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Posts filtered by tags: Ucla[x]


 

New peer-reviewed "Journal of Free Speech Law"

The lead editors are Jane Bambauer (Arizona), Ashutosh Bhagwat (UC Davis), and Eugene Volokh (UCLA). Professor Volokh says more about the journal here. A welcome... [Author: Brian Leiter]
Tags: Law, Ucla, Eugene Volokh, Brian Leiter, Volokh, Jane Bambauer Arizona Ashutosh Bhagwat UC Davis


Why is this gymnastics routine controversial?

I watched this based on a Slate headline — "The Absurd Backlash to Nia Dennis’ Viral Floor Exercise" — but without reading anything about why the routine is viral and what the backlash is:   All I thought was she's running out the clock with lots of dance moves and not doing enough gymnastics. I see at YouTube, this is "UCLA gymnast Nia Dennis clinch[ing] the win for the Bruins with a 9.95 on floor exercise against Arizona State on Jan. 23, 2021." I've only watched Olympic-level gymnastics...
Tags: Law, Sports, Colin Kaepernick, Kamala Harris, Ucla, Dennis, Bruins, Arizona State, Tommie Smith, Schuman, John Carlos, Race Consciousness, Ann Althouse, Rebecca Schuman, Nia Dennis, Blackity Black Black


Why not a clemency push focused on the (more lethal) new death penalty that is COVID in federal prisons?

I noted in this recent post that group of Democratic members of Congress signed a letter calling upon Prez Biden to "commute the sentences of all those" on federal death row.  I wondered in my post if there might be a less politically controversial group of federal prisonsers who might be a better focal point for the very first clemencies from Prez Biden.  And this new BuzzFeed News piece, which carries the subheadline "In crowded cells, where COVID is running rampant, appeals for clemency for t...
Tags: Law, Congress, California, US, Ucla, American Medical Association, Bertram, Douglas A Berman, Prison Policy Institute, COVID, Wanda Bertram, Prez Biden


"Mass Incarceration, Meet COVID-19"

The title of this post is the title of this paper now available via SSRN authored by Sharon Dolovich. Here is its abstract: With the global pandemic still unfolding, we are only beginning to make sense of the overall impact of COVID-19 on the people who live and work inside American prisons and jails, and of what effect, if any, the pandemic will have on the nation’s continued commitment to mass incarceration under unduly harsh conditions.  In this Essay, I take stock of where things now stand....
Tags: Law, Ucla, Douglas A Berman, SSRN, Sharon Dolovich Here


In Memoriam: David Dolinko (1948-2020)

MOVING TO FRONT FROM DECEMBER 31--UPDATED Emeritus at UCLA, where he spent his entire career (and earned both his J.D. and Ph.D. in philosophy), Professor... [Author: Brian Leiter]
Tags: Law, Ucla, Brian Leiter, David Dolinko


The new death penalty: Marshall Project reporting COVID has now killed more than 2000 prisoners in the United States

I am always sad to report when we pass yet another remarkable milestone in COVID prisoner deaths, but passing a new big ugly number prompts another one of my series of "new death penalty" posts.  The Marshall Project, which continues the critical job of counting via this webpage prisoner deaths  from coronavirus, reports as of Thursday, January 8, 2021 that there are now "at least 2010 deaths from coronavirus reported among prisoners."  Notably, just a month ago as noted in this post, the COVID...
Tags: Law, California, US, United States, Ucla, Marshall Project, Douglas A Berman, COVID


Is It Time to Regulate Collaborative Practice?

Collaborative practice is a dispute resolution process that is primarily used in family law, and it is currently unregulated in Canada. The forthcoming amendments to the Divorce Act include collaborative practice as a “family dispute resolution process” that a lawyer ought to “encourage” her client to consider, where “appropriate”. This suggests to me that a process that has for the last 30 years has been largely community-based, has finally come into its own – into the federal scope of the Divo...
Tags: Minnesota, Law, California, US, Toronto, Canada, New Brunswick, Court of appeal, Department Of Justice, Alberta, Legal Ethics, Ucla, Cpc, Cfl, Ontario, Webb


In Memoriam: David Dolinko (1948-2020)

Emeritus at UCLA, where he spent his entire career (and earned both his J.D. and Ph.D. in philosophy), Professor Dolinko was an important contributor to... [Author: Brian Leiter]
Tags: Law, Ucla, Brian Leiter, David Dolinko, Dolinko


The new death penalty: COVID has now killed in nine months more US prisoners than capital punishment over last 50+ years

I am sad to report that we have passed yet another remarkable milestone in COVID prisoner deaths, which prompts another one of my series of "new death penalty" posts.  The Marshall Project continues the critical job of counting via this webpage deaths  from coronavirus reported among prisoners, and as of Friday, December 4, this accounting had tabulated "at least 1568 deaths from coronavirus reported among prisoners."  As I have said in other posts, this considerable and still ever-growing numb...
Tags: Law, California, US, United States, Ucla, Marshall Project, Douglas A Berman, COVID, Because of Supreme Court


The new death penalty: COVID has now killed more US prisoners than capital punishment over last three decades

I am sad to report that we have passed yet another milestone in COVID prisoner deaths, which prompts another one of my series of "new death penalty" posts.  The Marshall Project continues the critical job of counting via this webpage of  deaths  from coronavirus reported among prisoners, and as of Thursday, November 12, this accounting had tabulated "at least 1412 deaths from coronavirus reported among prisoners."  As I have said in other posts, this considerable and ever-growing number is sad a...
Tags: Law, California, US, United States, Ucla, Marshall Project, Douglas A Berman, COVID


Detailing the continued public health catastrophe of COVID in incarceration nation

Sadly, I have been blogging for the better part of a year now about the catastrophe of COVID in the United States for persons who are incarcerated persons, prison staff, their families, and the general public.  We have seen some political, legal and social responses, but this new Washington Post article, headlined "Prisons and jails have become a ‘public health threat’ during the pandemic, advocates say," highlights how bad things have been and still are.  Here is the start of a lengthy piece wo...
Tags: Texas, Law, Washington Post, United States, South Dakota, Ohio, Criminal Justice, Ucla, East Texas, American Civil Liberties Union, Casper Star Tribune, University of Texas at Austin, Pickaway, Douglas A Berman, University of Miami He, Sharon Dolovich


The new death penalty: COVID has now killed as many US prisoners as has a quarter century of capital punishment

I am sad to report that we are approaching yet another stunning milestone in COVID prisoner deaths, which prompts another one of my series of "new death penalty" posts.  The Marshall Project is continuing with the critical job of keeping an updated count via this webpage of deaths from coronavirus reported among prisoners, and as of the morning of Thursday, October 8, this accounting had tabulated "at least 1211 deaths from coronavirus reported among prisoners."  As I have said in other posts,...
Tags: Law, California, US, United States, Ucla, Marshall Project, Douglas A Berman, COVID


The new death penalty: The Marshall Project reporting COVID prisoner deaths exceed 1000

In this post back in May, I started what became a series of posts in which I noted what might be called a new kind of death penalty for prison and jail inmates in the United States: by killing many hundreds of incarcerated persons, COVID-19 has turned all sorts of other sentences into functional death sentences.  In prior postings, I have often flagged the death data from the UCLA Covid-19 Behind Bars Data Project, but today I see that The Marshall Project has updated data here showing that pris...
Tags: Law, California, US, Georgia, United States, Albany, Ucla, Douglas A Berman, COVID, Lee State Prison, Anthony Cheek


Whicker: Will one Churchill Downs upset lead to another?

John Rebenstorf was the radio play-by-play man for Cal State Fullerton and UCLA. He used to speak of Tracy Murray draining buckets from the “parking lot.” He would have enjoyed Churchill Downs on Friday. As Gamine and Swiss Skydiver prepared to stage a private duel at the Kentucky Oaks, Shedaresthedevil jumped the fence. “Ride to win the race,” trainer Brad Cox told jockey Flaurent Giroux. “If she runs third, it’s a victory.” Running first was a victory, too. Shedaresthedevil exposed Gamine’s di...
Tags: Law, California, Kentucky, Sports, Sport, Soccer, Arkansas, Derby, Horse racing, Cal State Fullerton, Churchill, Kentucky Derby, Ucla, Flurry, Cox, Tracy Murray


UCLA Sues Under Armour And Says Force Majeure Doesn’t Excuse $200 Million Obligation

The complaint argues that a financially troubled Under Armour is using the COVID-19 pandemic as a pretext to terminate their contract.
Tags: Law, Sports, Ucla, Under Armour, Armour, Darren Heitner, Coronavirus, COVID-19


Spotlighting the still sorry state of federal prisons six months into a COVID pandemic

It has now be almost a full six months since my first post here flagging concerns about the intersection of incarceration and coronavirus, and since then I have covered this challenging story in dozens more posts. But the Washington Post has this notable new piece highlights that prison nation still has big COVID problems, and that matters seem to be even worse in federal prisons than in state systems. The piece is headlined "Prisoners and guards agree about federal coronavirus response: ‘We do ...
Tags: Post, Law, Washington Post, Georgia, Warren, Miami, The Washington Post, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, OIG, Ucla, Senate Judiciary Committee, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Carvajal, Lompoc, Sen Elizabeth Warren D Mass, Federal Correctional Institution


The new death penalty: COVID has now killed more US prisoners in months than the US death penalty has in the last two decades

The UCLA Covid-19 Behind Bars Data Project has been doing a terrific job keeping an updated count, via  , of confirmed COVID deaths of persons serving time in state and federal facilities.  As of the morning of Sunday, August 23, this UCLA accounting had tabulated 858 "Confirmed Deaths (Residents)."  This considerable number is sad and disconcerting on its own terms, but it is even more remarkable given that it amounts to more prisoner deaths than has been produced by carrying out formal death s...
Tags: Law, California, US, United States, Ucla, Coleman, Douglas A Berman, COVID, UCLA Covid, Luis A Velez


Winners Named in ‘Law for Everyone’ Legal Tech Student Challenge

In June, Documate founder Dorna Moini  and Northwestern Law professor Dan Linna issued a challenge to law students: Build an innovative legal technology application to solve a legal problem using the Documate document-automation platform and win $1,000. Today, the winners of that Law for Everyone Challenge, selected by a panel of independent judges, were announced, with the grand prize going to E-Pikeia, a tool developed by students in Peru that helps women file a suit for alimony or paternity a...
Tags: Law, California, Uncategorized, Peru, Ucla, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich Rosati, Dan Linna, Linna, Dorna Moini, Kathryn DeBord, Documate Enterprise, Payet Rey Cauvi Pérez Abogados, Nick Levsen Jacob Schuerger, Amy Halverson, Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner Judging


Why is everyone so selfish? Science explains

Selfish behavior has been analyzed by philosophers and psychologists for centuries.New research shows people may be wired for altruistic behavior and get more benefits from it.Crisis times tend to increase self-centered acts. Why do so many people seem so selfish these days, putting their needs first? The coronavirus has not only decimated our population and placed lives on anxious hold, it has also been a test of character. A test that, by and large, we appear to be failing. People are at each...
Tags: Psychology, Politics, Society, Brain, Yale, Innovation, Consciousness, Mind, Paul Krugman, Ucla, Self, Social Psychology, Yale University, Nature Communications, Peter Singer, University of Zurich


The new death penalty: COVID now a leading modern killer of California inmates on death row

As reported in this local article, headlined "Fifth San Quentin Death Row Inmate Dies During Prison COVID-19 Outbreak," the global pandemic is hitting California's death row hard these days. Here are the details: While California has not executed a death row inmate since 2006, an out-of-control COVID-19 outbreak at San Quentin State Prison may have contributed to the death of a fifth condemned inmate on Saturday. To date, more than 1,300 prisoners and 120 staff members have tested positive for ...
Tags: Law, California, US, Sacramento, San Diego, Ucla, Gavin Newsom, San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles County, San Pablo, Carey, Erskine, San Quentin State Prison, San Quentin, Machado, CDCR


One more on Aunt Jemima

by Dennis Crouch I’m sure that there will be a few references to the Aunt Jemima trademarks in upcoming law review articles. Let me direct you to a handful of court decisions regarding the mark. The cases offer an important look at how judges saw race & commerce in the mid-20th century. The courts here effectively concluded that only one company could sell flour (or syrup) branded with the caricature of a black-skinned person. In Aunt Jemima Mills Co. v. Kirkland Distribg. Co., 48 App. D.C. 2...
Tags: Law, Kodak, Patent, Rich, Ucla, Anheuser Busch, D C Circuit, Quaker, Kirkland, Westlaw, 2nd Circuit, Dennis Crouch, Jemima, Manring, Giles Rich, Rigney


Why Under Armour Should Be Scared Of A UCLA Lawsuit

What provision of the agreement Under Armour is resting on to cause an early termination is not clear.
Tags: Law, Sports, Ucla, Under Armour, Darren Heitner, Coronavirus, COVID-19


LawNext: The 10 Most Popular Episodes of May 2020

Here are the episodes of my LawNext podcast that got the most listens during May. This reflects episode downloads only during May, not for all time. (By the way, in the all-time tally, the Richard Susskind interview listed at number six below is now the third most-popular LawNext episode ever. First place has long been held by my September 2018 interview with Mark Britton, former Avvo CEO.) 1. The Innovation Advantage – A Panel Discussion with Leading Experts in Law Firm Innovation. 2....
Tags: Microsoft, Law, Uncategorized, David Lat, Ucla, Avvo, Richard Susskind, Mark Harris, Mark Britton, Jennifer Mnookin, Innovation Advantage A Panel


The new death penalty: COVID has now killed more than 500 US prisoners and prison staff according to UCLA Law data

In this post a few weeks ago, I noted what might be called a new kind of death penalty for prison and jail inmates in the United States: by killing many hundreds of incarcerated persons, COVID-19 has turned all sorts of other sentences into functional death sentences.  In that prior posting, I flagged that the UCLA Covid-19 Behind Bars Data Project, as of May 11, had tabulated 341 "Confirmed Deaths (Residents)," and I highlighted that this meant COVID in a few months had produced more prisoner d...
Tags: Law, US, United States, Ucla, Douglas A Berman, COVID


The new death penalty: COVID has now killed more US prisoners in weeks than the US death penalty has in over a decade

As reported in prior posts here and here, all scheduled executions in the United States have been postponed in the last two months due in large part to the global pandemic.  But a pause in the carrying out of formal death sentences in the United States has been replaced by a new kind of death penalty as COVID has turned all sorts of other sentences in to functional death sentences. The UCLA Covid-19 Behind Bars Data Project has been doing a terrific job keeping an updated count, via , of confir...
Tags: Law, US, United States, Ucla, Marshall Project, Douglas A Berman


On the Latest LawNext: Legal Education In A Lockdown, with UCLA Law Dean Jennifer Mnookin

The coronavirus crisis has created turmoil for legal education and bar admissions, as law schools have shut down their campuses and states have put off bar exams. One proposal, advocated by Jennifer L. Mnookin, dean of UCLA Law School, and Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of UC Berkeley Law School, in The National Law Journal, is for states to provisionally license law school graduates for two years, without a bar exam. Of course, bar admission is only one of the many difficult challenges facing law s...
Tags: Law, Uncategorized, Ucla, Ralph, Erwin Chemerinsky, UC Berkeley Law School, UCLA Law School, Jennifer Mnookin, LawNext, Mnookin, John E Grant, Agile Professionals LLC, Jennifer L Mnookin, Shirley Shapiro


Eight law professors elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences... (CORRECTED)

...in various sections, including Law. They are: Tomiko Brown-Nagin (Harvard), R. Alta Charo (Wisconsin), Malcolm Feeley (Berkeley), Jenny Martinez (Dean, Stanford), Jennifer Mnookin (Dean, UCLA),... [Author: Brian Leiter]
Tags: Law, Ucla, Brian Leiter, American Academy of Arts amp


Eight law professors elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences...

...in various sections, including Law. They are: Tomiko Brown-Nagin (Harvard), R. Alta Charo (Wisconsin), Malcolm Feeley (Berkeley), Jenny Martinez (Dean, Stanford), Jennifer Mnookin (Dean, UCLA),... [Author: Brian Leiter]
Tags: Law, Ucla, Brian Leiter, American Academy of Arts amp


Which states are doing best (or doing worst) responding to COVID incarceration challenges?

The question in the title of this post is prompted by this new Baltimore Sun article headlined "Maryland said it has released 2,000 inmates from prisons and jails to slow spread of the coronavirus."  Here are excerpts: The Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services announced Monday that it has released 2,000 inmates from its jails, prisons and other detention facilities over the past five weeks in an effort to reduce the spread of the coronavirus behind bars. The announcemen...
Tags: Maryland, Law, Washington, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Iowa, New Jersey, Baltimore, Ucla, Larry Hogan, Department, Hogan, Baltimore Sun, Marilyn Mosby, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland Court of Appeals


UCLA Law School Calls For Tolerance, So Obviously Professor Blows That Up With Childish, Racist Tirade

Eugene Volokh explicitly does NOT apologize for all the offensive stuff he does. And that's because he's oblivious.
Tags: Law, Racism, Free Speech, Law Schools, Ucla, Eugene Volokh, UCLA School of Law, Stephen Bainbridge, Jennifer Mnookin



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