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5200-year-old grains in the eastern Altai Mountains redate trans-Eurasian crop exchange

Cereals from the Fertile Crescent and broomcorn millet from northern China spread across the ancient world, integrating into complex farming systems that used crop-rotation cycles enabled by the different ecological regions of origin. The resulting productivity allowed for demographic expansions and imperial formation in Europe and Asia. In this study, an international, interdisciplinary team of scientists illustrate that people moved these crops across Eurasia earlier than previously realized, ...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Science, China, Eurasia, Altai Mountains, Fertile Crescent


5,200-year-old grains in the eastern Altai Mountains redate trans-Eurasian crop exchange

Cereals from the Fertile Crescent and broomcorn millet from northern China spread across the ancient world, integrating into complex farming systems that used crop-rotation cycles enabled by the different ecological regions of origin. The resulting productivity allowed for demographic expansions and imperial formation in Europe and Asia. In this study, an international, interdisciplinary team of scientists illustrate that people moved these crops across Eurasia earlier than previously realized, ...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Science, China, Eurasia, Altai Mountains, Fertile Crescent


Ancient goat genomes reveal mosaic domestication in the Fertile Crescent

Current genetic data are equivocal as to whether goat domestication occurred multiple times or was a singular process. We generated genomic data from 83 ancient goats (51 with genome-wide coverage) from Paleolithic to Medieval contexts throughout the Near East. Our findings demonstrate that multiple divergent ancient wild goat sources were domesticated in a dispersed process that resulted in genetically and geographically distinct Neolithic goat populations, echoing contemporaneous human diverge...
Tags: Europe, Science, Asia Africa, Fertile Crescent, Near East Our


Ancient Barley Took High Road to China, Changed to Summer Crop in Tibet

First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis,
Tags: Science, Tibet, China, Middle East, Tibetan Plateau, Washington University, Fertile Crescent, Barley Took High Road


Ancient barley took high road to China

First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
Tags: Science, China, Middle East, Tibetan Plateau, Washington University, Fertile Crescent


Wild emmer genome architecture and diversity elucidate wheat evolution and domestication

Wheat (Triticum spp.) is one of the founder crops that likely drove the Neolithic transition to sedentary agrarian societies in the Fertile Crescent more than 10,000 years ago. Identifying genetic modifications underlying wheat’s domestication requires knowledge about the genome of its allo-tetraploid progenitor, wild emmer (T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides). We report a 10.1-gigabase assembly of the 14 chromosomes of wild tetraploid wheat, as well as analyses of gene content, genome architecture, a...
Tags: Science, Fertile Crescent, Rachis


How humans transformed wild wheat into its modern counterpart

A sophisticated sequencing study reveals genetic changes that emerged in wheat as it became domesticated by agricultural societies in the Fertile Crescent, roughly 10,000 years ago.
Tags: Science, Fertile Crescent


[In Depth] First farmers' motley roots

Farming was such a good idea when it was invented 10,000 to 12,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent that it was quickly adopted by several different groups of people. According to three teams who used new techniques to gain glimpses of the nuclear DNA of the world's very first farmers, farming was adopted by at least three genetically distinct groups scattered across the Middle East and Anatolia. The research found that early farmers of Israel and Jordan were genetically distinct from those in ...
Tags: Science, Israel, Middle East, Jordan, Anatolia, Fertile Crescent, Zagros Mountains



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