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Fossil remains of herd of 11 dinosaurs discovered in Italy

Exceptional find includes biggest and most complete dinosaur skeleton ever unearthed in the countryA treasure trove of fossils of a herd of 11 dinosaurs has been identified for the first time in Italy, including the biggest and most complete dinosaur skeleton ever found in the country.Although isolated dinosaur remains have been discovered in Italy since the 1990s, palaeontologists have now identified an entire group at Villaggio del Pescatore, a former limestone quarry close to the north-easter...
Tags: Europe, Science, Biology, World news, Italy, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Zoology, Fossils, Palaeontology, Villaggio del Pescatore, Trieste Continue


Fossil remains of a herd of 11 dinosaurs discovered in Italy

Exceptional find includes biggest and most complete dinosaur skeleton ever seen in the countryA treasure trove of fossils of a herd of 11 dinosaurs has been identified for the first time in Italy, including the biggest and most complete dinosaur skeleton ever found in the country.Although isolated dinosaur remains have been discovered in Italy since the 1990s, palaeontologists have now identified an entire group at Villaggio del Pescatore, a former limestone quarry close to the north-eastern por...
Tags: Europe, Science, Biology, World news, Italy, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Zoology, Fossils, Villaggio del Pescatore, Trieste Continue


Covid: scientists find possible trigger for AstraZeneca jab blood clots

Experts hope better understanding of rare side effect of vaccine could help ‘turn the tide’ on pandemicCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists believe they may have found the trigger behind the extremely rare blood clot complications stemming from the Oxford/AstraZeneca’s Covid vaccine.According to a team of researchers from Cardiff and the US, the reaction can be traced to the way the adenovirus used by the vaccine to shuttle the coronavirus’s genetic material int...
Tags: Health, Business, Science, Biology, US, Society, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Astrazeneca, Pharmaceuticals industry, Cardiff, Vaccines and immunisation, Coronavirus, Oxford AstraZeneca


The pandemic body: how the Covid era changed us – from hair loss to weight gain

Sore, blurry eyes, decaying teeth, spreading feet – the strange, difficult years of coronavirus have changed us physically. Will we ever get back to our former selves?This year, out of nowhere, my left heel has started hurting. Is it the onset of some degenerative condition, a normal byproduct of ageing, or simply pandemic life, I wonder. After all, living through this period has had surprising health consequences – even for people who have not caught coronavirus. It has recently emerged, for in...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Life and style, Society, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Beauty, Microbiology, Dentists, Hair Loss, Coronavirus


World’s vast networks of underground fungi to be mapped for first time

Project aims to help protect some of trillions of miles of the ‘circulatory system of the planet’Vast networks of underground fungi – the “circulatory system of the planet” – are to be mapped for the first time, in an attempt to protect them from damage and improve their ability to absorb and store carbon dioxide.Fungi use carbon to build networks in the soil, which connect to plant roots and act as nutrient “highways”, exchanging carbon from plant roots for nutrients. For instance, some fungi a...
Tags: Science, Biology, Environment, World news, Fungi, Soil, Climate Crisis


Travel firms scramble to rearrange holidays amid new Covid measures

Swiss skiing holidays in doubt as country joins Spain in tightening travel rules to contain Omicron variantCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageTour operators are scrambling to rearrange Swiss skiing holidays after the country joined Spain in tightening travel restrictions amid rising concerns about the spread of the new Omicron Covid variant.From Saturday night Switzerland mandated 10 days of quarantine for all new arrivals, in effect wrecking skiing holidays in the Swiss...
Tags: Science, Biology, Spain, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Switzerland, Coronavirus


Nobel-winning stock market theory used to help save coral reefs

Portfolio selection rules on evaluating risk used to pick 50 reefs as ‘arks’ best able to survive climate crisis and revive coral elsewhereA Nobel prize-winning economic theory used by investors is showing early signs of helping save threatened coral reefs, scientists say.Researchers at Australia’s University of Queensland used modern portfolio theory (MPT), a mathematical framework developed by the economist Harry Markowitz in the 1950s to help risk-averse investors maximise returns, to identif...
Tags: Science, Biology, Australia, Environment, Wildlife, Conservation, Marine Life, Oceans, Zoology, Coral, University Of Queensland, Harry Markowitz


Omicron’s full impact will be felt in countries where fewer are vaccinated

Analysis: the new coronavirus variant seems highly transmissible, but the big question is whether it causes severe disease. Either way, poorer nations will be hit hardestCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn early August Gideon Schreiber and a team of virologists at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel began playing around with the spike protein of the Sars-CoV-2 virus – the protein that allows the virus to enter our cells – to see if they could predict future mut...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Israel, World news, Medical Research, South Africa, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Schreiber, Weizmann Institute of Science, Coronavirus, Gideon Schreiber


The need to trespass: let people in to protect nature, says guerrilla botanist

Naturalist and campaigner Dave Bangs says limiting access to the countryside makes it harder to save our ancient landscapesIn a prehistoric bog where iguanodons once roamed and the early Britons first smelted ore into iron, what looks like a tiny orange candle peeps through the mire. It sends my companion into a paroxysm of joy.“That’s good! That’s new!” Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Biology, Animals, Environment, UK News, World news, Wildlife, Conservation, Farming, Trees and forests, Brighton, Rural affairs, Fungi, Endangered Species, Endangered habitats, Biodiversity


Do lobsters have feelings? – podcast

Last week the UK government confirmed it would be extending its Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill to include decapods (such as crabs, lobsters and crayfish), and cephalopods (such as octopuses, squid and cuttlefish). The move followed a government-commissioned review of the scientific evidence, which found strong evidence that cephalopods and decapods do have feelings. Madeleine Finlay spoke to Dr Jonathan Birch, who led the review, to ask what it means for lobsters to have feelings, and what diff...
Tags: UK, Science, Biology, Animals, Ethics, Animal Welfare, Seafood, Jonathan Birch, Madeleine Finlay


People testing negative for Covid-19 despite exposure may have ‘immune memory’

Study says some individuals clear virus rapidly due to a strong immune response from existing T-cells, meaning tests record negative resultCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWe all know that person who, despite their entire household catching Covid-19, has never tested positive for the disease. Now scientists have found an explanation, showing that a proportion of people experience “abortive infection” in which the virus enters the body but is cleared by the immune syste...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, UK News, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Epidemics, Vaccines and immunisation, London England, Coronavirus


‘Massage breaks the pain cycle’: the return of touch – after almost two years without it

For many people, social distancing and lockdowns left them bereft of physical contact. Here, touch experts explain why it is so essential and what we lost in its absenceIn a pandemic that has meant keeping 2 metres away from one another whenever possible, it appears that physical contact is beginning to return. Even handshakes are making a comeback: one poll found younger people were shaking hands again, although older generations are more uneasy about it. “We are wired to respond to emotional t...
Tags: Science, Biology, Relationships, Friendship, Life and style, Liverpool John Moores University, Francis McGlone, Coronavirus


‘He was adamant he didn’t want it’: the pro-vax parents with vaccine-hesitant kids

Among under-18s, vaccine uptake is low, and there is a growing issue with misinformation spread on social media and at school. Is there anything a concerned caregiver can do?Throughout the pandemic, Anna has worked for the NHS. She has seen the effects of Covid-19 first-hand and, although she worked remotely because she was in a vulnerable group, other colleagues – she is a physiotherapist – were deployed to Covid wards at the height of hospital admissions. “At the trust I work for, they’re sett...
Tags: Health, Facebook, Science, Biology, Children, Youtube, Society, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, NHS, Microbiology, Young People, Vaccines and immunisation, Anna, Sam


Covid has caused 28m years of life to be lost, study finds

Oxford researchers arrive at virus’s toll in 31 countries by looking at deaths and age they occurredCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCovid has caused the loss of 28m years of life, according to the largest-ever survey to assess the scale of the impact of the pandemic.The enormous toll was revealed in research, led by the University of Oxford, which calculated the years of life lost (YLL) in 37 countries. The study measured the number of deaths and the age at which they...
Tags: Science, Biology, Society, UK News, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Oxford, Life Expectancy, University of Oxford, Coronavirus, YLL


Covid-19 virus does not infect human brain cells, study suggests

Exclusive: study raises hopes that Covid-related damage to sense of smell may be more superficial than previously fearedCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe virus that causes Covid-19 does not infect human brain cells, according to a study published in the journal Cell. The findings will raise hopes that the damage caused by Sars-CoV-2 might be more superficial and reversible than previously feared.The study contradicts earlier research that suggested the virus infects...
Tags: Science, Biology, Neuroscience, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Coronavirus


Covid-19 virus does not infect human brain cells, new study suggests

Exclusive: study raises hopes that Covid-related damage to sense of smell may be more superficial than previously fearedCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe virus that causes Covid-19 does not infect human brain cells, according to a new study published in the journal Cell.The findings will raise hopes that the damage caused by Sars-CoV-2 might be more superficial and reversible than previously feared. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Biology, Neuroscience, World news, Medical Research, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Coronavirus


Burn, baby, burn: the new science of metabolism

Losing weight may be tough, but keeping it off, research tells us, is tougher – just not for the reasons you might thinkAs the director of the Energy Metabolism Laboratory at Tufts University, Massachusetts, Susan Roberts has spent much of the past two decades studying ways to fight the obesity epidemic that continues to plague much of the western world.But time and again, Roberts and other obesity experts around the globe have found themselves faced with a recurring problem. While getting overw...
Tags: Science, Nutrition, Biology, Obesity, Massachusetts, Genetics, Diets and dieting, Food Science, Tufts University, Roberts, Susan Roberts, Energy Metabolism Laboratory


Human species who lived 500,000 years ago named as Homo bodoensis

Species was direct ancestor of early humans in Africa and discovery has led to reassessment of epochResearchers have announced the naming of a newly discovered species of human ancestor, Homo bodoensis.The species lived in Africa about 500,000 years ago, during the Middle Pleistocene age, and was the direct ancestor of modern humans, according to scientists. The name bodoensis derives from a skull found in Bodo D’ar in the Awash River valley of Ethiopia. Continue reading...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, World news, Anthropology, Ethiopia, Evolution, Neanderthals, Awash River


‘I’m scared I’ve left it too late to have kids’: the men haunted by their biological clocks

It’s certainly not just women who worry about ageing and procreation – and now men have begun speaking about their own deep anxietiesIt was when Connor woke up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom that he started thinking about it. The 38-year-old civil servant from London got back into bed and couldn’t sleep: he was spiralling. “I thought: ‘Shit, I might not be able to have children. It actually might not happen,’” he says.“It started with me thinking about how I’m looking to buy a ...
Tags: Health, Family, Science, London, Biology, Life and style, Society, Mental Health, Reproduction, Men, Parents and parenting, Ivf, Connor, Fertility problems


The last great mystery of the mind: meet the people who have unusual – or non-existent – inner voices

Does your internal monologue play out on a television, in an attic, as a bickering Italian couple – or is it entirely, blissfully silent? Claudia*, a sailor from Lichfield in her late 30s, is not Italian. She has never been to Italy. She has no Italian family or friends. And she has no idea why a belligerent Italian couple have taken over her inner voice, duking it out in Claudia’s brain while she sits back and listens.“I have no idea where this has come from,” says Claudia, apologetically. “It’...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Biology, Neuroscience, Life and style, Italy, Claudia, Lichfield, Dolmio


Ivory poaching has led to evolution of tuskless elephants, study finds

Researchers say findings in Mozambique demonstrate impact of human interference in natureIvory poaching over decades has led to the evolution of tuskless elephants, researchers have found, proving that humans are “literally changing the anatomy” of wild animals.A previously rare genetic mutation causing tusklessness has become very common in some groups of African elephants after a period in which many were killed for their tusks, according to a study published in the journal Science. Continue r...
Tags: Science, Biology, Africa, Environment, World news, Wildlife, Conservation, Evolution, Mozambique


Unfreezing the ice age: the truth about humanity’s deep past

Archaeological discoveries are shattering scholars’ long-held beliefs about how the earliest humans organised their societies – and hint at possibilities for our ownIn some ways, accounts of “human origins” play a similar role for us today as myth did for ancient Greeks or Polynesians. This is not to cast aspersions on the scientific rigour or value of these accounts. It is simply to observe that the two fulfil somewhat similar functions. If we think on a scale of, say, the last 3m years, there ...
Tags: Science, Biology, Climate Change, Africa, Environment, Geology, Anthropology, Evolution, Fossils, Great Rift Valley


Factory farms of disease: how industrial chicken production is breeding the next pandemic

At least eight types of bird flu, all of which can kill humans, are circulating around the world’s factory farms – and they could be worse than Covid-19One day last December, 101,000 chickens at a gigantic farm near the city of Astrakhan in southern Russia started to collapse and die. Tests by the state research centre showed that a relatively new strain of lethal avian flu known as H5N8 was circulating, and within days 900,000 birds at the Vladimirskaya plant were hurriedly slaughtered to prev...
Tags: Health, Food, Business, Science, Biology, China, Russia, Environment, Society, World news, Medical Research, Britain, Asia Pacific, Infectious Diseases, Wildlife, Farming


Polygenic screening of embryos is here, but is it ethical?

The first child born using the technique arrived last year. But can it really help reduce diseases in a new generation, or is it ‘techno-eugenics’?The birth of the first IVF baby, Louise Brown, in 1978 provoked a media frenzy. In comparison, a little girl named Aurea born by IVF in May 2020 went almost unnoticed. Yet she represents a significant first in assisted reproduction too, for the embryo from which she grew was selected from others based on polygenic screening before implantation, to opt...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, California, World news, Genetics, Medical Research, Ethics, Louise Brown, Aurea, Center for Genetics and Society CGS


Viva la vulva: why we need to talk about women’s genitalia

Ignorance about the basic biology of vulvas is still shockingly high – yet there are huge health benefits, physical and emotional, to be won with better understandingIf you have a vulva between your legs, could you identify the seven separate structures in a mirror? If your partner has a vulva, can you identify theirs?For over half the population, the vulva is a significant part of their body; an exit and an entrance, a site of pleasure and, often, pain, that speaks to core human function and ne...
Tags: Gender, Science, Education, Biology, Sex, Women, Life and style


‘Sophisticated’: ancient faeces shows humans enjoyed beer and blue cheese 2,700 years ago

Austrian Alps salt miners had a ‘balanced diet’, with an analysis of bronze and iron age excrement finding the earliest evidence of cheese ripening in EuropeIt’s no secret that beer and blue cheese go hand in hand – but a new study reveals how deep their roots run in Europe, where workers at a salt mine in Austria were gorging on both up to 2,700 years ago.Scientists made the discovery by analysing samples of human excrement found at the heart of the Hallstatt mine in the Austrian Alps. Continu...
Tags: Europe, Science, Biology, World news, Austria, Anthropology, Alps, Hallstatt


Homegrown Covid vaccines fill gap as UN Covax scheme misses target

India, Egypt and Cuba among first states to develop and make their own vaccines as Covax falls behind Developing countries are increasingly turning to homegrown Covid vaccinations as the UN-backed Covax programme falls behind.While western countries roll out booster jabs to their own populations, Covax, which was set up by UN agencies, governments and donors to ensure fair access to Covid-19 vaccines for low- and middle-income countries, has said it will miss its target to distribute 2bn doses g...
Tags: Health, Europe, Business, Science, Biology, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, China, Singapore, India, Africa, Americas, Senegal, European Union, Society, World news


Local Covid vaccines fill gap as UN Covax scheme misses target

India, Egypt and Cuba among first states to develop and make their own vaccines as Covax falls behind Developing countries are increasingly turning to homegrown Covid vaccinations as the UN-backed Covax programme falls behind.While western countries roll out booster jabs to their own populations, Covax, which was set up by UN agencies, governments and donors to ensure fair access to Covid-19 vaccines for low- and middle-income countries, has said it will miss its target to distribute 2bn doses g...
Tags: Health, Europe, Business, Science, Biology, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, China, Singapore, India, Africa, Americas, Senegal, European Union, Society, World news


Capsule of 1765 air reveals ancient histories hidden under Antarctic ice

Polar Zero exhibition in Glasgow features sculpture encasing air extracted from start of Industrial RevolutionAn ampoule of Antarctic air from the year 1765 forms the centrepiece of a new exhibition that reveals the hidden histories contained in polar ice to visitors attending the Cop26 climate conference in Glasgow.The artist Wayne Binitie has spent the past five years undertaking an extraordinary collaboration with scientists of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), who drill, analyse and preser...
Tags: Science, Biology, Scotland, Environment, UK News, World news, Culture, Art and design, Anthropology, Antarctica, Evolution, Glasgow, Exhibitions, Antarctic, Climate Crisis, Antarctic Survey BAS


Epigenetics, the misunderstood science that could shed new light on ageing

The study of the epigenome came with claims that trauma could be inherited, but now researchers are more excited about its potential to measure the risk of diseaseA little over a decade ago, a clutch of scientific studies was published that seemed to show that survivors of atrocities or disasters such as the Holocaust and the Dutch famine of 1944-45 had passed on the biological scars of those traumatic experiences to their children.The studies caused a sensation, earning their own BBC Horizon do...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Cancer, Time, Genetics, Medical Research, Dementia, BBC Horizon



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