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AI & X-Rays Recover Lost Artworks Underneath Paintings by Picasso & Modigliani

You see above a painting by Amedeo Modigliani, a portrait of the artist’s lover Beatrice Hastings, unseen by the public until its rediscovery just this year. Or at any rate, some see that: in another sense, the image is a new or almost-new artistic creation, based on X-rays of Modigliani’s Portrait of a Girl. Underneath the paint that makes up that celebrated work lie traces enough to establish the presence of a different, earlier one beneath. But only now, after the employment of neural networ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, London, College, Barcelona, Smithsonian, Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, Seoul, Picasso, Hastings, Da Vinci, Vermeer, Amedeo Modigliani, Modigliani


Google’s UX Design Professional Certificate: 7 Courses Will Help Prepare Students for an Entry-Level Job in 6 Months

During the pandemic, Google launched a series of Career Certificates that will “prepare learners for an entry-level role in under six months.” One such certificate focuses on User Experience Design, or what’s called UX Design, the process design teams use to create products that provide meaningful experiences to users. Offered on the Coursera platform, the User Experience (UX) Design Professional Certificate features seven courses, including the Foundations of User Experience, Start the UX Desi...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Design, College, Online Courses, Walmart Best, Conduct UX Research, Google Coursera, Top Universities Google


Download Great Works of Art from 40+ Museums Worldwide: Explore Artvee, the New Art Search Engine

Dilbert creator Scott Adams once wrote of his early experiences introducing the World Wide Web to others. “In 1993, there were only a handful of Web sites you could access, such as the Smithsonian’s exhibit of gems. Those pages were slow to load and crashed as often as they worked.” But those who witnessed this technology in action would invariably “get out of their chairs their eyes like saucers, and they would approach the keyboard. They had to touch it themselves. There was something about t...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, College, Nasa, Paris, Smithsonian, Rembrandt, New York Public Library, Seoul, Rijksmuseum, Scott Adams, Art Institute of Chicago, Museo, Hilma, Colin Marshall


Blockchain and Money: A Free Online Course from MIT

Taught by MIT professor Gary Gensler, Blockchain and Money is “for students wishing to explore blockchain technology’s potential use—by entrepreneurs and incumbents—to change the world of money and finance. The course begins with a review of Bitcoin and an understanding of the commercial, technical, and public policy fundamentals of blockchain technology, distributed ledgers, and smart contracts. The class then continues on to current and potential blockchain applications in the financial sector...
Tags: Facebook, Technology, College, Finance, Mit, Online Courses, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, Gary Gensler Blockchain, Princeton Cryptocurrency


Hear the Amati “King” Cello, the Oldest Known Cello in Existence (c. 1560)

The Stradivari family has received all of the popular acclaim for perfecting the violin. But we should know the name Amati — in whose Cremona workshop Antonio Stradivari apprenticed in the 17th century. The violin-making family was immensely important to the refinement of classical instruments. “Born around 1505,” writes Jordan Smith at CMuse, founder Andrea Amati “is considered the father of modern violinmaking. He made major steps forward in improving the design of violins, including t...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, France, History, Yale, Josh Jones, Charles IX, Cremona, Jordan Smith, Limoges, Zeller, Amati, Durham NC Follow, Antonio Stradivari


Sci-Fi “Portal” Connects Citizens of Lublin & Vilnius, Allowing Passersby Separated by 376 Miles to Interact in Real Time

Can we ever transcend our tendency to divide up the world into us and them? The history of Europe, which political theorist Kenneth Minogue once called “plausibly summed up as preparing for war, waging war, or recovering from war,” offers few consoling answers. But perhaps it isn’t for history, much less for theory or politics, to dictate the future prospects for the unity of mankind. Art and technology offer another set of views on the matter, and it’s art and technology that come together in ...
Tags: Travel, Art, Facebook, Europe, Technology, College, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Florence, Vilnius, Barnes, London England, Reykjavik Iceland, Vilnius Lithuania, Lublin, Lublin Poland


Director, College Center – Beautiful NW Montana

The Paul D. Wachholz College Center, scheduled to open in spring 2022, is located on the main campus of Flathead Valley Community College in Kalispell, Montana. As the premier performing arts facility serving western Montana, the College Center features a 50,000 square foot facility to include a large performance and lecture hall, a multi-purpose activity complex with two basketball courts, an outdoor amphitheater, and a reception hall with an exhibition gallery. JOB TITLE:Director, College C...
Tags: Google, Art, Jobs, College, Montana, United States, Kalispell, Flathead Valley, Northwest Montana, Kalispell Montana, National Service, Flathead Valley Community College, AmeriCorps Peace Corps, Paul D Wachholz College Center, College Center, MT Public Employees Retirement System and Employer


The Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery: A New Site Presents 403 Paintings from The Joy of Painting Series (and Uses Data Analysis to Demystify Bob Ross’ Craft)

“We don’t make mistakes. We have happy accidents,” the late Bob Ross soothed fans painting along at home, while brushing an alarming amount of black onto one of his signature nature scenes. His mellow on-camera demeanor and flowing, wet-on-wet oil painting style were perfectly calibrated to help tightly-wound viewers relax into a right-brained groove. The creators of the Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery take a more left brained approach. Having collected data on Ross’ evergreen series, The Joy ...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, Television, College, Data, Ross, Bob Ross, Van Dyke Brown, Ayun Halliday, Bob Ross Banksy, Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery, John Thamm, Thamm, Connor Rothschild, Virtual Art Gallery


The Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery: A New Site Presents 403 Paintings from The Joy of Painting Series

“We don’t make mistakes. We have happy accidents,” the late Bob Ross soothed fans painting along at home, while brushing an alarming amount of black onto one of his signature nature scenes. His mellow on-camera demeanor and flowing, wet-on-wet oil painting style were perfectly calibrated to help tightly-wound viewers relax into a right-brained groove. The creators of the Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery take a more left brained approach. Having collected data on Ross’ evergreen series, The Joy o...
Tags: Art, Facebook, Technology, Television, College, Data, Ross, Bob Ross, Van Dyke Brown, Ayun Halliday, Bob Ross Banksy, Bob Ross Virtual Art Gallery, John Thamm, Thamm, Connor Rothschild, Virtual Art Gallery


Download 1,000+ Beautiful Woodblock Prints by Hiroshige, the Last Great Master of the Japanese Woodblock Print Tradition

For 200 years, beginning in the 1630s, Japan closed itself off from the world. In its capital of Edo the country boasted the largest city in existence, and among its population of more than a million not a single one was foreign-born. “Practically the only Europeans to have visited it were a handful of Dutchmen,” writes professor of Japanese history Jordan Sand in a new London Review of Books piece, “and so it would remain until the mid-19 th century. No foreigners were permitted to live or tr...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Seoul, Nagasaki, Minneapolis Institute Of Art, Mount Fuji, Edo, Hokusai, London Review of Books, Utagawa Hiroshige, Colin Marshall


Download 1,000+ Beautiful Woodblock Prints by Hiroshige, the Last Great Master of the Woodblock Print Tradition

For 200 years, beginning in the 1630s, Japan closed itself off from the world. In its capital of Edo the country boasted the largest city in existence, and among its population of more than a million not a single one was foreign-born. “Practically the only Europeans to have visited it were a handful of Dutchmen,” writes professor of Japanese history Jordan Sand in a new London Review of Books piece, “and so it would remain until the mid-19 th century. No foreigners were permitted to live or tr...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Seoul, Nagasaki, Minneapolis Institute Of Art, Mount Fuji, Edo, Hokusai, London Review of Books, Utagawa Hiroshige, Colin Marshall


Meet the Inventor of Karaoke, Daisuke Inoue, Who Wanted to “Teach the World to Sing”

Daisuke Inoue has been honored with a rare, indeed almost certainly unique combination of laurels. In 1999, Time magazine named him among the “Most Influential Asians of the Century.” Five years later he won an Ig Nobel Prize, which honors particularly strange and risible developments in science, technology, and culture. Inoue had come up with the device that made his name decades earlier, in the early 1970s, but its influence has proven enduring still today. It is he whom history now credits w...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Japan, Technology, Stephen Colbert, College, History, Time Magazine, Abba, Seoul, Rob Sheffield, Wallace Stevens, Inoue, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Sannomiya Kobe


The First Cellphone: Discover Motorola’s DynaTAC 8000X, a 2-Pound Brick Priced at $3,995 (1984)

We get the culture our technology permits, and in the 21st century no technological development has changed culture like that of the smartphone. As with every piece of personal technology that we struggle to remember how we lived without, it evolved into being from a series of simpler predecessors that, no matter how clunky they seem now, were received as technological marvels in their day. Take it from Martin Cooper, the Motorola Engineer who invented the first handheld cellular mobile ...
Tags: Motorola, Facebook, Technology, College, Bloomberg, History, Seoul, Cooper, Wim Wenders, Lynda Barry, Colin Marshall, Project Management Institute, Martin Cooper, 21st Century Los Angeles, Rudy Krolopp


How to Shop Online & Check Your E-Mail on the Go: A 1980s British TV Show Demonstrates

“Links between computers and television sets are, it is always threatened, about to herald in an age of unbelievable convenience,” announces television presenter Tony Bastable in the 1984 clip above, “where all the sociability of going down to your corner shop to order the week’s groceries will be replaced with an order over the airwaves.” Do tell. Live though we increasingly do with internet-connected “smart TVs,” the only unfamiliar-sounding part of that prediction is its reference to ...
Tags: Facebook, South Korea, Japan, England, Technology, London, Television, College, France, History, United Kingdom, Seoul, Pat, Julian Green, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles


One Man’s Quest to Build the Best Stereo System in the World

To make Fitzcarraldo, a movie about a rubber baron who drags a steamship over a hill in the Peruvian jungle, Werner Herzog famously arranged the actual dragging of an actual steamship over an actual hill in the actual Peruvian jungle. This endeavor ran into all the complications you’d expect and then some. But the reasonable question of whether it wouldn’t be wiser to cut his losses and head back to civilization prompted Herzog to make an artistically defining statement: “If I abandon th...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Technology, College, Jimi Hendrix, Swan Lake, Seoul, Werner Herzog, Scott, Herzog, Fritz, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Ken Fritz, Facebook One Man


In 1926, Nikola Tesla Predicts the World of 2026

Not long after Nikola Tesla died in 1943, the world seemed to forget him. The first public tribute paid to his considerable research and development in the realm of electricity thereafter came in 1960 with the introduction of the tesla, the SI unit of magnetic flux density. But in the decades since Tesla has enjoyed an afterlife as an icon of under-appreciated prescience. Some of this reputation is based on interviews given in the 1920s and 1930s, when he was still a celebrity. Take the ...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, New York, Technology, College, Tesla, History, United States, Liberty, Nikola Tesla, Seoul, Colliers, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Technoillusionist Marco Tempest Futurist, Telephone Free College


32 useful graduation gifts under $100 that are Amazon Prime-eligible

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more. Amazon's Kindle makes a great gift for grads who love to read. Hollis Johnson/Business Insider College and high school graduation gifts can have a big impact and help recent grads celebrate. Below are 32 great gifts for graduates, all under $100 and eligible for Amazon Prime 2-day shipping. Need more gift ideas? Check out all of our gift guides here. The best graduation gifts for high school or colle...
Tags: Reviews, Google, Amazon, College, Trends, Amazon Prime, Gifts, Netflix, Graduation, Tokyo, Cbs, Starbucks, Fire TV Stick, Gift Guides, Detroit, Qi


Wendy Carlos Demonstrates the Moog Synthesizer on the BBC (1970)

We can break popular music into two periods: before the Moog and after the Moog. Upon its debut in 1964, that synthesizer made a big splash in the small but long-established electronic-music world by, among other innovative qualities, being smaller than an entire room. Over the next few years, inventor Bob Moog (whose previous line was in theremins) refined his eponymous brainchild to the point that it became accessible to composers not already on the cutting edge of music technology. Bu...
Tags: Facebook, Music, Technology, Television, College, Bbc, Stanley Kubrick, Seoul, Glenn Gould, Wendy, Carlos, Bach, Leonard Bernstein, Moog, BBC Radiophonic Workshop, Wendy Carlos


The Isolator: A 1925 Helmet Designed to Eliminate Distractions & Increase Productivity (Created by SciFi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback)

The anti-distraction device is the modern mousetrap: build a better one, and the world will beat a path to your door. Or so, at least, will the part of the world engaged in the pursuits we’ve broadly labeled “knowledge work.” Even among the knowledge workers who’ve spent most of the past year in pandemic-prompted isolation, many still feel besieged by unending claims on their attention. Laments at having been rendered unproductive by constant distraction go back at least to medieval times, but ...
Tags: Facebook, Technology, College, History, Science And Invention, Seoul, Hugo Gernsback, Gernsback, Colin Marshall, World Science Fiction Society, 21st Century Los Angeles, SciFi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback, Technocracy Review, Computer Scientist Cal Newport Pico Iyer


Behold the 1940s Typewriter That Could Type in English, Chinese & Japanese: Watch More Than a Thousand Different Characters in Action

There was a time, not long after the widespread adoption of telegraphy in the 19th century, when the written Chinese language looked doomed. Or at least it did to certain thinkers considering the implications of that instant global communication-enabling technology having been developed for the relatively simple Latin alphabet. And as unsuited as the Chinese writing system must have seemed to the world of the telegraph, it would have presented a seemingly even heavier burden in the world...
Tags: Facebook, Japan, Technology, College, China, History, West, Shanghai, Ibm, Seoul, Toshiba, Friedrich Nietzsche, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Facebook Behold, Hou Kun Chow


Freddie Mercury & Rami Malek’s Live Aid Performance: A Side-By-Side Comparison

All Hollywood musicals need a big final set piece, one final rousing number to bring all the narrative threads back together, and provide redemption to our fallen hero. Bohemian Rhapsody, the 2018 biopic about Freddie Mercury and the band Queen, uses Live Aid as its final number. We’ve written elsewhere about how this was not really the final hurrah for the band, nor was this some kind of triumphant return after years in the Wilderness. (“Radio Gaga” and “I Want to Break Free” had been i...
Tags: Google, Music, Hollywood, College, Bob Geldof, Queen, Wembley, Freddie Mercury, Bryan Singer, George, Facebook Twitter, Rami Malek, Malek, KCRW, Brendan Fletcher, Brian May Gwilym Lee


3D Print 18,000 Famous Sculptures, Statues & Artworks: Rodin’s Thinker, Michelangelo’s David & More

To recent news stories about 3D printed guns, prosthetics, and homes, you can add Scan the World’s push to create “an ecosystem of 3D printable objects of cultural significance.” Items that took the ancients untold hours to sculpt from marble and stone can be reproduced in considerably less time, provided you’ve got the technology and the know-how to use it. Since we last wrote about this free, open source initiative in 2017, Scan the World has added Google Arts and Culture to the many cult...
Tags: Google, Art, Photography, Technology, College, China, India, History, World, David, Austria, Vienna, Paris, Beethoven, Rodin, Facebook Twitter


30,000 People Line Up for the First McDonald’s in Moscow, While Grocery Store Shelves Run Empty (1990)

Everyone has waited in a long line — for burgers, Broadway tickets, Black Friday sales… But few us have the notorious queuing resilience of the Soviets. “When the first McDonald’s arrived in Moscow in 1990, the city went mad,” Boris Egorov writes at Russia Beyond. “Thousands of Muscovites flocked to the new burger joint, forming lines several kilometers long in the center of Moscow on Pushkinskaya Square.” On its first day, the restaurant obliterated the previous record for most McDonald...
Tags: Google, Washington Post, College, Russia, America, History, Budapest, Food & Drink, Broadway, Pizza Hut, Moscow, Andy Warhol, Mikhail Gorbachev, Cbc, Soviet Union, McDonald


Critics Celebrate Two-Lane Blacktop, the 1971 Existential Road-Movie Masterpiece by Monte Hellman (RIP), Starring James Taylor & Dennis Wilson

The road movie has long since proven itself as one of the great American cultural forms, not least by capturing the imagination of other societies, no matter how distant or different. As New York Times critic A.O. Scott declares in the video above, “one of the finest road movies, and perhaps the purest of them all, is Monte Hellman’s Two-Lane Blacktop.” In his original 1971 review of the film, a Roger Ebert described Hellman as “an American director whose work is much prized by the Frenc...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Washington, Beach Boys, Roger Ebert, New York Times, James Bond, James Taylor, Dennis Hopper, New Mexico, Woody Allen, Seoul, Taylor, Tom, Scott


Critics Celebrate Two-Lane Blacktop, the 1971 Existential Road-Movie Masterpiece by Monte Hellman (RIP), Starring James Tayler & Dennis Wilson

The road movie has long since proven itself as one of the great American cultural forms, not least by capturing the imagination of other societies, no matter how distant or different. As New York Times critic A.O. Scott declares in the video above, “one of the finest road movies, and perhaps the purest of them all, is Monte Hellman’s Two-Lane Blacktop.” In his original 1971 review of the film, a Roger Ebert described Hellman as “an American director whose work is much prized by the Frenc...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Washington, Beach Boys, Roger Ebert, New York Times, James Bond, James Taylor, Dennis Hopper, New Mexico, Woody Allen, Seoul, Taylor, Tom, Scott


Watch a Newly-Restored Peter Gabriel-Era Genesis Concert Film From 1973 in Stunning 4K Quality

There are two late-20th century rock bands named Genesis and both of them featured Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford, and Tony Banks. The second Genesis we know of as one of the biggest-selling bands of all time and authors of such massive hits as “Land of Confusion,” “In Too Deep,” and “Throwing It All Away.” The first we may not know at all, except indirectly by way of its frontman, Peter Gabriel, better known as… solo artist Peter Gabriel. One reason Genesis, the second, is more famous th...
Tags: Google, Music, England, College, Mtv, Paris, Broadway, Kate Bush, Rolling Stone, Collins, Bataclan, Facebook Twitter, Peter Gabriel, Gabriel, Josh Jones, Steve Hackett


Watch “Hi-Fi-Fo-Fum,” a Short Satirical Film About the Invention of the Audiophile (1959)

Sometime in the mid-1990s, my father gave me his hi-end, hi-fi stereo system from the mid-1970s: a vacuum tube-powered amplifier, pair of stereo speakers in walnut cabinets, and a turntable. Heavy, bulky, and built with hardly an ounce of plastic between them, these components lacked all of the functionality we look for in consumer audio today: no 4K HDMI, no Bluetooth, no surround sound of any kind. As such features became de rigeur, my stereo migrated to the closet, piece by piece, then out th...
Tags: Google, Music, Television, College, Bbc, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Ted Gioia, Durham NC Follow, Typewriters Electric Shavers, Cadeddu, Audiophilia, Lucio Cadeddu


Hear Joni Mitchell’s Earliest Recording, Rediscovered After More than 50 Years

How excited would you be to listen to a recording, made at an AM radio station in 1963, labeled “JONI ANDERSON AUDITION TAPE”? If you know much about the singer-songwriters of the mid-20th century, you’d be quite excited indeed. For Joni Anderson is none other than Joni Mitchell, who under that married name would go on to become one of the most influential solo performers to come out of the folk-music scene. Not that she prized the designation that thus accompanied her to stardom: “I was...
Tags: Google, Music, California, College, Toronto, Joni Mitchell, Seoul, Anderson, Mitchell, Saskatoon, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Bob Dylan Roger McGuinn Gordon Lightfoot, Joni Anderson, Barry Bowman


Godzilla, Kong, et al: Stupid Fun or Channeling Deep Fears? Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #90

https://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/secure/partiallyexaminedlife/PMP_90_4-17-21.mp3 What’s the meaning behind the continued international popularity of kaiju media in which giant creatures stomp on cities and beat each other up? Is this just pro wrestling drama with special effects, or does it relate to deep-seated feelings of helplessness in the face of natural disasters? Perhaps both? Your Pretty Much Pop hosts Mark Linsenmayer, Erica Spyres, and Brian Hirt reflect on ...
Tags: Google, Japan, Podcasts, Film, College, Godzilla, Facebook Twitter, Kong, Owen Gleiberman, Godzilla Kong, Brian Solomon, Darren Mooney, Pretty Much Pop, Mark Linsenmayer Erica Spyres, Brian Hirt, The Top


Watch the “Greatest Juggler of the Ages,” Frances Brunn, Perform His “Painfully Exciting” Juggling Routine (1969)

When John Ringling North, then president of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, saw a pair of German  jugglers and acrobats perform in Spain, he immediately invited them to join “the Greatest Show on Earth.” A brother and sister team, Francis and Lottie Brunn would astonish audiences. In 1950, theater critic Brooks Atkinson called Francis “the greatest juggler of the ages. Not many people in the world are as perfectly adjusted as Mr. Brunn is. He will never have to visit a psychia...
Tags: Google, England, Television, College, White House, Spain, Dance, Creativity, New York Times, Francis, Palace, Eisenhower, Alexander Calder, Judy Garland, Martin, Facebook Twitter



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