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South Africa says it has been 'punished' rather than 'applauded' for detecting the new Omicron variant

A passenger looks at an electronic flight notice board displaying cancelled flights at Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg on November 27, 2021, after several countries banned flights from South Africa following the discovery of a new coronavirus variant Omicron.Phill Magakoe/Getty Images South Africa said it is being punished for detecting the new coronavirus variant Omicron. The US, UK, and Europe have introduced travel restrictions on southern African countries. "Excellent science ...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Science, News, Australia, Africa, US, International, Trends, European Union, Bbc, South Africa, News UK, Zimbabwe, Who, World Health Organization


Scientists are closely tracking a COVID-19 variant with a 'worrying' number of mutations. They don't yet know if it's more infectious.

A man receives the COVID-19 vaccine at a drive-through COVID-19 vaccination site in Gaborone, Botswana, on October 12 2021Tshekiso Tebalo/Xinhua/Getty Images A variant with 'worrying' number of mutations has been detected in South Africa, Botswana, and Hong Kong. Experts are concerned its mutations may help it to avoid antibodies produced by vaccines and treatments. It has been detected 82 times, as of Thursday. For now, it's being closely monitored.  Scientists and health officia...
Tags: Health, Asia, Hong Kong, Science, News, Africa, Trends, South Africa, Healthcare, Delta, World Health Organization, Test, Cambridge University, Imperial College London, Botswana, Variant


Scientists are closely tracking a coronavirus variant with a 'worrying' number of mutations. They don't yet know if it's more infectious.

A man receives the COVID-19 vaccine at a drive-through COVID-19 vaccination site in Gaborone, Botswana, on October 12 2021Tshekiso Tebalo/Xinhua/Getty Images A variant with 'worrying' number of mutations has been detected in South Africa, Botswana, and Hong Kong. Experts are concerned its mutations may help it to avoid antibodies produced by vaccines and treatments. It has been detected 82 times, as of Thursday. For now, it's being closely monitored.  Scientists and health officia...
Tags: Health, Asia, Hong Kong, Science, News, Africa, Trends, South Africa, Healthcare, Delta, World Health Organization, Test, Cambridge University, Imperial College London, Botswana, Variant


The longest lunar eclipse this century will happen early Friday morning. Here's how to see it.

The moon enters the maximum eclipse in Glastonbury, England, on September 28, 2015. Matt Cardy/Getty Images A near-total lunar eclipse will occur early Friday morning, with prime visibility in North America. It will last 3 hours and 28 minutes - the longest partial lunar eclipse this century, NASA predicts. Here's how to see the rare event, when up to 97% of the moon will look red. The longest lunar eclipse of this century is coming this week.During the early hours of Friday morning, ...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Space, Science, News, Mexico, Africa, US, Trends, Nasa, Earth, Canada, Moon, Middle East, South America, North America


Oceans have become polluted with approximately 26,000 tons of PPE during pandemic, new report claims

The Ocean Cleanup workers empty plastic onto the deck of one of their vessels. The Ocean Cleanup One hundred and ninety-three countries have created eight million tons of waste during the pandemic. According to a new study, 25,900 tons of "pandemic-associated plastic waste" seeped into the oceans. The long-term effects of this are currently unknown. A report published on Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences states that 193 countries have created eight milli...
Tags: Health, Asia, Science, Climate Change, Trends, Research, Ocean, University Of California San Diego, Ocean Cleanup, PNAS, National Academy of Sciences, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Yanxu Zhang, Nanjing University, La Jolla California, Nanjing China


The longest lunar eclipse this century will happen in 2 weeks. Here's how to see it.

The moon enters the maximum eclipse in Glastonbury, England, on September 28, 2015. Matt Cardy/Getty Images A near-total lunar eclipse will occur on November 19, with prime visibility in North America. It will last 3 hours and 28 minutes - the longest partial lunar eclipse this century, NASA predicts. Here's how to see the rare event, when up to 97% of the moon will look red. The longest lunar eclipse of this century comes in two weeks.During the early hours of November 19, Earth will...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Space, Science, News, Mexico, Africa, US, Trends, Nasa, Earth, Canada, Moon, Middle East, South America, North America


After reevaluating humanity's fossil record, a group of experts designated a new species of human ancestor

An exhibit at the Neanderthal Museum in the town of Krapina, Croatia, February 25, 2010. Reuters/Nikola Solic After reevaluating the human fossil record, some experts designated a new type of human ancestor. This ancestor, Homo bodoensis, lived in Africa about 600,000 years ago and gave rise to modern humans. A study suggests that Homo bodoensis shared a common ancestor with Neanderthals and Denisovans. Humanity's family tree just got a makeover.After reevaluating a cadre of contentiou...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Science, London, News, France, China, Africa, Trends, South Africa, Ethiopia, Zimbabwe, Natural History Museum, Fossils, Neanderthals, Rhodes


States are begging Americans to kill spotted lanternflies as scientists struggle to keep the pests from spreading

A spotted lanternfly at a vineyard in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. Matt Rourke/AP Spotted lanternflies, which resemble polka-dotted moths, are spreading across the eastern US. Experts are telling people to kill the insects, as lanternflies are a destructive invasive species. Americans have spotted the pests, which first arrived from Asia in 2014, in seven states so far. See more stories on Insider's business page. Don't be fooled by its colorful palette. The spotted lanternfly may merit...
Tags: Pests, Asia, New York, Science, News, Maryland, Animals, Trees, US, Urban, Trends, Indiana, Canada, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Kansas


The Historical Land Practices Behind California’s Fires

The skies of the Bay Area turned orange in September 02020, as the smoke from the complex of wildfires throughout the Bay overwhelmed the sky. Image courtesy of Long Now Speaker and photographer Christopher Michel. Here at Long Now’s offices in San Francisco, we are in the midst of California’s fire season. The fire season is an ever-expanding span of time typically judged to peak between August and October, though the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection has warned for yea...
Tags: Asia, Science, Climate Change, California, Environment, Future, Americas, San Francisco, History, Bay Area, Bay, Nps, Northern California, Thomas, U S Forest Service, Jordan Thomas


Astronauts' photos from the space station reveal the highs and lows of watching Earth from above in 2021 so far

The thin blue line of Earth's atmosphere appears on the horizon beyond the Red Sea and the Nile River in Africa, February 3, 2021. NASA Astronauts on the International Space Station enjoy mesmerizing views of Earth. They orbit the planet every 90 minutes, so they see lots of sunrises, nighttime city lights, blue ocean water, and colorful landscapes. The best photos taken from the space station in 2021 so far, which follow below, showcase bright auroras, hypnotizing crop patterns, and s...
Tags: Asia, Florida, Science, News, Climate Change, Washington Post, Russia, Africa, US, Trends, Nasa, Earth, Features, United States, South Africa, National Parks


How Do We Know How Old Fossils Are?

Paleolithic hunters built mammoth traps in what is now Mexico some 14,700 years ago. An unknown sea creature left footprints in sand some 550 million years ago, making them the oldest known footprints on Earth. The mysterious Denisovan humans reached southeast Asia 160,000 years ago, as evidenced by a jawbone found on…Read more...
Tags: Asia, Science, Mexico, Fossil, Paleontology, California Institute of Technology, Michael Meyer, Physical Sciences, Natural Sciences, Radiocarbon dating, Eleanor Scerri, Academic Disciplines, Conservation And Restoration Of Cultural Heritage, Bridget Alex, Chronological Dating, Isotopes Of Carbon


Researchers have found the remains of a teenager that died 7,200 years ago, revealing a group of humans previously unknown to science

Remains of a Toalean teenager in the Leang Panninge cave in Sulawesi. University of Hasanuddin Researchers examined 7,200-year-old DNA, revealing a previously-unknown group of early humans in Southeast Asia. The findings shed light on the prehistoric Toalean culture, which mysteriously disappeared 1,500 years ago. See more stories on Insider's business page. The remains of a 17-to-18-year-old girl who died about 7,200 years ago has revealed a prehistoric lineage of humans previously un...
Tags: Asia, Science, Tibet, Indonesia, Australia, Southeast Asia, Trends, Cnn, News UK, Siberia, Griffith University, Oceania, Sulawesi, Eurasia, Prehistory, Denisovans


A hospital set up a plate-smashing booth for healthcare workers to relieve stress amid a surge in COVID-19 cases

Asia Made, 50, shows a plate with the word "COVID" written on it before smashing it into a wall in a rage room at Smash RX LLC in Westlake Village, Calif., Friday, Feb. 5, 2021. Jae C. Hong/AP Photo Hospital staff in Oregon are shattering plates to release their pandemic-related stress. The state is seeing record numbers of hospitalizations due to COVID, despite high overall vaccination rates. The plate smashing might provide some instant relief, but won't do much for long-term mental ...
Tags: Asia, Science, Oregon, Trends, Ap, Hospital, Burnout, Lisa, Westlake Village Calif, Salem Hospital, Rage Room, Scott Bea, Coronavirus, COVID-19, Andrea Michelson, Doctor Shortage


Scientists Have Discovered a Hotspot of Denisovan Ancestors

A demographic study shows that the Ayta Magbukun—a Philippine ethnic group—has the highest known level of Denisovan ancestry in the world. The finding shows that the history of archaic and modern humans living on the islands of southeast Asia during the Pleistocene is more complex than we imagined.Read more...
Tags: Asia, Science, Social Issues, Philippine, Denisovans, Paleolithic, Upper Paleolithic, Human Evolution, Denisovan, Pleistocene, Archaic Humans, Sharon Browning, Hominini, Middle Stone Age, Interbreeding Between Archaic And Modern Humans, Prehistoric Asia


Covid-19 Diary : Thursday 5 August, 2021

Tuesday saw the world total of reported Covid cases pass through 200 million.  Here in the US we’re just over 36 million cases, and rising now at a new rate of 100k or greater every day. I created a new chart, comparing the seven day average new case count in the US for each day this year with the same day last year.  This helps us to answer a key question – are we winning or losing the battle with Covid?  Are we better off? As you can see, for all of June and most of July, the answer was triu...
Tags: Travel, Asia, Twitter, Europe, Florida, Usa, UK, Science, Sweden, Cdc, Mexico, France, Germany, Israel, US, Georgia


Brotherhood of the Wolf Is Still the Greatest French Historical Epic Martial Arts Monster Movie Ever Made

Martial arts movies that double as historical epics are supposed to be set in Asia. They’re not supposed to take place in the opulent, luxurious, ostentatious mansions of the bewigged aristocracy of 1760s France. Yet 2001’s Brotherhood of the Wolf has the audacity to take these wildly incohesive elements, along with…Read more...
Tags: Asia, Science, France, Films, It, Pope, Monica Bellucci, Wolf, Fronsac, Marianne, Sylvia, Shout Factory, Beast, Mani, Vincent Cassel, Mark Dacascos


Earth’s solid metal inner core is growing more on one side than the other

More than 5,000 kilometres beneath us, Earth's solid metal inner core wasn't discovered until 1936. Almost a century later, we're still struggling to answer basic questions about when and how it first formed.These aren't easy puzzles to solve. We can't directly sample the inner core, so the key to unravelling its mysteries lies in collaboration between seismologists, who indirectly sample it with seismic waves, geodynamicists, who create models of its dynamics, and mineral physicists, who study ...
Tags: Asia, Science, Indonesia, Americas, Earth, Physics, Geology, Innovation, Universe, Brazil, Planets, Jupiter, Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Banda Sea


Chipmaker for iPhone 13 and MacBook Pros Hit by Gas Contamination

You might not know Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. off the top of your head, but you definitely use gadgets featuring their chips. In fact, it’s the sole semiconductor supplier for Apple’s various devices. Now, Nikkei Asia is reporting TSMC’s most advanced factory for Apple processors has been hit by gas…Read more...
Tags: Iphone, Apple, Ipad, Asia, Science, Steve Jobs, Joe Biden, Intel, Macintosh, Mobile Phones, Tim Cook, Computing, TSMC, Apple Inc, Iphone 7, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co


Benjamin Franklin on vaccination and a deadly virus outbreak

Exactly 300 years ago, in 1721, Benjamin Franklin and his fellow American colonists faced a deadly smallpox outbreak. Their varying responses constitute an eerily prescient object lesson for today's world, similarly devastated by a virus and divided over vaccination three centuries later.As a microbiologist and a Franklin scholar, we see some parallels between then and now that could help governments, journalists and the rest of us cope with the coronavirus pandemic and future threats. Smallpox ...
Tags: Asia, Science, Boston, Africa, US, History, Public Health, Canada, Innovation, West Africa, Francis, Benjamin Franklin, Vaccines, Viruses, New England, James


Migration and Covid deaths depriving poorest nations of health workers

Fragile health systems are at risk due to high numbers of medical staff leaving to work in richer countries, say expertsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe loss of frontline health workers dying of Covid around the globe, is being compounded in the hospitals of developing nations by trained medical staff leaving to help in the pandemic effort abroad, according to experts.With new Covid waves in Africa, and with Latin America and Asia facing unrelenting health emergenc...
Tags: Health, Asia, Science, Africa, Society, World news, Infectious Diseases, Migration, Global development, World Health Organization, Latin America, Migration And Development, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Coronavirus


Ready to tackle MIT's recommended reading list for summer 2021?

As we enter the heart of summer, many of us will find ourselves with added time for relaxation and deep reading. The following titles represent a selection of recent offerings from MIT faculty and staff. Happy reading!Novel, Biography, and Memoir"The Planet After Geoengineering" (Actar, 2021)By Rania Ghosn, associate professor of architectureThis graphic novel makes climate engineering and its controversies visible in five stories assembled from the deep underground to outer space. Each "geo-sto...
Tags: Asia, Books, New York, Science, Technology, Mexico, America, Spain, Mit, Culture, Britain, Williams, Ford, Innovation, Literature, Homeland Security


At most, just 7% of the human genome is unique to our species. We share most genes with Neanderthals, Denisovans, and other ancestors.

An employee of the Natural History Museum in London looks at model of a Neanderthal male in his twenties, which is on display at the museum's "Britain: One Million Years of the Human Story" exhibition, September 2014. Will Oliver/PA Images/Getty Just 1.5% to 7% of the human genome is unique to our species, a new study suggests. Neanderthals, Denisovans, and other ancestors share most of the same genes found in modern humans. Genes unique to humans are involved in brain development, wh...
Tags: Asia, Science, London, News, Trends, Green, Genetics, Britain, Neanderthals, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, University of California Santa Cruz, Denisovans, Human Evolution, Denisovan, Genome Sequencing, Richard Green


Migrant Invasion

If you're in to dawn-of-civilization type history, this find from Spain is pretty interesting."Beginning in the Bronze Age, the genetic makeup of the area changed dramatically. Starting in about 2,500 B.C., genes associated with people from the steppes near the Black and Caspian seas, in what is now Russia, can be detected in the Iberin gene pool. And from about 2,500 B.C. much of the population’s DNA was replaced with that of steppe people. The “Steppe Hypothesis” holds that this group spread e...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Books, Science, Guns, Russia, Spain, History, Iberia, Tam, National Geographic Society, Vilar, Miguel Vilar, Wolves of the Dawn


Revealing the values in mathematics education through a variety of cultural lenses

The mathematics education can often be associated with only numeracy skills. But viewing the discipline as a cultural product--whose values differ across cultures--reveals its significance beyond numbers crunching. In this June Special Issue for ECNU Review of Education, being released as a tribute to the 14th International Congress on Mathematical Education, Dr. Qiaoping Zhang and Dr. Wee Tiong Seah, with other researchers from across Asia and Oceania, share their latest research and developmen...
Tags: Asia, Science, Oceania, ECNU Review of Education, Qiaoping Zhang, Wee Tiong Seah


Melting High Mountain Asia glaciers are revealed as a potential source of greenhouse gases

For the first time, researchers have measured the flux variations of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) in typical glacial basins in High Mountain Asia. They have discovered that rapid cryospheric retreat has made the basins strong sources of carbon with positive methane and CO2 fluxes. While this is partially offset by proglacial river runoff, the findings suggest that these variations should be considered in regional CH4 and CO2 climate change budgets.
Tags: Asia, Science


High-tech toilets could spread antibiotic-resistant superbugs in hospitals, Japanese study suggests

Water-jet nozzles in electric toilets--commonly used in Japan and other parts of Asia--may be reservoirs for multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP) in hospitals, increasing the risk of dangerous germ transmission among patients, according to new research being presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) held online this year.
Tags: Asia, Japan, Science


Researchers detail the most ancient bat fossil ever discovered in Asia

A team based at the University of Kansas and China performed fieldwork in the Junggar Basin to discover two fossil teeth belonging to two separate specimens of bat, dubbed Altaynycteris aurora. It's the oldest fossil of bat found in Asia.
Tags: Asia, Science, China, University of Kansas, Junggar Basin


3 species of human ancestors may have mixed and mingled in one Siberian cave 45,000 years ago - altering our evolution

The Denisova cave in Russia's Anui River Valley. Dr. Richard G. Roberts Denisova cave in Siberia was home to three types of human ancestors starting 300,000 years ago. Our Neanderthal and Denisovan relatives may have overlapped with modern humans there, a study says. The cave might have sat along a migration route between Europe and Asia. See more stories on Insider's business page. Denisova Cave, high in the mountains of Siberia, was a happening place for our ancestors 300,000 yea...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Science, News, Germany, Russia, Trends, Anthropology, Siberia, Fossils, Neanderthals, Denisova Cave, Denisova, Max Planck Institute, Denisovans, Zavala


'Dragon Man,' a mysterious new human species found in China, could be a closer relative of ours than Neanderthals

An artist's concept of Homo longi, or "Dragon Man." Chuang Zhao Anthropologists found a 146,000-year-old human ancestor called Homo longi, or "Dragon Man," in China. These hunter-gatherers were widespread in the region and may have interbred with ancient humans. New research suggests Homo longi could be more closely related to modern humans than Neanderthals. See more stories on Insider's business page. About 146,000 years ago, a hunter died in the forests of what is now northern ...
Tags: Asia, Japan, Science, London, News, China, Trends, American Museum of Natural History, Natural History Museum, Fossils, Neanderthals, East Asia, Harbin, Heilongjiang, Arabian Peninsula, Homo


Move Over Neanderthals, Newly Discovered ‘Dragon Man’ Might Be Our True Sister Species

A comprehensive analysis of an unusually large skull found in Harbin, China has led to the reported discovery of a previously unknown species of extinct human, dubbed “Dragon Man.” Dating back some 146,000 years, the skull is forcing a re-think of human evolution in Asia during the Middle Pleistocene, but…Read more...
Tags: Asia, Science, Anthropology, Humanities, Homo, HARBIN China, Paleolithic, Upper Paleolithic, Human Evolution, Neanderthal, Denisovan, Pleistocene, Paleoanthropology, Chris Stringer, Kira Westaway, Early Modern Human



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