a full musical revival isn’t quite as simple as that: while there are baroque cellos, oboes, and violas around, not every instrument that Bach knew, played, and composed for has survived. Take the lautenwerck, a category of “gut-stringed instruments that resemble the h...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Germany, History, Npr, Seoul, Johann Sebastian Bach, Facebook Twitter, Bach, Shin, Neda Ulaby, Colin Marshall, Johann Sebastian, 21st Century Los Angeles, Lautenwerck Bach


Listen to Wikipedia: A Web Site That Turns Every Wikipedia Edit Into Ambient Music in Real Time

Wikipedia turned 20 years old this past January. Do you remember how you first heard of it? Or more to the point, do you remember when you actually started clicking on it when it came up in your search results? For me, Wikipedia first proved an essential resource for learning about music: on it I looked up my favorite bands, then found my way to entries about all the people, events, places, and things associated with them. (I then truly felt what it meant to go down an internet “rabbit h...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Wikipedia, Web/Tech, Justin Bieber, Tom Brady, Brian Eno, Seoul, Kawaii, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Hashemi, Hitchcock, Real Time, Colin Marshall


The Letters of Mozart’s Sister Maria Anna Get Transformed into Music

The talent of an individual may not always run in the family, but we can never discount the possibility of its doing so. This is true even in the case of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, not just one of the best-known composers ever to live, but a byword for deep, innate, and unrepeatable genius. Mozart was composing original music at the age of of four or five, an astonishing fact we know today in part because his older sister witnessed and later attested to it. Known as Nannerl, Maria Anna Moz...
Tags: Google, Europe, Music, Technology, College, Lg, Seoul, Adweek, Maria, Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Wolfgang, Leopold, Colin Marshall, Supersonica


The Last Interview Book Series Features the Final Words of Cultural Icons: Borges to Bowie, Philip K. Dick to Frida Kahlo

Where were you when you heard that Hunter S. Thompson had died? The uniquely addled, uniquely incisive taker of the strange trip that was 20th-century America checked out sixteen years ago last month, a span of time in which we’ve also lost a great many other influential figures cultural and countercultural. The departed include many of Thompson’s colleagues in letters: societal diagnosticians like David Foster Wallace and Christopher Hitchens; conjurers of the fantastical and the familiar like...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Music, Hollywood, Washington Post, College, Neil Gaiman, Orson Welles, America, David Bowie, Marilyn Monroe, Literature, Npr, Hunter S Thompson, Ursula K Le Guin, Nora Ephron


Hear Brian Eno Reinvent Pachelbel’s Canon (1975)

Discreet Music came out in 1975, when most of its first listeners had never heard anything quite like it; there must have been some debate as to whether to call it “music” at all. Brian Eno’s fourth solo album, released on his own label Obscure Records, represented a departure from his own previous work, and even more so from that of his former band, the art-rock outfit Roxy Music. The recording that occupies the entire A side of Discreet Music features no vocals, and indeed no lyrics; n...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Brian Eno, Seoul, Canon, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Johann Pachelbel, 21st Century Los Angeles, Authentic Pachelbel, Obscure Records, Brian Eno Reinvent Pachelbel, Original 17th Century Instruments Pachelbel, Facebook Hear Brian Eno Reinvent Pachelbel


Saint John Coltrane: The San Francisco Church Built On A Love Supreme

Little of San Francisco today is as it was half a century ago. But at the corner of Turk Boulevard and Lyon Street stands a true survivor: the Church of St. John Coltrane. Though officially founded in 1971, the roots of this unique musical-religious institution (previously featured here on Open Culture) go back further still. “It was our first wedding anniversary, September 18, 1965 and we celebrated the occasion by going to the Jazz Workshop,” write founders Franzo and Marina King on th...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Church, Religion, America, San Francisco, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Npr, North Carolina, Seoul, Coltrane, Facebook Twitter, Marina


The Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson & Beatles Producer George Martin Break Down “God Only Knows,” the “Greatest Song Ever Written”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnVyCuc9_P8 As an Englishman of a certain age, George Martin could, realistically, choose only one means of conveyance in Los Angeles: a red Coupe de Ville convertible, and a genuine 1950s model at that. But whatever that era’s glories of automobile design, its music was still in the dark ages — at least according to the millions upon millions of Beatles fans around the world today. The pop-cultural revolution that band ignited in the early 1960s owes, by ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Beach Boys, Los Angeles, Paul Mccartney, Brian Wilson, Brian, Seoul, Wilson, Cadillac, Martin, Facebook Twitter, George Martin, Sgt Pepper 's Lonely Hearts Club, Colin Marshall


Watch John Cage Play His “Silent” 4’33” in Harvard Square, Presented by Nam June Paik (1973)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RAgthGA-9Q Have you ever played 4’33” in public? Or rather, have you ever not played 4’33” in public? Calling as its score does for no notes at all over its titular duration, John Cage’s signature 1952 composition has made many ponder (and just as many joke about) what it means to actually perform the thing. If music is, by its most basic definition, organized sound, then 4’33” is anti-music, the deliberate absence of organized sound. Yet it isn’t silence...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, College, Boston, Jfk, Seoul, Orwell, Cage, John Cage, Facebook Twitter, Nam June Paik, Paik, Harvard Square, Brooklyn Rail, Brattle


Jetzt ist der richtige Zeitpunkt über deine Legacy nachzudenken

Was bedeutet Legacy für dich? Es ist ein Wort, das wir oft mit Hinblick auf die Zukunft benutzen. Eines, das wir hinter uns lassen, um zu zeigen, dass wir etwas in unserem Leben bewirkt haben – zum Beispiel, dass wir die Lebensumstände der nächsten Generation verbessert haben. Veränderung ist laut Definition ein laufender Prozess: alt wird durch neu ersetzt. Und genau dieses Gefühl verkörpert auch Reeboks neueste Kampagne #WriteYourLegacy. Anstatt in der Vergangenheit festzustecken und an Dingen...
Tags: Fashion, Music, England, Toronto, Birmingham, Seoul, Welt, Namen, Infos, Jahren, Egal, Reebok, Eines, Opfer, Kanada, Farbe


See Devo Perform Live for the Very First Time (Kent State University, 1973)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRyyNa9DAEQ Kent State University is known as the site of two important events in American culture: the massacre of May 4, 1970, and the formation of Devo. When the National Guard shot thirteen students at a Vietnam War protest, it signaled to many the end of the youth-driven optimism of the late 1960s. It also motivated a group of musically inclined undergraduates to consolidate the band/conceptual art project they’d premised on the idea of “de-evolution....
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Ohio, Bob, Vietnam, Seoul, Mark, Facebook Twitter, Kent State University, Jerry, Rolling Stones, Devo, Mothersbaugh, Bob Lewis


Animation Pioneer Lotte Reiniger Adapts Mozart’s The Magic Flute into an All-Silhouette Short Film (1935)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4uUchB429M When Lotte Reiniger began making animation in the late 1910s, her work looked like nothing that had ever been shot on film. In fact, it also resembles nothing else achieved in the realm of cinema in the century since. Even the enormously budgeted and staffed productions of major studios have yet to replicate the stark, quavering charm of her silhouette animations. Those studios do know full well, however, what Reiniger realized long before: tha...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Indonesia, College, Germany, History, Animation, Seoul, Mozart, Gretel, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Facebook Twitter, Eastern, Colin Marshall, Papageno


What’s Entering the Public Domain in 2021: The Great Gatsby & Mrs. Dalloway, Music by Irving Berlin & Duke Ellington, Comedies by Harold Lloyd & Buster Keaton, and More

“The year 1925 was a golden moment in literary history,” writes the BBC’s Jane Ciabattari. “Ernest Hemingway’s first book, In Our Time, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby were all published that year. As were Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans, John Dos Passos’ Manhattan Transfer, Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Sinclair Lewis’s Arrowsmith, among others.” In that year, adds Director of Duke’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain Jenni...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Film, College, Bbc, United States, Literature, Manhattan, Jordan, Seoul, Google Books, Duke, NICK, Gertrude Stein, Public Domain


What’s Entering the Public Domain in 2021: The Great Gatsby & Mrs. Dalloway, Music by Irving Berlin & Duke Ellington, Comedies by Buster Keaton, and More

“The year 1925 was a golden moment in literary history,” writes the BBC’s Jane Ciabattari. “Ernest Hemingway’s first book, In Our Time, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby were all published that year. As were Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans, John Dos Passos’ Manhattan Transfer, Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy and Sinclair Lewis’s Arrowsmith, among others.” In that year, adds Director of Duke’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain Jenni...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Film, College, Bbc, United States, Literature, Manhattan, Jordan, Seoul, Google Books, Duke, NICK, Gertrude Stein, Public Domain


17 Filme, die auf wahren Geschichten basieren & sehenswert sind

Viele der Filme, die wir lieben, haben eins gemein: Sie basieren nach wahrer Begebenheit. Offensichtlich liebt es Hollywood, die Realität als Grundlage zu nehmen, sie dann aber noch mal etwas aufzupolieren, sprich: sie unterhaltsamer, kunstvoller oder dramatischer – kurz gesagt: besser zu machen, als sie es eigentlich war.Manche Filme zeigen außergewöhnliche Momente der Menschheitsgeschichte, wie die Legende von Abraham Lincoln (Lincoln). Andere zeigen, wie einzigartig das Leben gewöhnlicher Me...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Usa, Hollywood, New York City, Barack Obama, Pennsylvania, Paris, Cambridge, Jane Austen, Liam Neeson, Seoul, Michael Keaton, Columbia, Welt, Michelle


Map of the soul: how BTS rewrote the western pop rulebook

Contrary to their dismissive framing as manufactured robots, South Korea’s BTS use social media, documentary and storytelling to make themselves into profoundly human starsBTS’s leader RM looks up from under a black baseball cap, then stares back down at his hands. “Doing the promotional interviews, [I kept saying], ‘Music truly transcends every barrier.’ But even while I was saying it I questioned myself if I indeed believe it.”It’s late September, and the rapper is confiding in over one millio...
Tags: South Korea, Music, Reality TV, Television, Media, Celebrity, US, Social Media, Life and style, World news, Culture, Asia Pacific, Pop and rock, Television & radio, Marketing & PR, Seoul


Experience Blade Runner Like You Never Have Before Through a Feature-Length Remastered Soundtrack

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3fz6CC45ok There is no one Blade Runner. Ridley Scott’s influential “neo-noir” has appeared in several different versions over the past 38 years, both official — the “director’s cut,” the “final cut,” and lest we forget, the now-derided first theatrical cut — and unofficial. So has Blade Runner‘s soundtrack, the first official release of which lagged the film by about a dozen years, and even then didn’t include all the music so integral to the unprecedent...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Film, College, Los Angeles, San Francisco, History, Ridley Scott, Philip K Dick, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Vangelis, Douglas Trumbull, Colin Marshall, Syd Mead


Experience a Video Painting of Brian Eno’s Thursday Evening That Has Soothed & Relaxed Millions of People

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLTPyRXUKc Brian Eno may not have invented ambient music, but he did give it a name. What better to call an album like his 1978 Music for Airports, whose slowly shifting pieces forego not just melody but all then-accepted methods of composition and performance? The result, as its title suggests, is meant not to occupy the intention of the listener but to color the atmosphere of a space. This marked one evolutionary step for an idea Eno first essayed in 19...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, New York, Hollywood, College, Brian Eno, Seoul, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Obscure Records, Mistaken Memories of Medieval Manhattan, Christine Alicino, Jonathan Jolly


Experience a Video Painting of Brian Eno’s Thursday Afternoon That Has Soothed & Relaxed Millions of People

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLTPyRXUKc Brian Eno may not have invented ambient music, but he did give it a name. What better to call an album like his 1978 Music for Airports, whose slowly shifting pieces forego not just melody but all then-accepted methods of composition and performance? The result, as its title suggests, is meant not to occupy the intention of the listener but to color the atmosphere of a space. This marked one evolutionary step for an idea Eno first essayed in 19...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, New York, Hollywood, College, Brian Eno, Seoul, Eno, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Obscure Records, Mistaken Memories of Medieval Manhattan, Christine Alicino, Jonathan Jolly


The 40 Best New Bands Of 2020

In a year when it’s largely been impossible to see live music, a major source of discovering new artists has been eliminated. But music finds a way and plenty of acts have emerged over the last 12 months. Every autumn here at Stereogum, we look at the artists that make us most excited about the future of music and organize them into our annual Best New Bands list, in order to celebrate what they’ve already accomplished and highlight them as someone to keep an eye on moving forward. There are, a...
Tags: Music, UK, New York, London, Washington, La, Milwaukee, Sacramento, Los Angeles, Park, Chicago, Stephen Malkmus, Sufjan Stevens, Brooklyn, Williams, Liverpool


How the Beach Boys Created Their Pop Masterpieces: “Good Vibrations,” Pet Sounds, and More

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPcPkc6KD7k If you ever decide to listen through the Beach Boys’ entire studio discography, one album per week, it will take about six months. I know because I just finished doing it myself, beginning with their simple celebration/exploitation of early-60s youth beach-and-car culture Surfin’ Safari and ending, six months yet half a century later, with the lushly elegiac That’s Why God Made the Radio. Between those points, of course, came the songs everyone...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Beach Boys, America, History, Paul Mccartney, Brian Wilson, Seoul, Beatles, Wilson, Facebook Twitter, Carl, Mike Love, John Belushi


The Legend of How Bluesman Robert Johnson Sold His Soul to the Devil at the Crossroads

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaKkzNqCPnc We remember the bluesman Robert Johnson as the Jimi Hendrix of the 1930s, a guitarist of staggering skill who died before age thirty. Both found mainstream success, but Johnson’s came posthumously: in fact, his music and Hendrix’s first music hit it big in the same decade, the 1960s. King of the Delta Blues Singers, an album of Johnson’s songs released by Columbia Records in 1961, had a great influence on the likes of Bob Dylan, Keith Richards,...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, London, Mississippi, College, History, Jimi Hendrix, New York Times, Johnson, Seoul, South, Eric Clapton, Columbia Records, Facebook Twitter, Robert Johnson


When Billy Idol Went Cyberpunk: See His Tribute to Neuromancer, His Recording Session with Timothy Leary, and His Limited-Edition Floppy Disk (1993)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fu40YANO1M Billy Idol has long evaded straightforward musical classification, being a full-on star but one fully belonging to neither rock nor pop. He may have come up in the 1970s as the frontman of Generation X, the first punk band to play Top of the Pops , but the hits he went on to make as an MTV-optimized solo artist in the 80s and 90s — “Eyes Without a Face,” “Cradle of Love” — sit less than easily with those origins. But as the end of the millen...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Technology, College, Los Angeles, History, Mtv, David Bowie, William Gibson, Seoul, Kathryn Bigelow, Keith Haring, Billy, Pete Townshend, Donald Fagen


“The Dark Side of the Moon” and Other Pink Floyd Songs Gloriously Performed by Irish & German Orchestras

The idea of an orchestra performing 1970s progressive rock sounds at first like the stuff of purest novelty. And while the excesses of that movement bent on the artistic “elevation” of rock-and-roll quickly became easy targets, its music has undeniable resonances with the classical canon, broadly defined. In a piece on the modern reevaluation of “prog-rock,” The New Yorker‘s Kelefa Sanneh quotes a Rolling Stone critic labeling the ambitious new sound “jazz-influenced classical-rock” in a...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, America, Pink Floyd, Britain, Moon, Palmer, Dublin, Rolling Stone, Seoul, Floyd, Facebook Twitter, Emerson Lake, Mussorgsky


Tom Lehrer Releases His All of Catchy and Savage Musical Satire Into the Public Domain

If the age of American musical satire is behind us, Tom Lehrer may have ended it simply by being unsurpassably good at it. No less a comedy-song master than “Weird Al” Yankovic still walks among us, of course, but he specializes in broad parody rather than biting irony. Despite having retired from public life, Lehrer too lives on, and at 92 has taken action to assure his work a longer existence by releasing it into the public domain. On his official site you’ll see a statement from the m...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Germany, Bbc, United States, Harry Potter, Nazi, Biden, Daniel Radcliffe, Seoul, National Security Agency, Public Domain, Santa Monica, Gilbert


The Story of the SynthAxe, the Astonishing 1980s Guitar Synthesizer: Only 100 Were Ever Made

What is the musical instrument most thoroughly of the 1980s? Many would say the "keytar," a class of synthesizer keyboards shaped and worn like a guitar. Their relatively light weights and affordable prices, even when first brought to market, put keytars within the reach of musicians who wanted to possess both the wide sonic palette of digital synthesis and the inherent cool of the guitarist. This arrangement wasn't without its compromises: few keytar players enjoyed the full range of th...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, Technology, College, History, Virgin Group, Richard Branson, Bela Fleck, Seoul, Brian May, Yamaha, Facebook Twitter, Aitken, Guitar World, Holdsworth


When Shostakovich Adapted Gogol’s “The Nose” Into an Opera: Watch Giant Noses Tap Dancing on the Stage

The first-time reader of a story called "The Nose" may expect any number of things: a character with a keen sense of smell; a murder evidenced by the titular organ, disembodied; a broader ironic point about the things right in front of our faces that we somehow never see. But given its conception in the imagination of Nikolai Gogol, "The Nose" is about a nose — a nose that, on its own, lives, breathes, walks, and dresses in finery. The nose does this, it seems, in order to rise in rank p...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, London, College, Russia, Berlin, Dance, United States, Literature, Opera, Royal Opera House, Seoul, Dmitri Shostakovich, St Petersburg, Peter


Composer John Philip Sousa Denounces the Menace of Recorded Music (1906)

When did you last hear live music? Granted, this isn't an ideal time to ask, what with the ongoing pandemic still canceling concerts the world over. But even before, no matter how enthusiastic a show-goer you considered yourself, your life of music consumption almost certainly leaned toward the recorded variety. This is just as John Philip Sousa feared. In 1906, when recorded music itself was still more or less a novelty, the composer of "The Stars and Stripes Forever" published an essay in App...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, History, Brian Eno, Seoul, Alex Ross, Ucsb, McDonald, Facebook Twitter, Appleton, Sousa, John Philip Sousa, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles



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