Science


 

Now Is the Perfect Time to Revamp Your Digital Filing System

Look, 2020 was supposed to be my year. I set out with what I thought were pretty reasonable New Year’s resolutions—one of which was to spend less time on my screens. And then the pandemic hit. During the endless hours that ensued, I noticed something: My digital filing system was a goddamn mess.Read more...
Tags: Science, Dropbox, Desktop, Files, Trash, Order, Organizing


Keep Your Gadgets Going With up to 43% off Anker Gear at Amazon Today

43% Off Select Anker gear | AmazonRead more...
Tags: Deals, Cyber Monday, Kinja Deals, Science, Amazon deals, Cyber Monday Deals, Amazon Today, Anker Deals, Holiday 2020


The Mandalorian Has Removed 'Jeans Guy,' And I'm Disappointed

Mistakes are a beautiful part of film and television production. Let ‘em be. They’re great. Read more...
Tags: Star Wars, Science, Disney, Streaming, Lucasfilm, Goofs, The Mandalorian, Disney Plus, Jeans Guy


Why Do I Sometimes Feel Like I'm Falling for No Reason?

To be alive is to feel fucking terrible, if not all then at least some of the time. Headaches, nausea, mysterious aches and pains—all conspire to make our short time on Earth something less than a nonstop thrill-ride. Worse than the routine ailments are the ones you can’t even name: sudden strobes of unwellness you…Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Vertigo, Dizziness, Side Effects


North Korean leader Kim Jong Un may have already received an unapproved coronavirus vaccine

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Getty North Korean leader Kim Jong Un received a COVID-19 vaccination from the Chinese government, Japanese intelligence sources told a Washington DC-based Korea expert. Kim's health has been the subject of rumors throughout his nine-year rule of the country. The 36-year-old dictator is a frequent smoker and obese, according to South Korean lawmakers, fueling speculation that he would experience complications if he were to contract COVID-19. Visit Business ...
Tags: South Korea, Politics, Science, North Korea, China, International, Trends, Cnn, Washington Dc, Kim Jong Un, Korea, Cia, Kim, Pyongyang, Kim Jong, David Choi


3 coronavirus vaccines so far seem to prevent COVID-19. Here's how their efficacy compares to vaccines for flu, measles, and more.

A healthcare worker injects a patient with the Pfizer and BioNTech coronavirus vaccine during the phase 3 trial in Turkey in October. Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images AstraZeneca reported last week that its coronavirus vaccine candidate was 70% effective, on average, in preventing COVID-19 in clinical trials. Moderna and Pfizer's vaccine candidates were found to be 94% and 95% effective, respectively.  The chart below shows how the efficacy of those vaccine candidates co...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, News, Massachusetts, Trends, Turkey, MMR, Food And Drug Administration, Brazil, Astrazeneca, Fda, Pfizer, University of Oxford, Pascal Soriot, Johnson Johnson


Get Hype: HyperX Gaming Accessories Are up to 50% off at Amazon Today

Up to 50% off HyperX Gaming Accessories | AmazonRead more...
Tags: Deals, Cyber Monday, Kinja Deals, Science, Amazon deals, Cyber Monday Deals, Amazon Today, Holiday 2020


PS4's Share Button Was So Great Everyone Copied It

The Nintendo Switch, the PS5, and the Xbox Series X all have something in common: A controller button that lets you quickly and easily take screenshots of games. While this feature feels like something obvious that’s been around for a long time, it only first became a thing in 2013’s PS4. The share button has since…
Tags: Science, Controller, Screenshots, Kotakucore, Ps4, Share Button, Dualshock 4, Last Gen


Give the Whole Family a Merry Sithmas With 30% off Ugly Star Wars Holiday Sweaters

Toddler Baby Yoda Ugly Holiday Sweater | $12 | TargetGirls’ Baby Yoda Fair Isle Pullover Sweater | $14 | TargetDarth Vader Merry Sithmas Ugly Holiday Sweater | $21 | TargetRead more...
Tags: Deals, Cyber Monday, Kinja Deals, Science, Amazon deals, Cyber Monday Deals, Target Deals, Holiday 2020


Our Human Heroes Fight a Dalek Apocalypse in the Full Trailer for the Doctor Who New Year's Special

It’s here: your first full look at the upcoming Doctor Who holiday special, “Revolution of the Daleks.” It’s going to be a big one. Read more...
Tags: Science, Doctor Who, Daleks, Jodie Whittaker, Captain Jack


Nobody’s Gonna Miss You

Cartoonish internet supervillain Ajit Pai, the Donald Trump-appointed Republican chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, announced Monday that he is leaving the agency on Jan. 20 before the incoming Biden administration shows him the door. Pai’s departure marks the end of an era at the FCC overshadowed by…Read more...
Tags: Science, Fcc, Net Neutrality, Federal Communications Commission, Biden, Pai, Ajit Pai, Ajit Pai the Donald Trump


Please, Stop Adding Stories to Every Single App

Et tu, Spotify?Read more...
Tags: Twitter, Spotify, Science, Social Media, Linkedin, Stories, Fleets


The Walking Dead's Zombie Apocalypse Origin May Never Be Revealed

For folks living in the world of AMC’s The Walking Dead, only three things matter: How do I survive, how can we fix this...and why is this happening? The last question might seem like the easiest one to answer, but it’s something TWD’s chief content officer Scott Gimple says we may never know.
Tags: Comics, Science, The Walking Dead, Amc, Zombies, Fear The Walking Dead, Image Comics, Robert Kirkman, Scott Gimple, The Walking Dead World Beyond


Creative therapy and shared support can help with grief after losing a child

A retreat for grieving parents provides therapeutic benefits, writes a mother whose daughter was stillborn 22 years agoAfter my daughter Grace died when I was eight months pregnant, my first impulse was to write it all down: the birth, surrounded by candles; the coffin and funeral where there should have been a christening; how her death had been accompanied by snowdrops fighting their way through the frozen ground in the first stirring of spring. I felt I was the only one really to have known h...
Tags: Psychology, Family, Science, Life and style, Health & wellbeing, Death and dying, Parents and parenting, Grace


Life after Covid: will our world ever be the same?

From cities, to science, to politics, six Observer writers assess how a post-pandemic world will emerge into a new normalCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageHere are some things that the pandemic changed. It accustomed some people – those whose jobs allowed it – to remote working. It highlighted the importance of adequate living space and access to the outdoors. It renewed, through their absence, an appreciation of social contact and large gatherings. It showed up mass da...
Tags: Health, Politics, Science, Society, UK News, Work & careers, Cities, Culture, Vaccines and immunisation, Ts Eliot, Coronavirus


Pyroclasts protect the paintings of Pompeii buried but damage them when they are unearthed

A study conducted by the UPV/EHU's IBeA group shows that pyroclasts may be putting the conservation of the paintings of Pompeii at risk. Specifically, the ions leached from these materials and the underground ion-rich waters from the volcanic rocks may be causing the salts in the paintings to crystallise. In addition, the use of fluorine as a marker is proposed to monitor in situ the extent of the damage sustained by the murals.
Tags: Science, Pompeii


First meta-analysis shows promise for yoga, meditation, mindfulness in concussion

Chronic concussion symptoms are notoriously difficult to treat. But Rebecca Acabchuk - a UConn researcher who is also a yoga instructor and has been teaching yoga for 17 years - is hoping that a recently published InCHIP study, the first-ever meta-analysis looking at the use of yoga, meditation, and mindfulness-based interventions for the effective treatment of chronic concussion symptoms, will offer hope to those still struggling with their symptoms. The study was recently published in the jour...
Tags: Science, UConn, Rebecca Acabchuk


N-heterocyclic phosphines: promising catalysts for transfer hydrogenation

N-heterocyclic phosphines (NHPs) have recently emerged as a new group of promising catalysts for metal-free reductions, owing to their unique hydridic reactivity. Compared with the conventional protic reactivity of phosphines, this umpolung P-H reactivity leads to inverse selectivity in NHP-mediated reductions, which has therefore found many applications in the catalytic reduction of polar unsaturated bonds. This review summarizes recent progress in studies of the reactivity and synthetic applic...
Tags: Science, NHP


Researchers find how stress and the circadian clock affect sleep

Japanese researchers have found a new neural pathway that links the circadian clock, stress, and wakefulness in mammals. They identified a neuron that becomes excessively active when the mammal is under stress, which could trigger insomnia and other sleep disorders.
Tags: Science


Family pigs prefer their owner's company as dogs do, but they might not like strangers

Researchers compared how young companion dogs and companion pigs seek human proximity in a novel environment. It turned out that both dogs and pigs stay close to their owner if no other person is present; but if a stranger is also there, only dogs stay near humans, pigs prefer to stay away. The study reveals that living in a human family is not enough for early developing a general human preference in companion animals, species differences weigh in.
Tags: Science


Who Needs Disneyland With a Giant Replica of the Matterhorn in Your Backyard

As you look back on a year spent in as much isolation as you’ll ever experience (hopefully), what do you have to show for all that time at home? Did you learn to cook? Master an instrument? Clean out the garage? Whatever it was it probably wasn’t as gung-ho as the LaRochelle family, who put us all to shame by building…Read more...
Tags: Science, Roller Coasters, Disneyland, Matterhorn, Replicas, Larochelle


'Financial toxicity' of prostate cancer treatment: Radiation therapy has the greatest impact on patient finances

For men with early-stage prostate cancer, choices about initial treatment carry varying risks of 'financial toxicity,' reports a study in The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
Tags: Science, Lippincott, American Urological Association AUA


DeepMind AI cracks 50-year-old problem of protein folding

Program solves scientific problem in ‘stunning advance’ for understanding machinery of lifeHaving risen to fame on its superhuman performance at playing games, the artificial intelligence group DeepMind has cracked a serious scientific problem that has stumped researchers for half a century.With its latest AI program, AlphaFold, the company and research laboratory showed it can predict how proteins fold into 3D shapes, a fiendishly complex process that is fundamental to understanding the biologi...
Tags: Science, Technology, Biology, World news, Deepmind, Artificial intelligence (AI


Big data saves lives, and patient safeguards are needed

The use of big data to address the opioid epidemic in Massachusetts poses ethical concerns that could undermine its benefits without clear governance guidelines that protect and respect patients and society, a University of Massachusetts Amherst study concludes.
Tags: Science, Massachusetts, University of Massachusetts Amherst


Earth faster, closer to black hole in new map of galaxy

Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is critical. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA.
Tags: Science


Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home

The UPV/EHU's IXA group has use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represent the activation of both sensors and human activity.
Tags: Science


Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa

A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa.
Tags: Science, PNAS, Saharan Africa, RFF CMCC European Institute on Economics, Environment EIEE


Customized programming of human stem cells

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) have the potential to convert into a wide variety of cell types and tissues. However, the "recipes" for this conversion are often complicated and difficult to implement. Researchers at TU Dresden, Harvard University (USA) and the University of Bonn have found a way to systematically extract hundreds of different cells quickly and easily from iPS using transcription factors. Researchers can use this transcription factor source through the non-profit organizati...
Tags: Science, University of Bonn, TU Dresden Harvard University USA


Deep learning predicts woman's risk for breast cancer

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a deep learning model that identifies imaging biomarkers on screening mammograms to predict a patient's risk for developing breast cancer with greater accuracy than traditional risk assessment tools. Results of the study are being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
Tags: Science, Massachusetts General Hospital MGH


Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'

Princeton University researchers have developed a new way to examine, predict and engineer interactions between multiple liquid phases, including arrangements of mixtures with an arbitrary number of separated phases.
Tags: Science, Princeton University



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