Science


Posts filtered by tags: Africa[x]


 

Here's what it was like to get one Covid shot in Nigeria, where less than 3% are vaccinated, and a second in the UK, where people are already getting access to booster shots

The author, Paul Adepoju (left), got his first Covid vaccine shot in Nigeria. The center was so crowded that there was no room to sit down. Paul Adepoju In Nigeria, less than 3% of the population has gotten the Covid vaccine. In the UK, 68% of people are fully vaccinated. Life is returning to normal in both places - but in Nigeria, most people must make do without the vaccine. There's a growing push to speed up vaccine access in poor countries. I got my first COVID-19 vaccine shot in...
Tags: UK, Science, London, News, Nigeria, Africa, America, Trends, Cnn, National Health Service, Patents, West Africa, Who, World Health Organization, Astrazeneca, World Bank


Merck is set to make billions off a COVID-19 pill that could change the pandemic. Here's why some countries will pay more than others.

Molnupiravir is an experimental oral antiviral developed by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics that could treat COVID-19. Merck Merck's COVID-19 pill holds tremendous promise in fighting the pandemic. Industry analysts expect Merck to make billions off the not-yet-authorized drug. Some countries will be paying $12 per pill, while the US agreed to pay $712 per treatment course. Merck is walking a tightrope with its COVID-19 pill, expecting to reap billions in revenue while still makin...
Tags: Health, Science, News, Africa, US, Trends, Merck, Joe Biden, Gotham, Harvard University, Healthcare, Middle East, Biotech, Bernstein, Gilead Sciences, Harvard Medical School


Local Covid vaccines fill gap as UN Covax scheme misses target

India, Egypt and Cuba among first states to develop and make their own vaccines as Covax falls behind Developing countries are increasingly turning to homegrown Covid vaccinations as the UN-backed Covax programme falls behind.While western countries roll out booster jabs to their own populations, Covax, which was set up by UN agencies, governments and donors to ensure fair access to Covid-19 vaccines for low- and middle-income countries, has said it will miss its target to distribute 2bn doses g...
Tags: Health, Europe, Business, Science, Biology, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, China, Singapore, India, Africa, Americas, Senegal, European Union, Society, World news


Homegrown Covid vaccines fill gap as UN Covax scheme misses target

India, Egypt and Cuba among first states to develop and make their own vaccines as Covax falls behind Developing countries are increasingly turning to homegrown Covid vaccinations as the UN-backed Covax programme falls behind.While western countries roll out booster jabs to their own populations, Covax, which was set up by UN agencies, governments and donors to ensure fair access to Covid-19 vaccines for low- and middle-income countries, has said it will miss its target to distribute 2bn doses g...
Tags: Health, Europe, Business, Science, Biology, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, China, Singapore, India, Africa, Americas, Senegal, European Union, Society, World news


The best wildlife photos of the year show a curious grizzly, dueling reindeer, and fish swimming through a cloud of sperm

Laurent Ballesta/Wildlife Photographer of the Year The London Natural History Museum's Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest awards images that showcase the diversity and fragility of life. This year, the contest drew a record of more than 50,000 entries from photographers in 95 countries. The winning photos show reindeer fighting over mates, seals giving birth, and a mountain gorilla enjoying the rain. The camouflage grouper is declining due to overfishing, but each July, beneath...
Tags: Photography, Science, London, News, California, Animals, Africa, US, Trends, Uganda, Wildlife, Alaska, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Natural History Museum, Virunga, Svalbard


Photo Essay: As we celebrate the first malaria vaccine, remembering the epidemic's staggering toll

Arek Nuoi, 32 and a mother of four, arrives unconscious at the health center in Panthou village, carried in by her three brother-in-laws. The family lifted Arek onto a chair that they had tied on top of a bicycle, and pushed from their home village of Maper to the health care, a journey that took one and a half hours. Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi The first malaria vaccine has been approved. Malaria kills 400,000 people a year, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. Photographer Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi do...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, News, Africa, Trends, Healthcare, South Sudan, Who, GlaxoSmithKline, Ssp, Malaria, World Health Organization WHO, Salva Kiir, Saharan Africa, Kiir


Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine is extremely helpful at preventing severe COVID-19 but it's hard to come by in the planet's poorer countries

A container of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is seen at the United Memorial Medical Center on December 21, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Getty Images/Go Nakamura Around one million doses of Moderna's vaccines have been sent to low-income countries. The company has been accused of focusing on profit, The New York Times reported. Moderna told the Times it has limited production capacity and is fulfilling existing orders. Poorer countries have received significantly fewer doses of Moderna'...
Tags: Science, Singapore, Africa, Trends, United States, New York Times, The Times, Ethiopia, Pfizer, Times, Tunisia, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Botswana, Johnson Johnson, Houston Texas, Tom Frieden


Dinosaur fossil with ‘totally weird’ spikes in skeleton stuns experts

Extraordinary ankylosaur remains dating back 168m years a first for AfricaFossil hunters have unearthed remnants of the oldest – and probably weirdest – ankylosaur known so far from a site in the Middle Atlas mountains in Morocco.The remains of the heavily armoured animal are extraordinary in being the first to have defensive spikes that are fused to the skeleton, a feature researchers say is unprecedented in the animal kingdom. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Africa, Morocco, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Fossils, Palaeontology, Middle Atlas


Gaia review – attack of the killer mushrooms

A terrifying contagion spreads in this chilling South African eco-horror that takes the fun out of fungi The mushroom is having a moment. Its magical qualities and deep connection with the Earth have been explored in numerous recent releases, including Louie Schwarzberg’s Fantastic Fungi. Also journeying into the curious kingdom of the fungus, this psychedelic eco-horror directed by Jaco Bouwer reimagines the mushroom as an environmental avenger that awes and petrifies all at once.Deep in the be...
Tags: Science, Biology, Film, Africa, World news, Earth, Culture, South Africa, Fungi, Horror Films, Gabi, Tsitsikamma, Jaco Bouwer, Gabi Monique Rockman, Barend Carel Nel, Stefan Alex van Dyk


Africa is poised to be a significant player in the new space age - especially when it comes to governance. Here's why.

The thin blue line of Earth's atmosphere appears on the horizon beyond the Red Sea and the Nile. NASA Professor Timiebi Aganaba believes Africa has an important role to play in a new space age. Governance is a particular area of interest for countries across the continent, she told Insider. But there are obstacles these countries must navigate to become competitive hubs for exploration. See more stories on Insider's business page. There are many unanswered questions about the real...
Tags: Space, Spacex, Science, Russia, Nigeria, Africa, US, International, Trends, Nasa, Zimbabwe, Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Rwanda, Red Sea, Space Exploration Technologies


UK’s ambition to stamp out neglected tropical diseases gets neglected

£200m project to tackle avoidable blindness and disfigurement in Africa is axed with cut to aid budgetA chandelier sparkling in the background, the grandeur of Downing Street gleaming behind him, Boris Johnson looks into the camera and speaks with solemnity. He is marking World Neglected Tropical Diseases Day, he says, to raise awareness of these “terrible afflictions … which impose an immense burden of suffering in developing countries”.Huge progress has been made, he says, in the fight against...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, Biology, Africa, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Aid, Global development, World Health Organization, Boris Johnson, Blindness and visual impairment


‘A very cruel exit’: UK’s aid cuts risk rapid return of treatable diseases

£200m project to eliminate avoidable blindness and disfigurement in Africa ends after funding is prematurely axedA chandelier sparkling in the background, the grandeur of Downing Street gleaming behind him, Boris Johnson looks into the camera and speaks with solemnity. He is marking World Neglected Tropical Diseases Day, he says, to raise awareness of these “terrible afflictions … which impose an immense burden of suffering in developing countries”.Huge progress has been made, he says, in the fi...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, Biology, Africa, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Aid, Global development, World Health Organization, Boris Johnson, Blindness and visual impairment


‘I was hit by an adult bull buffalo’: An interview with Kruger National Park veterinary technologist Tebogo Manamela

Tebogo Manamela talks to Lucas Ledwaba about helping to preserve Africa’s heritage and the rewards of working with – and sometimes being attacked by – animals at the Kruger National Park The post ‘I was hit by an adult bull buffalo’: An interview with Kruger National Park veterinary technologist Tebogo Manamela appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Science, Africa, Environment, Elephant, Nature, South Africa, Conservation, Rhino, Rhino Horn, Kruger National Park, Top Six, Biobank, Lucas Ledwaba, Tebogo Manamela, Veterinary Technologist


Trump's former Surgeon General Jerome Adams says Biden officials must be more transparent to combat vaccine hesitancy

Former US Surgeon General Jerome Adams. GREG NASH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images Dr. Jerome Adams, the former surgeon general, practices medicine in Indiana and continues to be outspoken about public health. Adams spoke to Insider informing the public, saying officials must be more transparent about when kids can get vaccinated. "They keep moving the goalposts on us [regarding vaccine authorization for kids] and that's further hurting confidence," he said. See more stories on Insider's ...
Tags: Politics, Science, Cdc, White House, India, Africa, US, Trends, Indiana, Indianapolis, Public Health, Delta, Food And Drug Administration, World Health Organization, Fda, Health Care


Droughts have killed the most people in the world's worst natural disasters over the last 50 years

Empty boat docks sit on dry land at the Browns Ravine Cove area of drought-stricken Folsom Lake, currently at 37% of its normal capacity, in Folsom, Calif., Saturday, May 22, 2021. AP Photo/Josh Edelson Droughts killed the most people of the world's most deadly weather-related disasters, the UN said. A new report released Tuesday highlights an increase in weather-related disasters but fewer deaths. More than 90% of deaths occured in developing countries. See more stories on Insider'...
Tags: Europe, Weather, Science, News, Climate Change, Africa, US, Trends, Drought, Un, Natural Disaster, North America, Folsom Lake, WMO, Folsom Calif, World Meteorological Organization


Astronauts' photos from the space station reveal the highs and lows of watching Earth from above in 2021 so far

The thin blue line of Earth's atmosphere appears on the horizon beyond the Red Sea and the Nile River in Africa, February 3, 2021. NASA Astronauts on the International Space Station enjoy mesmerizing views of Earth. They orbit the planet every 90 minutes, so they see lots of sunrises, nighttime city lights, blue ocean water, and colorful landscapes. The best photos taken from the space station in 2021 so far, which follow below, showcase bright auroras, hypnotizing crop patterns, and s...
Tags: Asia, Florida, Science, News, Climate Change, Washington Post, Russia, Africa, US, Trends, Nasa, Earth, Features, United States, South Africa, National Parks


Your brain is wired to be prejudiced towards strangers, but there's a way to trick yourself out of it

We're naturally wired to be prejudiced, even if it is subconscious. Getty Images / Jose Luis Pelaez Inc When faced with new or unfamiliar things, we can often feel negative or critical. This is common when meeting new people, even if we're unaware of it happening. Listing a person's positive traits can be effective in curtailing the phenomenon, psychologists say. See more stories on Insider's business page. When confronted with something we're not familiar with, we can ...
Tags: Psychology, Europe, UK, Science, Life, Africa, Trends, Strategy, Prejudice, Discrimination, Bias, Alves, Biases, Rawpixel, BI General Contributors, Qayyah Moynihan


Ancient History of Rhinos, Including Woolly Ancestors, Revealed in DNA Study

New research details the evolutionary history of rhinoceroses, exposing a surprising lack of genetic diversity throughout their long history. Given that all living species of rhinos are currently endangered and facing their own genetic bottlenecks, the new research could improve conservation efforts.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Environment, Merck, Charles Darwin, North, Mammals, Eurasia, Tom Gilbert, Black Rhinoceros, Rhinoceroses, White Rhinoceros, Love Dalen, Dalen, Population Genetics


The WHO Africa chief said rolling out booster shots 'makes a mockery of vaccine equity' as the US plans to offer them to most citizens

Moeti WHO Regional Director for Africa attends a briefing on the Ebola outbreak response in Democratic Republic of the Congo in Geneva on May 28, 2021. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse/File Photo Countries that "hoard" vaccines for boosters "make a mockery" of vaccine equity, the WHO Africa chief said. The news comes days after the US announced plans to roll out boosters to most Americans. President Biden has said he disagrees with those saying it is too early for Americans to get third shots. See ...
Tags: UK, Science, White House, Africa, Israel, US, America, Trends, Joe Biden, News UK, Delta, Who, Geneva, Pfizer, Vaccine, Democratic Republic of the Congo


Mega-clouds of traveling smoke are harming people's health thousands of miles away from wildfires

A resident watches from his porch as the Cameron Peak Fire, the largest wildfire in Colorado's history, burns outside Estes Park, Colorado, October 16, 2020. Wildfire smoke is traveling thousands of miles, polluting air on distant coasts and even in the North Pole. The smoke can damage lungs and exacerbate disease even a continent away from a fire. World-traveling clouds of wildfire smoke may be annual events now. See more stories on Insider's business page. For the second year i...
Tags: Health, Science, News, Greece, Climate Change, Colorado, California, Washington, Oregon, Boston, Russia, New York City, Africa, Trends, Ap, Nasa


Vaccine hesitancy is a symptom of people’s broken relationship with the state | Nesrine Malik

From Khartoum to Kansas, vaccine conspiracy theorists share one thing in common: they have lost their faith in governmentCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIt’s hard to explain what it feels like when someone you thought you knew intimately starts to repeat conspiracy theories about the pandemic and vaccines. You don’t really grasp what’s happening immediately: it’s too vast and jarring a realisation to gulp down in one go. So you go through phases. First you clutch at s...
Tags: Health, Science, Media, Protest, Africa, UK News, World news, Sudan, Kansas, Vaccines and immunisation, Khartoum, Nesrine Malik, Coronavirus


Shell Has to Pay $111 Million for 1970 Oil Spill That Turned Rain Black

After a 13-year legal battle, Shell agreed on Wednesday to pay $111 million (45.9 billion naira) to a Nigerian community for damages caused by its crude oil spill more than five decades ago.Read more...
Tags: Science, Africa, Environment, Companies, Royal Dutch Shell, Shell, Niger Delta, Oil Companies, Niger River Delta, Shell Nigeria, Disaster Accident, Law Crime, Ogoni People, Oil Spills In Nigeria, Isaac Osaro Agbara, Movement For The Survival Of The Ogoni People


Lesotho’s PM isolating with Covid as cases ‘go unrecorded’

Medics fear government is failing to gather data as ‘social media conspiracies’ slow vaccination take-upCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageLesotho’s prime minister, Moeketsi Majoro, has said he is isolating after testing positive for Covid-19, as doctors warned that the true tally of cases in the country was going unrecorded.Majoro tweeted that he had taken a travel-related test that came back positive. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Africa, Society, World news, Infectious Diseases, Global development, Vaccines and immunisation, Lesotho, Majoro, Coronavirus, COVID, Moeketsi Majoro


COVID-19 vaccines were produced and distributed at breakneck speed, now millions of excess doses around the globe are about to expire.

Technicians sort doses of the Pfizer vaccine at the Virginia Hospital Center on December 16, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. Win McNamee/Getty Images Millions of vaccine doses around the world are set to expire amid the ongoing pandemic. Vaccine efforts generate some waste, but the massive COVID-19 vaccine rollout could spell disaster. The vaccination effort was unprecedented, given the scale and severity of this pandemic. See more stories on Insider's business page. Millions of doses of ...
Tags: Post, Science, Africa, Israel, US, Alabama, Trends, Georgia, Iowa, Netherlands, World Health Organization, Pfizer, The Washington Post, Georgetown University, Arlington Virginia, Johnson & Johnson


'The Day After Tomorrow' film foretold a real and troubling trend: The Atlantic ocean's circulation system is weakening

A still from the film "The Day After Tomorrow." 20th Century Fox In the movie "The Day After Tomorrow," an ice age happens after currents in the Atlantic suddenly stop. The Atlantic's current system is responsible for Europe's warm climate, but it may be weakening. Slower circulation may bring droughts to west Africa and colder weather to Europe and North America. See more stories on Insider's business page. In the 2004 film "The Day After Tomorrow," a climatologist played by D...
Tags: Europe, UK, Science, News, Climate Change, Germany, Africa, Environment, Trends, Global Warming, Ipcc, Nasa, Earth, Atlantic, Antarctica, West Africa


‘Our morgues are full’: Zimbabwe struggles with surge in Covid burials

Pressure on undertakers leads to widespread delays after record number of coronavirus infections and deaths last monthA group of women sing hymns at the cemetery in Harare as undertakers, dressed in Covid-19 protective gear, gently lower a white casket into the grave.“This world is not our home,” they sing, as relatives, standing a few metres away, mourn their loss. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Africa, World news, Infectious Diseases, Global development, Zimbabwe, Harare, Coronavirus, COVID


‘They thought Covid only kills white people’: myths and fear hinder jabs in DRC

Mutant strain may emerge amid vaccine hesitancy, experts say, as even medics reject jabs in DR CongoDr Christian Mayala and Dr Rodin Nzembuni Nduku sit together on a bench outside the Covid ward at Kinshasa’s Mama Yemo hospital.They are discussing the health of their father, Noel Kalouda, who contracted coronavirus weeks before, and is now lying in a hospital bed, breathing through an oxygen mask. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Ebola, Science, Africa, Society, World news, South Africa, Infectious Diseases, Epidemics, Global development, Vaccines and immunisation, Democratic Republic of the Congo, KINSHASA, Drc, Coronavirus, Christian Mayala


Why the world's favorite banana may go extinct, and how scientists are trying to save it

Similar to humans, bananas are facing a pandemic. Nearly all of the bananas sold globally are just one kind called the Cavendish, which is susceptible to a deadly fungus called Tropical Race 4, or Panama Disease. If not stopped, Tropical Race 4 could wipe out the $25 billion banana industry. See more stories on Insider's business page. Following is a transcription of the video:Narrator: The world's most popular banana may be on the verge of extinction.Fernando: Similar to humans, banan...
Tags: Europe, Video, Science, Southeast Asia, Africa, US, Trends, Walmart, Eu, Gmo, Colombia, Netherlands, Gm, Retail, Cavendish, Bananas


Genetic engineering test with mosquitoes ‘may be game changer’ in eliminating malaria

UK scientist says gene-drive study rendering female insects infertile may lead to ‘self destruct mosquito’ field tests within 10 yearsScientists have successfully wiped out a population of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes by using a radical form of genetic engineering to render the females infertile – in the most advanced and largest ever test of use of the technology to fight the disease.As well as bringing fresh hope in the fight against one of the world’s biggest killers, the study lays the fo...
Tags: UK, Science, Africa, UK News, World news, Genetics, Medical Research, Wildlife, Microbiology, Burkina Faso, Malaria, Insects, Imperial College London, Gene Editing


Benjamin Franklin on vaccination and a deadly virus outbreak

Exactly 300 years ago, in 1721, Benjamin Franklin and his fellow American colonists faced a deadly smallpox outbreak. Their varying responses constitute an eerily prescient object lesson for today's world, similarly devastated by a virus and divided over vaccination three centuries later.As a microbiologist and a Franklin scholar, we see some parallels between then and now that could help governments, journalists and the rest of us cope with the coronavirus pandemic and future threats. Smallpox ...
Tags: Asia, Science, Boston, Africa, US, History, Public Health, Canada, Innovation, West Africa, Francis, Benjamin Franklin, Vaccines, Viruses, New England, James



Filters
show more filters
August - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
September - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930   
October - 2021
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031