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Pioneering brain haemorrhage treatment reduces long-term disability in premature babies

Premature babies with serious brain haemorrhage treated with a 'brain washing' technique pioneered by Bristol researchers have shown in a 10-year follow-up study, were twice as likely to survive without severe learning disability when compared with infants given standard treatment. The findings are published today [5 July] in the journal Archives of Diseases in Childhood.
Tags: Science, Bristol


Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington's and other diseases

Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. The article, published in Brain Pathology, describes how SAFB1 expression occurs in both spinocerebellar ataxias and Huntington's disease and may be a common marker of these conditions, which have a similar genetic background.
Tags: Science, Bristol, HUNTINGTON


New heart valve could transform open heart surgery for millions of patients globally

A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. The team's latest in-vitro results, published in Biomaterials Science, suggest that the PoliValve could last for up to 25 years.
Tags: Science, Cambridge, Bristol


Bristol innovation challenges regular touchscreens with new spray-on technique

A team at Bristol has challenged the idea that touchscreens are limited to 2D and rectangular shapes by developing an interactive display that can be sprayed in any shape.Inspired by the way an artist creates graffiti on a wall and using a novel combination of sprayable electronics and 3D printing, the technique, called ProtoSpray, allows the creation of displays on surfaces that go beyond the usual rectangular and 2D shapes.
Tags: Science, Bristol


An ant-inspired approach to mathematical sampling

In a paper published by the Royal Society, a team of Bristol researchers observed the exploratory behaviour of ants to inform the development of a more efficient mathematical sampling technique.
Tags: Science, Bristol, Royal Society


Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases

A Bristol academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem -- the discrete diffusion equation in finite space.
Tags: Science, Bristol


Bristol scientists see through glass frogs' translucent camouflage

Glass frogs are well known for their see-through skin but, until now, the reason for this curious feature has received no experimental attention. A team of scientists from the University of Bristol, McMaster University, and Universidad de Las Américas Quito, sought to establish the ecological importance of glass frog translucency and, in doing so, have revealed a novel form of camouflage.
Tags: Science, Bristol, University of Bristol McMaster University, Universidad de Las Américas Quito


Eavesdropping crickets drop from the sky to evade capture by bats

Researchers have uncovered the highly efficient strategy used by a group of crickets to distinguish the calls of predatory bats from the incessant noises of the nocturnal jungle. The findings, led by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Graz in Austria and published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, reveal the crickets eavesdrop on the vocalizations of bats to help them escape their grasp when hunted.
Tags: Science, Austria, Bristol, Graz


Cooperative male dolphins match the tempo of each other's calls

When it comes to working together, male dolphins coordinate their behavior just like us. New findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Western Australia and Bristol, provide insight into the importance of physical and vocal coordination in alliance forming animals.
Tags: Science, Bristol, Western Australia


Bristol team develops photosynthetic proteins for expanded solar energy conversion

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has developed a new photosynthetic protein system enabling an enhanced and more sustainable approach to solar-powered technological devices. The initiative is part of a broader effort in the field of synthetic biology to use proteins in place of man-made materials which are often scarce, expensive and can be harmful to the environment when the device becomes obsolete.
Tags: Science, Bristol, University of Bristol


Bristol pioneers use of VR for designing new drugs

Researchers at the University of Bristol are pioneering the use of virtual reality (VR) as a tool to design the next generation of drug treatments.
Tags: Science, Bristol, University of Bristol


Bristol scientists demonstrate first non-volatile nano relay operation at 200°C

Researchers at the University of Bristol have come up with a new type of nanoelectromechanical relay to enable reliable high-temperature, non-volatile memory. The work, which is reported in Nature Communications, is an important development for all-electric vehicles and more-electric aircraft which require electronics with integrated data storage that can operate in extreme temperatures with high energy efficiency.
Tags: Science, Bristol, University of Bristol, Nature Communications


Bristol discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible

In an article published in Physical Review Letters, Bristol scientists have answered the fundamental question: 'Is it possible to move without exerting force on the environment?', by describing the tractionless self-propulsion of active matter.
Tags: Science, Bristol


'World-class' surf lake opens near Bristol

The creators of the complex say it is powered 100% by renewable energy.
Tags: Science, Bristol


More than 50 bowel surgery patients should not have been operated on by well-known doctor, hospital admits

More than 50 patients who were given a controversial form of bowel surgery by a well-known surgeon should not have been operated on, a hospital trust has admitted. Dozens of women were left in severe pain after pelvic floor surgery using artificial mesh at Southmead Hospital in Bristol. Tony Dixon, one of Britain's best known surgeons in the area, was suspended in 2017 after concerns were first raised and an inquiry examined 143 cases. Among them were Lucinda Methuen-Campbell, who underwent ...
Tags: Science, Britain, Bristol, General Medical Council, Dixon, Southmead Hospital, Chris Burton, Southmead, Irwin Mitchell, North Bristol NHS Trust, Tony Dixon, Spire Hospital, Lucinda Methuen Campbell, Metheun Campbell, Sallie Booth


More than 50 bowl surgery patients should not have been operated on by well-known doctor, hospital admits

More than 50 patients who were given a controversial form of bowel surgery by a well-known surgeon should not have been operated on, a hospital trust has admitted. Dozens of women were left in severe pain after pelvic floor surgery using artificial mesh at Southmead Hospital in Bristol. Tony Dixon, one of Britain's best known surgeons in the area, was suspended in 2017 after concerns were first raised and an inquiry examined 143 cases. Among them were Lucinda Methuen-Campbell, who underwent ...
Tags: Science, Britain, Bristol, General Medical Council, Dixon, Southmead Hospital, Chris Burton, Southmead, Irwin Mitchell, North Bristol NHS Trust, Tony Dixon, Spire Hospital, Lucinda Methuen Campbell, Metheun Campbell, Sallie Booth


‘Baby Bio’ for brain cells trial halted despite Parkinson's patients seeing 'miracle' results

Parkinson’s patients treated with a groundbreaking new therapy to regrow their brain cells have criticised a decision by regulators to stop trials as ‘sinful.’ In the biggest surgical trial ever for the disease, British patients had holes drilled into the heads and special ports implanted so that a naturally occurring protein could be infused directly into the brain over nine months. Described as ‘Baby Bio’ for brain cells, the Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF) encourages the gr...
Tags: UK, Science, Bbc, Britain, Bristol, Parkinson, Tyneside, Vicki Dillon, MintMotion, Tom Phipps, Arthur Roach


Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of 2 species of ancient reptile

Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.
Tags: Science, Bristol, University of Bristol


We'd be lost without them: meet the team that runs GPS for the world

It was announced this week that the £1m QE Engineering Prize had been won by four individuals who pioneered the creation of The American Global Positioning System (GPS). Below, we republish a 2011 report by Paul Kendall who was given rare and exclusive access to the United States Air Force unit that operates the satellite system At 23 years-old, Joshua Williams seems a little young to be in charge of the Global Positioning System. Three years ago, it was still illegal for him to buy a drink. Two...
Tags: Facebook, England, Hollywood, Science, London, Microsoft, Navy, California, Virginia, Iraq, US, America, Department Of Defense, European Union, Earth, Transit


Why Bristol-Myers Squibb Stock Sank By 15.2% in 2018

Bristol's inability to compete against Merck in front-line lung cancer weighed heavily on its shares last year.
Tags: Science, Merck, Bristol, Bristol Myers Squibb Stock Sank


Bristol-Myers bulks up with $74 billion deal to buy Celgene

Bristol's most important cancer immunotherapy and growth driver, Opdivo, has lost much of its luster as Merck & Co's rival drug Keytruda seized dominance in advanced lung cancer, the most lucrative oncology market. Meanwhile, Celgene has endured high-profile clinical failures and the U.S. exclusivity on its flagship multiple myeloma drug, Revlimid, starts being phased out in 2022. Bristol-Myers shares fell 15.2 percent in 2018, while Celgene plunged nearly 40 percent last year.
Tags: Science, Bristol, Celgene, KEYTRUDA, Merck Co, Opdivo, Bristol Myers


Bristol-Myers bulks up cancer portfolio with $74 billion Celgene deal

Bristol-Myers pioneered immunotherapy with its Yervoy and later Opdivo, but has come under pressure as Merck & Co's rival treatment Keytruda moved ahead in market share in lung cancer treatment, the most lucrative oncology market. BMO Capital Markets analyst Alex Arfaei said the deal addresses a priority for Bristol to diversify from immunotherapy, calling the acquisition opportunistic but expensive. "This proposed deal does not send a confident signal about Bristol's independent growth prosp...
Tags: Science, Bristol, Celgene, BMO Capital Markets, KEYTRUDA, Merck Co, Yervoy, Bristol Myers, Alex Arfaei, Arfaei


Overeating in teenage years may damage lifespan of future grandsons, study suggests 

Overeating in teenage years could damage the lifespan of future grandsons, a new study suggests. Researchers in Sweden looked back at 9,039 grandparents born between 1874 and 1910, and followed their grandchildren until 2015. After comparing information from harvests, they found that that the grandsons of grandfathers who had eaten well from bountiful harvests during their formative years, were three times more likely to have died from cancer. They were also 50 per cent more likely to have died ...
Tags: Science, Sweden, Britain, Bristol, Stockholm University, Denny Vagero, Stephen Frankel


Earth teeming with strange underground organisms which may be planet's first inhabitants

Earth is teeming with life miles beneath the surface, scientists have discovered, leading to speculation that our distant ancestors may even have evolved deep underground. Researchers at the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) said they had found barely-living ‘zombie’ bacteria and tiny worms, inhabiting entirely new ecosystems more than three miles into the crust. The lifeforms are so numerous that their mass may be up to 385 times that of all humans. And some are so odd and striking, living for mill...
Tags: Japan, Science, US, Earth, Oxford, Bristol, Pacific Ocean, Galapagos, University College London, Oregon State University, Rockefeller University, Carl Woese, JOHANNESBURG South Africa, American Geophysical Union, Jesse Ausubel, DCO


Mystery ozone-damaging emissions are coming from China, scientists discover

Mysterious emissions which are preventing the hole in the ozone layer from closing are coming from China, scientists have discovered. Researchers from the University of Bristol have found significant ongoing fumes of a potent ozone-depleting substance have their origin eastern China. The compound, carbon tetrachloride, contributes to the destruction of the Earth’s ozone layer, which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation.  As a result, the production of carbon tetrachloride has been bann...
Tags: Asia, Usa, Science, China, Nasa, Earth, Bristol, University of Bristol, Shandong, Geophysical Research Letters, Lunt, British Antarctic, University of Bristol 's School of Chemistry, South Korea Switzerland Australia, Mark Lunt, Matt Rigby


Mystery of Charles Darwin's flying spiders solved - they harness electricity

You might assume that evolution gave Charles Darwin enough to ponder during his five year voyage on The Beagle. But of all the phenomena the naturalist encountered circumnavigating the globe, it was the flight of spiders which continued to puzzle him. Darwin noticed that hundreds of spiders would inexplicably land on the Beagle even on a calm day without any wind to blow them on board. Similarly, they would suddenly soar away again, as if magically plucked up by an unseen hand into the serene sk...
Tags: Science, Charles Darwin, Bristol, Darwin, Bristol University, Morley, Spencer Arnold HULTON, Erica Morley


Bristol scientists discover a new way to find mass extinctions

During the history of the Earth, there were many mass extinctions, when huge numbers of species died out. They are usually easy to identify because of the sudden extinctions, followed by a gap, and then the recovery of life.
Tags: Science, Earth, Bristol


Polymer crystals hold key to record-breaking energy transport

Scientists from the universities of Bristol and Cambridge have found a way to create polymeric semiconductor nanostructures that absorb light and transport its energy further than previously observed.
Tags: Science, Cambridge, Bristol


Are these bones the remains of England's first turkey dinner?

Poultry bones dug up from a street may be the remains of the first ever turkey dinner in England, archaeologists believe. The 16th century bones - two thighs and a wing – have been analysed by University of Exeter archaeologists and identified as among some the first turkeys to be brought to England from the Americas. The first turkeys were introduced to England in 1524 or 1526 by William Strickland, an English landowner and trader who made his fortune sailing to the New World and eventually bec...
Tags: England, Science, London, Americas, America, Britain, Yorkshire, Bristol, Exeter, Henry Viii, University of Exeter, New World, Strickland, Stickland, Paul Street, Royal Albert Memorial Museum


Rich People Have Installed Anti-Bird Spikes in Trees to Keep Bird Poop Away from Cars

Nobody likes it when a bird poops on their car. But the residents of a wealthy neighborhood in Bristol, England seem to have taken this dislike to another level. They’ve installed anti-bird spikes on local trees. Humans really are the worst.Read more...
Tags: Science, Technology, Animals, Birds, Bristol, Rich People, Bristol England, Bird Law, Anti Bird Spikes, Anti Human Tech, Anti Bird Tech



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