Science


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How to get a handle on carbon dioxide uptake by plants

How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? It's a deceptively complicated question, so a Rutgers-led group of scientists recommends combining two cutting-edge tools to help answer the crucial climate change-related question.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


College students with disabilities at greater risk for substance abuse

College students with physical and cognitive disabilities use illicit drugs more, and have a higher prevalence of drug use disorder, than their non-disabled peers, according to a Rutgers study.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


New smart drug delivery system may help treatment for neurological disorders

A Rutgers-led team has created a smart drug delivery system that reduces inflammation in damaged nervous tissues and may help treat spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders. The system, which uses extremely thin biomaterials implanted in the body, also protects nerve fibers (axons) that connect nerve cells in injured neural tissues, according to a study in the journal Advanced Materials.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots

Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Ocean algae get 'coup de grace' from viruses

Scientists have long believed that ocean viruses always quickly kill algae, but Rutgers-led research shows they live in harmony with algae and viruses provide a 'coup de grace' only when blooms of algae are already stressed and dying. The study will likely change how scientists view viral infections of algae, also known as phytoplankton - especially the impact of viruses on ecosystem processes like algal bloom formation (and decline) and the cycling of carbon and other chemicals on Earth.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Glass tables can cause life-threatening injuries

Faulty glass in tables can cause life-threatening injuries, according to a Rutgers study, which provides evidence that stricter federal regulations are needed to protect consumers.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


As domestic violence spikes, many victims and their children have nowhere to live

COVID-19 has left many victims of domestic violence facing difficulties feeding their children and accessing services for safe housing, transportation and childcare once they leave shelters, according to a Rutgers study published in the journal Violence Against Women.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age

Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Bat tick found for the first time in New Jersey

A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. This species (Carios kelleyi) is a "soft" tick. Deer ticks, which carry Lyme disease, are an example of "hard" ticks.
Tags: Science, New Jersey, Rutgers


Land development in New Jersey continues to slow

Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it's unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report.
Tags: Science, New Jersey, Rutgers


Sexual minority men who smoke report worse mental health and more frequent substance use

Cigarette smoking is associated with frequent substance use and poor behavioral and physical health in sexual and gender minority populations, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, published in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine, examined tobacco use by sexual minority men and transgender women to better understand the relationships between smoking, substance use and mental, psychosocial and general health.
Tags: Science, Rutgers, Annals of Behavioral Medicine


Rutgers-led national survey uncovers doctors' misconceptions about nicotine risks

Most doctors misperceive the risks of nicotine, the addictive chemical in tobacco products, according to a Rutgers-led national survey.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Jacques Cousteau's grandson wants to build the world's largest underwater research station in the Caribbean — take a look

Fabien Cousteau's PROTEUS. Concept designs by Yves Béhar and fuseproject. The Fabian Cousteau Ocean Learning Center is creating an advanced underwater research station. Proteus will have freezers, microscopes, and a video studio for research and education.  It will be located off the coast of Curacao, an island in the Caribbean.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Fabian Cousteau, grandson of famed oceanographer and documentary maker Jacques Cousteau, has an ambitious ...
Tags: Florida, Science, Climate Change, Trends, Tech, Research, Features, Yves Behar, Ocean, Stephen, Caribbean, Curacao, Rising Sea Levels, Rutgers, Caribbean Sea, Jacques Cousteau


'Wrong-way' migrations stop shellfish from escaping ocean warming

Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates -- including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry -- into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a Rutgers-led study shows.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Seizures during menstrual cycle linked to drug-resistant epilepsy

More frequent seizures during the menstrual cycle in women with genetic generalized epilepsy have been linked for the first time to drug-resistant epilepsy, when anti-seizure medications don't work, according to a Rutgers coauthored study that may help lead to tailored treatments.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


New device can measure toxic lead within minutes

Rutgers researchers have created a miniature device for measuring trace levels of toxic lead in sediments at the bottom of harbors, rivers and other waterways within minutes -- far faster than currently available laboratory-based tests, which take days. The affordable lab-on-a-chip device could also allow municipalities, water companies, universities, K-12 schools, daycares and homeowners to easily and swiftly test their water supplies. The research is published in the IEEE Sensors Journal.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment?

Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise. Unique to this precision medicine study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, is an assessment of cognitive control and reward-related brain activity, two facets of brain function that are impaired in people with depression.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Young gay men's health care needs not being met

Young gay men who are uncomfortable discussing sexual issues with their primary care providers and experience health care discrimination are less likely to seek coordinated care, leading to missed opportunities for early diagnosis of chronic and mental health issues, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Bacteria can defuse dangerous chemical in Rassaic River

Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River - a Superfund hazardous waste site - could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers scientists. Their research, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, needs further work to realize the full potential of the beneficial bottom-dwelling microbes.
Tags: Science, Rutgers, Environmental Science Technology, Passaic River, Rassaic River


Bacteria can defuse dangerous chemical in Passaic River

Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River - a Superfund hazardous waste site - could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers scientists. Their research, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, needs further work to realize the full potential of the beneficial bottom-dwelling microbes.
Tags: Science, Rutgers, Environmental Science Technology, Passaic River


Surprising coral spawning features revealed

When stony corals have their renowned mass spawning events, in sync with the moon's cycle, colonies simultaneously release an underwater 'cloud' of sperm and eggs for fertilization. But how do the sperm and eggs survive several hours as plankton, given threats from predators, microbes and stresses such as warming waters? A Rutgers-led team has discovered some surprising features in coral sperm and eggs (collectively called gametes), according to a study in the journal PeerJ.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Protein produced by the nervous system may help treatments for inflammatory diseases

A Rutgers-led team discover a protein produced by nervous system may be key to treating inflammatory diseases like asthma, allergies, chronic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Opioid use can trigger deafness

Opioid use, particularly in high doses, can cause deafness, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, published in The Journal of Medical Toxicology, reviewed records from the New Jersey Poison Control Center, based at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, from 1999 to 2018 to determine the association between opioid use and degrees of hearing loss.
Tags: Science, Rutgers, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, New Jersey Poison Control Center


Quantum materials quest could benefit from graphene that buckles

Graphene, an extremely thin two-dimensional layer of the graphite used in pencils, buckles when cooled while attached to a flat surface, resulting in beautiful pucker patterns that could benefit the search for novel quantum materials and superconductors, according to Rutgers-led research in the journal Nature. Quantum materials host strongly interacting electrons with special properties, such as entangled trajectories, that could provide building blocks for super-fast quantum computers.
Tags: Science, Rutgers, Nature Quantum


Group-based smoking cessation help US inmates quit tobacco

Behavioral and nicotine replacement therapies offered together can help people who are incarcerated quit smoking, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Science, US, Rutgers


Indigenous people vital for understanding environmental change

Grassroots knowledge from indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to Rutgers-led research. The study, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, shows the importance of indigenous and local knowledge for monitoring ecosystem changes and managing ecosystems. The team collected more than 300 indicators developed by indigenous people to monitor ecosystem change, and most revealed negative trends, such as increased invasive species...
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Decline of bees, other pollinators threatens US crop yields

Crop yields for apples, cherries and blueberries across the United States are being reduced by a lack of pollinators, according to Rutgers-led research, the most comprehensive study of its kind to date. Most of the world's crops depend on honeybees and wild bees for pollination, so declines in both managed and wild bee populations raise concerns about food security, notes the study in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.
Tags: Science, US, United States, Rutgers


Seafood products made from cells should be labeled cell-based

Companies seeking to commercialize seafood products made from the cells of fish or shellfish should use the term "cell-based" on product labels, according to a Rutgers study - the first of its kind - in the Journal of Food Science. Both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Department of Agriculture require food products to have a "common or usual name" on their labels so consumers can make informed choices about what they're purchasing.
Tags: Science, U S Department of Agriculture, Rutgers


Antibiotics use early in life increases risk of inflammatory bowel disease later in life

Even short, single antibiotic courses given to young animals can predispose them to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) when they are older, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, published in Genome Medicine, provides further evidence supporting the idea that the use of antibiotics in children under 1 year old disrupts the intestinal microbiota - the trillions of beneficial microorganisms that live in and on our bodies - that play a crucial role in the healthy maturation of the immune system...
Tags: Science, Ibd, Rutgers, Genome Medicine


Perceived "whiteness" of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination

The perceived "whiteness" of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a "negative cycle" in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study.
Tags: Science, Rutgers



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