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Electrochemical reaction powers new drug discoveries

A Cornell-led collaboration is flipping the switch on traditional synthetic chemistry by using electricity to drive a new chemical reaction that previously stumped chemists who rely on conventional methods.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Researchers control elusive spin fluctuations in 2D magnets

A Cornell team developed a new imaging technique that is fast and sensitive enough to observe these elusive critical fluctuations in two-dimensional magnets. This real-time imaging allows researchers to control the fluctuations and switch magnetism via a "passive" mechanism that could eventually lead to more energy-efficient magnetic storage devices.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Evergreen idea turns biomass DNA into degradable materials

A Cornell-led collaboration is turning DNA from organic matter -- such as onions, fish and algae -- into biodegradable gels and plastics. The resulting materials could be used to create everyday plastic objects, unusually strong adhesives, multifunctional composites and more effective methods for drug delivery, without harming the environment the way petrochemical-based materials do.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Study finds gender differences in active learning classrooms

Men participated more in an active learning course in science, technology, engineering and math, while women reported lower perceptions of their scientific abilities, were more aware of gender identity and more likely to feel judged based on gender, a new Cornell-led study has found.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Bangladeshi eggplant farmers reap rewards via genetics

Farmers in Bangladesh achieved significantly higher yields and revenues by growing insect-resistant, genetically engineered eggplant, a new Cornell study has found.
Tags: Science, Bangladesh, Cornell


Researchers track how bacteria purge toxic metals

Cornell researchers combined genetic engineering, single-molecule tracking and protein quantitation to get a closer look at this mechanism and understand how it functions. The knowledge could lead to the development of more effective antibacterial treatments.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Algal genome provides insights into first land plants

Cornell researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many clues to how aquatic plants first colonized land.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread

A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health.
Tags: New York, Science, Cornell, Cornell University


The ‘PuffPacket’ could help researchers learn when, how and why people vape

Vaping is a controversial habit: it certainly has its downsides, but anecdotally it’s a fantastic smoking cessation aid. The thing is, until behavioral scientists know a bit more about who does it, when, how much and other details, its use will continue to be something of a mystery. That’s where the PuffPacket comes in. Designed by Cornell engineers, the PuffPacket is a small device that attaches to e-cigarettes (or vape pens, or whatever you call yours) and precisely measures their use, sharing...
Tags: Apple, Health, Gadgets, Science, Bluetooth, Tech, Vaping, Cornell, Cornell University, Adams, Alexander Adams


New imaging technique sheds light on adult zebrafish brain

Cornell scientists have developed a new technique for imaging a zebrafish's brain at all stages of its development, which could have implications for the study of human brain disorders, including autism.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Game theory suggests more efficient cancer therapy

Cornell mathematicians are using game theory to model how this competition could be leveraged, so cancer treatment -- which also takes a toll on the patient's body -- might be administered more sparingly, with maximized effect.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Color is launching a high-capacity COVID-19 testing lab and will open-source its design and protocols

Genomics health technology startup Color is doing its part to address the global COVID-19 pandemic, and has detailed the steps it’s taking to support expansion of testing efforts in a new blog post and letter from CEO Othman Laraki on Tuesday. The efforts include development of a high-throughput lab that can process as many as 10,000 tests per day, with a turnaround time of within 24 hours for reporting results to physicians. In order to provide the most benefit possible from the effort of stand...
Tags: Health, Startups, TC, Science, Education, Tech, Mit, Harvard, Genomics, Biotech, Test, Cornell, Broad Institute, Weill Cornell Medicine, Color Genomics, Othman Laraki


Hospitals Turn to 3D-Printed Donations for Sorely Needed Supplies in Covid-19 Outbreak

A network of 3D printer-users has stepped in to help hospitals grappling with critical shortages of protective gear and other vital medical supplies during the covid-19 pandemic, NPR reports. It’s the latest unorthodox emergency measure U.S. health workers, who are pleading for equipment, have been increasingly forced…Read more...
Tags: Science, 3d Printer, Npr, 3d Printers, Cornell, 3dprinting, 3D printed, Coronavirus, Covid 19, Sars Cov 2


Video game experience, gender may improve VR learning

Students who used immersive virtual reality (VR) did not learn significantly better than those who used two more traditional forms of learning, but they vastly preferred the VR to computer-simulated and hands-on methods, a new Cornell study has found.
Tags: Science, Cornell


The “Feynman Technique” for Studying Effectively: An Animated Primer

After winning the Nobel Prize, physicist Max Planck "went around Germany giving the same standard lecture on the new quantum mechanics. Over time, his chauffeur memorized the lecture and said, 'Would you mind, Professor Planck, because it’s so boring to stay in our routine, if I gave the lecture in Munich and you just sat in front wearing my chauffeur’s hat?' Planck said, 'Why not?' And the chauffeur got up and gave this long lecture on quantum mechanics. After which a physics profe...
Tags: Google, Productivity, Science, Education, College, Germany, Physics, Munich, Richard, Seoul, Feynman, Cornell, Usc, Max, Richard Feynman, Facebook Twitter


Lack of media skepticism tied to belief in rape myths

People who tend to recognize similarities between people they know and people depicted in the media are more likely to believe common myths about sexual assault, according to a new study co-led by a Cornell researcher.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Model simulator helps researchers map complex physics phenomena

A Cornell-led collaboration has successfully created such a simulator using ultrathin monolayers that overlap to make a moiré pattern. The team then used this solid-state platform to map a longstanding conundrum in physics: the phase diagram of the triangular lattice Hubbard model.
Tags: Science, Cornell, Hubbard


If you're poor, poverty is an environmental issue

A survey from Cornell researchers -- conducted among more than 1,100 US residents -- found that there were, in fact, demographic differences in how people viewed environmental issues, with racial and ethnic minorities and lower-income people more likely to consider human factors such as racism and poverty as environmental, in addition to more ecological issues like toxic fumes from factories or car exhaust.
Tags: Science, US, Cornell


Muscle stem cells compiled in 'atlas'

A team of Cornell researchers led by Ben Cosgrove, assistant professor in the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, used a new cellular profiling technology to probe and catalog the activity of almost every kind of cell involved in muscle repair. They compiled their findings into a 'cell atlas' of muscle regeneration that is one of the largest datasets of its kind.
Tags: Science, Cornell, Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, Ben Cosgrove


Researchers map protein motion

Cornell structural biologists took a new approach to using a classic method of X-ray analysis to capture something the conventional method had never accounted for: the collective motion of proteins. And they did so by creating software to painstakingly stitch together the scraps of data that are usually disregarded in the process.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Machine learning illuminates material's hidden order

A Cornell collaboration led by physicist Brad Ramshaw, the Dick & Dale Reis Johnson Assistant Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences, used a combination of ultrasound and machine learning to narrow the possible explanations for what happens to this quantum material when it enters this so-called "hidden order."
Tags: Science, Cornell, College of Arts and Sciences, Brad Ramshaw, Dick Dale Reis Johnson


'Triangle 2' plastic containers may see environmental makeover

Cornell chemists can demonstrate how to make high-density polyethylene with better control over polymer chain lengths, which allows for improvement over physical properties such as processability and strength, according to research published Dec. 27, 2019, in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Spending time in nature reduces stress, research finds

New research from an interdisciplinary Cornell team has found that as little as 10 minutes in a natural setting can help college students feel happier and lessen the effects of both physical and mental stress.
Tags: Science, Cornell


InSight detects gravity waves, devilish dust on Mars

More than a year after NASA's Mars InSight lander touched down in a pebble-filled crater on the Martian equator, the rusty red planet is now serving up its meteorological secrets: gravity waves, surface swirling "dust devils," and the steady, low rumble of infrasound, Cornell and other researchers have found.
Tags: Science, Nasa, Mars, Cornell


Physics tool helps track cancer cell diversity

A Cornell-led team took a novel, interdisciplinary approach to analyzing the behavior of breast tumor cells by employing a statistical modeling technique more commonly used in physics and economics. The team was able to demonstrate how the diversity, or heterogeneity, of cancer cells can be influenced by their chemical environment -- namely, by interactions with a specific protein, which leads to tumor growth.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Lost in translation: Organic matter cuts plant-microbe links

Soil scientists from Cornell and Rice Universities have dug around and found that although adding carbon organic matter to agricultural fields is usually advantageous, it may muddle the beneficial underground communication between legume plants and microorganisms.
Tags: Science, Cornell


If it takes a hike, riders won't go for bike sharing

Even a relatively short walk to find the nearest bicycle is enough to deter many potential users of bike sharing systems, new Cornell research suggests.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Discoveries detail role of stem cell in deadly gastric cancer

A Cornell study provides important new insights into a common and deadly type of gastric cancer.
Tags: Science, Cornell


Richard Feynman’s “Lost Lecture:” An Animated Retelling

Nobel prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman is “famous in a number of dimensions,” says science and math explainer Grant Sanderson of the YouTube channel 3blue1brown in the video above. “To scientists, he’s a giant of 20th century physics… to the public, he’s a refreshing contradiction to the stereotypes about physicists: a safe-cracking, bongo-playing, mildly philandering non-conformist.” Feynman is also famous, or infamous, for his role in the Manhattan Project and the building of th...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Science, Youtube, College, Fbi, David, Physics, Feynman, Manhattan Project, Los Alamos, Cornell, Richard Feynman, Caltech, Facebook Twitter, Sanderson


Bone breakthrough may lead to more durable airplane wings

Cornell researchers have made a new discovery about how seemingly minor aspects of the internal structure of bone can be strengthened to withstand repeated wear and tear, a finding that could help treat patients suffering from osteoporosis. It could also lead to the creation of more durable, lightweight materials for the aerospace industry.
Tags: Science, Cornell



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