Science


 

Blood pressure drugs could prevent type 2 diabetes, study finds

Lowering high blood pressure may slash the risk of the disease in millions of people in futureBlood pressure drugs could prevent millions of people worldwide from developing type 2 diabetes, a large study suggests.Lowering high blood pressure is an effective way to slash the risk of the disease in the future, according to the research published in the Lancet. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, UK News, Diabetes, Medical Research, Lancet Continue


The physics behind the Astroworld tragedy: When crowds behave like a fluid, people can wind up powerless

Travis Scott performs during the Astroworld music festival at NRG Park in Houston, Texas, on November 5, 2021. Amy Harris/Invision/AP Astroworld was so densely packed that concertgoers couldn't move or execute independent choices. The crowd behaved like a fluid, with waves of pressure and release. Attributing crowd surges solely to "mass panic" places false blame on victims. There's a scientific explanation for last week's deadly crowd surge at the Astroworld music festival in...
Tags: UK, Science, News, Berlin, Trends, Bbc, Physics, Cbs, Associated Press, Houston, Fluid Dynamics, Concerts, Travis Scott, Erin Schumaker, Keith, KHOU


Invoking the blitz spirit to tackle Covid and the climate | Letters

Bob Caldwell wonders what has happened to our trust in government since the second world war, while Dave Hunter is concerned that current generations are not making sacrifices for future onesMuch has been made of the resemblance between wartime Britain and the current pandemic. Having experienced both, I find the contrast in social reactions to the two situations very striking and puzzling. During the war, nobody denied its existence, nor disputed whether it represented an existential threat; no...
Tags: Health, Science, Environment, Society, Britain, Infectious Diseases, Second world war, Remembrance Day, Northamptonshire, Dave Hunter, Climate Crisis, Bob Caldwell, Mark Walford, Coronavirus, COVID, Bob Caldwell Badby


Near-Earth asteroid is a fragment from the moon, say scientists

Spectrum of reflected light from Kamo`oalewa closely matches lunar rocks from Nasa’s Apollo missionScientists have identified what appears to be a small chunk of the moon that is tracking the Earth’s orbit around the Sun.The asteroid, named Kamo`oalewa, was discovered in 2016 but until now relatively little has been known about it. New observations suggest it could be a fragment from the moon that was thrown into space by an ancient lunar collision. Continue reading...
Tags: Space, Science, Nasa, Earth, Asteroids, The moon, Kamo`oalewa


An Alabama baby born at 21 weeks has been certified the most premature in the world

Curtis Zy-Keith Means after he was born. Michelle Butler via University of Alabama at Birmingham University Relations A baby born at 21 weeks is the world's most premature baby to survive, Guinness World Records said. Curtis Zy-Keith Means was born in Alabama in July 2020, weighing 14.8 ounces (420 grams). His twin died, but Curtis is now 16 months old and "thriving," Guinness World Records said. A baby born in Birmingham, Alabama, at 21 weeks and one day has been certified by Guinness...
Tags: Science, Alabama, Trends, News UK, Guinness World Records, Brian Sims, University Of Alabama, Michelle, Curtis, Birmingham Alabama, Asya, Michelle Butler, Sinead Baker, Speed desk, Curtis Zy Keith Means, Birmingham University Relations


Moms may pass on COVID-19 antibodies in breast milk, a small study found - but it's unclear what that means for the baby

Woman breastfeeding their babies during the "La Grande Tétée" event backed by La Leche League in Nantes, France on October 14, 2007. Alain Denantes/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images A study found COVID-19 antibodies in the breast milk of moms who had caught COVID-19 or been vaccinated. It's not yet clear whether the antibodies would protect babies from getting sick. The study was small. One expert called it "useful" but questioned the methods. A small lab study found antibodies that fight C...
Tags: Health, Science, News, US, Trends, Breastfeeding, Healthcare, Pfizer, Vaccine, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, La Leche League, Nantes France, Moderna, University of Rochester New York, Science Media Center, Coronavirus


Wildfires in California and Siberia are throwing soot into the high atmosphere that's landing in the Arctic and melting polar ice

The South Fire burning in Lytle Creek, California, in August 2021. AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu Soot from fires in mid-latitudes are traveling all the way to the Arctic, scientists have found. The substance can speed the melting of ice and in turn could warm the atmosphere. The discovery may have far-reaching implications for the climate crisis. Wildfires have been brutal these past few years, and may have wider-reaching implications than first realized.The vast blazes send soot particles so ...
Tags: Science, Climate Change, California, Trends, Nasa, Earth, News UK, Arctic, Siberia, North America, Antarctic, Reuters, University Of Tokyo, Arctic sea, Arctic Council, British Antarctic Survey


As Covid recedes in US a new worry emerges: wildlife passing on the virus

New study shows that deer can catch the virus from people and give it to other deer in overwhelming numbersAs America’s pandemic – for now – seems to be moving into a new phase with national rates in decline from the September peak and vaccines rolling out to children, a new worry has appeared on the horizon: wildlife passing on the virus.A new study shows that deer can catch the coronavirus from people and give it to other deer in overwhelming numbers, the first evidence of animals transmitting...
Tags: Science, Animals, US, America, US news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Coronavirus


New species of big-nosed dinosaur discovered by retired doctor

Nasal bone distinguishes herbivore Brighstoneus simmondsi, whose skull was found on the Isle of WightA new species of dinosaur with an extremely large nose has been identified by a retired GP who spent lockdown rummaging through boxes of ancient bones.Jeremy Lockwood, who is studying for a PhD at the University of Portsmouth, set himself the task of cataloguing every iguanodon bone discovered on the Isle of Wight. As he sorted the bones from the collections of the Natural History Museum in Londo...
Tags: Science, London, UK News, Dinosaurs, Natural History Museum, Fossils, Wight, Palaeontology, University of Portsmouth, Dinosaur Isle, Jeremy Lockwood


Chakras, crystals and conspiracy theories: how the wellness industry turned its back on Covid science

Its gurus increasingly promote vaccine scepticism, conspiracy theories and the myth that ill people have themselves to blame. How did self-care turn so nasty?Ozlem Demirboga Carr is not really into all that woo‑woo stuff. “I’m definitely a full-science kind of person,” says the 41-year-old telecoms worker from Reading. She doesn’t believe in crystals, affirmations or salt lamps. But she did find herself unusually anxious during the UK’s Covid lockdown in March 2020 and, like many people, decided...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, Media, Instagram, Social Networking, Social Media, Society, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Digital Media, Vaccines and immunisation, Science and scepticism, Coronavirus, Demirboga Carr


‘The tone of their posts shifted’: how the wellness industry turned its back on Covid science

Its gurus increasingly promote vaccine scepticism, conspiracy theories and the myth that ill people have themselves to blame. How did self-care turn so nasty?Ozlem Demirboga Carr is not really into all that woo‑woo stuff. “I’m definitely a full-science kind of person,” says the 41-year-old telecoms worker from Reading. She doesn’t believe in crystals, affirmations or salt lamps. But she did find herself unusually anxious during the UK’s Covid lockdown in March 2020 and, like many people, decided...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, Media, Instagram, Social Networking, Social Media, Society, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Digital Media, Vaccines and immunisation, Science and scepticism, Coronavirus, Demirboga Carr


‘Injecting poison will never make you healthy’: how the wellness industry turned its back on Covid science

Its gurus increasingly promote vaccine scepticism, conspiracy theories and the myth that ill people have themselves to blame. How did self-care turn so nasty?Ozlem Demirboga Carr is not really into all that woo‑woo stuff. “I’m definitely a full-science kind of person,” says the 41-year-old telecoms worker from Reading. She doesn’t believe in crystals, affirmations or salt lamps. But she did find herself unusually anxious during the UK’s Covid lockdown in March 2020 and, like many people, decided...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, Media, Instagram, Social Networking, Social Media, Society, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Digital Media, Vaccines and immunisation, Science and scepticism, Coronavirus, Demirboga Carr


Science Communication and Social Marketing

Applying marketing to improve communications about social issues is an important part of social marketing for me. While I do not like to see mass communication campaigns or social media projects passed off as ‘social marketing,’ I do believe that marketing can help make health communication, risk communication, or any other type of science communication more effective, efficient, sustainable and equitable. And, some times, theories and research in communication have lessons to be learned and ap...
Tags: Health, Science, Washington, Environment, Seo, Communication, Research, Craig, National Academies Press, Professional Issues, Research Studies, Social_marketing, Science Communication and Social Marketing, US National Academy of Sciences Communicating, THE National Academy of Sciences, Research Agenda


Joy, toys and bumper cars as Manila’s children reclaim the city

Malls, restaurants and arcades in the Philippines capital are packed with children as Covid curbs easeSee all our coronavirus coverageTen-year-old Gabriel Estrella beams as he talks about T-shirts he bought on his first day out at a shopping mall after nearly two years of staying away due to coronavirus restrictions in the Philippines.“Before the pandemic, buying T-shirts used to be boring,” he said, sweaty after playing with his eight-year-old sister. “Now, it’s exciting! I bought four shirts. ...
Tags: Science, World news, Asia Pacific, Infectious Diseases, Philippines, Global development, Manila, Coronavirus, Gabriel Estrella



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