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Ancient Romans Used Molten Iron to Repair Streets Before Vesuvius Erupted

Ancient workers used molten iron to repair Pompeii's streets before the historic and devastating eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79, a team of archaeologists has discovered.The discovery reveals a previously unknown method of ancient Roman street repair and represents "the first large-scale attestation of the Roman use of molten iron," wrote researchers Eric Poehler, a classics professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst; Juliana van Roggen, an independent researcher; and Benjami...
Tags: Science, Pompeii, University of Massachusetts Amherst, University of Texas at Austin, Mount Vesuvius, Eric Poehler, Juliana van Roggen, Benjamin Crowther, Eric PoehlerThe Romans, Pompeii Poehler


Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier

A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. A team of biomedical engineers and clinician-scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas at Austin borrowed molecules from the immune system of the parasitic sea lamprey to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly to brain tumors.
Tags: Science, University of Wisconsin Madison, University of Texas at Austin


Aerospace engineer: Space is like the 'Wild West,' with trillions of dollars to be made from surveillance and communications

"It's like a gold rush because people see, 'Oh, wow, there are trillions of dollars to be made with space-based services. There are no space traffic rules. ... I'm just going to go up there and make my claim and make my money and get out,'" Moriba Jah, an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin and a 2019 TED Fellow, said on the Recode Decode podcast.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin, Moriba Jah


How A.I. Engineered the Most Delicious, Efficient Basil Ever

GettyCaleb Harper and Risto Miikkulainen were on a mission to grow basil: lots of it, fast, in an industrial environment—and without compromising the herb’s sweet-but-savory flavor.So they did. The two scientists—Harper is a research scientist at MIT’s Media Lab, Miikkulainen is a professor of computer science at the University of Texas at Austin—and their team hauled a bunch of shipping containers into a warehouse in Middleton, Massachusetts. They fitted the containers with automated lights, ai...
Tags: Japan, Science, New York City, San Francisco, Mit, The Daily Beast, Harper, Mooney, University of Texas at Austin, Risto Miikkulainen, John de la Parra, GettyCaleb Harper, Media Lab Miikkulainen, Middleton Massachusetts, Miikkulainen, Pat Mooney


Bill Nye uses profanity and fire to stress the enormity of climate change

Bill Nye just dropped a slew of F-bombs.  As a guest on the May 12 episode of Last Week Tonight With John Oliver, the storied science communicator used profanity and half-jest to make a succinct point about Earth's rising carbon dioxide emissions, which are now at their highest levels in millions of years: CO2, a potent greenhouse gas, will continue to relentlessly trap heat on the planet unless the U.S. and the rest of the world ambitiously slash their carbon emissions. As of now, global ...
Tags: Science, Congress, John Oliver, Earth, Nye, Bill Nye, BETO, Fahrenheit, Rourke, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of Texas at Austin, Matthew Lachniet, Dan Breecker, Green New Deal Such


Since the first Earth Day, the planet’s CO2 levels have gone off the rails

When Americans celebrated the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, the planet's atmosphere was markedly different than it is today. Nearly 50 years ago, scientists measured Earth's levels of carbon dioxide — the planet's most important greenhouse gas — at around 325 parts per million, or ppm.  Now, almost five decades later, that number has shot up to around 412 ppm, nearly 90 ppm higher. It's a change atmospheric researchers, geologists, and climate scientists call unparallele...
Tags: Science, Earth, Paris, Un, United Nations UN, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Texas at Austin, University of Nevada, Jason Briner, Briner, Las Vegas This, Bob Kopp, Oceanic Sciences, Kris Karnauskas, Matthew Lachniet, Lachniet


Depression-Era Workers Found Strange Fossilized Beasts in 'Texas Serengeti'

About 12 million years ago, antelopes with slingshot-like horns and beasts that weren't quite elephants but that had long trunks and tusks tramped across the "Texas Serengeti" searching for food and caring for their babies.Little was known about this ancient menagerie until, during the Great Depression, the government created the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and tasked some of the organization's employees with finding and preserving thousands of fossils from the Miocene, an epoch ...
Tags: Texas, Science, North America, San Antonio, Matthew Brown, University of Texas at Austin, Works Progress Administration, The University of Texas at Austin, Jackson School of Geosciences, Texas Gulf Coast, BEEVILLE, Texas Serengeti, Glen Evans, University of Texas at Austin Jackson School, Steven May, Palaeontologia Electronica Photos


Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more

During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. The workers retrieved tens of thousands of specimens that have been studied in small bits and pieces while stored in the state collections of The University of Texas at Austin for the past 80 years.Now, decades after they were first collected, a UT researcher has studied and identified an extensive collection of fossils from dig sites near Beeville, Texas, and found that the fauna make up a veritable 'Texas Serengeti.'
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin, Ancient Texas Serengeti, Beeville Texas


Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions

It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but research led by the University of Texas at Austin links the lag to something different: evolution.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin


Soap Bubble Theorist Is the First Woman to Win the ‘Nobel Prize’ of Mathematics

Trailblazing mathematician Karen Uhlenbeck from the University of Texas at Austin has been awarded the 2019 Abel Prize—regarded as one of the highest accolades in mathematics. She is now the first woman to receive the illustrious award.Read more...
Tags: Science, Maths, Mathematics, University of Texas at Austin, Abel Prize, Karen Uhlenbeck


Abel Prize: American professor is first woman to win prestigious math award

Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck of the University of Texas at Austin wins one of the world’s most prestigious mathematics awardsAn American professor has become the first woman to be awarded the Abel Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious international mathematics awards.The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters announced in Oslo on Tuesday that Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck of the University of Texas at Austin was this year’s winner of the prize, seen by many as the Nobel Prize in mathematics. Conti...
Tags: Science, Mathematics, US education, Oslo, University of Texas at Austin, Abel Prize, Academy of Science and Letters, Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck


U.S. professor is first woman to be awarded math’s top prize

HELSINKI (AP) — An American professor has become the first woman to be awarded the Abel Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious international mathematics awards. The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters announced in Oslo on Tuesday that Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck of the University of Texas at Austin was this year’s winner of the […]
Tags: Science, News, Ap, Nation, Helsinki, Oslo, University of Texas at Austin, Academy of Science and Letters, Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck


New computer modeling approach could improve understanding of megathrust earthquakes

Years before the devastating Tohoku earthquake struck the coast of Japan in 2011, the Earth's crust near the site of the quake was starting to stir. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin are using computer models to investigate if tiny tremors detected near this site could be connected to the disaster itself.
Tags: Japan, Science, Earth, Tohoku, University of Texas at Austin


Neil DeGrasse Tyson accused of rape and sexual harassment by 4 women

Tchiya Amet says Neil DeGrasse Tyson raped her in the 1980s. As his star rose, no one believed her. Three additional women, one for the first time, now say Neil sexually harassed them. This isn't looking good for the popular science entertainment personality. Allegations against Neil DeGrasse Tyson were previously detailed on this website, patheos.com. Now there's reporting from Azeen Ghorayshi for BuzzFeed News: With three women now making allegations on the record, the Patheos article spr...
Tags: Facebook, Post, Science, News, Media, Entertainment, Sexual Assault, New York City, Rape, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Watson, American Museum of Natural History, BuzzFeed News, Neil, Tyson, Hayden Planetarium


New study reveals connection between climate, life and the movement of continents

A new study by The University of Texas at Austin has demonstrated a possible link between life on Earth and the movement of continents. The findings show that sediment, which is often comprised from pieces of dead organisms, could play a key role in determining the speed of continental drift.
Tags: Science, Earth, University of Texas at Austin


Weed killers might be killing off honey bees, new study suggests

Mankind fancies itself pretty capable when it comes to taming Mother Nature, but many things humans have invented to manipulate nature to our liking have had unintended side effects. The latest example of this might be a herbicide called glyphosate which researchers now claim is actually killing honey bees. In the study, which was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists explain that honey bees which have been exposed to the herbicide end up being more vulnerable ...
Tags: Science, Mother Nature, National Academy of Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Nancy Moran


Researchers seek vaccine for 'traveler's diarrhea'

A joint effort between the University of Georgia and the University of Texas at Austin has discovered how ETEC works to cause disease. They are using this information in an effort to develop a preventive vaccine for travelers.
Tags: Science, University Of Georgia, University of Texas at Austin, ETEC


Yellowstone won't erupt anytime soon, but a debate still rages about the supervolcano

Ying Zhou teaches a Geology 101 class to students at Virginia Tech, but after peering deeply into the subterranean world beneath the Yellowstone volcano, Zhou says she needs to modify her lesson plans — for Yellowstone, anyhow.  Yellowstone is one of the most heavily-researched volcanoes in the world, and it's believed to be responsible for few mega-eruptions in the last two million years. Volcanologists understand its behavior quite well, and there's agreement that any sort of eruptio...
Tags: Science, Oregon, Earth, Alaska, Hawaii, Kilauea, Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Nps, Virginia Tech, Franklin, Wolff, University of Texas at Austin, Washington State University, Zhou, Marshall College


Legos and smartphones harnessed to fight chemical weapons

Allison Barrie shares details on how University of Texas at Austin researchers have devised a simple way to hunt difficult-to-find deadly nerve agent weapons by using two everyday items, Legos and smartphones.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin, Allison Barrie


New nerve gas detector built with legos and a smartphone

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed a way to sense dangerous chemicals using, in part, a simple rig consisting of a smartphone and a box made from Lego bricks, which could help first responders and scientists in the field identify deadly and difficult-to-detect nerve agents such as VX and sarin.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin


Scientist Contributes to Significant Advance in Silicon Photonics

By Julie Hammonds Office of the Vice President for ResearchNorthern Arizona University assistant professor Ryan Behunin collaborated with a team of physicists from Yale and the University of Texas at Austin in discovering an innovative way to manipulate light in silicon. By demonstrating a new type of laser that amplifies light with sound waves in a silicon chip, the team's research represents a significant advance in the field of silicon photonics.
Tags: Science, Yale, University of Texas at Austin, Silicon Photonics, Ryan Behunin, Julie Hammonds Office, ResearchNorthern Arizona University


A change in bacteria's genetic code holds promise of longer-lasting drugs

By altering the genetic code in bacteria, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method to make therapeutic proteins more stable, an advance that would improve the drugs' effectiveness and convenience, leading to smaller and less frequent doses of medicine, lower health care costs and fewer side effects for patients with cancer and other diseases.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin


Life recovered rapidly at impact site of dino-killing asteroid

New research led by the University of Texas at Austin finds that life rebounded in the crater left by the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs much faster than previously thought. Sea life was present a few years after the impact and a thriving ecosystem within 30,000 years.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin


Our solar system is now tied with Kepler-90 for number of planets circling a star

Eight planets circle our sun (sorry, Pluto), but our solar system is no longer unique in that number. NASA recently announced the discovery of an eighth planet circling the star Kepler-90, tying our solar system with that one for most number of planets around one star. Machine learning from Google helped researchers discover Kepler-90i, a rocky, hot planet that orbits Kepler-90 every 14.4 days. Scientists drew on data from NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope to make the exciting discovery: there’s a...
Tags: Google, Space, Science, Design, Nasa, Earth, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Planets, Pluto, Kepler, Ames Research Center, Planet, Astronomical Journal, University of Texas at Austin, Kepler Space Telescope


East Antarctic Ice Sheet has history of instability

The East Antarctic Ice Sheet locks away enough water to raise sea level an estimated 53 meters (174 feet). It's also thought to be among the most stable, not gaining or losing mass even as ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland shrink. New research published on Dec. 14 in Nature and led by the University of Texas at Austin and the University of South Florida found that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet may not be as stable as it seems.
Tags: Science, Greenland, University of South Florida, University of Texas at Austin, West Antarctica, East Antarctic Ice Sheet


Seafloor sediments appear to enhance Earthquake and Tsunami danger in Pacific Northwest

The Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of the Pacific Northwest has all the ingredients for making powerful earthquakes -- and according to the geological record, the region is due for its next 'big one.' A new study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that the occurrence of these big, destructive quakes and associated devastating tsunamis may be linked to compact sediments along large portions of the subduction zone.
Tags: Science, Pacific Northwest, University of Texas at Austin


Ancient enzyme could boost power of liquid biopsies to detect and profile cancers

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin are developing a new tool for liquid biopsy that can detect RNA biomarkers from cancer cells in a patient's blood much more accurately and completely than other existing methods. This could soon provide doctors with a more complete picture of an individual's disease, improving their chances of finding the best treatment, while also sparing patients the pain, inconvenience and long wait times associated with surgical biopsies.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin


Tiny bees play big part in secret sex lives of trees

When it comes to sex between plants, tiny bees the size of ladybugs play a critical role in promoting long-distance pairings. That's what scientists at The University of Texas at Austin discovered after one of the most detailed paternity tests in wild trees ever conducted. The research gives new insights into how certain bees promote genetic diversity that is essential for plants to adapt to various threats, from disease to climate change.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin


Couples weather bickering with a little help from their friends

New research finds that having good friends and family members to turn to alleviates the stress of everyday conflict between marital partners. According to a new study led by The University of Texas at Austin's Lisa Neff, social networks may help provide protection against health problems brought about by ordinary tension between spouses.
Tags: Science, University of Texas at Austin, Lisa Neff


Earthquake triggers 'slow motion' quakes in New Zealand

Slow slip events, a type of slow motion earthquake that occurs over days to weeks, are thought to be capable of triggering larger, potentially damaging earthquakes. In a new study led by The University of Texas at Austin, scientists have documented the first clear-cut instance of the reverse--a massive earthquake immediately triggering a series of large slow slip events.
Tags: Science, New Zealand, University of Texas at Austin



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