Bloglikes - Autos https://www.bloglikes.com/c/autos en-US Sun, 17 Jan 2021 12:54:37 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter Upcoming Suzuki Burgman Electric spotted undergoing road tests again http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/IndianAutosBlog/~3/4KtMGxGNCcw/suzuki-burgman-electric-spy-shots-jan-2021-p322342 Sun, 17 Jan 2021 01:30:28 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos Suzuki Upcoming Suzuki Burgman Electric Burgman Electric New 650cc Royal Enfield Cruiser testing continues; prototype spied again http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/IndianAutosBlog/~3/cn4Llb4wFFE/650cc-royal-enfield-cruiser-spy-shots-jan-2021-p322341 Sat, 16 Jan 2021 23:30:36 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos New 650cc Royal Enfield Cruiser Mercedes Teases EQA All-Electric SUV Ahead Of Global Unveil on January 20 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/IndianAutosBlog/~3/Q2-AhXoQErk/mercedes-teases-eqa-all-electric-suv-p322340 Sat, 16 Jan 2021 23:30:05 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos Mercedes Benz EQA All Electric SUV Ahead Of Global Unveil 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Overview: Upgraded Engines, More Creature Comforts & New Trim Levels http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Automoblognet/~3/0ZSc1gdcROo/ Two years after unleashing the fourth-generation Santa Fe, Hyundai has given its popular midsize SUV a new face, a slew of new engines, a modified chassis, and a host of comfort and luxury features. In essence, we’re talking about a new vehicle since the 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe is slightly bigger in all aspects than the outgoing model.

The first-generation Hyundai Santa Fe came at the turn of the new millennium. It instantly won SUV buyers’ hearts with its affordable price, roomy interior, and superb warranty – and the trend continues today. In 2020, we drove the Santa Fe with both the naturally-aspirated engine and the turbo engine. Our preference was for the turbo powertrain, but we enjoyed driving both and believe the Santa Fe will be a solid option for SUV buyers in 2021.

Here’s what you can expect from new Santa Fe.

2021 Hyundai Santa Fe: If Looks Could Kill

The 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe’s aggressive new fascia makes it stand out amidst friendlier faces like the Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport, Ford Edge, Nissan Murano, and Honda CR-V. The new Santa Fe is brandishing a distinctive three-dimensional front grille, and new T-shaped LED running lights. Meanwhile, the new rear bumper has a lower and broader appearance with its rear diffuser and full-length reflector.

The new Santa Fe has the silhouette of Hyundai’s seven-seat Palisade, and that’s a good thing. We particularly like the new LED taillights connected via a center reflector strip on the tailgate. Overall, the new Santa Fe is a stylish commuter, although we think the 2021 Kia Sorento – platform sibling of the Santa Fe – is better looking with its Telluride DNA.

New 2.5-Liter Four-Cylinder Engines

The outgoing model made do with a base 2.4-liter four-banger and a smaller yet more powerful 2.0-liter turbo four-pot mill. But in the 2021 Santa Fe, you get a 2.5-liter naturally-aspirated four-cylinder with both multi-port and direct-injection. It now has 191 horsepower and 181 lb-ft. of torque, a slight increase over the outgoing base engine. Power is sent to the front wheels (Hyundai’s HTRAC AWD system is optional across the range) via an eight-speed automatic transmission.

Higher trim models receive a turbocharged version of the 2.5-liter four-cylinder with 277 horsepower and 311 lb-ft. of torque. This engine is not only bigger than last year’s 2.0-liter turbo variant, but it also has 42 more horses and 51 more lb-ft. of torque than before. Harnessing the extra power is a new eight-speed dual-clutch automatic.

Fuel Mileage by Model @media screen and (max-width: 767px) {.tg {width: auto !important;}.tg col {width: auto !important;}.tg-wrap {overflow-x: auto;-webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch;}} 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Fuel Economy Model & Powertrain City Highway Combined 2.5 L, 4 cyl, FWD 25 28 26 2.5 L, 4 cyl, Turbo, FWD 22 28 25 2.5 L, 4 cyl, AWD 22 25 24 2.5 L, 4 cyl, Turbo, AWD 21 28 24 New Hybrid Powertrain

The 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe also has a hybrid option. It combines a 1.6-liter turbocharged inline-four motor (178 horsepower, 195 lb-ft. of torque), a 59-horsepower electric motor, and a 64 kWh lithium-ion polymer battery for a total output of 225 horsepower. Hyundai has yet to release the official EPA numbers, but we reckon the Santa Fe hybrid will have no trouble achieving 35 mpg.

Also, Hyundai confirms a Santa Fe plug-in-hybrid is in the works. Naturally, the PHEV model will have a larger battery pack for an extended all-electric range.

2021 Hyundai Santa Fe under the hood. Photo: Hyundai Motor America. New Legs & Stronger Bones

The chassis of the 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe has been improved versus prior models. The front and rear suspension have new sub-frames to improve crash performance and ride comfort, while a new one-piece rear cross member and aluminum front bumper beam optimize the center of gravity and reduce weight.

Additionally, Hyundai angled the front struts by seven degrees to improve the steering response while reducing friction within the bearing rotation shaft. The new Santa Fe also has new hydro sub-frame bushings, new engine mounts, and an acoustic windshield with thicker glass to offer better noise isolation.

Cargo Space

The 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe is available in four trim levels, including a new Calligraphy trim. Regardless of which trim level you pick, the 2021 Santa Fe offers 36.4 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second row. Fold them down, and the available space increase to 72.1 cubic feet.

Trim Levels & Features

The base Santa Fe SE is equipped with 18-inch alloy wheels, LED headlights, wireless Android Auto & Apple CarPlay, and an eight-inch touchscreen infotainment system. It also gets forward collision-avoidance assist, lane-keeping assist, and a driver attention warning system.

On the other hand, the SEL model has more safety features from Hyundai’s Smart Sense portfolio. This includes blind-spot collision avoidance, rear cross-traffic alert, a proximity key, and Blue Link connected car services. The Santa Fe SEL is available with two optional packages. The Convenience package adds a digital key and a 12.3-inch instrument cluster, while the Premium package adds more features, including leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, and updated exterior accouterments.

The Santa Fe Limited comes standard with the 2.5-liter turbo engine. Additional standard features include 19-inch alloy wheels, remote smart parking assist, ventilated front and heated rear seats, and a surround-view camera with blind-spot monitoring. The hybrid Santa Fe is available in SEL (with either the Premium or Convenience package) and Limited trims.

New for 2021 is the Santa Fe Calligraphy with the larger turbo engine, HTRAC all-wheel drive system, 19-inch or 20-inch wheels, and a heads-up display. The Calligraphy model includes premium Nappa leather upholstery, a suede headliner, and interior ambient lighting.

2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Calligraphy. 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Warranty

Every new Santa Fe is covered by a 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty, a five-year/60,000-mile limited warranty, and an anti-perforation warranty for seven years. Complimentary maintenance, which includes oil changes and tire rotations, goes for three years or 36,000 miles. If you have questions on how to extend your Hyundai warranty, please see this comprehensive guide.

2021 Hyundai Santa Fe: Pricing & Availability

The 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe is available for a starting MSRP of $26,850 for the SE model. The SEL starts at $28,650 while the Limited begins at $38,600. The Calligraphy, at the top of the range, starts at $42,300.

If you are in the market for a new Santa Fe, this free and helpful search tool* will show you dealer inventory in your area. That tool will also help you secure the invoice price, which is beneficial to have if you are negotiating with the dealership. 

The hybrid model will arrive in the first quarter of 2021 and will be made in Ulsan, Korea, while gasoline models will come from the Hyundai Motor Manufacturing plant in Alabama.

Alvin Reyes is an Automoblog feature columnist and an expert in sports and performance cars. He studied civil aviation, aeronautics, and accountancy in his younger years and is still very much smitten to his former Lancer GSR and Galant SS. He also likes fried chicken, music, and herbal medicine. 

Photos & Source: Hyundai Motor America.

*Automoblog and its partners may be compensated when you visit this link.

Original article: 2021 Hyundai Santa Fe Overview: Upgraded Engines, More Creature Comforts & New Trim Levels

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The most reliable cars of 2021 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/7EFq1p8_O4E/ ]]> Sat, 16 Jan 2021 14:48:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Cars Trends Other Buying Guides Toyota Prius Audi Q3 Lexus GS Tier 4 How to watch Formula 1 online http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/43KMNFSYd28/ ]]> Sat, 16 Jan 2021 14:43:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Cars Trends How-to Racing F1 Formula 1 Movies & TV Tier 4 The 2021 Ducati Lineup + Our Take On Each Model https://www.webbikeworld.com/2021-ducati-motorcycle-lineup/ Table of Contents

Ducati is arguably the most famous Italian motorcycle brand in the industry. Over the years, it has developed a reputation for producing some of the most attractive sportbikes in production, equipped with exotic technology and firey Italian temperaments. The last decade has seen the brand move from strength to strength, with bold evolutions of their tried and tested models, and the introduction of an entirely new sub-range too.

2020 was a difficult year for the entire motorcycle industry, and without any trade shows to host great unveilings, it has been difficult for our favorite brands to communicate the highlights of the 2021 range. Luckily, Ducati rose to the challenge and covered the full extent of their 2021 line-up in a series of staggered online, live-streamed unveilings.

After no less than five world premier events, the somewhat tantric unveiling of the 2021 Ducati line-up has now drawn to a close. Here’s what delights we have to look forward to for 2021.

Diavel 2021 Ducati Diavel 1260

2021 Ducati Diavel 1260

Ducati’s class-leading cruiser is back for 2021. The Diavel-range doesn’t get much in the way of updates for the new year, but it does get an added model, which you can find out more about below. The standard Diavel retains its contemporary, muscular physique, but with an agile, sporty nature.

The secret to the Diavel’s ongoing success is the Testastretta DVT 1262 engine. It’s a 1262 cc twin cylinder unit that produces an impressive 159 horsepower and 95 lb-ft of torque. It comes equipped with a modern Ride-by-Wire system, three riding modes, three power modes, Desmodromic variable valve timing, and a two-tailpipe exhaust pipe. Traction control, wheelie control, cornering ABS, and a full LED lighting system also come as standard too.

2021 Ducati Diavel 1260 S

2021 Ducati Diavel 1260 S

The 2021 Ducati Diavel 1260 S is a machine made for those looking for a slightly more refined muscular cruiser experience. While it shares almost all of the same DNA as the standard Diavel 1260, it comes with a number of surprising extras that elevate it above the base model. If you’re expecting a more powerful engine, that’s not the case. The Diavel 1260 still uses the same desmodromic 1262 cc twin cylinder unit, making the same 157 horsepower and 95 lb-ft of torque.

The most significant difference between the two models is the addition of Ducati’s Quick Shift (DQS) technology as standard. It’s a bi-directional system that allows for easy clutchless shifting, enhancing your ride experience and making urban riding a blast—especially during stop and go traffic. The 2021 Ducati Diavel 1260 S also gets a second color option for prospective buyers to choose from too.

2021 Ducati Diavel 1260 Lamborghini

2021 Ducati Diavel 1260 Lamborghini

Now, for those who want a really exclusive Diavel experience, there’s only one option: the limited edition 2021 Ducati Diavel 1260 Lamborghini. Limited to just 630 units, this special model fuses two iconic Italian Volkswagen brands together: Lamborghini and Ducati. It’s an unconventional fusion that takes the classic Diavel 1260 and gives it a dash of design-language taken directly from the Lamborghini Sian FKP-37.

In terms of performance, the actual drive train remains identical to that of the other models in the Diavel range. There’s a Desmodromic 1262 cc twin-cylinder engine that makes 157 horsepower and 95 lb-ft of torque, complemented with the same technology found on the more advanced 1260 Diavel S model. The only real differences between the Diavel 1260 S and the Diavel Lamborghini are a whole load of very subtle design elements, such as the forged rims and intricate patterns embossed on the seat, and a Sian-inspired paint scheme. And the limited-edition nature and price tag, of course.

XDiavel 2021 Ducati XDiavel Dark

2021 Ducati XDiavel Dark

The XDiavel family is back for 2021, and this time with a number of exciting new models for us to fawn over. Unlike the regular Diavel, the XDiavel has a more sports-focused attitude. After a quick glance, the two models may look similar, but they’re absolutely not. And to help solidify the differences between the two, Ducati has launched the 2021 XDiavel Dark: a blacked-out sports cruiser that offers serious performance, and a relaxed riding experience too.

In short, it’s a new XDiavel available exclusively in Dark Stealth coloring, with Carbon Black features and matt black wheels. The XDiavel Dark draws power from Ducati’s 1262 cc Testastretta DVT 1262 engine, which produces 160 horsepower and 93.7 lb-ft of peak torque (in Euro5 compliant regions). Traction control, selectable ride modes, adjustable suspension, cornering ABS, power launch, and electronic cruise control are also featured.

2021 Ducati XDiavel S

2021 Ducati XDiavel S

The XDiavel S is back in the line-up for 2021 but the updates are only noticeable if you’re living in a region that complies with Euro5 regulations. If not, then 2021’s Ducati XDiavel S will be exactly the same as last year’s Ducati XDiavel S. However, if you do live in a Euro5 regulation area, then your new XDiavel will have had a few tweaks and refinements to help it conform to the new rules.

As you can probably guess from the details above, the new version of the XDiavel S features an updated 1262 cc Testastretta DVT 1262 engine. After the tweaking, the engine now produces 160 horsepower and 93.7 lb-ft of torque. Riding aids and other tech remains the same as last year. Prospective customers can enjoy the XDiavel S in Thrilling Black, with matt black and red trim, with a grey frame and blacked-out wheels.

2021 Ducati XDiavel Black Star

2021 Ducati XDiavel Blackstar

The last model in the XDiavel line-up is the brand-new XDiavel Black Star. It’s an evolution of the standard XDiavel S but with a sportier attitude. Ducati stated that the design of the Black Star was influenced by the world of sports cars, and to that end, they’ve treated the Black Star with a sports-inspired livery with exciting equipment to match.

Grey and matte black are the Black Star’s predominant colors, but there are nice red accents to give it an exciting and edgy look. Other stylistic features include the saddle, which has been treated to a high-grip suede material, and red engine headcovers. The looks are great, but Ducati also gave the Black Star new lightweight forged rims and Pirelli Diablo Rosso III tires. The engine is the same 1,262 cc twin-cylinder Testastretta unit found on the XDiavel S.

Monster 2021 Ducati Monster

2021 Ducati Monster

The Monster series is arguably the most recognizable and well-known model lines that Ducati has ever produced. For 2021, the Monster has received a significant upgrade. Firstly, it’s now just the Monster without and displacement labels. Secondly, it has been redesigned with an all-new frame, new ergonomics, and an updated engine, taking inspiration directly from the original 1993 Monster: sports performance wrapped in a race-derived frame, in an overall package that’s ideal for everyday road use.

Using an all-new lightweight superbike-inspired frame made from aluminum, with a narrow body and slim design, the Monster is an agile and compact motorcycle. Powered by an updated 937 cc Testatretta 11-degree engine, the now Euro5 compliant Monster produces 111 horsepower and 69 lb-ft of torque: more than enough for the average commuter!

2021 Ducati Monster Plus

2021 Ducati Monster Plus

For 2021, there’s a second Monster offering available. This one is known as the Monster Plus (or Monster +). It shares 99% of its DNA with the regular Monster, but it has a few interesting differences. These include the addition of a small flyscreen covering the instrumentation and a pillion seat cover. And that’s about it. It’s not much, but it’s something.

The rest of the Monster Plus is the same as the model mentioned above: an all-new frame with a new 937 cc Testastretta 11-degree V-twin engine and 111 horsepower and 69 lb-ft of torque. Standard equipment for both models includes selectable ride modes, power modes, cornering ABS, traction control, wheelie control, and more. Is it worth paying a little more for the Plus? Well, if you really must have a fly screen and can’t possibly live without a pillion seat cover, then yes.

2021 Ducati 821

2020 Ducati Monster 821

For 2021, the Ducati Monster 821 is still available in North America, but there are no upgrades from 2020. Still, the 821 has defined itself as a commuting stalwart and a versatile motorcycle that can do a little bit of everything.

With 109 horsepower and 63 lb-ft of torque on tap, the Monster 821 is still a solid option. Curiously, however, it has a higher MSRP than the new Monster.

2021 Ducati 821 Stealth

2020 Ducati Monster 821 Stealth

It’s the same story with the Monster 821 Stealth. It’s still available for purchase in North America through 2021 but in 2020 form. Like the Monster 821, the Monster 821 Stealth features an 821 cc twin-cylinder Desmodromic Testastretta engine, with 109 horsepower and 63 lb-ft of torque.

The major difference between the two 821 models is the color options. While the standard Monster 821 is available only in Ducati Red, the 821 Stealth is available in an exclusive matte black livery, with updated graphics. There’s also a small fly screen, but everything else is more or less the same. The 821 Stealth is a great choice for Ducati enthusiasts who don’t like red. If there is such a person.

2021 Ducati 1200

2020 Ducati Monster 1200

The Monster 1200 also joins the ranks of un-updated Ducatis for 2021. The big Monster is still available as part of the 2021 Ducati line-up in North America, but with no updates of any kind. The Monster 1200 is an excellent motorcycle for riders in search of versatility, power, and performance, in a contemporary and modern package.

The heart of the Monster 1200 is the 1198 cc liquid-cooled, twin-cylinder, Testastretta engine with 4 valves per cylinder. It produces 147 horsepower and 91 lb-ft of torque. Standard equipment on the 1200 includes cornering ABS, traction control, wheelie control, selectable ride modes, a power mode, and Ride-by-Wire technology. It might not receive any updates for 2021, but the Monster 1200 is an undeniably advanced machine.

2021 Ducati 1200 S

2020 Ducati Monster 1200 S

The Ducati Monster 1200 S is also a part of the North American Ducati line-up for 2021, and like the standard 1200 model, the 1200 S gets no updates of any kind.  Like the 1200, the 1200 S draws power from Ducati’s 1198 cc liquid-cooled, twin-cylinder, Testastretta engine, which produces an impressive 147 horsepower and 91 lb-ft of torque.

Luckily, there’s more to the 1200 S than a black paint option. The main differences concern the suspension, which has been upgraded to adjustable Öhlins units, for a sportier ride experience. Other performance upgrades include 3-spoke Y rims, carbon fiber features, an LED DRL, and an advanced racing braking system. These upgrades help the 1200 S weight in at 4lbs lighter than the regular 1200. While the black color looks great, the 1200 S is also available in Classic Ducati Red.

Multistrada 2021 Ducati 950

2021 Ducati Multistrada 950

The Ducati Multistrada 950 is a street-focused sport-touring model with a comfortable riding position, impressive technology, and plenty of performance. For 2021, the Multistrada 950 doesn’t receive any updates. However, don’t be upset by the lack of updates, because the Multistrada is already a great bike and doesn’t need really need any.

Under the proverbial hood, the Multistrada 950 features a 937 cc Testastretta 11-degree engine, producing an impressive 113 horsepower and 71 lb-ft of peak torque. Not only does the 950 boast a comprehensive electronics package—with traction control, cornering ABS, and more—but it also has a versatile and practical nature, making it the ideal bike for a wide range of riding styles.

2021 Ducati 950 S

2021 Ducati Multistrada 950 S

The Multistrada 950 S is an enhanced version of the standard Multistrada 950, with a few nice upgrades that set it apart from the base model. The most notable of these include the addition of a quick-shifter and a set of tidy spoked wheels. Unlike the Multistrada 950, the 950 S does get something of an update for 2021, though the most significant of these only affect Euro5 compliant countries.

For clarity, the North American 950 S uses a 937cc twin-cylinder Testastretta engine that produces 113 hp and 71 lb-ft of torque. Euro5 countries get the same engine, but with some compliance-related changes that adjust the torque output down to 69 lb-ft. Nothing drastic, but worth a mention. For North America, the 2021 model gets a cool GP White livery option, inspired by the MotoGP’s Desmosedici racer.

2021 Ducati V4

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4

The Multistrada V4 is an all-new motorcycle for 2021, boasting an all-new engine. For 2021, Ducati has done away with the standard twin-cylinder unit that used to power the Multistrada range, in favor of the new Granturismo V4 engine. This new engine is a 1,158 cc V4 beast that produces 170 horsepower, 92 lb-ft of torque, in a compact shape that actually weighs less than the outgoing V-twin.

The new engine compliments the agile, sport-touring nature of the Multistrada, giving it more power to take riders further than ever before. It’s not just a new engine though, because the Multistrada V4 also showcases a host of new tech too. It still features multiple riding and power modes, cornering ABS, traction control, and more.

2021 Ducati V4 S

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S

Naturally, the all-new Multistrada V4 isn’t the only new model in the Multistrada range. For those looking for a more advanced model with more features and more tech, then the Multistrada S is the bike for you. It shares most of its DNA with the standard model, but it has enough differences and additions to make it worth the extra money. Aside from the new Granturismo V4 engine, the V4 S also boasts Marzocchi Ducati Skyhook Suspension Evolution, larger brake discs and Brembo Stylema calipers, full LED lighting, and Ducati Connect smartphone compatibility.

Other cool features include a 6.5 inch TFT display, a quick-shifter, vehicle hold control, cornering lights, and a unique radar system. In fact, the 2021 Multistrada V4 is the first motorcycle that uses front and rear radar to power functions such as adaptive cruise control and blind-spot detection.

2021 Ducati V4 S Sport

2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 Sport

The top-of-the-line machine in the new Multistrada V4 line is the 2021 Ducati Multistrada V4 S Sport. Like the rest of the new Multistrada V4 range, it’s a powerful sport touring machine that draws power from Ducati’s new Granturismo V4 engine: an 1158 cc four-cylinder engine that produces 170 horsepower and 92 lb-ft of peak torque. In terms of technology, it boasts the same features as the above-mentioned V4 S, but it has plenty of other interesting differences that elevate it above the S model.

These differences include the addition of a number of carbon fiber parts, such as the mudguard, and the fancy new exhaust system. The latter is a carbon-fiber and titanium unit from Akrapovic. The last and most obvious difference is the livery. For 2021, the V4 S Sport features Ducati’s Sport Livery, which is a red base with black features, including glossy black wheels, with a signature red tag. It’s available with either alloy or spoked wheels too.

2021 Ducati 1260 Enduro

2020 Ducati Multistrada 1260 Enduro

The last Multistrada model for sale in 2021 is last year’s 1260 Enduro. While most of Multistradas are designed for road-based adventures, the older 1260 Enduro has enough off-road ability to tackle some trails. It also boasts plenty of on-road performance too, with all of the usual features. These include cornering ABS, traction control, multiple riding modes, selectable power modes, wheelie control, cornering lights, and vehicle hold control.

Since it’s a 2020 model, the 1260 Enduro doesn’t benefit from Ducati’s new Granturismo engine. Instead, the 1260 Enduro draws power from a 1,262 cc Testastretta DVT L-twin cylinder engine that produces 158 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of peak torque. In short, it’s a strong, capable, and versatile motorcycle that you can customize to your heart’s content thanks to Ducati’s extensive accessories catalog.

Hypermotard 2021 Ducati 950 RVE

2021 Ducati Hypermotard 950 RVE

The newest addition to the Ducati Hypermotard family is the only new model in the sub-range. It’s the 2021 Ducati Hypermotard 950 RVE. It’s based on the Hypermotard 950 Concept that was unveiled at the 2019 Concours d’Elegance Villa d’Este, and features a number of upgrades on the other Hypermotard models. The engine has been tweaked for new Euro5 compliance, which has resulted in a small power boost. The 937 cc twin-cylinder Ducati Testastretta 11-degree engine now produces 114 horsepower and 71 lb-ft of peak torque.

Aside from the engine, the 950 RVE also boasts a full suite of advanced riding aids. These include multiple riding modes, power modes, cornering ABS, traction control, wheelie control, a bi-directional quick-shifter, and an LED DRL, to name a few. Other upgrades include tapered handlebars, removable passenger footpegs, and a USB power socket too. And of course, there’s also that sweet looking Graffiti black and red color option too.

2021 Ducati 950

2020 Ducati Hypermotard 950

The standard Hypermotard 950 is back for 2021 but with no changes from 2020. This cool hooligan machine offers exceptional sports performance, incredible handling, and a ride experience like no other. It’s sharp, nimble, and lightweight in nature, but don’t be fooled by its spartan aesthetic, because it packs a powerful punch.

Under the hood, the Ducati Hypermotard 950 features a 937 cc twin-cylinder Ducati Testastretta 11-degree engine. It’s a powerful engine that produces an impressive 114 horsepower and 71 lb-ft of peak torque. It also features a vast array of top-level riding aids, including selectable riding modes, cornering ABS, traction control, wheelie control, and more. It’s the ideal motorcycle to channel your inner mischief-maker.

2021 Ducati 950 SP

2020 Ducati Hypermotard 950 SP

Like the standard 950, the Ducati Hypermotard 950 SP is also back for 2021, with absolutely no changes from 2020. But don’t worry. The Hypermotard 950 SP is more than enough for anyone in its current form so it doesn’t really need much in the way of an update anyway. It’s agile, powerful, and designed for serious trouble-making. If you really want to tame the urban jungle, then there’s only one way to do it: on board a Hypermotard 950 SP.

Featuring the same 937 cc twin-cylinder Ducati Testastretta 11-degree engine, with 114 horsepower and 71 lb-ft of torque, the SP version looks almost identical to the standard model, but there are some key differences. These include the addition of a Ducati Quick Shifter, upgraded suspension, a lighter overall weight, and a few other surprises.

Streetfighter 2021 Ducati Streetfighter V4

2021 Ducati Streetfighter V4

Ducati’s Streetfighter V4 platform was a masterstroke when it first burst onto the scene. It was a winning recipe. Essentially, the Streetfighter V4 is a Panigale V4 without the fairings. Featuring an unfettered 1,103 cc Desmosedici Stradale engine that produces a fear-inducing 208 horsepower and 90.4 lb-ft of torque, and all the trimmings usually reserved for a class-leading, fully-faired sportbike, this naked streetfighter is in a league of its own.

Aside from the powerful engine, the Streetfighter V4 also features wide-set handlebars, a Showa BPF fork, Sachs rear shock, Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa 2 tires, and Brembo Stylema brakes. And of course, there’s no shortage of top-level riding aids too, such as selectable riding modes, power modes, cornering ABS, traction control, wheelie and slide control, engine brake control, a quick-shifter, and Ducati’s power launch function. The only thing this machine lacks is fairings. The rest is all business.

2021 Ducati Streetfighter V4 S

2021 Ducati Streetfighter V4 S For 2021, Ducati has given the top-spec Streetfighter V4 S a few nice upgrades. Like the regular Streetfighter V4, the V4 S model features a 1,103 cc Desmosedici Stradale engine that produces a mammoth 208 horsepower and 90.4 lb-ft of torque, but like many engines in the 2021 line-up, it’s had a few revisions since last year to bring it into line with Euro5 regulations in certain markets. But that’s not all that’s had a change.

The new Streetfighter V4 S now boasts new front brake pumps and a self-purging clutch—features that originated on the class-leading Superleggera V4 platform. But that’s not all. For 2021, Ducati has treated the Streetfighter V4 S with a brand new color scheme. The Dark Stealth option features a blacked-out look with a dark grey frame and black wheels.

Panigale 2021 Ducati Panigale V2

2021 Ducati Panigale V2

While the majority of the Panigale line-up transitioned to V4 engines, the good folks at Ducati to retain one good old-fashioned twin for Ducati purists to continue fawning over. For 2021, we have the Panigale V2, a traditional Panigale but with modern enhancements. Like the pre-V4 Panigale models, the Panigale V2 draws power from a twin-cylinder Superquadro engine. The 2021 edition has a displacement of 955 cc, which allows it to produce more power than the older 959. The outputs are now rated at 155 horsepower and 76.7 lb-ft of torque.

Fitted with an advanced inertial measurement unit and all of the corresponding riding aids that go along with it, the Panigale V2 is completely up to date. But it’s not just a new motorcycle wearing the Panigale name. One look at it will tell you that it’s every bit the classic Ducati sportbike that you want it to be. Naturally, it’s available in two colors: Ducati Red, and White Rosso.

2021 Ducati Panigale V4

2020 Ducati Panigale V4

The next Panigale in the 2021 range is the Panigale V4. Unlike the rest of the Panigale models, the V4 and it’s uprated V4 S stable mate didn’t receive any updates for 2021. They’re both exactly the same as they were for 2020. That means that they’re both powered by the same 1,103 cc Desmosedici Stradale V4 engine, which makes 214 horses and 91.5 lb-ft of torque. Even without any updates, those figures are hardly boring.

The powerful engine is complemented with plenty of class-leading tech, as you’d expect from one of the world’s most admired sportbikes. The electronics suite includes cornering ABS, advanced traction control, slide control, wheelie control, power launch settings, engine brake control, electronic suspension, and an up and down quick-shifter. If you’re looking for track day domination, well, this is what you need.

2021 Ducati Panigale V4 S

2020 Ducati Panigale V4 S

Next up, we’ve got the Ducati Panigale V4 S. This is the premium-version of the above-mentioned Panigale, and there’s more to it than just a (significantly) larger price tag. Not only does it sport the same, track-tested 1,103 cc Desmosedici Stradale V4 engine with 214 horses and 91.5 lb-ft of torque, but it also includes Superleggera V4-derived self-bleeding brake and clutch pumps. Hardly exciting—but wait, there’s more.

While the Panigale V4 S might look similar to the base-model V4, it has plenty of differences that justify the increased price tag. The most noteworthy differences of these include an Öhlins NIX-30 front fork, Öhlins TTX36 rear shock absorber, and an Öhlins event-based steering damper. These are all governed by a second-generation Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 system. And that’s just the suspension. It gets a number of other top-notch goodies too!

2021 Ducati Panigale V4 SP

2021 Ducati Panigale V4 SP

For 2021, Ducati has introduced a new model into the Panigale V4 family. This is the Panigale V4 SP, a numbered series of top-tier machines emblazoned with the “SP” (Sport Production) moniker. The Sports Production name first appeared on the Ducati 851 and has since been used to designate models that served as the base for Ducati’s racing bikes in the Sport Production Championship. Today, the SP designation recognizes production bikes with track-focused technical equipment.

Using Ducati’s 1,103 cc Desmosedici Stradale V4 engine that produces 214 horsepower and 91.5 lb-ft of torque, the Panigale V4 SP is already a formidable motorcycle, but it has so much more. It’s got carbon parts, billet features, top-shelf suspension and brakes, and all the riding aids you can think of. Better still, it features a “Winter Test” inspired livery in striking black and with brushed aluminum. It’s one of the most beautiful motorcycles on the market, without a doubt.

2021 Ducati Panigale V4 R

2021 Ducati Panigale V4 R

Despite the excellence of the Panigale V4 SP, it’s not the top model in the range. That title is reserved for the Panigale V4 R. Though it has no updates for 2021 and remains identical to the 2020 version, it’s still the top dog in the Ducati superbike stable. In stock form, the Panigale V4 R’s 1,103 cc Desmosedici Stradale V4 engine produces a whopping 221 horsepower and 83 lb-ft of torque. But with the race kit installed, it’s even better.

With the race kit installed, including the Akrapovic exhaust system, that power figure jumps to an incredible 234 horsepower. Considering that the Panigale V4 R has a total dry weight of 365 lbs, that’s a power-to-weight ratio of 1.41. To keep that under control, the engineers at Ducati Corse treated the Panigale V4 R to everything, from the best suspension available, sophisticated aerodynamics, and more riding aids than most riders would even know what to do with. It’s literally all that and more.

Supersport 2021 Ducati Supersport 950

2021 Ducati Supersport 950

The Ducati Supersport 950 is an entry-level sportbike that captures the spirit of Ducati’s sporting nature. It takes its inspiration directly from the Panigale V4 range, but in a more compact and manageable shape, and with an entirely different engine. If you’re looking for a calmer, but no-less sexy, Ducati sportbike with a cheaper price tag, then the Supersport 950 is the bike for you.

Powered by Ducati’s 937 cc Testastretta 11-degree twin-cylinder engine, the Supersport 950 produces a modest 110 horsepower and 69 lb-ft of torque, all in a chassis with a dry weight of 405 lbs. The engine is complemented with an advanced electronics suite that included multiple riding modes, power modes, cornering ABS, next-generation traction control, wheelie control, and a Ducati bi-directional quick-shifter. It’s not just a Panigale-lite. It’s a serious sportbike in its own right.

2021 Ducati Supersport 950 S

2021 Ducati Supersport 950 S

The Supersport 950 S is for riders who want something a little extra. It costs more, but it comes with plenty of added features that make it worth the additional expense. The engine, however, remains the same. For 2021, both the Supersport 950 and Supersport 950 S have had their engines tweaked to conform with Euro5 regulations, but the actual outputs remain the same as last year. The Supersport 950 S uses the 937 cc Testastretta 11-degree twin-cylinder, with 110 horses and 69 lb-ft of torque.

The main difference between the two models is the suspension. Instead of Marzocchi forks and a Sachs shock, the 950 S receives fully-adjustable Öhlins forks and monoshock too. Other differences include the addition of a passenger seat cowl, and an additional color option: Arctic White Silk.

Superleggera 2021 Ducati Superleggera V4

2021 Ducati Superleggera V4

Ducati’s Superleggera V4 is available for 2021, though it remains unchanged for the new year. Still in last year’s trim, this superlight sportbike features a carbon fiber front frame, swing arm, fairings, and wheels, partnered with Ducati’s powerful 998cc Desmosedici Stradale V4 engine, with power outputs of 224 horsepower and 85.5 lb-ft of torque, or 234 hp and 87.7 lb-ft with a racing exhaust installed. The lightweight chassis and strong engine result in a power-to-weight ratio of 1.41 hp to kg. Which is seriously impressive.

As you’d expect, this exclusive motorcycle has the full works in terms of top-spec equipment and rider aids. If it can be made out of carbon fiber, it’s made out of carbon fiber. It has all the technology currently on offer from advanced traction control to lap timers. Naturally, it also has a titanium Akrapovic exhaust too.

Scrambler 2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100

The Ducati Scrambler 1100 is back for 2021, though with no changes from last year. The bigger Scrambler offers a more advanced riding experience for expert riders who loved the architecture of the smaller Scrambler but wanted a little more power. Now featuring a 1,079 cc Desmodromic L-twin engine that produces a hearty 86 horsepower and 65 lb-ft of torque, the Scrambler 1100 offers uncompromising power for true Scrambler enthusiasts.

The bigger engine is accompanied by premium extras, including Ride-by-Wire technology, selectable riding modes, a power mode, cornering ABS and traction control, LED lighting, LCD instrumentation, and more. Marzocchi forks, a Kayaba shock, and Brembo brakes are also included, along with a choice of yellow or black color schemes.

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Pro

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Pro

The Ducati Scrambler 1100 Pro also gets a few minor updates for 2021. This is the 1100 Pro, an upgraded version of the standard 1100 with a 1,079 cc Desmodromic L-twin engine, that produces 86 horsepower and 65 lb-ft of peak torque. It features all the same gear, including riding modes, a power mode, cornering ABS and traction control, LED lights, LCD instrumentation, and more.

The only real update for the new year is the addition of a new two-color paint scheme. For 2021, riders can enjoy the new “Ocean Drive” livery, which looks pretty cool. The color works excellently with the tubular steel frame and rear sub-frame, making for a smart and compact looking Scrambler.

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport

The Scrambler 1100 Sport is another returning Scrambler model that comes without any updates for the new year. Still, this impressive Scrambler still looks the part and offers a unique ride experience. It’s styled with a classic racing look, with a Viper Black color scheme and sports-inspired accents. It’s definitely a sporty looking machine.

The actual performance specs are the same as you’d find on the other Scrambler models, with Ducati’s 1,079 cc Desmodromic L-twin engine producing a respectable 86 horsepower and 65 lb-ft of peak torque. Naturally, it comes complete with the full Scrambler riding suite that you can find listed in the models above.

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport Pro

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport Pro

The 1100 Sport Pro is one of the few Scrambler machines that received updates for 2021. Unlike the others in the larger-capacity engine range, the Sport Pro has a more café-racer vibe. It’s equipped with low handle-bars, bar-end mirrors, and a sleek Matt Black color scheme with a cool 1100 logo. But there’s more to the Sport Pro than fancy styling.

For 2021, the engine has been tweaked to meet Euro5 standards. The 1,079 cc Desmodromic L-twin engine still produces the same output of 86 horsepower and 65 lb-ft of torque but in a more Euro-friendly package. The Sport Pro also boasts Öhlins suspension, Brembo brakes, and Ducati’s advanced electronics suite, governed by a sophisticated inertial measurement unit.

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Special

2021 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Special

Next up, we have the Ducati Scrambler 1100 Special. This stunning motorcycle doesn’t receive any updates for 2021 and remains unchanged from last year. Still, it features a high level of on-board technology, a sharp aesthetic, and decent hardware. It’s not as advanced as some of the other 1100 models, but it might be the best looking.

It features the usual 1,079 cc Desmodromic L-twin engine with 86 horses and 65 lb-ft of torque, and the same riding aids. The main difference is that it comes with the lower-spec hardware, such as Marzocchi front suspension and a Kayaba rear shock. It still features Brembo brakes though. And a few select aluminum parts too! It’s one of the best value-for-money Scramblers in our opinion.

2021 Ducati Scrambler Nightshift

2021 Ducati Scrambler Nightshift

The Ducati Scrambler Nightshift is a new addition for 2021. It’s a stark and bare-bones model designed for prowling through the urban jungle at night. It’s an aggressive-looking Scrambler but with a café racer edge. For example, it features straight, narrow handlebars, café-racer style mirrors, and design elements inspired by the Scrambler Full Throttle model, such as the number plate. Also, take note of the lack of a traditional rear mudguard.

Under the hood, the Scrambler Nightshift features Ducati’s mid-size Scrambler engine: an 803 cc Desmodromic L-twin unit that produces 73 horsepower and 49 lb-ft of torque. It features all the usual Scrambler bells and whistles, from cornering ABS to advanced traction control. It’s available exclusively in Aviator Grey.

2021 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2021 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

Ducati’s Full Throttle variant of the Scrambler is back for 2021. Like many other Scramblers in this list, it’s back with no discernible changes for the new year. It’s Euro5 compliant, but then again, all of the Scramblers are now anyway. Still, this black and yellow hornet of a motorcycle is back, breathing some aggression and edge into the otherwise friendly-looking Scrambler range.

As you can probably guess, the Full Throttle uses the Scrambler’s middle-weight engine option, the 803 cc Desmodromic L-twin, with power outputs rated at—see if you can guess—73 horsepower and 49 lb-ft of torque. While it doesn’t have much to separate it from the other Scramblers in the range, it does have a seriously eye-catching two-tone paint scheme, which is plenty of difference in our opinion.

2021 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer

2021 Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer

For those in search of a truly sophisticated ride experience, Ducati offers the Scrambler Café Racer. It features absolutely no updates for 2021, but since it’s such a stylish-looking motorcycle, we’re willing to forgive the lack of upgrades. It’s a compact café-racer that takes inspiration from the Ducati Sport Classic of the past but revamped in a newer and more accessible package.

In the performance department, let’s see who can guess the engine and specs? Yep, it features an 803 cc L-twin Desmodromic engine, 73 horsepower, and 49 lb-ft of torque. Full marks to all who guessed that. Now, all joking aside, as far as factory-made café-racers go (which is something of an oxymoron), there’s no denying that the Scrambler Café Racer is one of the best of them, if not the best.

2021 Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled

2021 Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled

The Scrambler Desert Sled does get something new for the 2021 model year: a brand new color scheme. 2021 owners can enjoy the Desert Sled wearing a new Sparkling Blue livery which serves as a tribute to the enduro racers of the 1980s. It’s got red and white details on the tank and mudguards, plus a new, off-road character for tackling the dunes. It embodies the spirit of old-school off-road riding in a modern package. Delightful.

While the exterior has had a bit of a makeover, the insides remain unchanged from 2020. Engine-wise, the Scrambler Desert Sled draws power from the usual 803cc Desmodromic L-twin unit, with 73 horsepower and 49 lb-ft of torque on tap. No surprises there, but what it lacks in engine surprises, it makes up for in aesthetic details, such as the easy-to-miss golden rims.

2021 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2021 Ducati Scrambler Icon

The last of the middleweights is the Ducati Scrambler Icon. It has no fancy title, no gimmicks, and funnily enough, no updates for 2021. However, don’t assume that its lack of extra features is a downside. It’s exactly what it’s supposed to be: an unfettered Scrambler that takes its inspiration directly from the scramblers of old. It doesn’t need any extras. In fact, less is more.

Featuring a large seat for two-up riding, a retro-themed paint job, and a gorgeous exhaust, the Scrambler Icon is one of the most popular Scrambler models. At this stage, writing about the engine is fairly redundant, but let’s do it anyway. It draws power from an 803 cc Desmodromic L-twin and makes 73 horsepower and 49 lb-ft of peak torque. Obviously.

2021 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

2021 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

And just to keep you on your toes, we have the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2. It’s the smallest Scrambler in the range and the smallest Ducati full-stop. It shuns the 803 cc engine that we’ve talked about to death, and instead features a 399 cc L-twin Desmodromic unit, making a more modest 40 horsepower and 24 lb-ft of torque, which makes it a more accessible Ducati for entry-level riders and urban commuters.

There are no changes for 2021, but none were expected. It’s a basic, no-frills Ducati, but a Ducati nonetheless and features everything you’d hope for from an exotic Italian motorcycle. It has aluminum 10-spoke rims, a 2-into-1 black exhaust, LED lights, and LCD instrumentation. An ideal bike for entry-level Ducati enthusiasts.

The post The 2021 Ducati Lineup + Our Take On Each Model appeared first on webBikeWorld.

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Sat, 16 Jan 2021 12:28:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Motorcycles Ducati Volkswagen North America Grey Black Star Sachs Brembo DRL Sian Carbon Black 2021 Matt Black Marzocchi Ducati Hypermotard Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa Panigale Ducati Corse Model lineups Multistrada Pirelli Diablo Rosso III Diavel Testastretta Brembo Stylema Öhlins NIX Ducati Quick Shifter Multistrada V4 Ducati Diavel 1260 Lamborghini Limited Ducati XDiavel Black Star North American Ducati Marzocchi Ducati Skyhook Multistradas Ducati Testastretta Showa BPF Öhlins Smart EC Ducati Scrambler Nightshift Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle Ducati Desmodromic
Startups look beyond lidar for autonomous vehicle perception http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/qiqSjVO2c-Y/ Last CES was a time of reckoning for lidar companies, many of which were cratering due to a lack of demand from a (still) non-existent autonomous vehicle industry. The few that excelled did so by specializing, and this year the trend has pushed beyond lidar, with new sensing and imaging methods pushing to both compete with and complement the laser-based tech.

Lidar pushed ahead of traditional cameras because it could do things they couldn’t — and now some companies are pushing to do the same with tech that’s a little less exotic.

As autonomy stalls, lidar companies learn to adapt

A good example of addressing the problem or perception by different means is Eye Net’s vehicle-to-x tracking platform. This is one of those techs that’s been talked about in the context of 5G (admittedly still somewhat exotic), which for all the hype really does enable short-distance, low-latency applications that could be life-savers.

Eye Net provides collision warnings between vehicles equipped with its tech, whether they have cameras or other sensing tech equipped or not. The example they provide is a car driving through a parking lot, unaware that a person on one of those horribly unsafe electric scooters is moving perpendicular to it ahead, about to zoom into its path but totally obscured by parked cars. Eye Net’s sensors detect the position of the devices on both vehicles and send warnings in time for either or both to brake.

Image Credits: Eye Net

They’re not the only ones attempting something like this, but they hope that by providing a sort of white-label solution, a good size network can be built relatively easily, instead of having none, and then all VWs equipped, and then some Fords and some e-bikes, and so on.

But vision is still going to be a major part of how vehicles navigate, and advances are being made on multiple fronts.

Brightway Vision, for instance, addresses the issue of normal RGB cameras having limited visibility in many real-world conditions by going multispectral. In addition to ordinary visible-light imagery, the company’s camera is mated to a near-infrared beamer that scans the road ahead at set distance intervals many times a second.

Image Credits: Brightway Vision

The idea is that if the main camera can’t see 100 feet out because of fog, the NIR imagery will still catch any obstacles or road features when it scans that “slice” in its regular sweep of the incoming area. It combines the benefits of traditional cameras with those of IR ones, but manages to avoid the shortcomings of both. The pitch is that there’s no reason to use a normal camera when you can use one of these, which does the same job better and may even allow another sensor to be cut out.

Foresight Automotive also uses multispectral imagery in its cameras (chances are hardly any vehicle camera will be limited to visible spectrum in a few years), dipping into thermal via a partnership with FLIR, but what it’s really selling is something else.

To provide 360-degree (or close) coverage, generally multiple cameras are required. But where those cameras go differs on a compact sedan versus an SUV from the same manufacturer — let alone on an autonomous freight vehicle. Because those cameras have to work together, they need to be perfectly calibrated, aware of the exact position of the others, so they know, for example, that they’re both looking at the same tree or bicyclist and not two identical ones.

Image Credits: Foresight Automotive

Foresight’s advance is to simplify the calibration stage, so a manufacturer or designer or test platform doesn’t need to be laboriously re-tested and certified every time the cameras need to be moved half an inch in one direction or the other. The Foresight demo shows them sticking the cameras on the roof of the car seconds before driving it.

It has parallels to another startup called Nodar that also relies on stereoscopic cameras, but takes a different approach. The technique of deriving depth from binocular triangulation, as the company points out, goes back decades, or millions of years if you count our own vision system, which works in a similar ways. The limitation that has held this approach back isn’t that optical cameras fundamentally can’t provide the depth information needed by an autonomous vehicle, but that they can’t be trusted to remain calibrated.

Nodar shows that its paired stereo cameras don’t even need to be mounted to the main mass of the car, which would reduce jitter and fractional mismatches between the cameras’ views. Attached to the rear view mirrors, their “Hammerhead” camera setup has a wide stance (like the shark’s), which provides improved accuracy because of the larger disparity between the cameras. Since distance is determined by the differences between the two images, there’s no need for object recognition or complex machine learning to say “this is a shape, probably a car, probably about this big, which means it’s probably about this far away” as you might with a single camera solution.

Image Credits: Nodar

“ The industry has already shown that camera arrays do well in harsh weather conditions, just as human eyes do,” said Nodar COO and co-founder Brad Rosen. “For example, engineers at Daimler have published results showing that current stereoscopic approaches provide significantly more stable depth estimates than monocular methods and LiDAR completion in adverse weather. The beauty of our approach is that the hardware we use is available today, in automotive-grade, and with many choices for manufacturers and distributors.”

Indeed, a major strike against lidar has been the cost of the unit — even “inexpensive” ones tend to be orders of magnitude more expensive than ordinary cameras, something that adds up very quickly. But team lidar hasn’t been standing still either.

Sense Photonics came onto the scene with a new approach that seemed to combine the best of both worlds: a relatively cheap and simple flash lidar (as opposed to spinning or scanning, which tend to add complexity) mated to a traditional camera so that the two see versions of the same image, allowing them to work together in identifying objects and establishing distances.

Sense Photonics flashes onto the lidar scene with a new approach and $26M

Since its debut in 2019 Sense has refined its tech for production and beyond. The latest advance is custom hardware that has enabled it to image objects out to 200 meters — generally considered on the far end both for lidar and traditional cameras.

“In the past, we have sourced an off-the-shelf detector to pair with our laser source (Sense Illuminator). However, our 2 years of in-house detector development has now completed and is a huge success, which allows us to build short-range and long-range automotive products,” said CEO Shauna McIntyre.

“Sense has created ‘building blocks’ for a camera-like LiDAR design that can be paired with different sets of optics to achieve different FOV, range, resolution, etc,” she continued. “And we’ve done so in a very simple design that can actually be manufactured in large volumes. You can think of our architecture like a DSLR camera where you have the ‘base camera’ and can pair it with a macro lens, zoom lens, fisheye lens, etc. to achieve different functions.”

One thing all the companies seemed to agree on is that no single sensing modality will dominate the industry from top to bottom. Leaving aside that the needs of a fully autonomous (i.e. level 4-5) vehicle has very different needs from a driver assist system, the field moves too quickly for any one approach to remain on top for long.

“AV companies cannot succeed if the public is not convinced that their platform is safe and the safety margins only increase with redundant sensor modalities operating at different wavelengths,” said McIntyre.

Whether that means visible light, near-infrared, thermal imaging, radar, lidar, or as we’ve seen here, some combination of two or three of these, it’s clear the market will continue to favor differentiation — though as with the boom-bust cycle seen in the lidar industry a few years back, it’s also a warning that consolidation won’t be far behind.

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Sat, 16 Jan 2021 12:15:16 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs TC Gadgets Transportation Hardware Tech Automotive Autonomous Vehicles Dslr Lidar Daimler McIntyre Sense Photonics Nodar Nodar COO Brad Rosen Shauna McIntyre Sense
The Renault 5 Is Reborn in 2021 As An EV Paying Homage To The Original http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/IndianAutosBlog/~3/CiqD4tOhX-c/renault-5-prototype-unveiled-p322339 Sat, 16 Jan 2021 09:00:24 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos Renault Both BMW and Audi shutter vehicle subscription programs https://www.autoblog.com/2021/01/16/bmw-audi-shut-down-subscription-programs/ Filed under: Audi,BMW,Cadillac,Car Buying,Ownership,Luxury

Continue reading Both BMW and Audi shutter vehicle subscription programs

Both BMW and Audi shutter vehicle subscription programs originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 16 Jan 2021 09:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sat, 16 Jan 2021 09:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Luxury Car Buying Autos Bmw Audi Ownership Cadillac
A lifelong car collector is auctioning 48 of his pristine Corvettes - see the 'Muscle Car City' collection http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/KT0gdfYkX_A/classic-corvette-car-auction-chevy-mecum-auction-muscle-car-city-2021-1 2010 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021/Mecum Auctions

  • Rick Treworgy spent most of his life collecting cars but now he's ready to sell most of his collection.
  • About 200 of his cars will be available at Mecum Auctions' Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021 event.
  • Of those 200 cars, 48 of them are Chevrolet Corvettes spanning from 1954 to 2020.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Chevrolet Corvette fans listen up. From January 22 to 23, you'll get a chance to bring home vehicles from one of the biggest muscle car collections ever assembled. 

Rick Treworgy spent most of his life personally adding cars to his extensive collection. Nearly all of that collection will be up for auction soon - at no reserve! - at Mecum Auctions' Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021 event in Punta Gorda, Florida. 

Among the collection are no less than 48 Corvettes, spanning all the way from 1954 to 2020. It's quite a Corvette collection to behold - scroll on to see it all.

Rick Treworgy spent much of his life collecting cars, but he's now got most of them up for auction. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

That auction includes a whopping 48 Corvettes - a number challenged only by the combination of every Chevrolet dealership within a 500-mile radius of your home. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

There's a red 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Z51. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_1 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

A red 2016 Chevrolet Corvette Z06. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_2 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

A blue 2010 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_3 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

There a red 2006 Chevrolet Corvette Z06. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_4 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

A blue 2002 Chevrolet Corvette Z06. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_5 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

A blue 1998 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_6 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

And this 1996 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_7 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a white 1992 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_8 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Then there's this red 1991 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_9 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

And this 1990 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_10 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Plus this yellow 1991 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_11 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Aaaand this 1990 red Chevrolet Corvette ZR1. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_12 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a 1975 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_13 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

And a red 1974 Chevrolet Corvette convertile. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_14 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a 1973 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_15 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a red 1972 Chevrolet Corvette LT1 coupe. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_16 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a gorgeous blue 1971 Chevrolet Corvette LS6 convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_17 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a 1971 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_18 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a 1970 Chevrolet Corvette LT1 convertible in blue. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_19 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

And a yellow 1970 Chevrolet Corvette coupe. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_20 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a 1969 Chevrolet Corvette convertible in blue. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_21 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Similarly, here's a 1969 Chevrolet Corvette convertible in yellow. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_22 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

And if you want it in black, there's this 1968 example. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_23 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

There's a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_24 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

And a red one as well. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_25 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a black 1967 Chevrolet Corvette convertible resto-mod. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_26 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette coupe. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_27 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is that, but in a different color. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_28 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This one's a 1966 Chevrolet Corvette coupe. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_29 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a red 1965 Chevrolet Corvette coupe. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_30 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a silver 1965 Chevrolet Corvette coupe. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_31 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This one's a red 1965 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_32 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a blue 1965 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_33 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a blue 1965 Chevrolet Corvette Fuelie convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_34 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a brown 1964 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_35 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's one in white. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_36 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a red 1963 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_37 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a gorgeous 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Split-Window coupe. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_38 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a 1963 Chevrolet Corvette resto-mod. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_39 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a 1962 Chevrolet Corvette convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_40 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a blue 1961 Chevrolet Corvette. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_41 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a white 1960 Chevrolet Corvette. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_42 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a dark blue 1959 Chevrolet Corvette resto-mod convertible. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_43 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a 1958 Chevrolet Corvette. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_44 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a 1957 Chevrolet Corvette. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_45 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

This is a white 1956 Chevrolet Corvette. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_46 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Here's a white-on-red 1955 Chevrolet Corvette. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_47 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

And finishing up the collection is this 1954 Chevrolet Corvette roadster. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021_48 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Is owning 48 Corvettes necessary? Probably not! Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Does give you a reason to justify buying one (1) when your significant other asks why you're buying another car? Probably! Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Go forth, friends. Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021 Rick Treworgy's Muscle Car City 2021.

Mecum Auctions

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: klee@businessinsider.com (Kristen Lee)]

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Sat, 16 Jan 2021 08:06:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Transportation Trends Autos Chevrolet Corvette Mecum Auctions Chevrolet Corvette Chevy Corvette Mecum Rick Treworgy Chevrolet Corvettes Car Auctions Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport Kristen Lee PUNTA GORDA Florida BITranspo Chevrolet Corvette Rick Treworgy
Ford Focus ST Review: The Slower Auto Is Best Avoided http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/carthrottle/~3/eDzSNcs5o0s/ Beyond being slower to 62mph, what's the new automatic Focus ST like? We drove one for a week to find out

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Sat, 16 Jan 2021 06:05:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos Ford Focus ST Review
Is the Volvo Extended Warranty Worth It? (2021) http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Automoblognet/~3/b0K6oNgVO78/
  • Volvo’s extended warranty comes in three varieties and can cover up to 120,000 miles.
  • All coverage levels include extras like towing, rental car coverage, and travel expense reimbursement.
  • You can also get extended auto warranties from third-party providers, which usually offer more flexible coverage options.
  • Affiliate disclosure: Automoblog and its partners may be compensated when you purchase the products below.

    Known for their safety features and aesthetics, Volvo vehicles impress many drivers on the road today. The Volvo extended warranty covers a range of repairs so drivers can have peace of mind and enjoy their vehicles in the long run. Because Volvos have average reliability ratings, an extended auto warranty can be a worthwhile investment.

    Beyond Volvo, third-party extended warranty providers offer additional coverage options and plan terms. We’ve reviewed the best extended car warranty providers and rated them in categories like customer service, cost, and industry reputation. There are several reputable companies, so we recommend getting multiple free quotes to find the best deal. You can start with our top recommended providers below. 

    Top Extended Warranty Companies We reviewed the best extended auto warranty providers, and here are our top picks.  Best Overall Best for Older Vehicles Best Prices logo endurance logo logo carshield Endurance CARCHEX CarShield black starblack starblack starblack starblack star black starblack starblack starblack starblack star black starblack starblack starblack starblack half star 5 1 Get Quote Get Quote Get Quote (877) 374-1840 (866) 254-0205 (800) 563-2761       Volvo Extended Warranty Overview

    Volvo offers three Volvo Increased Protection (VIP) plans: Platinum, Gold, and Powertrain. These Volvo extended warranty plans can cover an additional six years or 120,000 miles. Since Volvo’s original warranty lasts for four years, the longest VIP plan would expire at 10 years or 120,000 miles.

    Here’s what each Volvo extended warranty covers: 

    Powertrain VIP Gold VIP Platinum VIP Engine ? ? ? Cooling ? ? ? Transmission ? ? ? Drive Axle ? ? ? Hybrid Components ? ? ? Steering ? ? Brakes ? ? Air Conditioning ? ? Front and Rear Suspension ? ? Electrical ? ? Exclusionary Coverage ?

    Volvo Extended Warranty Advantages & Disadvantages

    The systems listed above do not cover every part or component. While the Platinum plan offers comprehensive coverage, there are parts and situations excluded from the plan. Here are a few examples:  

    • Glass
    • Air bags
    • Alignments 
    • Standard batteries
    • Catalytic converters
    • Body parts and panels
    • Solar-powered devices
    • Brake drums, pads, and rotors
    • Wear-and-tear items like hoses and filters
    • Damage from lack of maintenance or environmental events

    Volvo encourages drivers to visit dealerships for repairs. If you can’t make it to a dealership, you can call the extended service contract administrator to find other authorized repair service centers. The administrator may deny a repair if you don’t call ahead and find the right shop. 

    The Volvo extended warranty also offers a few advantages. All coverage plans include the following perks for covered repairs:

    • Towing up to $100 per occurrence
    • Trip interruption up to $100 per day (maximum five days)
    • Alternate transportation coverage up to $40 per day (maximum 10 days)
    • Roadside assistance, which includes flat tire services, lockout services, battery jump-starts, and fuel deliveries

    Plans are transferable to secondary drivers for a $40 fee. You can cancel a Volvo extended warranty within 30 days for a full refund at no additional cost, and if you cancel between 30 and 60 days, you’ll pay a $50 fee. After 60 days, you can cancel for a prorated refund based on time, mileage, and repairs paid. 

    Can I Buy a Volvo Extended Warranty?

    You can buy a Volvo extended warranty from a dealership in your area or through dealers that support online sales. Your vehicle is eligible as long as it is within the maximum coverage period of 10 years or 120,000 miles. Most auto brands require you to purchase a plan before the factory warranty expires, so Volvo gives drivers more flexibility in this aspect. 

    Volvo Reliability

    Volvo regularly wins awards for safety, but the brand is not known for reliability. However, this is not to say Volvo cars don’t last a long time. They just require a larger investment in repairs and maintenance. According to RepairPal, a trusted cost-estimation site, Volvo owners pay $769 per year on average for maintenance and repairs, which is more expensive than the industry average of $652. 

    RepairPal rates Volvo 3.5 out of 5.0 stars, ranking it 17th in reliability compared to 32 other brands. However, Volvo drivers are slightly less likely to encounter severe repairs than drivers of other brands. Volvos only have a 9% chance of a severe repair while the industry average stands at 12%.

    Here are some problems commonly reported by Volvo drivers along with their estimated costs (via RepairPal): 

    Volvo Model Repair Estimated Cost Volvo S60 Powertrain control module replacement $833 to $856 Volvo S60 Timing belt tensioner replacement $415 to $512 Volvo XC70 Air conditioning line replacement $731 to $754 Volvo XC70 Radiator fan assembly replacement $785 to $842

    You generally won’t encounter higher repair costs until your original manufacturer warranty expires. All new Volvo vehicles come with four years or 50,000 miles of bumper-to-bumper warranty coverage and powertrain warranty coverage. And for certified pre-owned (CPO) Volvos, the manufacturer provides five years of exclusionary warranty coverage without a mileage limit.

    Cost of a Volvo Extended Warranty

    All Volvo extended warranties come with a choice of a $0, $100, or $250 deductible. You can purchase a plan when you buy a vehicle or anytime within the coverage zone (10 years or 120,000 miles). If you finance your plan with your vehicle loan, you’ll pay more in interest over the long term.

    Our team received quotes for three VIP plans extending five years or 60,000 miles for a 2017 Volvo XC90 with 50,000 miles. The prices below are all for the same term length. Keep in mind, this quote was from a dealership website and prices can vary between dealerships.

    Deductible Platinum VIP Gold VIP Powertrain VIP $0 $6,486 $4,286 $2,707 $100 $4,818 $3,373 $2,420 $250 $4,207 $3,035 $2,287

    Overall, these prices are somewhat higher than the industry average. For drivers interested in the Volvo extended warranty, choosing a $100 deductible can save you a significant amount of money.

    How Much Should You Pay for an Extended Car Warranty?

    We’ve compared numerous extended warranty quotes from leading providers. We found the average plan costs $2,601, and prices range from about $1,300 to $4,600. A long-term bumper-to-bumper plan can be expensive, but you shouldn’t have to pay $6,486 like the quote we received for the Volvo above.  

    So, is the Volvo extended warranty worth it? Volvo’s VIP plans can be worth it if you live close to a dealership and don’t mind paying slightly more for than the market average for extended warranty coverage. However, if you want flexibility in where you can go for repairs, or if you want a longer coverage term, we suggest going with a reputable third-party provider. 

    Other Options for Extended Car Warranty Coverage

    As we mentioned above, you have many more options for extended auto warranty coverage beyond dealership plans. It’s good to know the advantages of a third-party plan when you’re shopping around. For example, most third-party extended warranties are more affordable than dealer-backed plans. 

    Leading warranty companies allow you to go to any licensed repair facility so that you can choose your shop and mechanic. You aren’t required to go to a Volvo dealership for covered repairs, but the option is available.

    Also, warranty companies usually offer better coverage options. Volvo’s extended warranty lasts up to 120,000 miles, but other providers can cover vehicles up to 200,000 or even 250,000 miles. Volvos are built for strength, and many last well beyond the 200,000-mile mark. Third-party vehicle service contracts typically come with several plan perks like roadside assistance and rental car coverage, too. 

    Volvo aims to sell only hybrid and electric vehicles by 2021. Warranty companies can cover hybrid components, but you need to be sure to pick the right plan for your vehicle. 

    When you shop around, it’s best to compare reputable extended car warranty companies with plans from Volvo. You can get free, no-obligation quotes from leading extended warranty providers below.

    Top Extended Warranty Companies We reviewed the best extended auto warranty providers, and here are our top picks.  Best Overall Best for Older Vehicles Best Prices logo endurance logo logo carshield Endurance CARCHEX CarShield black starblack starblack starblack starblack star black starblack starblack starblack starblack star black starblack starblack starblack starblack half star 5 1 Get Quote Get Quote Get Quote (877) 374-1840 (866) 254-0205 (800) 563-2761      

    Original article: Is the Volvo Extended Warranty Worth It? (2021)

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    Sat, 16 Jan 2021 05:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos Volvo Volvos Vehicle Ownership Auto Warranty Volvo Increased Protection VIP Volvo Reliability Volvo Volvo Model Repair Estimated Cost Volvo CPO Volvos
    BMW F 900 XR launched in the Philippines, costs INR 14.84 lakh http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/IndianAutosBlog/~3/N8XtoymItPw/bmw-f-900-xr-philippines-launch-p322338 Sat, 16 Jan 2021 01:30:05 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Philippines Autos First Batch Of Mercedes EQCs Sold Out In India; Second Batch Coming Soon http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/IndianAutosBlog/~3/p7m6fYp43Jw/first-batch-of-mercedes-eqc-sold-out-in-india-p322337 Fri, 15 Jan 2021 22:30:10 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs India Autos Mercedes Benz In One Continues Shot, VWs Hypnotic Ad Tells the History of Transportation http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Adfreak/~3/7dak1tjFY-I/ ]]> Fri, 15 Jan 2021 19:14:08 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Advertising Automotive Volkswagen Johannes Leonardo History of Transportation Housekeeping: In Which TTAC Observes MLK Day https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2021/01/housekeeping-in-which-ttac-observes-mlk-day/ Hey gang, the boss here. Thanks to a directive from our corporate masters, we’re off on Monday. Our bosses based in the frozen North added two U.S. holidays for 2021 — MLK Day and President’s Day. So in the honor of Martin Luther King, we’re going to be light on posts, if we post at […]

    The post Housekeeping: In Which TTAC Observes MLK Day appeared first on The Truth About Cars.

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    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 17:30:10 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mlk Autos North Martin Luther King Housekeeping Mlk Day Martin Luther King Day News Blog
    I Let My Friends Buy My New £1000 Daily http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/carthrottle/~3/0ajMl9RDH5o/ ]]> Fri, 15 Jan 2021 16:13:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos Here’s A Look At The Updated 2021 Aprilia RSV4 and Tuono https://www.webbikeworld.com/heres-a-look-at-the-updated-2021-aprilia-rsv4-and-tuono/ Aprilia has already brought us the grand unveilings of the new Tuono 660 and recently debuted RS 660 – so now it’s time for their bigger full-size brothers to get some time in the spotlight. The RSV4 and Tuono V4 are coming into 2021 with some notable updates to the base and factory versions.

    For those not caught up on Aprilia’s model guide, with both the V4 and 660 versions; the Tuono and RS share the same engine and general DNA, but the Tuono is typically more comfortable for every-day streetability leaving the RS as a highly-capable track-missile.

    2021-aprilia-rsv4 2021 RSV4

    The RSV4 (and factory edition) have seen an updated facelift with the inclusion of a triple LED headlight assembly that bend with the curvature of the road as you ride so the path ahead is more visible. Winglets stationed on the sides of the fairings have been re-seated in a better position to integrate themselves into the fairings.

    The engine has been revisited due to Euro 5 regulations and as a result, Aprilia took the opportunity to bump the engine displacement from 1077cc to 1099cc’s for a total of produce 217 horsepower.

    The RSV4 also comes with a new (and bigger) TFT display featured in the dash along with an updated ECU. The electronics have had a go-over with new multi-level engine braking, six riding modes, and the ride-by-wire system has seen improvements.

    If you have your eyes set on the RSV4 Factory, you’ll be pleased to hear that it will complete with semi-active suspension from Öhlins along with Brembo Stylema brake calipers and forged wheels to improve the track-ability of the bike.

    2021 Tuono V4

    Since the Tuono is so closely tied to the RSV4 (with the similarities far outweighing the differences), most of the changes that made their way over to the RSV4 can also be found on the Tuono: headlights, electronics (including riding modes and ride-by-wire update), ECU, IMU, fairing changes, and the rest. The Factory Tuono will also closely resemble the RSV4 Factory and reflect those changes as well.

    The main difference between the Tuono and RSV4 going into this year will be the engine. Aprilia opted to keep the 1077cc engine (producing 157 hp) in the Tuono V4, so if you’re looking for face-melting power the RSV4 is the better option in that regard.

    At the moment, we have no official pricing for the V4 duo available from Aprilia, but you can probably expect a slight pricing increase from last year’s model due to the big changes that have made their way over to both bikes.

     

     

    The post Here’s A Look At The Updated 2021 Aprilia RSV4 and Tuono appeared first on webBikeWorld.

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    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 14:21:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Motorcycles Ohlins Motorcycle News Aprilia Aprilia RSV4 Tuono Brembo Stylema Aprilia Tuono V4 Factory Tuono
    QOTD: Big Wheels, Small Sidewall – Yes or No? https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2021/01/qotd-big-wheels-small-sidewall-yes-or-no/ The debate rages on, whether 22-inch, 24-inch, even 26-inch or larger wheels, and tires without a lot of sidewall to them, are okay or not.   Is this appealing in certain parts of the country, such as Arizona, California, Texas, and throughout the South all the way down through Florida? Are the weather conditions such […]

    The post QOTD: Big Wheels, Small Sidewall – Yes or No? appeared first on The Truth About Cars.

    ]]>
    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 14:00:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Florida Autos Trucks Diesel Wheels South Enthusiasm News Blog Enthusiasts Question of the Day Show Cars Arizona California Texas Brodozers Mall Crawlers Show Trucks
    This is one cool '77 Lincoln Continental Town Coupe https://boingboing.net/2021/01/15/this-is-one-cool-77-lincoln-continental-town-coupe.html

    Smooth and slow with a giant truck spacious enough for three bodies! I still love those flip-up headlights, but I lack the imagination to own this 1977 Lincoln.

    Bring A Trailer:

    This 1977 Lincoln Continental Town Coupe was originally delivered to Dave Pyles Lincoln of Alexandria, Virginia and was acquired around 2001 by the current owner's late husband.

    Read the rest ]]>
    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 13:16:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Post News Cars Automotive Lincoln Continental Alexandria Virginia Lincoln Continental Town Coupe Dave Pyles Lincoln
    Rare Rides: The 1967 Hino Contessa 1300S, Rear-engine Blip on the Radar https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2021/01/rare-rides-the-1967-hino-contessa-1300s-rear-engine-blip-on-the-radar/ Hino is a well-known producer of commercial vehicles today and has been in the commercial truck market since World War II. But for a short while in the Sixties, they built their own rear-engine passenger car. Say hello to Contessa. The Contessa traced its roots back to the Renault 4CV. Produced between 1947 and 1961, […]

    The post Rare Rides: The 1967 Hino Contessa 1300S, Rear-engine Blip on the Radar appeared first on The Truth About Cars.

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    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 13:00:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos Renault Hino
    How the Chevy Corvette went from America's icon to mid-engine marvel taking after Ferraris and Lamborghinis http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/VpPtCMuAt-U/corvette-history-chevy-chevrolet-1953-debut-mid-engine-supercar-2020-5 All eight generations of the Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    • For almost 70 years, the Chevrolet Corvette was a front-engined sports car.
    • It was a great performer, but was missing that one last element that'd make it competitive in the global sports-car market.
    • The 2020 Corvette is now mid-engined and a worthy international competitor.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories

    Despite the generous offering of American muscle cars available to buyers today, there's only one considered to be America's sports car. That car is the Chevrolet Corvette.

    The Corvette is currently in its eighth generation - and for the first time in its 67-year history, it finally has the setup that makes it competitive with the likes of the European supercars. 

    See, for the first seven generations, the Corvette stuck with a very traditional, front-engine layout, meaning its engine was located in front of the driver. Of course, there's nothing inherently wrong with a front-engine setup, but it's also a setup that very pedestrian cars like Toyota Camry also have. 

    In racing and with supercars, a mid-engine layout is generally much more preferred. A mid-engine layout is when the engine is located behind the driver and between the car's front and rear axles. Generally, mid-engine cars offer improved balance and handling because the heaviest part of the car - its engine - isn't located on only one end. 

    For decades, talk of a mid-engine Corvette flitted about the automotive industry. Years went by and nothing concrete ever came of it. The "mid-engine Corvette" sort of became an automotive tall tale. 

    Those rumors were finally laid to rest with the eight-generation Corvette, also known as the "C8" generation: the mid-engine Corvette, actualized. America's sports car had finally grown up and was ready to take on the global performance segment.

    How did we get here? Why does the C8 matter? Dear reader, keep scrolling to find out.

    On January 17, 1953, the Chevrolet C1 Corvette was displayed as a "dream car" at the General Motors Motorama exposition at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City. 1953 Corvette Motorama Show Car B3729 0279 1953 Corvette Motorama show car.

    Chevrolet


    It was a futuristic-looking sports car, with an engine mounted in the front. That layout would persevere for the next six decades.

    The Corvette logo bore two crossed flags: a checkered one and one with the Chevrolet bow-tie and a fleur-de-lis - a French symbol for purity. 1953CCF 1953 Corvette logo.

    Chevrolet

    On June 30, the first production-ready Corvette was built at an assembly plant in Flint, Michigan. 1953 Chevrolet Corvette 77172 1953 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    It was the first mass-produced car to have an all-fiberglass body, making it very light. 1953 Chevrolet Corvette D 1953 CORVETTE 1953_Chevrolet_Motorama_Corvette_2 1953 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    In those days, fiberglass was also more flexible than something that could be stamped out in a steel press, so the resulting Corvette's body was curvier than most had ever seen before. 1953 Chevrolet Corvette Sketch 070806 1953 Chevrolet Corvette sketch.

    Chevrolet

    As of 1955, the car was available with a 265 cubic-inch small-block V8 and a three-speed manual transmission. 1954 Chevrolet Corvette 1954 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    All first-generation Corvettes were convertibles. 1957 Corvette 50367 1957 Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    And the first generation established styling elements that would become staples of Corvettes to come: the iconic dual-round tail lights and cockpit-style interior.

    The year the C1 Corvette came out, a Belgian engineer named Zora Arkus-Duntov began trying to shape it into something much more performance oriented. 1966 Corvette wtih Zora Arkus-Duntov 1966 Corvette wtih Zora Arkus-Duntov.

    Chevrolet.


    Ultimately, Arkus-Dontov was the one who pushed hardest for a mid-engine Corvette. During the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1957, a front-engine Corvette race car recorded a DNF — a "did not finish" in racing speak. What was more, the driver's feet were burning because of the engine's placement.

    This race convinced Arkus-Dontov that the engine had to be behind the driver. It sparked years of mid-engine concepts and experiments that never panned out, but always seemed to be tantalizingly close production wise.

    But no mid-engine car came. 1958 Corvette Convertible 251618 1958 Corvette convertible.

    Chevrolet


    Instead, in 1958, Chevrolet introduced a slight design refresh for dual headlights.

    The 1959 Sting Ray Racer was a concept that embodied the aesthetics of speed in its day. 1959 Corvette Sting Ray Racer D 05 00540 A0FT0459 1959 Corvette Stingray racer.

    Chevrolet


    It went on to inspire the looks of the next-gen C2 Corvette.

    The 1960 Corvette was the last Corvette to feature the "teeth" looking front grille. 1960 Chevy Corvette Convertible C2709 0031 1960 Chevy Corvette convertible

    Chevrolet


    The C1 Corvette lasted from 1953 through 1962.

    Also in 1960, the model made its debut at the world-famous 24 Hours of Le Mans race in France with three race-prepped Corvettes. 1960 Corvette at Le Mans DN248 0021 1960 Corvette at Le Mans.

    Chevrolet

    At the race's end, only one Corvette was still running and finished 8th overall. 1960 Corvette Racer 1 LeMans DN248 0014 1960 Corvette Racer 1 at Le Mans.

    Chevrolet


    You can see a documentary of the race here. It's pretty neat.

    The C2 Corvette lasted from 1963 to 1967. 1962CCF 1962 Corvette logo.

    Chevrolet

    It was nicknamed “Sting Ray” after the influential concept car. 1963 Chevrolet Corvette 055_Corvette_06 0193 1963 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Whereas the C1 used a modified passenger-sedan platform, the C2 was built on a completely new and dedicated platform. 1966 Chevrolet Corvette 1966 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    It also had one of the most beautiful Corvette designs in history: the split rear window. 1963 Chevrolet Corvette CX7260 3VET 0004 1963 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    The Corvette Sting Ray "Split Window" Coupe had a sort of  "spine" that ran down the length of its body and manifested in a sectioned rear window.

    Ultimately, the split-window design was abandoned after a time because it resulted in poor visibility. 1963 Corvette C2709 0033 1963 Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    Sad.

    Because the Corvette was now offered as a coupe, GM was able to nearly double its sales. 1965 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible 51593 1965 Chevrolet Corvette convertible.

    Chevrolet

    The C3 is currently the Corvette's longest-running generation, spanning from 1968 to 1982. 1972CCF 1972 Corvette logo

    Chevrolet

    This is also the Corvette that weathered the oil crisis in the 1970s, which devastated the muscle-car industry. 1966 Chevrolet Corvette B3729 0308 1966 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Early C3s came with powerful, ozone-destroying, 435-horsepower big-block engines. 1968 Chevrolet Corvette CX2760 F 0017 1968 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Industry changes and tightening emissions resulted in 165-horsepower small-block engines in 1975. 1968 Chevrolet Corvette W68HV_CH009 1968 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Regardless, the C3 was still cool, with its aggressive styling, long hood, and retractable headlights. 1972 Chevrolet Corvette 1972 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    It had industry-first "T-top" removable roof panels!

    The name was also slightly changed from “Sting Ray” to “Stingray,” but Corvette fans preferred to call the C3 a “shark.” 1973 Chevrolet Corvette C2236 0102 1973 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Corvette production had moved from Flint, Michigan, to St. Louis, Missouri in the 1950s. 1973 Chevrolet Corvette W73HV_CH008 1973 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    In 1981, GM moved Corvette production to Bowling Green, Kentucky, where it remains today. 1977 Corvette C2636 0196 1977 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Maybe it's because the C3 was around for so long, but it's probably the least-liked generation by fans. 1978 Chevrolet Corvette Pace Car X02MO_CH052 1978 Chevrolet Corvette pace car.

    Chevrolet

    Edmunds said it "overstayed its welcome by at least five years." 1978 Chevrolet Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition CX2766 0408 1978 Chevrolet Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition.

    Chevrolet


    Source: Edmunds

    Still, something about the C3 worked. 1979 Chevrolet Corvette 122104 1979 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    A total of 58,307 Corvettes were sold in 1979, which, in 2013, was still the highest they'd ever been.

    The C4 generation ran from 1983 to 1996. 1984CCF 1984 Corvette logo.

    Chevrolet

    The ‘80s and ‘90s signified the Corvette’s technology era. 1984 Chevrolet Corvette C 5209 0074 1984 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The car got an electroluminescent instrument panel with digital readouts. 1984 Corvette 70646 1984 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    These, according to GM, really "captured the zeitgeist of the circuit board era." 1987 Chevrolet Corvette 1987 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    Source: General Motors

    Then came the ZR1, a Corvette made to take on the European sports cars. 1989 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 1989 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet


    It was wider, had better tires, and, as noted by Road & Track, the LT5 5.7-liter V8 engine was unique to the ZR1. The LT5 was jointly developed with Lotus and boat-motor company Mercury Marine. The car made an impressive 380 horsepower and could hit 60 mph from a standstill in just 4.9 seconds.

    The C4 ZR1's run spanned from 1990 to 1995. 1990 Corvette ZR1 C5909 R774 0007 1990 Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    The C4 Corvette was also incredibly aerodynamic. 1990 Chevrolet Corvette C5909 0599 1990 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    It had a 0.34 coefficient of drag, which was almost 25% less than the outgoing C3.

    The C5 generation ran from 1997 to 2004. 1997CCF 1997 Corvette logo.

    Chevrolet

    Despite it being larger than the C4, it was actually 100 pounds lighter than the car it replaced. 1997 Chevrolet Corvette 74704 1997 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    This was because the C5 used way more plastic in its construction. 1997 Chevrolet Corvette CX7660 7VET 0020 1997 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    You can decide for yourself if that’s a good or bad thing. 2001 Chevrolet Corvette 2001 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The 2001 C5 Z06 was a performance variant that had a 385-horsepower LS6 V8. 2001 Chevrolet CorvetteZ06 2001 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

    Chevrolet


    It had a top speed of more than 170 mph.

    The 2002 Z06 increased power to make a respectable 405 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque. 2002 Chevrolet CorvetteZ06 2002 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

    Chevrolet


    Even by today's standards, that's a lot.

    The C6 generation spanned from 2005 to 2013. 2005CCF 2005 Corvette logo.

    Chevrolet

    GM got with the times here and did away with the raised headlights. 2009 Chevrolet Corvette X09CH CR117 2009 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    It wasn't a bad move.

    The C6 was powered by a 6.0-liter V8. 2005 Chevrolet Corvette X05CH CR039 2005 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    It made 400 horsepower. 2005 Corvette 75225 2005 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    It was also the first Corvette to offer navigation. 2005 Chevrolet Corvette Conv  CX05CH_CR059 2005 Chevrolet Corvette convertible.

    Chevrolet

    But the 2006 C6 Z06 was truly one of the coolest Corvettes ever made. 2006 Chevrolet CorvetteZ06 02 2006 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

    Chevrolet


    Powered by a massive, naturally aspirated 7.0-liter LS7 V8, the Z06 produced 505 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque. It made a noise like metal being torn apart.

    It also weighed less than 3,200 pounds, so its power-to-weight ratio was excellent. 2006 Chevrolet CorvetteZ06 03 2006 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

    Chevrolet


    It might have looked similar to regular C6s, but underneath, the Z06 was anything but. It had an aluminum frame, a magnesium engine cradle, and carbon-fiber front fenders, front wheel houses, and rear fenders.

    In 2009 came the C6 ZR1 - a fire-breathing, supercharged monster. 2008 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 254518 2008 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    The ZR1 had the same aluminum chassis structure found in the Z06 but also used more carbon-fiber body parts, including the roof panel. 2008 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1254516 2008 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    The car produced 638 horsepower and had a top speed of 205 mph. 2009 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 255348 2009 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    It was so cool. 2009 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 X09CH_CR129 2009 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    Here are some Corvettes celebrating the brand's 50th anniversary of running at Le Mans at Laguna Seca Raceway. 2010 Corvette Racing Le Mans 50th Anniversary 1PRN7498 2010 Corvette Racing Le Mans 50th Anniversary.

    Chevrolet


    (Now called WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca.)

    There was also the Corvette C6.R, built for endurance racing. 2011 C6R Race Car 271629 2011 C6R race car.

    Chevrolet


    Here's one in 2009.

    The car is particularly striking in yellow. 2011 Corvette 269418 2011 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    It's two generations old, but it's aged very well. 2013 Chevrolet Corvette 427 054 2013 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Production of the C6 officially stopped on February 28, 2013. 2013 Chevrolet Corvette 2013 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The C7 Corvette spanned from 2014 to 2019. 2014CCF 2014 Corvette logo.

    Chevrolet

    Its looks noticeably sharpened up. 2014 Chevrolet Corvette 056 2014 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The rounded aesthetic it carried from the ‘50s was gone. 2014 Chevrolet Corvette 104 2014 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The C7 also used an aluminum frame. 2014 Chevrolet Corvette 106 2014 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    But the base model was 60% stiffer than the performance-focused Z06 and ZR1 from the previous C6 generation.

    Also, with the C7, GM brought back the "Stingray" designation for the base model. 2014 Chevrolet Corvette 115 2014 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The C7 Stingrays had LT1 V8 engines that produced 460 horsepower. 2014 Chevrolet CorvetteConv 150 2014 Chevrolet Corvette convertible.

    Chevrolet

    The Z06 also appeared once more as a track weapon. 2016 Chevrolet CorvetteZ06 048 2016 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

    Chevrolet

    But this time it had a supercharged LT4 V8 engine. 2016 Chevrolet CorvetteZ06 050 2016 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

    Chevrolet

    It produced 650 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque. 2016 Chevrolet CorvetteZ06 052 2016 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

    Chevrolet


    Unfortunately, the Z06 also apparently had some overheating issues. A class-action lawsuit filed by Z06 owners claimed the car had a cooling system defect that forced it to go into limp mode after 15 minutes of track use.

    And then came the C7 ZR1. 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 003 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    I’d think 638 horsepower from the C6 was already enough, but clearly I don’t know anything. 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 005 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    The car made 755 horsepower and 715 pound-feet of torque from its supercharged, 6.2-liter LT5 V8. 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 013 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

    Chevrolet

    It is currently the most powerful Corvette ever built from the factory. 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 Convertible 015 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 convertible.

    Chevrolet

    And in 2020, the world saw the first and official mid-engine Corvette. 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 170 2020 Corvette logo.

    Chevrolet


    Finally.

    More than six decades after the overheating race car and all of Zora Arkus-Duntov's dreaming, the car is real at last. 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 201 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray.

    Chevrolet

    The 2020 C8 is sleek. Pointy faced. A little ungainly looking in profile, perhaps. 2020 Corvette DSC_8455 2020 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    But it’s real, and it has a naturally aspirated V8 between its axles. 2020 Corvette D55_4834 2020 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    A V8 that makes about 500 horsepower in a mid-engine car that can be had for less than $60,000. 2020 Corvette DSC_9255 2020 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Unfortunately, none of the C8 Corvettes will be offered with a manual transmission. 2020 Corvette DSC_8738 2020 Corvette.

    Chevrolet


    This is because, according to Car and Driver, people just didn't buy enough manual C7 for GM to see a business case in offering manual C8s.

    That angered many purists. 2020 Corvette DSC_9293 2020 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The Z06 and ZR1 offerings haven't been officially announced yet. But if or when they come out, they'll probably make more than 1,000 horsepower. 2020 Corvette DSC_9468 2020 Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Corvette deliveries faced delays because of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, meaning some customers would get the 2021 model instead. 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 246 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray.

    Chevrolet

    A rumor in January 2021 stated that GM might be working on a Corvette-branded, high-performance crossover to compete with the Lamborghini Urus. 2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_47 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    Source: Insider

    Read the original article on Business Insider

    [Author: klee@businessinsider.com (Kristen Lee)]

    ]]>
    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 12:28:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Transportation France New York City America Trends General Motors Gm Autos Toyota Lotus Chevrolet Corvette Flint Michigan Waldorf Astoria St Louis Missouri Chevrolet Corvette Chevy Corvette Bowling Green Kentucky Zora Arkus Duntov Kristen Lee Laguna Seca Raceway Chevrolet GM WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca Corvette C8 General Motors Motorama Arkus Dontov Ray Racer Corvette Sting Ray Split Window Coupe BITranspo Chevrolet Corvette Kristen Lee Chevrolet Corvette Chevrolet Corvette Motorama Chevrolet Corvette Chevrolet Corvette Chevrolet Edmunds Chevrolet Corvette Chevrolet Source Chevrolet Corvette Chevrolet It Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Chevrolet Corvette Chevrolet Corvette
    Husqvarna’s Norden 901 Release Delayed By Patents https://www.webbikeworld.com/husqvarnas-norden-901-release-delayed-by-patents/ It’s been quite some time since the covers were torn off of Husqvarna’s plans to bring a larger adventure bike to the market, and many of us have been wondering when the heck we can expect an official release as the anticipation for this model increases.

    At the time, we still don’t have a definitive answer from Husqvarna as to when we should expect this ADV bike to hit showrooms, but we do have a glimmer of hope coming in the form of patent data that points us in a proper direction as to what has been holding up this release.

    husqvarna Nordern Concept

    A few weeks ago, KTM filed a patent detailing a headlight-embedded radar system that hints towards an adaptive cruise control system that will be coming to later KTM and Husqvarna models. As the Norden 901 is a brand new model and Husky’s introduction to the ADV market, I’m sure that it’s in their best interest to ‘stick the landing’ right the first time and not miss out on any key features the market may be expecting; ala ACC.

    The patent documents reveal this ACC system inlaid into a few different KTM headlight assemblies, but most importantly we can see an example of a large circular headlight that also features this adaptive cruise control system. ACC systems work wonders in touring platforms and make sense to package into a bike suited for going the distance, so it’s no surprise that the Norden 901’s release will be prolonged until they perfect the ACC system.

    KTM’s first motorcycle outfitted with the ACC system should roll out at the end of this month, so it’s safe to assume the Norden will follow suit at some point in the near future.

    The post Husqvarna’s Norden 901 Release Delayed By Patents appeared first on webBikeWorld.

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    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 12:27:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News Motorcycles Husqvarna KTM Norden Motorcycle News Husqvarna Norden 901
    Thruxton Gullwing X: A twist on classic café racer style http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Bikeexif/~3/--9ch4nASiI/thruxton-cafe-racer-tamarit Triumph Thruxton Gullwing cafe racer by Tamarit
    Every car enthusiast of a certain age knows the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL. It made roof-hinged ‘gullwing’ doors famous—despite being a design trick first seen on the Bugatti Type 64. And it’s one of the most iconic sportscars of the last century.

    The 300 SL has inspired the Alicante workshop Tamarit to create a limited edition series of customs, and the latest version is ‘Gullwing X.’ The link to the Mercedes design is the new bodywork on the bike, which is a monocoque arrangement with a front-mounted hinge allowing it to be lifted up at the back.

    Triumph Thruxton 'Gullwing' cafe racer by Tamarit
    ‘X’ is an upgraded version of Tamarit’s ‘Gullwing‘ design, and this prototype is the first in a limited series of nine. Tamarit’s José Antonio describes it as a ‘sport’ version: “Parts like the brakes, rims, carbs and cooling system are dramatically improved.” And quite aside from the nifty engineering, it’s drop dead gorgeous.

    The base is a carbureted Triumph Thruxton, which means it’s powered by the classic 865cc air-cooled parallel twin that offers 70 hp in stock form.

    Triumph Thruxton Gullwing cafe racer by Tamarit
    Tamarit reckon their version is pumping out a stonking 98 horses, thanks to a complete engine rebuild, big valves, hot cams, and a free-flowing Tamarit ‘Speedster’ exhaust system. Plus two Keihin FCR39 racing flat slide carburetors with the essential TPS sensors.

    The velocity stacks shown in the images are replaced by a pair of K&N pod filters for road use, but this engine has a much stronger and smoother ‘pull’ throughout the rev range than the standard setup. There’s also a custom oil-cooler-in-frame setup, with machined fins that help the cooling system work more effectively.

    Triumph Thruxton Gullwing cafe racer by Tamarit
    The new bodywork is made from fiberglass, with the standard fuel cell attached to it via a skeletal frame on the inside. “The biggest challenge was fitting the hydraulics inside, so the one-piece body can be lifted to access the battery and the rest of the electronics,” says José.

    The hydraulic components are within the frame tubes, under the four gel seat pads of the shortened tail unit and custom subframe. There’s a hinge unit by the steering neck, and the body is secured to the frame by several pins. It takes just the turn of a key to release it.

    Triumph Thruxton Gullwing cafe racer by Tamarit
    The fairing is designed and hand-made by Tamarit, and shaped to echo the retro curves of the 300SL.

    The wheels are especially stunning: they’re Kineo’s lightweight ‘Radio’ design, matched to Galfer discs and Beringer calipers, with Kustom Tech levers on the bars. The top triple tree is custom, with an inset Motogadget digital speedo and warning lights to keep the cockpit super-clean.

    Triumph Thruxton Gullwing cafe racer by Tamarit
    Despite the vintage look of the forks, they’re reconditioned originals—with new internals from Hagon, and chromed ‘springs’ added to the top to accentuate the retro vibe. The shocks are also deceptively modern, being Hagon ‘Nitro’ fully adjustable units with stainless steel construction.

    More modernity comes from the electrics, which are routed through the omnipresent Motogadget mo.unit control box. And for easy starting, there’s a keyless mo.lock contact-free digital ignition system.

    Triumph Thruxton Gullwing cafe racer by Tamarit
    For us, the Gullwing X is just the right mix of ‘modern’ and ‘classic.’ The styling is faultless, it’s got oodles of power, and it’s likely to be as reliable as any modern showroom bike.

    If we were putting in an order, we’d change out those Victory Classic TT tires though. This Spanish flyer looks like it could hold its own on the twisties as well as the straights.

    Tamarit Motorcycles | Facebook | Instagram

    ]]>
    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 12:01:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Motorcycles Mercedes Benz Alicante Jose Antonio Custom Motorcycles Keihin Kineo Motogadget Hagon Triumph motorcycles Triumph Thruxton Tamarit Beringer Kustom Tech Triumph cafe racer Cafe racers Hagon ` Nitro
    Kia Seeks World Domination https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2021/01/kia-seeks-world-domination/ Kia, no longer content to occupy the second tier among carmakers, yesterday held a virtual press conference to announce their plans for world domination. Dropping Motors America from their name was the first indicator, as the company now known as just Kia moves forward. We reported the other day on Kia’s new logo, a bold […]

    The post Kia Seeks World Domination appeared first on The Truth About Cars.

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    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 12:00:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Design Marketing Global Electric Vehicles Korea Autos Kia Korean Branding Kia Motors America News Blog World Domination Dropping Motors America
    Turns Out You Can Fit A V8 In A Tesla Model S http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/carthrottle/~3/4pvUXUfIEqU/ Rich Rebuilds is attempting to build the first running V8-transplanted Model S, and is off to a tremendous start

    ]]>
    Fri, 15 Jan 2021 12:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Autos
    Uber planning to spin out Postmates’ delivery robot arm http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/fT_OnD2HefM/ Another Uber spinout is in the works.

    Postmates X, the robotics division of the on-demand delivery startup that Uber acquired last year for $2.65 billion, is seeking investors in its bid to become a separate company, according to several people familiar with the plans.

    The startup is being referred to as Serve Robotics, a nod to the yellow and black-emblazoned autonomous sidewalk delivery bot that was developed and piloted by Postmates X. The Serve robot, which recently partnered with Pink Dot Stores for deliveries in West Hollywood, will likely be the centerpiece of the new startup.

    Uber declined to comment.

    Under the deal, which is being shopped to investors, the company would be run by Ali Kashani, who heads up Postmates X and leads the Serve program. Anthony Armenta would lead the startup’s software efforts and Aaron Leiba would be in charge of hardware — keeping the same positions they hold at Postmates X.

    Uber would retain an ownership stake in Serve Robotics and maintain a commercial agreement with the startup. Serve would get the IP and assets in exchange. Uber is in discussions to retain about a 25% stake in the new startup, according to one source familiar with the deal.

    There is not a legal entity — as of yet — named Serve Robotics. However, a website domain serverobotics.com was registered January 6.

    Uber’s path to profits

    The spinoff would be in line with Uber’s streamlined business strategy that began to take shape after its public market debut in May 2019 and accelerated last year as the COVID-19 pandemic put pressure on the ride-hailing company. Two years ago, Uber had enterprises across the transportation landscape from ride-hailing and micromobility to logistics, public transit, food delivery and futuristic bets like autonomous vehicles and air taxis. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has dismantled the everything-but-the-kitchen-sink approach as he pushes the company towards profitability.

    In 2020, Uber offloaded shared scooter and bike unit Jump in a complex deal with Lime, sold a stake worth $500 million in its logistics spin off Uber Freight and rid itself of its autonomous vehicle unit Uber ATG and its air taxi play Uber Elevate.

    Aurora acquired Uber ATG in a deal that had a similar structure to the Jump-Lime transaction. Aurora didn’t pay cash for Uber ATG. Instead, Uber handed over its equity in ATG and invested $400 million into Aurora, which gave it a 26% stake in the combined company,

    In a similarly crafted deal, Uber Elevate was sold to Joby Aviation in December.

    Delivery remained the one area that Uber has invested in. The company, seeing an opportunity as demand skyrocketed for its Uber Eats delivery service, started looking for an acquisition to strengthen its position. Uber tried and failed to buy Grubhub, losing out to European heavyweight Just Eat Takeaway.

    Uber landed on Postmates and in July 2020 agreed to buy the delivery startup in an all-stock deal valued at $2.65 billion. The deal closed in December.

    Serve, the friendly robot

    Postmates’ exploration into sidewalk delivery bots began in earnest in 2017 after the company quietly acquired Kashani’s startup Lox Inc. As head of Postmates X, the company’s R&D arm, Kashani set out to answer the question: ‘why move two-pound burritos with two-ton cars?’

    Postmates revealed its first Serve autonomous delivery bot in December 2018. A second-generation — with an identical design but different lidar sensors and few other upgrades — emerged in summer 2019 ahead of its planned commercial launch in Los Angeles.

    Instead of working with a partner, Postmates used its own delivery data to form the foundation of how it would design and deploy a sidewalk bot, according to comments Kashani made during TC Sessions: Mobility 2020 event in October.

    “When you look at the data and see that over half of deliveries are within a short distance it becomes a no brainer — these robots can actually complete them,” Kashani said at the time in reference to the application of autonomous delivery bots for delivery.

    The Postmates X used historical delivery data from the company to develop a simulation, which was then used in the design of the Serve bot. It helped the team determine what battery life would be needed and the size of the cargo hold, among other features.

    The bot only represented a sliver of Postmates’ delivery business. However, the company has seen an increase interest in the bot in Los Angeles and San Francisco — the two cities where it commercially operates — as COVID-19 fueled demand for contactless delivery.

    Kashani noted back in October that the bots had completed thousands of deliveries in Los Angeles and was preparing to expand into the city’s West Hollywood enclave. That expansion launched late last year with a twist. The Serve robots were changed to a bright pink to match the signature color of the Pink Dot stores.

    Help wanted: Autonomous robot guide

    ]]> Fri, 15 Jan 2021 11:39:21 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Transportation Uber Los Angeles San Francisco Tech Automotive Postmates Lime West Hollywood Aurora ATG GrubHub Dara Khosrowshahi Kashani Aurora Innovation Pink Dot Uber ATG Joby Aviation Ali Kashani Serve Robotics Pink Dot Stores Anthony Armenta Aaron Leiba Postmates X Uber Uber Elevate Aurora Uber ATG Instead Uber Lox Inc The coolest car gadgets for 2021 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/E4bQicZqMg4/ ]]> Fri, 15 Jan 2021 10:24:45 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Apple Android Mobile Cars Trends Automotive Other Buying Guides Escort Best Of Everything Tile Mate Tier 4 REVIEW: The $80,000 mid-engine Corvette is the best bargain supercar, yet it's unexpectedly tame to drive http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/3GoNoec9uZk/chevrolet-corvette-mid-engine-review-c8-horsepower-price-specs-chevy-2020-10 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    • The 2020 Chevrolet Corvette is the first mid-engine Corvette ever.
    • It has a naturally aspirated V8 between its axles that makes nearly 500 horsepower.
    • Starting MSRP for the mid-engine Corvette is $58,900. But after options, my loaner came out to $80,315.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    The person walking their dog pumped a fist triumphantly into the air upon seeing my Rapid Blue 2020 Corvette loaner drive by. So did a driver in their brand-new Corvette, going the opposite way on I-80. Another driver in an oncoming red Ferrari 488 flashed their lights in greeting.

    Wherever you go in the new Corvette, that'll be the standard reaction - for a while, at least, until everyone calms down about the car a bit.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_46 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    That's because the new Corvette is exciting, and it's a seismic shift from any other Corvette in history. America's Sports Car has finally landed in the form of the mid-engine supercar - an idea that's been in the works since the late 1950s, but never actually came to be. 

    That is, until now. 

    The mid-engine Corvette is no longer a myth, no longer a tall tale. This is the real thing, designed to go toe-to-toe against the other midship sports cars and supercars that command much, much higher price tags.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_37 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    Unlike some of the mid-engine options from Italy or Britain, however, the mid-engine Corvette isn't merely a noisy, one-trick track pony. It calms down into everyday civility, broadening the number of places you can actually use it.  The 2020 Corvette: Folklore no more 

    Since 1953, the Corvette has been Chevrolet's two-door, two-seater sports car. For the first seven generations, it used a traditional front-engine setup, where the engine was located in front of the driver.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_47 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    For the current and eighth generation, also known as the "C8," the Corvette finally went mid-engine, tucking its power source behind the driver and between the front and rear axles. Rumors of the Corvette going mid-engine have been swirling for decades. With the C8, they finally became true. 

    Mid-engine setups are generally seen as the more naturally performance-oriented ones. Ferrari, Lamborghini, Porsche, and McLaren choose not to use the tired, old front-engine setup seen in both your Ford Fusion and the Corvettes of years past. Mid-engine cars are praised for their balance and handling, since most of their weight isn't located at one extreme end. 

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_26 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    For lifelong Corvette fans and enthusiasts, the move to midship is a controversial one - added to the fact that the C8 Corvette will not offer a manual transmission. Primarily, the reason for dropping the stick had to do with demand. 

    When the C7 Corvette launched as a 2014 model, about half of its customers optioned it with a manual transmission. By the end of the C7's production run, however, the number had shrunk to only 20%. That, according to Car and Driver, was enough to convince General Motors' money team to axe the manual option on the C8 altogether.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_7 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    You've only got yourselves to blame for this.  Details and safety ratings: An all-American V8 

    Cheer up, though. The C8 has plenty of other good stuff, like its naturally aspirated V8. Most automakers don't offer that anymore! 

    Packed between the base C8's axles is Chevrolet's LT2 engine: a 6.2-liter V8 that produces a claimed 495 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque. All of that is sent to the rear wheels via an eight-speed dual-clutch transmission. The automaker quotes a sub-three-second time to get from 0 to 60 mph when the base car has the $5,000 Z51 Performance Package.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 214 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Overall, the C8 measures 15.2 feet long, 6.3 feet wide, and four feet tall. Its dry weight - meaning its weight without onboard consumables such as cargo or people - comes to 3,366 pounds. 

    Because the engine is now no longer in the nose, the C8 has two trunks: one in the front and one in the back. The front trunk will fit a pretty average-sized carry-on suitcase, while the rear trunk is much longer and will fit a set of golf clubs, according to Chevrolet. Why this is a unit of measurement is beyond me. 

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 061 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    Anyway, Chevrolet quotes the C8 to have 12.6 total cubic feet of cargo volume. This is slightly less than the Porsche 718 Cayman, which is also mid-engined and has a combined cargo volume of 14.9 cubic feet from its two trunks, according to US News.

    The Environmental Protection Agency estimates the C8 to return 15 mpg in the city, 27 mpg on the highway, and 19 mpg combined. Corvettes, like many sports cars, generally aren't rated for their crashworthiness. 

    What stands out: The steering, suspension, and transmission are your friends  2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_33 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    The new Corvette's steering is wonderful. You only need about five seconds with the car to realize this. Tight, beautifully weighted, and acute, the C8's steering fills you with confidence. It builds trust, relaying gobs information up through your fingers and obeying even the smallest inputs. 

    This particular loaner came with the $5,000 Z51 Performance Package, which adds performance brakes, suspension, and exhaust, as well as a special rear spoiler. There was also the $1,895 Magnetic Ride Control option: GM's highly adaptive suspension system that uses magnetically controlled shock absorbers.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_30 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    Combined, these options give the C8 a solid and stiff-feeling ride, certainly less bouncy than the Z51-less C8 I tried out in 2020. It's not a ride that will shake your spine to pieces like it has something to prove, but rather one that clearly articulates the road surface and how the car is responding to it. There's no body roll - or lean - to speak of.

    The road feedback doesn't mean the C8 is murderous on your bones over long distances, though. It cruises comfortably, its cylinder deactivation system keeping four of the eight cylinders inactive in order to save fuel. 

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 060 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    When that happens, the Corvette putters along quietly, its dual-clutch transmission keeping the engine's revs low in eighth gear. That dual-clutch, despite being a sore spot for many purists, is in fact quite good. 

    It's relentlessly fast on upshifts and snappy on the way back down. DCTs, as I've experienced them elsewhere, typically don't handle stop-and-go traffic very well. They shudder all the way down, jerking to match the right gear with the steadily decreasing speed of the car. 

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Engine 100 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    The C8's DCT is comparatively slick, shudder-free in traffic, and smooth as glass. So smooth, in fact, that you can barely feel it working in the car's comfort mode. Under harder driving I sort of wish the transmission made its presence a bit more known, but during around-town cruising, it was ideal.

    The removable roof is nice, too. It unclips easily and you can store it in the trunk, though you sacrifice rear trunk space if you do.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 059 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    What falls short: An all-consuming interior 

    When Chevrolet set out to build the new C8, it really seems like the intent was to remake the whole thing. The engine got moved. The base version is slightly more powerful. There's no more manual transmission. No more chrome wheels.

    And the interior went from this, which was just fine and serviceable:

    2018 Chevrolet CorvetteConv 045 2018 C7-generation Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    To this:

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 223 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    As you can see, the big change was moving all the climate buttons to the giant, driver-oriented ridge thingy that sweeps down the center console like a spine and cleaves the cabin in two. 

    Here's a closer look at it.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 219 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    In the Corvette, the interior was one place that needed no revamping. It was just fine in the previous-generation C7.

    The very best thing I can say about the new one is it looks like Star Trek cosplay. The worst I can say is that it's claustrophobic. From the driver's seat, I felt consumed, swallowed up by the tallness of the center console, the high window line and the narrow, steeply raked windshield. 

    Outward visibility is not great, which did not help to alleviate the overwhelming sense of mass that came from sitting in the new Corvette. The car is and feels big to drive. Intellectually, I knew I could fit it on the tight, twisting roads of Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Emotionally, I'd still cringe a bit when there was an oncoming car. 

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 218 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Chevrolet

    As a passenger, you feel quite isolated from the driver - cut off completely - and your own climate control buttons aren't even facing you. It's a good interior for two people who are having a fight, I guess.

    The C8 also could have used more nighttime testing, if the final product is anything to go by. When driving at night, light from the center infotainment screen reflects off of the partition behind the cabin, which then reflects directly into the rearview mirror. This was also slightly annoying to deal with.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray 216 See that clear partition? It turns into a mirror at night.

    Chevrolet

    How the C8 Corvette compares to its competitors: The most car for the least amount of money

    With a starting price of under $60,000, it's tough to find a better bargain out there than the C8 Corvette. You get a 500-horsepower, mid-engined supercar for less than the price of the new BMW M3, and none of the pretentiousness of a Porsche or Ferrari. This is America's Sports Car, after all. The car with home-team advantage. If you don't like it, you're a dirty Commie. 

    Besides the Corvette, other mid-engine cars for sale today include the Acura NSX, Alfa Romeo 4C Spider, Audi R8, Bugatti Chiron, Ferrari 488, Ferrari F8, Ford GT, Lamborghini Aventador, Lamborghini Huracán, Lotus Evora GT, all McLaren models, and Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman, according to this helpful Car and Driver list.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_45 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    Unfortunately, all of these cars also either start at well over $100,000, are down on power, are less daily usable, or some combination of all three.

    Among its competitors, the C8 shines. It offers the most mid-engine car for the dollar.

    Good luck finding a sub-$60,000 C8 Corvette anytime soon, though. As of March, base-model cars were "virtually non-existent." My loaner certainly wasn't cheap, either. 

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_11 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    Sure, the base price was $58,900, but it also had the: 2LT equipment package ($7,300) that included a premium sound system, head-up display, heated and ventilated seats, a heated steering wheel, wireless charging, and navigation; Magnetic Ride Control ($1,895); Z51 pack ($5,000); GT2 bucket seats ($1,495); a front-nose lift system ($1,495); staggered 19-inch front wheels and 20-inch rear wheels ($995); and Rapid Blue paint ($500). 

    In all, the car had $20,320 in options, bringing the total MSRP to $80,315. Still less than a 911, however!

    Here's the window sticker, if you're curious.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette window sticker. 2020 Chevrolet Corvette window sticker.

    Chevrolet

    Our impressions: The true everyday supercar

    Head-on, the C8 is a visual punch to the face. Low, pointy, and wide, it captures the wild essence of great supercar design. Everyone will wave at you. Everyone will be stoked to see it. Smiles all around, and you'll feel just a little bit famous.

    In profile and from the rear, the design flattens out and becomes rather disjointed - a gripe overshadowed by the stunning front end.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_13 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    But as striking as its face is, the C8 is docile. Driving it, you'll forget the car is mid-engined at all. It handles beautifully as a cruiser, agreeable and quiet, kind on your body over bumps but also not erasing the sensation of road imperfections altogether. It strikes a nice balance.

    That tame mood also extends to when you want to push the car a little bit. Oh, there's power, no doubt about that, and it'll do the fast stuff just fine - but the C8 doesn't feel innately hyped-up and ready to go like other sports cars do.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_40 f r i e n d.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    Somehow, what a naturally aspirated V8 packed in behind you is supposed to offer just doesn't translate to a kick in the back of the head (the good kind) when you really put your foot down. Rather, it feels a little sluggish at low revs. 

    As a base model, though, it's clear that Chevrolet left room for what's coming next. It's the only explanation for all the tameness. The upcoming performance versions will build on what the C8 already offers, and will likely surpass what they were in the C7 generation when they put down 650 horsepower and 755 horsepower.

    I'm speculating, but I wouldn't be surprised if in two or three years we find ourselves with a 1,000-horsepower, hybrid, mid-engined Corvette for the C8 generation.

    2020 Chevrolet Corvette_KL_17 2020 Chevrolet Corvette.

    Kristen Lee/Business Insider

    But for now, we have the base C8. Even calling it a base model feels disingenuous because the car is so capable. The C8 is easily the most exciting thing this side of $100,000, and as something to live your normal, everyday life with, it's pretty tough to beat. 

    Just hope you like attention.

    ♦♦♦

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    Read the original article on Business Insider

    [Author: klee@businessinsider.com (Kristen Lee)]

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