Science


Posts filtered by tags: Yale School of Medicine[x]


 

2 charts show how Omicron symptoms differ from Delta and past coronavirus variants

Girl takes test after getting COVID-19 symptoms on January 4.Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram/Getty Images Sore throats and runny noses are increasingly common in vaccinated people with Omicron. But Omicron patients report fewer instances of fever, cough, and loss of taste or smell. The charts below show which Omicron symptoms are most common, and how they compare to prior variants. Almost as soon as Omicron started spreading, doctors noticed slight differences in the...
Tags: Hong Kong, UK, Science, News, San Francisco, Trends, Connecticut, Delta, Symptoms, Oakland California, Moreno, Yale School of Medicine, Juan Perez, Brandenburg Germany, Jorge Moreno, Carlos Ramirez


Omicron infections often start with a scratchy throat, doctors say — evidence of the changing nature of COVID-19 symptoms

Dr. Carlos Ramirez conducts an examination on Juan Perez, 50, in Oakland, California, on May 12, 2020.Jessica Christian/The San Francisco Chronicle/Getty Images Sore throat appears to be a common, early symptom of an Omicron infection. Patients in South Africa, the UK, and the US reported scratchy throats prior to other symptoms. Omicron could infect the throat before the nose, unlike other variants, some experts say. At the end of December, Dr. Jorge Moreno and his colleagues were monitoring...
Tags: UK, Science, London, News, US, San Francisco, Trends, South Africa, Connecticut, Delta, Norway, Symptoms, University College London, Oakland California, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Moreno


When should you take a COVID-19 rapid test if you only have one? Experts suggest waiting for symptoms or hours before your next party.

Aaron Salvador swabs his nose with a COVID-19 rapid antigen test kit in Washington, DC, on December 29, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images The best time to take a rapid test is right before you see vulnerable people or a large group. Some disease experts also recommend waiting until you develop symptoms when testing is scare. If you're symptom-free, but had a recent exposure, you can wait 3-5 days for a test, experts said. COVID-19 rapid tests are flying off the shelves at p...
Tags: Science, London, News, US, Trends, Washington Dc, Delta, Norway, Symptoms, Biden, Exposure, Abbott, Campbell, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, King s College, Yale School of Medicine


When should you take a COVID-19 rapid test if you only have one? Experts suggest waiting for symptoms or your next big party.

Aaron Salvador swabs his nose with a COVID-19 rapid antigen test kit in Washington, DC, on December 29, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images The best time to take a rapid test is right before you see vulnerable people or a large group. Some disease experts also recommend waiting until you develop symptoms when testing is scare. If you're symptom-free, but had a recent exposure, you can wait 3-5 days for a test, experts said. COVID-19 rapid tests are flying off the shelves at p...
Tags: Science, London, News, US, Trends, Washington Dc, Delta, Norway, Symptoms, Biden, Exposure, Abbott, Campbell, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, King s College, Yale School of Medicine


'Swab your throat first and then your nose': 4 disease experts offer new guidance on COVID-19 rapid tests

A woman uses a swab to take a sample from her mouth at a NHS Test and Trace COVID-19 testing unit in west London on May 25 2021.ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images New research suggests Omicron may be easier to detect in saliva than nasal samples. Some experts recommend swabbing your throat then your nose for a COVID-19 rapid test, even if the test doesn't say to. The FDA and testing manufacturers advise against performing throat swabs at home. The FDA has authorized just one method of taking ...
Tags: UK, Science, London, News, US, Trends, European Union, Public Health, Moscow, Fda, University Of Southern California, University College London, Abbott, Petersen, Campbell, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Brain functional connectivity in Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder, causes motor and phonic "tics," or uncontrollable repeated behaviors and vocalizations. People affected by Tourette syndrome can often suppress these tics for some time before the urges become overwhelming, and researchers have long wondered at the neural underpinnings of the suppression effort. In a new study, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have assessed the impact of tic suppression on functional connectivity between brain regions.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine


Immunotherapy drug delays onset of Type 1 diabetes in at-risk group

More than five years after receiving an experimental immunotherapy drug, half of a group of people at high risk of developing Type 1 diabetes remained disease-free compared with 22% of those who received a placebo, according to a new trial overseen by Yale School of Medicine researchers.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine


Anti-vaxxers are using a doctor's miscarriage to claim the COVID-19 vaccine affects pregnancy - but the doctor lost her baby before getting the shot

Getty A Facebook post allegedly claimed the coronavirus vaccine caused an OB-GYN's miscarriage.  But the doctor suffered the loss before receiving the vaccine, according to her Instagram posts. Based on how it's made and data so far, scientists say it's likely the vaccine is safe in pregnancy. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. When Dr. Michelle Rockwell woke up Sunday morning, just a couple months after suffering a pregnancy loss, she said she saw her photos plaster...
Tags: Facebook, Usa, Science, Parenting, Cdc, Miscarriage, Pregnancy, Trends, World Health Organization, Getty, Women's Health, Reproductive Health, Anthony Fauci, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Shepherd, Tulsa


Researchers say a new coronavirus variant found in California may have contributed to Los Angeles' case surge

Nurse Michelle Goldson in the ICU at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in Los Angeles, California on December 17, 2020. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images More than 1 million people in LA county have gotten COVID-19. Two-thirds of those cases were reported in the last two months. According to a recent study, LA's coronavirus surge coincides with the emergence of a new variant called CAL.20C. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. More than 1 million people...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, News, California, La, US, Los Angeles, Trends, South Africa, Anthony Fauci, Pacific Ocean, Eric Garcetti, Gavin Newsom, Southern California, Los Angeles County


More than a year after the first COVID-19 case was discovered, more than 2 million people have died from the highly transmissible virus

Health workers in personal protective suits ferry the body of a man who died of COVID-19 on a handcart for cremation in New Delhi, India, May 28, 2020. AP Photo/Manish Swarup More than 2 million people worldwide have died from COVID-19 as of Friday.  The world hit one million COVID-19 deaths just three months ago.  The death toll is the equivalent to the entire country of Slovenia. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. More than a year after the first novel coronavirus case w...
Tags: UK, England, Science, US, Trends, South Africa, Slovenia, Nebraska, New Mexico, Bahrain, New Delhi India, Yale School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Aylin Woodward, Coronavirus, COVID


SARS-CoV-2 can infect neurons and damage brain tissue, study indicates

Using both mouse and human brain tissue, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect the central nervous system and have begun to unravel some of the virus's effects on brain cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may help researchers develop treatments for the various neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine


What it actually means that a new coronavirus strain is more transmissible - and how that changes your chances of getting sick

Masked travelers on a London Underground platform, September 24, 2020. Getty A new, more transmissible coronavirus strain first detected in the UK has spread worldwide. The variant jumps from person to person more easily, so if you're exposed, your chances of infection are higher. Strict masking and social distancing are still the best means of protection against the variant. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A new, more transmissible strain of coronavirus that was first ...
Tags: Health, UK, New York, Science, London, News, California, New York City, US, San Francisco, Trends, Getty Images, World Health Organization, Getty, London Underground, Mutations


The contagious coronavirus variant identified in the UK has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely that it's in every state'

Travelers at Miami International Airport on December 24. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, and New York all confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business Insider's homepa...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Georgia, Genetics


The contagious coronavirus variant identified in the UK has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely it's in every state'

Travelers wear masks at Miami International Airport on December 24, 2020. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, and New York all confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, France, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Georgia


The contagious coronavirus variant first identified in the UK has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely it's in every state'

Travelers wear masks at Miami International Airport on December 24, 2020. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images Colorado, California, Florida, and New York confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business Insider's ho...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, France, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Genetics


The contagious UK coronavirus variant has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely it's in every state'

Travelers wear masks at Miami International Airport on December 24, 2020. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images Colorado, California, Florida, and New York confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business Insider's ho...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, France, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Genetics


The US has confirmed its first case of the new, more transmissible coronavirus strain in Colorado

Healthcare workers from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment check in with people waiting to be tested for COVID-19 at a drive-up testing center in Denver on March 12, 2020. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images Colorado officials confirmed the first US case of a new coronavirus variant that was first identified in the UK. The strain may be more transmissible than its predecessors, but there's no reason to think it's more deadly. Public-health experts say the emergence of the ne...
Tags: UK, England, Science, London, News, Colorado, US, Trends, United Kingdom, Mutations, Anthony Fauci, Denver, Yale School of Medicine, PBS NewsHour, Polis, Jared Polis


No, the coronavirus vaccine won't make you infertile

Dr. Marina Del Rios, from University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System, receives Chicago's first COVID-19 vaccination from Dr. Nikhila Juvvadi on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020, at Loretto Hospital, a 122-bed medical facility in the Austin neighborhood of Chicago. Jose M. Osorio/Chicago Tribune via AP A now-blocked Facebook post that went viral claimed the coronavirus vaccine could cause infertility. It suggested incorrectly that the vaccine teaches the body to attack a protein inv...
Tags: Facebook, Usa, Science, Cdc, Pregnancy, Trends, Ap, Chicago, Austin, Fertility, Food And Drug Administration, Pfizer, Vaccine, Women's Health, Reproductive Health, Conspiracy Theories


Biden congratulates Pfizer on its COVID-19 vaccine news, but warns widespread availability is 'many more months' away

Joe Biden, then the Democratic nominee, puts on a mask after a campaign event on July 28, 2020. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images President-elect Joe Biden on Monday congratulated Pfizer after it announced that its coronavirus vaccine works. But he also noted that widespread vaccination will not happen for "many more months." "The end of the battle against COVID-19 is still months away," he said. Biden's tone was calmer than that of President Donald Trump, who sent an all-caps...
Tags: Health, Politics, Science, Trends, Joe Biden, Food And Drug Administration, Pfizer, Vaccine, Biden, Donald Trump, Anthony Fauci, Trump, Afp, Yale School of Medicine, Vivek Murthy, David Kessler


Biden's first move as president-elect will be to announce a new coronavirus task force in coming days: report

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images President-elect Joe Biden will announce a 12-person coronavirus task force on Monday, according to Axios.  The task force will be led by former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner David Kessler, and Yale School of Medicine professor Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith, according to Axios.  By declaring the formation of this task force, Biden signals toward expactations that the coronavirus will continue to be an area ...
Tags: Health, Politics, Science, White House, Trends, Joe Biden, Pennsylvania, Food And Drug Administration, Biden, Vox, Donald Trump, Presidential Election, Kamala Harris, Trump, Yale School of Medicine, Vivek Murthy


Getting a flu shot could reduce your risk of getting COVID-19, preliminary research suggests

An advertisement offering free flu shots in New York City on August 21, 2020. John Nacion/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images Health experts are encouraging people to get flu shots to avoid the possibility of getting the flu and COVID-19 at the same time. According to a preliminary study, flu shots may also reduce your risk of catching COVID-19. Researchers found that healthcare workers who got a flu shot in the 2019-2020 season were 39% less likely to have gotten the coronavirus by June....
Tags: Health, Europe, Science, London, News, New York City, US, Trends, Italy, Healthcare, Netherlands, World Health Organization, Flu, Vaccines, Northern Hemisphere, Yale School of Medicine


New hormone therapies for hot flashes offer enhanced benefits and minimized risk

Hormone therapy remains the best proven method for managing menopause symptoms such as hot flashes. Research continues, however, in the area to identify novel approaches to estrogen therapy that minimize any associated risks. Dr. Hugh Taylor from Yale School of Medicine will discuss some of the latest developments, including fetal estrogens, during the 2020 Pre-Meeting Symposium of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine, Hugh Taylor


Yale to lead trial of potential COVID-19 treatment

Yale School of Medicine and the biopharmaceutical firm AI Therapeutics have launched a multi-institutional clinical trial of a drug for treating COVID-19. Known as LAM-002A (apilimod), the drug has a proven safety record. Preliminary research has shown it can block cellular entry and trafficking of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of COVID-19.
Tags: Science, Yale, Yale School of Medicine, AI Therapeutics


Frankenswine: Pig brains partly revived by scientists 4 hours after pigs were killed

Yale scientists have managed to restore some biological function to the brains of dead pigs killed in a slaughterhouse 4 hours before the experiment. Yep, that's it. The most 2019 sentence I've read or written. ABOVE: The image on the left shows the brains of pigs that were untreated for 10 hours after death, with neurons appearing as green, astrocytes as red and cell nuclei as blue. The image on the right shows cells in the same area of brains that, four hours after death, were hooked up t...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Yale, Yale University, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven Conn, Nita Farahany, Nenad Sestan, Pig Brains, Stefano G Daniele


Scientists have identified genes linked to excessive alcohol consumption

A huge study performed by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and Yale School of Medicine in the United States has identified the genetic variants linked to excessive alcohol consumption and dependency. Carried out on 274,000 people, this research highlights the 18 genetic variants that could be involved in alcohol addiction. The results, published in Nature Communications this week, suggest that while excessive alcohol consumption is a prerequisite for alcoholism, the presence of the...
Tags: Science, United States, University of Pennsylvania, Nature Communications, Yale School of Medicine


In live brain function, researchers are finally seeing red

For years, green has been the most reliable hue for live brain imaging, but after using a new high-throughput screening method, researchers at the John B. Pierce Laboratory and the Yale School of Medicine, together with collaborators at Stanford University, have identified a new fluorescent protein that will make it possible for live neurons to glow red when activated.
Tags: Science, Stanford University, John B Pierce Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine


Best way to assess obstetrics programs? Measure outcomes for both mom, baby

Mothers and babies are dying due to birth-associated complications at higher rates now than a decade ago. In a new study appearing online in Birth, Katherine Campbell, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the Yale School of Medicine, and her team found that that jointly considering morbidity outcomes for mom and baby is the best way to measure the quality of a hospital's obstetrics program.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine, Katherine Campbell


Complementary medicine for cancer can decrease survival

People who received complementary therapy for curable cancers were more likely to refuse at least one component of their conventional cancer treatment, and were more likely to die as a result, according to researchers from Yale Cancer Center and the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER) at Yale School of Medicine. The findings were reported today online in JAMA Oncology.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center


Running a Marathon Is as Traumatic for Your Kidneys as Heart Surgery

I ran a marathon a little over a week ago, and while I’m glad I finished, it totally kicked my ass. A new study from the Yale School of Medicine might explain a bit why. Besides the sore muscles, running a marathon wrecks your kidneys for a few days.Read more...
Tags: Science, Running, Studies, Marathons, Yale School of Medicine, Long Distance Running, life-hacks, Body Science


For Your Kidneys, Running a Marathon Is as Traumatic as Heart Surgery

I ran a marathon a little over a week ago, and while I’m glad I finished, it totally kicked my ass. A new study from the Yale School of Medicine might explain a bit why. Besides the sore muscles, running a marathon wrecks your kidneys for a few days.Read more...
Tags: Science, Running, Studies, Marathons, Yale School of Medicine, Long Distance Running, life-hacks, Body Science



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