Science


Posts filtered by tags: National Institutes of Health[x]


 

NIH study supports new approach for treating cerebral malaria

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence that specific immune cells may play a key role in the devastating effects of cerebral malaria, a severe form of malaria that mainly affects young children. The results, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, suggest that drugs targeting T cells may be effective in treating the disease. The study was supported by the NIH Intramural Research Program.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, Nih


They Wanted Research Funding, So They Entered the Lottery

A few years ago, Anna Ponnampalam did something out of the box: She entered a lottery. But she wasn't buying scratch-off tickets promising cash for life. She was trying to win funding for her medical research.Her application wasn't successful. All proposals go through an initial quality and eligibility check, which hers did not pass; those that get to enter the pool then get selected at random for funding. But Ponnampalam, a reproductive biologist at the University of Auckland in New Zea...
Tags: Science, Germany, New York Times, New Zealand, National Institutes of Health, Barnett, Indiana University, Bloomington, Brisbane Australia, Swiss National Science Foundation, Queensland University of Technology, University of Auckland, U S National Science Foundation, Volkswagen Foundation, Bollen, Research Integrity


Genetic profile may predict type 2 diabetes risk among women with gestational diabetes

Women who go on to develop type 2 diabetes after having gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes are more likely to have particular genetic profiles, suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The findings provide insight into the genetic factors underlying the risk of type 2 diabetes and may inform strategies for reducing this risk among women who had gestational diabetes.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


Remdesivir prevents MERS coronavirus disease in monkeys

The experimental antiviral remdesivir successfully prevented disease in rhesus macaques infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), according to a new study from National Institutes of Health scientists. Remdesivir prevented disease when administered before infection and improved the condition of macaques when given after the animals already were infected.
Tags: Science, Middle East, National Institutes of Health, Remdesivir


Why Trump might soon make (some) scientists very happy

The White House issued its 2021 budget request to Congress on Feb. 10.The request includes deep cuts to many federal science agencies, though it also calls for more funding into certain research, including NASA.The administration could soon mandate that all federally funded research be published without paywalls, a move that many researchers seem to support. The White House sent its 2021 budget request to Congress on Feb. 10, offering a glimpse into how the Trump administration wants to repri...
Tags: Energy, Europe, Politics, Science, Obama, Congress, White House, Usda, Nasa, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Brazil, National Institutes of Health, Homeland Security, Wiley


Key HIV vaccine trial in South Africa ends because of poor results

Decision described as a ‘significant setback’ by International Aids SocietyThe latest trial of a vaccine against HIV has been halted because interim results show it is not working, the National Institutes of Health in the United States has announced.The end of the trial taking place in South Africa is a blow to the vaccine field and to Aids experts and advocates. As early as the mid-1980s, the US government was forecasting that Aids would be stopped by a vaccine. In 1997, the then-president Bill...
Tags: Science, Africa, US, World news, US news, Medical Research, United States, South Africa, Bill Clinton, National Institutes of Health, Aids and HIV


Researchers discover a new auto-inflammatory disease called CRIA syndrome

Over the last 20 years, three families have been unsuspectingly linked by an unknown illness. Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other organizations have now identified the cause of the illness, a new disease called CRIA syndrome.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute NHGRI


Zinc, folic acid supplements fail to enhance male fertility

Zinc and folic acid, a pair of dietary supplements long touted as an effective treatment for male infertility, failed to improve pregnancy rates, sperm counts, and sperm potency in a new study conducted at University of Utah Health and other medical centers in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health. According to the researchers, the finding presents the most definitive evidence to date that so-called fertility supplements do not live up expectations.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, University of Utah Health


Persistent organic pollutants in mother's blood linked to smaller fetal size

Pregnant women exposed to persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, had slightly smaller fetuses than women who haven't been exposed to these chemicals, according to an analysis of ultrasound scans by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


Severity of autism symptoms varies greatly among identical twins

Identical twins with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience large differences in symptom severity even though they share the same DNA, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that identifying the causes of this variability may inform the treatment of ASD-related symptoms.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


Being teased about weight linked to more weight gain among children, NIH study suggests

Youth who said they were teased or ridiculed about their weight increased their body mass by 33 percent more each year, compared to a similar group who had not been teased, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health. The findings appear to contradict the belief that such teasing might motivate youth to change their behavior and attempt to lose weight.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, Nih


Study shows incidence rates of aggressive subtypes of uterine cancer rising

New findings from a study by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, show that US incidence rates for aggressive subtypes of uterine cancer rose rapidly among women ages 30 to 79 from 2000 to 2015. The findings also reveal racial disparities, including higher incidence of these aggressive subtypes and poorer survival -- irrespective of subtype and cancer stage -- among non-Hispanic black women than among women in other racial/ethnic groups.
Tags: Science, US, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute NCI


U.S. launches four-state study to find ways to reduce opioid overdose deaths

The National Institutes of Health will award grants to research sites in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York and Ohio, NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins said at a news conference to unveil the plan. Prescription opioid pain treatments and drugs like heroin and the more potent fentanyl were responsible for 47,600 U.S. deaths in 2017, according to government figures, with only a small decline last year, according to provisional data. The plan calls for the research centers to work with at least 15 ...
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, Francis Collins, Kentucky Massachusetts New York, Ohio NIH


Healthy hearts need two proteins working together

Two proteins that bind to stress hormones work together to maintain a healthy heart in mice, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. These proteins, stress hormone receptors known as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), act in concert to help support heart health. When the signaling between the two receptors is out of balance, the mice have heart disease.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


Want to learn a new skill? Take some short breaks

In a study of healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may solidify the memories of new skills we just practiced a few seconds earlier by taking a short rest. The results highlight the critically important role rest may play in learning.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


Scientists review influenza vaccine research progress and opportunities

In a new series of articles, experts in immunology, virology, epidemiology, and vaccine development detail efforts to improve seasonal influenza vaccines and ultimately develop a universal influenza vaccine. The 15 articles are part of a supplement in the April 15 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and scientists supported by NIAID, are among the contributing a...
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, NIAID


Acute flaccid myelitis requires galvanized research response

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) presents significant challenges not only to patients but also to researchers, and efforts must be accelerated to learn more about the condition, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, write in a new perspective published in mBio.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


National Cancer Institute chief to serve as acting FDA head

Sharpless, who has led the National Institutes of Health's cancer unit since 2017, will take over following Gottlieb's exit in April, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said on Tuesday. Cancer experts and advocates praised the appointment of Sharpless as acting FDA chief after Gottlieb's abrupt resignation earlier this month.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, Fda, U S Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, Sharpless, Gottlieb


The Green New Deal Is Unserious and Juvenile

Do you ever wonder why people run for office? I mean, unless you’re a total cynic, you must assume that at least part of the motivation is wanting to do good. Sure, you want fame and prestige, but you also have strongly held views and want to affect public policy, right? So why in the world would you engage in sabotage of the ideas you hope to advance?That’s undeniably what Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D., N.Y.) and Senator Ed Markey (D., Mass.) have done with their juvenile Green Ne...
Tags: Science, France, Russia, National Institutes of Health, Chernobyl, Markey, Ed Markey, La Porte Texas, Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, Ocasio Cortez, Recently the Union of Concerned Scientists, Sam Thernstrom, Energy Innovation Reform Project, United States Three Mile Island


Vitamin D may protect against pollution-associated asthma symptoms in obese children

A new study finds vitamin D may be protective among asthmatic obese children living in urban environments with high indoor air pollution. The study out of John Hopkins University School of Medicine, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, was published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, John Hopkins University School of Medicine


Women scientists get less federal funding than men

First-time women principal investigator scientists received considerably less funding from the National Institutes of Health compared to first-time male principal investigators, even at top research institutions. Women scientists are disadvantaged at the start of their careers. Women also can't buy as much lab equipment or recruit as many grad students for their research. 
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


Anti-flu antibodies can inhibit two different viral proteins, NIH study reveals

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have discovered that antibodies that may form the basis of a universal flu vaccine inhibit a second viral protein in addition to the one that they bind. The study, to be published Jan. 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that antibodies that recognize the viral surface protein hemagglutinin can also inhibit the viral neuraminidase, and that this enhances antibody neutralization of the virus and the activation of innate immune cel...
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, Nih


Bad Plumbing Helped Cause a Strange Outbreak of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria at a Maryland Hospital

In 2016, a mysterious illness spread inside the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical Center, the U.S. government’s most prominent research hospital, in Bethesda, Maryland. Patients were somehow being sickened by an antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria that practically never causes disease in humans. Two years…Read more...
Tags: Science, Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Nih, Antibiotic Resistance, Superbugs, Bethesda Maryland, Outbreaks, Maryland Hospital


Can too much screen time change the structure of a child's brain?

Children who spend more than seven hours a day using smartphones and tablets differently-structured brains, scientists have said.  In the study by US researchers into children's brain health, those who had developed premature thinning of the cortex, the outermost layer of the brain, were found to have spent multiple hours in front of screens.  Scientists said it was not clear whether the difference in the exterior part of the brain, that processes information from the five senses, was cause...
Tags: Science, US, National Institutes of Health, ABCD, Gaya Dowling


More than seven hours of screen time a day changes the structure of a child's brain, scientists claim

More than seven hours of screen time a day can change the structure of a child's brain and affect their test scores, claim scientists.  Children develop premature thinning of the outermost layer of the brain if they spend multiple hours on smartphones, according to US researchers who are conducting the largest long-term study of children’s brain health.  The effect on the “wrinkly” exterior part of the brain, that processes information from the five senses, was revealed after scientists tra...
Tags: Science, US, National Institutes of Health, ABCD, Gaya Dowling


Meeting the challenge of engaging men in HIV prevention and treatment

A new commentary from National Institutes of Health scientists asserts that engaging men in HIV prevention and care is essential to the goal of ending the HIV pandemic. The article by Adeola Adeyeye, M.D., M.P.A., and David Burns, M.D., M.P.H., of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Michael Stirratt, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) also discusses potential solutions.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, David Burns, National Institute of Mental Health NIMH, Michael Stirratt


Study finds early career publications as likely source of NIH funding racial gap

In seeking to pinpoint why black or African-American scientists are less likely than their white counterparts to receive National Institutes of Health research funding, a group of researchers has identified early career publications as a likely contributor to the gap.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health, Nih


National Institutes of Health official visits UW to explain why they want your genome

The National Institutes of Health is looking for one million volunteers to participate in a health study that's billed as the largest research project in human history.
Tags: Health, Science, News, Education, National Institutes of Health, Local News, UW


Daily low-dose aspirin found to have no effect on healthy life span in older people

In a clinical trial to determine the effects of daily low-dose aspirin in healthy older adults without previous cardiovascular events, aspirin did not prolong healthy, independent living free of dementia or physical disability. These findings from the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) trial, partially supported by the National Institutes of Health, were published online on September 16, 2018 in three papers in The New England Journal of Medicine.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health


Scanning thousands of molecules against an elusive cancer target

Researchers at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed a system to accelerate the discovery of chemical compounds that inhibit an enzyme implicated in a number of cancers. The set of tools and methods, which the researchers used to test more than 16,000 compounds, is described in a new paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
Tags: Science, National Institutes of Health



Filters
show more filters
December - 2019
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
January - 2020
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
February - 2020
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272829