Bloglikes - Cycling https://www.bloglikes.com/c/cycling en-US Thu, 15 Apr 2021 16:59:49 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter Bikerumor Pic Of The Day: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/9iuQHluh-pQ/ Photo submitted by Bas Slabbers, “Got the bike a few weeks ago and I am now exploring our local trails… Which means taking the wrong turn and having to peddle back up the hill you just came from is part of that too.” We always love seeing photos from where you are riding and are happy […]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 06:03:03 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Pic of the Day
Need help as a new(ish) rider? Here are some resources http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/OYZybgvxkD4/need-help-as-a-newish-rider-here-are-some-resources-330035

With confidence, comes smiles.
(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

Let’s say you just started biking during the pandemic or are thinking about biking and just haven’t done it yet. Or perhaps you’ve gotten strong on the indoor bike and haven’t ventured out into city traffic. Or maybe you’ve biked for a while and are just still not super confident?

If you need help getting over the hump to that next level of confidence, I’ve got a few ideas that might help. Here they are, in no particular order:

The Lumberyard: Portland’s only indoor bike park can help folks of all ages. What’s great about The Lumberyard is their progressive approach. That means you can have fun at any skill level, and build as you progress in confidence and technique. Their camps are geared toward kids (and will be held this summer), but the place itself is awesome for all ages. They also offer individual instruction and fun classes like, “For the Ladies”, “Jumping Like a Dad”, and “Keeping up With the Kids”. They’re now open for indoor sessions with Covid precautions in place. Learn more here.

Portland By Cycle (PBOT): This city program offers a trove of online resources and offline classes and events. They’ve got all the maps, route ideas, tips and information any new or seasoned rider would need. Get on their email list and like their Facebook page to stay in the loop for their solid slate of clinics and workshops. Learn more here.

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WashCo Bikes Education Clinics: This Hillsboro-based nonprofit offers several educational courses taught by certified cycling instructors. They have a class for beginners, one for learning rules of the road, and one geared toward gaining confidence in traffic. Learn more here.

We-Bike Portland: This Facebook group is hosted by The Street Trust and bills itself as a program to, “Inspire more trans people of all genders, gender non-conforming folx, 2 spirit, and women (both trans and cis) to incorporate a bike into their lives and use biking as a way to meet their transportation needs and personal goals.” They host rides, social events, and will help connect you with a bike mentor. Learn more here.

Pedalpalooza: Portland’s annual summer bike festival is a perfect way to sharpen your cycling skills. Think about it: Hundreds of fun (and free) group rides that are full of helpful and welcoming people. If you stick to the larger rides, you’ll benefit from the “safety in numbers” phenomenon and you’ll roll through town like a royal motorcade. Start Pedalpalooza as a newbie; end Pedalpalooza as a wily veteran. Learn more here.

Parks & Rec classes: Some cities have cycling classes as part of their Parks & Rec offerings. The City of Lake Oswego for instance, has an adult mountain biking class taught by an expert rider that meets at a nearby bike park. Learn more here.

Gracie’s Wrench: Portlander Tori Bortman has been offering one-on-one riding instruction (and repair classes!) for many years. She can teach almost anyone how to ride, whether you are just starting out or want to move from novice to master. Learn more here.

Around Portland Bike Tours: A tour guide company might not seem like an obvious place for beginners, but I had a hunch it would a nice way for beginners to gain confidence, so I asked our friend and Around Portland Bike Tours guide Sarah Gilbert about it. “We very frequently coach our riders in use of gears, brakes, etc., and a good part of every tour is introducing people to Portland’s bike infrastructure,” she shared. Sarah brings up a good point: Even if you know how to ride, do you know how to use Portland’s many different (and sometimes confusing) types of bike infrastructure? A guided tour is the perfect way to gain confidence and learn about the city you ride in. Learn more here.

What did I miss? Any other resources for folks just starting out?

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 17:23:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Front Page Resources Riding Tips
The 6 best bike locks in 2021 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/MAotOLEsXVQ/best-bike-lock
  • A bike lock is a vital part of anyone's cycling kit, whether you mountain bike, commute, or road cycle.
  • The best locks should be easily portable and feature thick steel shackles or cables that are hard to slice.
  • Our top pick, Kryptonite's Fahgettaboudit U-Lock, has anti-theft protection, is easy to mount, and uses a double-bolting system.
  • Owning a bike lock is an important part of anyone's cycling kit. Though it may not be as vital as something like a helmet, a reliable bike lock does provide immense peace of mind that your bike stays secure wherever you leave it.

    And while there's no end-all-be-all bike lock capable of deterring a well-equipped thief, there are a number of options designed to slow down or discourage them.

    The most common way bikes are stolen is when someone cuts through a lock's shackle, cable, or chain. Because of this, bike lock design has prioritized features like thick steel or double bolts to make them as close to impenetrable as possible. While many offer this kind of bulked-up protection, there are also plenty of others intended for when you just need to quickly lock your bike.

    Having lived and biked in the bike-heavy cities of Portland, Oregon, and New York City, I've handled my fair share of locks - and know all too well just how vital they are. Be it mountain bike trips, e-bike outings, or just casual rides around the neighborhood, I've had the opportunity to try a variety of bike locks designed for each of these use cases.

    Below, I've rounded up six of my favorite bike locks, each of which offer a unique and useful design and, perhaps most importantly, allow me to trust that they'll keep my bike safe and secure. From robust U-lock's to a quick-use zip tie-style option, the bike locks featured are fit for a variety of use cases.

    At the end of this guide, I've also included some insight into the testing methodology I used in deciding which made the cut.

    Here are the best bike locks: Updated on 4/14/2021 by Rick Stella: Added the Hiplok Z-Lok as our pick of the best quick-use bike lock, updated the section on how we test bike locks, rewrote the introduction for relevancy, checked the availability of all recommended locks, and updated the pricing. The best overall kryptonite mini bike lock

    Kryptonite

    If you live in a high crime area, the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini Bicycle U-Lock does an excellent job of warding off criminals and protecting your bike.

    Pros: Takes longer to cut through than any other lock

    Cons: Small, heavy

    Kryptonite is the top name in the bike lock industry. That's why we've included three of its locks in our guide. One of the factors that set Kryptonite apart is its Anti-Theft Protection Offer. Basically, when you get your lock, you must register it with the company right away. Then, if your bike is stolen while it is covered by anti-theft protection, the company will pay to replace your bike. For the Fahgettaboudit Mini, the first year of registration is free. After that, it is $24.99 for five years of coverage.

    The New York Fahgettaboudit Mini offers the highest level of security of any of Kryptonite's locks according to the company. The shackle is made of 18-millimeter hardened "MAX-Performance" steel.

    For extra security, the crossbar has an oversized hardened steel sleeve. The lock comes with three keys, which disengages the lock using a high-security disk-style cylinder. The cylinder is protected by a sliding dust cover. And, the center keyway is designed to make leverage attacks difficult.

    The best on a budget best budget bike lock titanker bike lock cable

    Amazon

    For less than $15, the Titanker Bike Lock Cable is an affordable alternative that offers a variety of locking options.

    Pros: 10,000 possible combinations, four-foot reach, flexible

    Cons: Cable is relatively easy to cut

    The Titanker Bike Lock Cable is made of flexible steel cables that measure a half-inch in diameter. The 4-foot cable is covered with PVC coating and recoils back into its original shape when not in use. The four-digit combination lock has 10,000 possible passcodes. This lock is the lightest option in this guide at 11.2 ounces, and it mounts to your bike with the provided bracket.

    The cable design offers flexibility in what you can lock a bike to, and the combination key is also convenient. While a lock is a good deterrent in general, this option doesn't offer the level of protection as the other locks on this list. Still, the thick cable should deter most thieves.  

    Note: We previously recommended the UShake Bike Lock Cable, which is nearly similar to the Titanker option. Although many reviewers also recommended the UShake, that lock is not available at the time of posting.

    The best D-lock HiplokDX3

    Hiplok

    The Hiplok DX is a heavy-duty D-lock designed to keep your bike secure no matter where you lock it up, and its lightweight design makes it easy to throw into a backpack or even to wear on your person.

    Pros: Heavy-duty yet lightweight design, 14mm steel shackle prevents theft

    Cons: Locking area might be small for bikes with bigger tires

    Hiplok is one of the who's who in the bike lock industry (we've written about, and loved, its Z-Lok) thanks to its wide selection of dependable products. With the DX, Hiplok not only offers one of the most heavy-duty D-locks on the market, but it challenges the Kryptonite lock that nabbed our top spot. 

    What makes the DX particularly stand out is its rugged and durable design, led by a double deadlock and 14mm hardened steel shackle that would take nothing short of a tank to break through it. This means you should feel comfortable locking up your bike anywhere and can rest assured it'll be there waiting for you when you're reading to ride again. 

    It's also one of the most lightweight locks we've tested and can just as easily slip into a backpack or affix to our belt loops without seeming like we're dragging an anvil. The DX offers up a sizable locking area, as well, which can easily slide through your tire and around a pole. 

    At $90, it's not a budget pick, but with bike locks, you pay for premium quality (and the assurance you won't have to spend hundreds on a new bike). Hiplok offers a lifetime warranty, so that $90 investment should last you a very long time. -- Rick Stella

    The best U-lock kryptonite  bike lock 2

    Kryptonite

    The Kryptonite Kryptolok Standard Bicycle U-Lock w/4-foot Flex Cable is one of the most affordable locks, and the 4-foot cable makes locking up easy.

    Pros: Easy to use, lightweight, inexpensive

    Cons: Only requires one cut to defeat

    The design of the Kryptolok Standard Bicycle U-Lock is fairly similar to the Kryptonite locks we covered in previous slides. It has a center keyway, high-security disc-style cylinder, reinforced hardened crossbar, and a hardened MAX-Performance steel shackle. However, there are some key differences. The shackle is 13 millimeters thick, the U-lock is 4 x 9 inches, and there is not a double locking mechanism.

    Kryptonite rates the security of the Kryptolok as 6 out of 10 (versus 9 for the New York Standard and 10 for the Fahgettaboudit Mini). The company states that it should be secure enough in rural areas, in the suburbs, and when traveling with your bike on a car rack.

    Remember to register your bike lock with the brand immediately after you purchase it to take advantage of its theft protection program.

    The best quick-use HiplokZ

    Hiplok

    The Z-Lok from Hiplok may not be a good choice for everyday use but its zip tie style makes it perfect for quickly locking up your bike on short trips, or for securing it to a car rack.

    Pros: Easy to use, allows you to set a custom combination, lightweight, highly portable, inexpensive

    Cons: Not robust enough to use for long periods of time

    Though Hiplok's Z-Lok looks like some sort of beefed-up zip tie (it essentially is), it's still a highly useful bike lock. Perfect for locking up your bike in a pinch, say, while running some quick errands or popping into a store, the Z-Lok is a great companion to a larger, more robust bike lock. 

    What makes the Z-Lok particularly stand out is how easy it is to use. When first using it, it allows you to set a custom combination code, and then using it to lock up your bike is as easy as tightening a zip tie. Just slide the lock through wherever you want to secure your bike, feed the end of the lock through the locking mechanism, and tighten. Unlocking it is just as easy as you only need to put in your set combo and then slide the unlock button to fully loosen it. 

    I also like how lightweight the lock is, too. I have a few of these in my kit and throw at least one or two into my backpack before every ride, even if I don't plan on actually using them. They take up next to no space and can even just be attached to my bike, or even a belt loop on my pants if I'm ever not cycling with a backpack.

    The Z-Lok's downside is a clear one: It's just not as robust as larger locks, so it can't necessarily be used for everyday use or for any time you'll be away from your bike for a long period of time. It works best as a complement to a larger lock system and as a quick use to lock up your bike in a pinch. -- Rick Stella, fitness and health editor

    The best on-bike Screen Shot 2020 09 01 at 3.17.34 PM

    Lobster Lock

    The Lobster Lock permanently attaches to your bike frame so you'll never have to worry about forgetting to grab a lock on your way out the door.

    Pros: Attaches to your bike permanently so you'll never forget a lock, easy to lock/unlock, inexpensive $75 price tag

    Cons: Can rattle on your bike a little bit while riding

    We've all been there: You're getting ready for a ride, you've packed a backpack, grab your helmet, and jet out the door. As you get to your destination, you realize it; you forgot your bike lock. Now, you're left with a decision, do you leave the bike there and quickly run inside to get what you need, or do you ride back home? With the Lobster Lock, those forgetful moments cease to exist.

    Thanks to a design that allows you to permanently attach it to your bike's frame, the Lobster Lock goes wherever your bike goes, all day, every day. By attaching to where you'd put a water bottle cradle, the lock is able to stay out of the way enough to avoid hindering you as you ride, yet is perfect for attaching to a bike rack (including through your wheel, too).

    Using the lock is easy, too. By simply unlocking it with a key, two arms swing out from the base and attach to each other to create the lock. When you're reading to ride again, just unlock the two arms from each other, fold them back into the base, and lock it again with the key. Simple as that. 

    Also, don't think you have to sacrifice the water bottle cradle — it basically acts as an extension of that area as you're able to affix a cradle to the lock itself. That's a ton of convenience packed into one bike lock. -- Rick Stella

    How we test bike locks

    Each of the following bike locks went through several rounds of field testing to make sure they not only provided a reliable method for locking up our bike but that they were easy to use, weren't a pain to lug around, and offered enough value regardless of their price tag.

    Specifically, we looked at these five categories: Ease of use, durability, security, and value. Here's how each category factored into what locks made the cut:

    Ease of use: Using a bike lock shouldn't be a headache each time you lock and unlock your ride. This means that it should be easy to affix to a bike rack while still being able to secure valuable parts of your bike (i.e. the wheel) without it feeling like solving a Rubik's cube. 

    Durability: What good is a bike lock if it starts to fall apart mere months after you purchase it? Bike locks take a beating, whether it be while getting throwing into a backpack or vehicle, someone attempting to disassemble it, or being stored at home in a garage or closet. You want any lock you purchase (especially since you're spending hard-earned cash) to last you several years, at the very least. 

    Security: If a bike lock is easy to break into, then what's the point? A reliable bike lock should be able to stand up to a variety of bike-stealing methods and not only continue to protect your bike but be able to continue to live up to its namesake. 

    Value: Value isn't just about how much a bike lock costs — it's more about how much return you get on your investment. If you pay a premium price, you should expect premium features. This is sort of like the sum of all the categories before it (while still considering its sticker cost). 

    Read the original article on Business Insider

    [Author: rstella@businessinsider.com (Rick Stella,James Brains)]

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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 16:32:14 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Reviews Outdoors (Reviews Fitness (Reviews Features Insider Picks Guides Bike Bike Lock Cycling Bike Guides Best Guides Buying Guide IP Freelance Spring Forward 2021 Insider Reviews 2021
    Review: The 2021 Vitus Sommet CRS rips, nails the cost to performance ratio http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/eG_AEluMxV4/ For this model year, Vitus have updated their line of enduro and trail mountain bikes, overhauling their suspension designs adding significantly more progression. These are some very good value for money bikes, with the direct-to-consumer brand offering up a complete build of the carbon 2021 Vitus Sommet from just $2999.99. With such competitive price points, […]

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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 16:16:38 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Bicycles Feature Stories Mountain Bike Reviews
    KGW got a few things wrong about Portland’s Bike Theft Task Force http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/4wIVSxo1A8k/kgw-show-spreads-false-information-confusion-about-ppb-bike-theft-task-force-330026 Screen grab from interview with KGW host Dan Haggerty.

    A segment that aired Tuesday night on KGW, Portland’s NBC affiliate station, got a few things wrong about bike theft in Portland.

    The Story with Dan Haggerty spent about six minutes on the topic, framed around the assertion that the Portland Police Bureau’s Bike Theft Task Force (BTTF) has been “eliminated” due to recent police budget cutbacks.

    Unfortunately, the central idea and framing of the segment is untrue. The BTTF is alive and was never shut down. Worse yet, host Dan Haggerty perpetuates harmful and unfair stereotypes about people who live on the street.

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    The show (you can watch it above) was prompted by a viewer who asked KGW about what they assumed to be a bicycle “chop shop” in downtown Portland. When Haggerty introduced the viewer’s question, he supported their assumption, dismissed an unhoused person’s claim that the bikes weren’t stolen, and even said jokingly, “I think that’s my tire right there.”

    I have been pushing back against the “chop shop” narrative for years. The fact is, not every bike you see in a homeless camp is stolen. And people who live on the street can have multiple bikes. They can repair bikes for other people. They can even collect bikes, sell them, or even work on them as a hobby. Yes, these Portlanders who live in tents can have the same interests as you and me! They deserve respect and are innocent until proven guilty. Making assumptions about criminal behavior — especially when it perpetuates harmful stereotypes — is totally unacceptable.

    I’ve worked on the bike theft issue for a long time. I know that many stolen bikes have been recovered from encampments (including one of mine!), but that does not make it OK to blithely accuse people of theft.

    The other major point the show got wrong is that the BTTF has been “eliminated” due to funding cuts. That is untrue.

    The BTTF was never a funded unit with a line-item in the PPB budget. It was a unit with a few officers who had permission from bureau leadership to work on bike theft. All the cool things they did like lock giveaways and promotional events at Sunday Parkways and elsewhere were done with grants and/or donations. The only city budget impact came from officers’ time spent doing the work.

    We explained all this back in January. The BTTF was put on pause as part of the PPB’s attempt to re-assign officers and respond to budget cuts bureau-wide. But it was never “eliminated”. The PPB lieutenant cited in the KGW story who said, “We do not have a Bike Theft Task Force,” is simply unaware of what’s going on.

    The BTTF website is still alive and officers respond to bike theft calls just like they would any other crime. There were several months over the winter when the BTTF went silent and no longer updated or responded on their social media channels, but that’s no longer the case.

    Since March 30th, the BTTF has returned to action. Officers have posted numerous updates on Instagram about their work in the field.

    When one BTTF Instagram follower expressed confusion that the account was still active, someone from the PPB replied, “We lost funding for community events and bicycle outreach. However, we still investigate bicycle theft and assist officers in determining if a bicycle is stolen. We just unfortunately can’t do as much as we used to! We also still have 5 officers in downtown Portland that patrol and respond to calls on bicycles, which is awesome!”

    The officers who founded the BTTF trained dozens of PPB officers in the fine art of sniffing out stolen bikes, recovering them, and getting unstolen ones registered. That means even as those officers have moved on and/or have been re-assigned, there remains a strong foundation of bike theft prevention and recovery knowledge at the PPB.

    As someone who helped create the BTTF and has done a lot of work around bike theft in general, it’s important to me that the issue is covered accurately. I was also interviewed by Dan Haggerty in the KGW story so I wanted to clear up any confusion my appearance might have caused.

    If you have questions about the BTTF, I’m happy to answer them in the comments.

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 15:01:59 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Bike Theft Front Page Media Portland Bike Theft Task Force
    New bike lanes on N Whitaker will connect slough path to Delta Park http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/SgvSFDlQewE/new-bike-lanes-on-n-whitaker-will-connect-slough-path-to-delta-park-330006

    Existing conditions on N Whitaker Rd looking north from Schmeer. That parking lane on the right will become a bike lane.

    (Graphic: BikePortland)

    A big gap in the north Portland bike network will be closed by this summer.

    At last night’s Bicycle Advisory Committee meeting, Portland Bureau of Transportation staff revealed details of a project that will re-stripe about 0.4 miles of North Whitaker Road between the Columbia Slough (Schmeer Road) and Delta Park (Denver Ave/I-5). This stretch of Whitaker provides a crucial connection between north Portland neighborhoods and the Hayden Meadows shopping center (Lowe’s, Dick’s, Dollar Tree, Walmart, etc…), Delta Park athletic fields, Marine Drive, Vancouver, and more.

    Currently it has no bike lane and wide general purpose lane which creates very stressful conditions for non-drivers.

    Project Manager Zef Wagner said it started as a Rose Lane Project to speed up the Line 6 TriMet bus.

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    “Most of the time this will feel like an 11-foot bike lane.”
    — Zef Wagner, PBOT project manager describing the shared bus/bike lane

    “We were just going to do a northbound bus lane from [North] Hayden Meadows Drive up to the I-5 on ramp, and then we looked at the volumes of bike traffic that’s already there, and thought about its role in our bike network and we decided to make it a combined bike and bus project,” Wagner shared at last night’s meeting.

    Northbound, the design will trade the on-street parking lane between Schmeer and Hayden Meadows Dr (shopping center entrance) for an eight-and-a-half foot buffered bike lane (six feet plus a two-and-a-half foot buffer zone) that will come with protection via plastic vertical delineators. North of Hayden Meadows Dr, the facility will transition into an 11-foot wide shared bus/bike lane for a short distance to the Delta Park entrance.

    Southbound the protected and buffered bike lane will be continuous from the Delta Park exit to Schmeer Road (there are no intersections or driveways in the southbound direction).

    Below are a few more existing conditions shots, followed by PBOT plan drawings:


    Wagner fielded some concerns from the BAC about the northbound shared bus/bike lane. But he explained that due to “space constraints” PBOT had to make a compromise. The two bus stops are rarely used, he said, “So most of the time this will feel like an 11-foot bike lane.” “And when there is a bus, there’s a small chance that you might have to wait behind the bus for a short time, but most of the time that won’t be an issue… I think this will be a huge improvement”

    PBOT plan drawing.

    Another issue brought up by BAC members was the tricky cycling route southbound from of Delta Park/Denver onto Whitaker Road (above). This is a curved road next to freeway ramps (and those horrible ODOT wide-radius corners!) that can feel scary to bike riders. There’s also a median in the middle of the intersection with a small cut-through for bike riders. Wagner said PBOT would have preferred to rebuild the median to create more safety and space for riders to cross in that location, but doing so would have required sign-off from state traffic engineers (because of the proximity to Oregon Department of Transportation’s freeway).

    “I think the whole corridor is gonna have more friction and visual annoyance for people, which also tends to slow down traffic.”
    — Zef Wagner, PBOT

    “Modifying the median itself would involve a lot more difficulties getting approval with ODOT than we were prepared to do in this phase of the project,” Wagner explained. “It would have required state traffic engineer approval which can be very difficult and time consuming.”

    To help in the short-term, PBOT’s project will stripe a big “Do Not Block” box at the intersection. That should provide some refuge, and Wagner says is just a placeholder until the city can invest more. This project has a “pretty low budget”, he said. “Think of this as a ‘phase one’ that we can upgrade in the future.”

    According to a PBOT spokesperson, the project budget is just $150,000. That includes $35,000 from TriMet.

    Another bit of good news shared at last night’s meeting is that the Amazon distribution facility being planned nearby will come with a new traffic signal at Schmeer and Whitaker. Wagner said PBOT will take this opportunity to “create a seamless connection for bikes from Whitaker to the Columbia Slough Trail… There will be a little path connection there.”

    Whitaker currently has 14-foot general purpose lanes next to eight feet of shoulder/parking area that is rarely used. It’s a design that encourages dangerous driving. PBOT will reduce those 14-foot lanes to 11-feet, and the addition of a buffered bike lane and/or bus lane will dramatically change the feeling of the road.

    “I think the whole corridor is gonna have more friction and visual annoyance for people, which also tends to slow down traffic,” is how Wagner put it.

    This is excellent news! This gap has been on my story list for years and I’ve been hoping that PBOT would address it.

    The project is expected to be constructed this spring.

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
    — Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
    — Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 13:12:05 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Front Page Infrastructure Projects Columbia Slough Path Delta Park N Whitaker Rd
    Pirelli Scorpion Gravity teases EWS & DH race tires developed with MTB legend Fabien Barel http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/sDJeNSw0oxc/ Working with downhill MTB legend Fabien Barel, Pirelli is set to release their next level of DH & EWS race-ready Scorpion Gravity Racing mountain bike tires. The prototype gravity tires are being thrashed down the mountain now, being tested on the EWS & DH World Cup race circuits before an imminent launch for consumers… Pirelli […]

    The post Pirelli Scorpion Gravity teases EWS & DH race tires developed with MTB legend Fabien Barel appeared first on Bikerumor.

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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 10:14:52 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mountain Bike Prototypes & Concepts
    Hunt Enduro Wide v2 alloy MTB wheels get tougher without extra weight, Trail Wides too! http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/bBd_94pFlik/ Hunt’s EWS-proven, affordable alloy Enduro Wide mountain bike wheels get tougher with a v2 redesign that shifts to front & rear-specific rims, and profiles specifically designed to survive the real enduro racing abuse. With similar goals in mind, a re-optimized set of Trail Wide v2 wheels get a 20% improvement in impact resistance, with almost […]

    The post Hunt Enduro Wide v2 alloy MTB wheels get tougher without extra weight, Trail Wides too! appeared first on Bikerumor.

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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 10:00:08 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mountain Bike
    MMR Rakish SL XC & Adrenaline SL road bikes get F1 Fernando Alonso special editions http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/5XgNhDGGJyA/ Spanish bikemaker MMR’s top lightweight carbon Rakish SL cross-country and Adrenaline SL road bikes get custom Fernando Alonso special editions, celebrating the return to racing of the Spanish F1 driver. A longtime cyclist from the same Asturias province on the northern coast of Spain as MMR, Alonso has been riding both the XC Rakish SL […]

    The post MMR Rakish SL XC & Adrenaline SL road bikes get F1 Fernando Alonso special editions appeared first on Bikerumor.

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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 09:03:39 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mountain Bike Road Bike
    Bikerumor Pic Of The Day: Chicago, Illinois http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/bfFlDzTif2M/ Photo submitted by Gaelan Mundorff, “My Project One Emonda SLR in front of the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois.” We always love seeing photos from where you are riding and are happy to share them with our readers around the world here on the Pic Of The Day. Send in your pics with a description here. *Please note […]

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    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:01:12 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Pic of the Day
    Wolf Tooth add IS Premium Headsets for Specialized 42mm upper bearing diameters http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/6Al2ADUF9H8/ Wolf Tooth Components are now able to cater to Specialized mountain bike riders with their new IS Premium Headset for 42mm upper bearing diameters. Riders of almost all Specialized aluminium frame MTBs can now benefit from the upgrade, as can riders of a handful of their carbon frames such as the new Stumpjumper. Wolf Tooth […]

    The post appeared first on Bikerumor.

    ]]>
    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 05:16:30 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Mountain Bike
    3 No-Cost Tips to Improve Your Road Cycling Technique http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CyclingTrainingTips/~3/Ru4eC0TDHS0/ ]]> Wed, 14 Apr 2021 03:21:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Cycling Training 2021 Santa Cruz Tallboy CC 4 X01 Review https://www.feedthehabit.com/gear-reviews/2021-santa-cruz-tallboy-cc-4-x01-review/ Now in its fourth generation, the Santa Cruz Tallboy is something of a legend. Since its introduction in 2009, the Tallboy has been built around the VPP suspension design. It has also maintained itself as something more than just an XC bike. Now that it’s billed as the “downhiller’s XC bike,” how much of the original, zippy character is still there? And, at the other end of the spectrum, just how hard can you push the Tallboy in the roughest terrain you can handle? The answer is this bike can tackle just about everything in the middle of the bell curve.

    2021 Santa Cruz Tallboy CC 4 X01 Features:

    • Progressive lower link-mounted VPP design
    • Fox Float Factory DPS shock with 120mm travel
    • Slack, 65.5 degree head angle (65.7 deg in Hi setting)
    • RockShox PIKE Ultimate 130 fork
    • CC carbon ensures the lightest and strongest carbon Santa Cruz offers
    • Adjustable geometry via flip chip and rear dropout
    • Santa Cruz Reserve 27 carbon wheelset
    • SRAM X01 Eagle groupset with X1 Carbon cranks
    • SRAM G3 RSC brakeset
    • Santa Cruz carbon low riser bars
    • RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper post
    • Weight: 28.05 lbs (large, actual)
    • MSRP: $8899 (with Reserve 27’s)

    The full X01 kit is superb.

    Tallboy X01 is kitted for success

    In the current bike environment, it’s difficult to be too choosy with the parts spec of any bike in your LBS. From high-end to entry-level, parts and components are getting difficult to come by. With that, SRAM seems to be in the best position as far as availability and it just so happens that the SRAM X01 Eagle kit was both available and preferred groupset for the Tallboy 4 test.

    Outfitted with a full SRAM X01 Eagle drivetrain, mated to the new SRAM X1 Eagle Carbon crankset, there’s nothing really left to be desired, unless you want the beauty of AXS wireless shifting. In addition, the Tallboy X01 came with the Santa Cruz Reserve 27 wheelset and 800mm carbon riser bars. No expenses were spared with the Fox Float Factory DPS shock, RockShox PIKE Ultimate 130 fork and Reverb Stealth dropper to round out the package. Again, this is as kitted as anyone would ever reasonably need on this bike.

    The full X01 parts kit performed flawlessly.

    House-brand parts are becoming more common — even among high-end brands like Santa Cruz. Their ability to tap into the greater buying power and resources of the Pon Bicycle Group has delivered high-quality carbon wheels and riser bars that perform at a high level while allowing product managers to design and spec each part as appropriate for the bike and intended use. In short… Santa Cruz has spec’d quite the bike here and the foundation is something truly unique. We’re talking a 65.5 degree head angle and ultra-short 430mm chainstays, mated with a long and low geometry that’s uncommon in the 120mm travel space.

    Okay, with all that, how has the full kit performed? Like a champ. Every component and part has performed at a high level without any fuss whatsoever. Shifting has remained fantastically crisp and fast and the progressive VPP suspension hasn’t made a peep. There’s no rattling or squeaks anywhere so you can focus on spanking the terrain.

    Angulate and the Tallboy follows.

    Racking up the test miles

    Since the Tallboy 4 arrived in the dead of winter, I had to initially be creative with my rides. As the weather has warmed, I’ve been able to venture deeper and deeper into the type of terrain that the Tallboy is made for. From the outset, I had the frame in the Lo setting, just to see how it behaved. No question, it feels supremely capable and smooth on rough descents, but it wasn’t quite as snappy as I would like. After a few rides, I changed to Hi setting and never looked back.

    A little swap made a noticeable difference.

    Each rider needs to decide what they expect from their Tallboy and I want it as nimble and quick as possible. So, Hi linkage setting with 430mm chainstays was where I settled. Again, should you want to sled this bike out for lift-serviced or more gnarly terrain, you can do that very easily. In addition, the fork and shock are extremely-tunable with actual adjustments that can be immediately felt. It is 2021 and shock technology is leaps-and-bounds over those of just a few years earlier.

    Ultimately, it’s player’s choice for you to tinker and dial everything in. Honestly, once I got the settings sorted, I left the shock in medium mode (used to be called trail mode) 95% of the time and felt that was ultimately the best way to enjoy climbing and descending on the Tallboy 4. I ended up dialing in the low speed compression on the PIKE to reduce fork dive on standing climbs and sprints. It really wasn’t rocket science, but did take a few rides to nail it.

    To be fair, I’m more of an XC rider than enduro and 120-130mm travel is about the most I would ever need. In fact, at 100mm travel, the Tallboy 2 that I rode and tested in 2014 remains something of a legend as I once nabbed Strava hardware on the 18 segments I rode on one particular ride. Now, that 100mm travel Tallboy, while legendary in my mind, is a relic of days gone by because the 2021 Tallboy 4 is built to meet the demands of today’s riders and is both heavier and less zippy than the Tallboy 2. But, it remains a ton of fun on the trails — just in different ways. 

    Seated or standing, the Tallboy 4 climbs without wandering.

    Climb up anything (for realz)

    At 28 lbs, the 2021 Tallboy 4 X01 isn’t the most lightweight bike around. And, I’d be lying if I said you won’t notice it on long climbs, because you will. Again, I’m coming off the 24 lb. Trek Supercaliber 9.8, so an extra 4 lbs. is definitely apparent. But, most folks don’t have such a lightweight bike, so 28 lbs is reasonable all things considered.

    What’s most beautiful about the bike’s climbing ability is just how capable it is. While it’s not wicked-light, it can climb up anything with panache. I typically just settle in and let the bike propel me upwards. The low-slung VPP design really contours to the terrain and maximizes your power to the wheels. Honestly, there’s no need to lock things out — I just keep the shock in medium setting. Standing, when needed, is a great way to mix up your cadence and also get through technical bits. Just keep in mind that you’ll still need to find the proper balance point to maintain rear wheel traction.

    Got a top 10 on one of my local test climbs.

    Even though the head angle is 65.7 degrees in Hi setting, the front end doesn’t wander on any climb. I can power through technical, loose climbs and the steering remains straight. That balance point is something that Santa Cruz has nailed here. You’d think steering would flop around on these climbs, but it doesn’t at all. I simply remain seated and lean forward just a touch and confidently spank all the climbs. Long, sustained climbs aren’t quite as fast as I can get on a lightweight XC bike, but it’s no slouch.

    Further evidence of the balance of the entire geometry is that the Tallboy 4 is easy to ride hands-free and doesn’t ever feel floppy. Hooray for technology and R&D because this bike is dialed. Speaking of dialing, a couple of clicks of low speed compression on the PIKE and the fork remains stable for standing efforts while staying squishy on descents. Longer-term, my hope is to get some lighter tires and a touch longer stem to try to XC this bike out a wee bit (stay tuned).

    Flowy, rolling terrain is bonkers-fun.

    Rolling terrain

    Everyone loves hero trails that have a little bit of climbs and descents for maximum enjoyment. These roller coaster trails bring out the best characteristics of any bike and that’s no exception here. One such trail found at my local trail system is called Fault Line. At just shy of a mile with only 50 total feet of climbing, this little loop rides fast and requires an adept mix of dropper post mastery and standing climbs with some awesome sweeping turns around every corner.

    While a PR on this segment remained out of reach of the Tallboy, it hangs with some of my best times and I’ll continue to push it as the weather warms and it just might crack the top 5.

    Roll through rock gardens with confidence.

    Descends like a Santa Cruz should

    When it comes time to let the Tallboy rip, there’s no ignoring just what Santa Cruz bikes are known for — playing with gravity. A few pedal strokes to get up to speed and you’ll be able to roll through anything with absolute confidence. Sweeping in/out of corners and pointing it through rock gardens are just the beginning because this bike is a blast on descents. Be warned that you do need to get up to speed before you can enjoy the best of the Tallboy, but even at low speeds the bike remains balanced, even if the steering is a little slow.

    When it comes to great descending bikes, there’s nothing more fun than entering a turn at speed and exiting like being shot out of a gun. That’s the feeling you’ll get on the Tallboy. If it doesn’t put a huge grin on your mug, you need to check your pulse because this bike is an absolute hoot to descend on.

    Between those hero turns, any drops or terrain features become child’s play as you can enjoy airtime, manuals or whatever you want to do. It’s under these conditions that the super-short 430mm chainstays shine and really shows the genius of Santa Cruz designers. It’s a blast to rip downhill. The 130mm PIKE Ultimate is a great match with the Tallboy and allows for responsive handling and maximum bump absorption. You’ll notice that the suspension is tuned to absorb everything, so it feels more damp than lively through rough stuff. My body definitely appreciates that smoothness.

    My Setup: I’m 5’11” / 170 lbs. and rode the size large. The fork was set at 80 psi. and the rear shock at 180 psi. The tires were setup tubeless at 20/21 psi. front/rear. I changed to the Ergon GE1 Evo Factory grips and left everything else stock. And, finding one these days may require added patience. Inventories are coming. Call your local dealer to find out more.

    The Good

    • Rips sweeping descents
    • Balanced geometry allows for wander-free climbing
    • Traction galore
    • The entire parts kit is flawless
    • VPP has been dead silent and pivots can be user serviced
    • Gets you into and out of trouble without worry
    • Santa Cruz riser bars and wheels shine
    • Water bottle placement is super easy to reach
    • Haven’t thought one bit about the drivetrain, dropper or wheels (they just plain work)
    • Feels planted to the terrain
    • Loves to manual — so fun to wheelie through dry creek beds at speed

    The Bad

    • A little heavy for a 120mm bike
    • XC crowd may want something nimbler
    • Water bottle blocks access to shock lever (I mostly kept it in medium anyway)
    • Chunky tires grip well, but roll slowly on long climbs
    • Not quite as nimble as previous iterations
    • This build is pricey (but leaves nothing to be desired)
    The Bottom Line: Santa Cruz Tallboy CC 4

    As the Tallboy has evolved, it has become burlier and burlier. Still, at its core, it it remains a fantastic do-it-all bike that can handle the terrain most of us ride. You won’t want to line up at the local XC race with it, nor will you want to point it down the DH course, but you will want to climb and descend anything found in your local trails. You can push it and it responds. And, it can both get you into and back out of trouble without batting an eye. The Tallboy 4 is a blast of a bike for the masses.

    Buy Now: Available at CompetitiveCyclist.com (hopefully, soon)

    The post 2021 Santa Cruz Tallboy CC 4 X01 Review appeared first on FeedTheHabit.com.

    ]]>
    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 03:20:57 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Gear Reviews Mountain Biking 29er Santa Cruz
    First Ride: Knolly Bikes’ Fugitive gets updated geometry and a tad more travel http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/vLFYN2VQ6FE/ When mountain bikes were first invented, their biggest advantage over ‘ten speeds’ was how they could handle nearly any terrain. Many years later, modern trail bikes like Knolly’s Fugitive are still evolving to become that versatile, highly capable bike we all dreamed of in the beginning. Knolly recently updated their mid-travel, 29” wheeled Fugitive with […]

    The post First Ride: Knolly Bikes’ Fugitive gets updated geometry and a tad more travel appeared first on Bikerumor.

    ]]>
    Wed, 14 Apr 2021 03:01:44 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Bicycles Bike Types Mountain Bike Reviews
    Senator hints at compromise to ensure passage of ‘Safe Routes for All’ spending bill http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/_ye1f526VW0/senator-hints-at-compromise-to-ensure-passage-of-safe-routes-for-all-spending-bill-329987

    Screen grab from Bike Bill 50th Birthday Party.

    Well into the legislative session, a push to increase active transportation funding in Oregon is still in play.

    The Street Trust, the Portland-based nonprofit and chief architect of Senate Bill 395, held a virtual 50th birthday party for Oregon’s “Bike Bill”. Along with an attempt at Zoom group karaoke (to Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again”) and fundraising pleas, dozens of supporters heard an update on the bill’s chances from lead sponsor Senator Floyd Prozanski.

    Signed on the seat of a bicycle in 1971, Oregon’s “Bike Bill” (which also funds sidewalks and pedestrian crossings) requires the Department of Transportation to spend a minimum of 1% of Highway Fund dollars on active transportation infrastructure whenever they build major projects. The multiuse path alongside Interstate 205 is just one local example of a project built because of the Bike Bill.

    Advertisement

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale -->

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    The Street Trust saw an opportunity on the bill’s 50th anniversary to increase the minimum requirement to 5%. Now dubbed the Safe Routes for All bill, SB 395 is in the legislature’s Joint Transportation Committee where it received a public hearing on March 4th.

    Thursday’s party was a chance for the coalition of advocates pushing for SB 395 to connect and build momentum as the legislative session heats up.

    Senator Floyd Prozanski.

    Rob Zako with Better Eugene-Springfield Transportation was one of the emcees. He shared that the bill’s value goes way beyond bikes. “Bicycles are just machines, they’re made of steel or aluminum or alloys and rubber. This is really not about bicycles, this is about people. It’s about people getting where they want to go safely it’s about safe routes for all.”

    Being careful to show the bill isn’t just an urban and Portland issue, The Street Trust has allied with champions like Yamhill County Commissioner Casey Kulla who rose to prominence for his valiant attempt to save the Yamhelas Westsider Trail project. Kulla reminded partygoers that, “Safe shoulders and roads are the number one transportation concern of the people that I talked to in rural Oregon.” “Our county is an open space desert. Public land is distant, and it’s hard to access,” he shared. “This bill will accelerate the non-car infrastructure.”

    According to Senator Prozanski, who said he’s made the bill one of his top two priorities, SB 395 might not build as much non-car infrastructure as advocates hoped. As he hinted at back in February, Prozanski thinks a 5% minimum might be a bit too much for his fellow lawmakers to agree to. Prozanski joined the party just after a 25-mile bike ride and said 5% is “A pretty big jump to go for.” “Based on feedback it’s probably not going to make it across the finish line at 5%,” he added. “But that doesn’t mean we can’t still have a win.”

    Advertisement

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale -->

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    “I look at anything above the 1% as a win. And right now we’re going to be pushing really hard for 3%.”

    Prozanski hinted that a formal amendment to the bill is in works and that it might come directly from Joint Transportation Committee Co-chair Lee Beyer, a senator from Springfield and respected veteran of Oregon transportation politics.

    “Even if we do have to make concessions down from 5% to 3%. When you’re only at 1%, that’s a pretty good increase.”
    — Sarah Iannarone, The Street Trust

    “He was more receptive than some people thought to a smaller number than 5%,” Prozanski shared on Thursday. “Based on the conversation I had, I do believe 3% is attainable.”

    (It’s notable that when The Street Trust first launched this campaign in December 2020, the minimum was pegged at 3%. This was a recommendation from Hau Hagedorn, a former Street Trust board member and Portland State University graduate student whose Bike Bill research was the inspiration for SB 395.)

    For any increase to pass it will take a considerable push. Lawmakers from districts outside major metro areas must also hear about it from their constituents. Political strategist Gregory McKelvey urged attendees to email their state reps and be sure to share a personal story about why it’s so important.

    Because the bill is in a joint committee, the deadline for a committee work session (vote) isn’t until May 14th. If it passes the Joint Transportation Committee it could go straight to the Senate and House floors. (Because it’s funding related, there’s some confusion as to whether the bill would need to be referred to the Ways and Means Committee, which would add a significant procedural hurdle. Prozanski and others at the party assumed it would, but since the bill would not not create new revenue and is just re-allocation of existing funds, it might not be required. The official OLIS overview page makes no mention of a Ways and Means referral. I have a call into the Legislative Fiscal Office to learn more.)

    The reason this bill exists is because ODOT has come under fire for its active transportation investments. According to data on funding between 1985 and 2016 supplied by ODOT, the agency has met its 1% minimum — but just barely.

    ODOT has spent an average of 1.14% of the State Highway Fund on biking and walking infrastructure during those years, which is equal to about $8.7 million annually. The highest ever was 2.26% ($14.3 million) in 2007. (This funding source is not the only way ODOT invests in active transportation. It doesn’t include federal spending, grants, or other sources.)

    As host of the party, The Street Trust Interim Executive Director Sarah Iannarone was optimistic about the bill’s chances and seemed fine with a potential compromise. “Even if we do have to make concessions down from 5% to 3%,” she said at the party. “When you’re only at 1%, that’s a pretty good increase.”

    Learn more about the Safe Routes for All bill at TheStreetTrust.org.

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
    — Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
    — Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale --> ]]>
    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 17:31:22 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Politics Oregon Senate Legislation Sport Front Page Cycling House Portland Willie Nelson Bill Department Of Transportation Advocacy Portland State University Springfield ODOT Yamhill County Ways and Means Ways and Means Committee Jonathan Maus Sarah Iannarone Floyd Prozanski Prozanski Legislative Fiscal Office Kulla Street Trust The Street Trust Lee Beyer Joint Transportation Committee Bike Bill Gregory McKelvey Hau Hagedorn Casey Kulla Yamhelas Westsider Trail 2021 Legislative Session Sb 395 Floyd Prozanski Rob Zako Better Eugene Springfield Transportation Joint Transportation Committee Co
    Push for bike/walk spending increase in Oregon “Bike Bill” headed for compromise http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/_ye1f526VW0/senator-hints-at-compromise-to-ensure-passage-of-safe-routes-for-all-spending-bill-329987

    Screen grab from Bike Bill 50th Birthday Party.

    Well into the legislative session, a push to increase active transportation funding in Oregon is still in play.

    The Street Trust, the Portland-based nonprofit and chief architect of Senate Bill 395, held a virtual 50th birthday party for Oregon’s “Bike Bill”. Along with an attempt at Zoom group karaoke (to Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again”) and fundraising pleas, dozens of supporters heard an update on the bill’s chances from lead sponsor Senator Floyd Prozanski.

    Signed on the seat of a bicycle in 1971, Oregon’s “Bike Bill” (which also funds sidewalks and pedestrian crossings) requires the Department of Transportation to spend a minimum of 1% of Highway Fund dollars on active transportation infrastructure whenever they build major projects. The multiuse path alongside Interstate 205 is just one local example of a project built because of the Bike Bill.

    Advertisement

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale -->

    Advertisement

    The Street Trust saw an opportunity on the bill’s 50th anniversary to increase the minimum requirement to 5%. Now dubbed the Safe Routes for All bill, SB 395 is in the legislature’s Joint Transportation Committee where it received a public hearing on March 4th.

    Thursday’s party was a chance for the coalition of advocates pushing for SB 395 to connect and build momentum as the legislative session heats up.

    Senator Floyd Prozanski.

    Rob Zako with Better Eugene-Springfield Transportation was one of the emcees. He shared that the bill’s value goes way beyond bikes. “Bicycles are just machines, they’re made of steel or aluminum or alloys and rubber. This is really not about bicycles, this is about people. It’s about people getting where they want to go safely it’s about safe routes for all.”

    Being careful to show the bill isn’t just an urban and Portland issue, The Street Trust has allied with champions like Yamhill County Commissioner Casey Kulla who rose to prominence for his valiant attempt to save the Yamhelas Westsider Trail project. Kulla reminded partygoers that, “Safe shoulders and roads are the number one transportation concern of the people that I talked to in rural Oregon.” “Our county is an open space desert. Public land is distant, and it’s hard to access,” he shared. “This bill will accelerate the non-car infrastructure.”

    According to Senator Prozanski, who said he’s made the bill one of his top two priorities, SB 395 might not build as much non-car infrastructure as advocates hoped. As he hinted at back in February, Prozanski thinks a 5% minimum might be a bit too much for his fellow lawmakers to agree to. Prozanski joined the party just after a 25-mile bike ride and said 5% is “A pretty big jump to go for.” “Based on feedback it’s probably not going to make it across the finish line at 5%,” he added. “But that doesn’t mean we can’t still have a win.”

    Advertisement

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale -->

    Advertisement

    “I look at anything above the 1% as a win. And right now we’re going to be pushing really hard for 3%.”

    Prozanski hinted that a formal amendment to the bill is in works and that it might come directly from Joint Transportation Committee Co-chair Lee Beyer, a senator from Springfield and respected veteran of Oregon transportation politics.

    “Even if we do have to make concessions down from 5% to 3%. When you’re only at 1%, that’s a pretty good increase.”
    — Sarah Iannarone, The Street Trust

    “He was more receptive than some people thought to a smaller number than 5%,” Prozanski shared on Thursday. “Based on the conversation I had, I do believe 3% is attainable.”

    (It’s notable that when The Street Trust first launched this campaign in December 2020, the minimum was pegged at 3%. This was a recommendation from Hau Hagedorn, a former Street Trust board member and Portland State University graduate student whose Bike Bill research was the inspiration for SB 395.)

    For any increase to pass it will take a considerable push. Lawmakers from districts outside major metro areas must also hear about it from their constituents. Political strategist Gregory McKelvey urged attendees to email their state reps and be sure to share a personal story about why it’s so important.

    Because the bill is in a joint committee, the deadline for a committee work session (vote) isn’t until May 14th. If it passes the Joint Transportation Committee it could go straight to the Senate and House floors. (Because it’s funding related, there’s some confusion as to whether the bill would need to be referred to the Ways and Means Committee, which would add a significant procedural hurdle. Prozanski and others at the party assumed it would, but since the bill would not not create new revenue and is just re-allocation of existing funds, it might not be required. The official OLIS overview page makes no mention of a Ways and Means referral. I have a call into the Legislative Fiscal Office to learn more.)

    The reason this bill exists is because ODOT has come under fire for its active transportation investments. According to data on funding between 1985 and 2016 supplied by ODOT, the agency has met its 1% minimum — but just barely.

    ODOT has spent an average of 1.14% of the State Highway Fund on biking and walking infrastructure during those years, which is equal to about $8.7 million annually. The highest ever was 2.26% ($14.3 million) in 2007. (This funding source is not the only way ODOT invests in active transportation. It doesn’t include federal spending, grants, or other sources.)

    As host of the party, The Street Trust Interim Executive Director Sarah Iannarone was optimistic about the bill’s chances and seemed fine with a potential compromise. “Even if we do have to make concessions down from 5% to 3%,” she said at the party. “When you’re only at 1%, that’s a pretty good increase.”

    Learn more about the Safe Routes for All bill at TheStreetTrust.org.

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
    — Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
    — Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale --> ]]>
    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 17:31:22 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Advocacy Front Page Legislation Politics 2021 Legislative Session Sb 395 The Street Trust
    Review: Prologo AGX gravel saddles deliver performance & comfort, with options http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/_V__KHLyitw/ The Prologo AGX saddle line up is a three-saddle collection designed specifically for Adventure, Gravel and CX, with shapes for any type or ride or rider. Launched in 2020, the group uses specific design features that actually do seem optimized for off-road drop bar bikes, and they work. Prologo AGX saddle options & actual weights […]

    The post Review: Prologo AGX gravel saddles deliver performance & comfort, with options appeared first on Bikerumor.

    ]]>
    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 16:40:37 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Reviews Sport Cycling Components Gravel Bikes Prologo AGX
    Portland will pilot Nike’s recycled rubber bike share stations http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/Afkpw34NKyM/portland-launches-recycled-rubber-biketown-stations-329980

    New Biketown station made out of recycled “Nike Grind” rubber on NE Ainsworth in the King Neighborhood.
    (Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)


    The City of Portland is rolling out 40 new Biketown stations with a new design and a new material: rubber mats made partly from the scraps of Nike shoes.

    This is what happens when the title sponsor of your bike share station also happens to be the largest shoe company in the world.

    Biketown operator Lyft sees the new station material — which is known as Nike Grind — as a way to deliver their service with a smaller environmental footprint.

    Here’s more from a press statement:

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    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale -->

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    “The rubber mats of the Lyft stations will be made with 25% Nike Grind rubber from Nike’s footwear manufacturing scraps in the top layer and 100% recycled tires in the bottom layer. The stations embrace the concept of circular economy by repurposing shoe scrap manufacturing waste and recycled tires.”

    A spokesperson for Lyft said Portland will be the pilot city and will get 40 recycled rubber stations to start. E-bike share systems in Denver and Chicago will get the stations later this year.

    (Photo: Lyft)

    I spotted one of the new stations a few days ago on the north side of NE Ainsworth Street just east of Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd (in front of Walgreens).

    As you can see the new design has a smaller footprint than the previous locking station design. This will free up a bit more space and make the sidewalk a bit friendlier in general. This is important because PBOT seems to increasingly use Biketown stations to enhance safety and visibility at busy intersections. The new stations are also easier and quicker to install than previous versions, which should help PBOT add service to more areas beyond the central city core.

    Lyft says the stations, “Perform an important placemaking function in cities by giving riders a reliable place to park e-bikes as part of Lyft’s efforts to build cities around people.”

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
    — Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
    — Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale --> ]]>
    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 14:10:25 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Lyft Nike Sport Walgreens Front Page Chicago Cycling Portland Denver Ainsworth Martin Luther King Jr Blvd Biketown Jonathan Maus PBOT Bike-sharing system Nike Grind Ainsworth Street
    Go Long Range https://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/magazine/april-2021/go-long-range/ Steep climbs and stunning spring views are all part of the experience on these four Blue Ridge backpacking treks, which will take you along the most scenic ridge lines of the Southeast.  Black Mountain Crest Trail, North Carolina Difficulty: StrenuousLength: 11.3 miles one wayTrail type: Out-and-back or shuttle Located along the ridgeline of the Black Mountains, […]

    The post Go Long Range appeared first on Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine.

    ]]>
    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:21:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Hiking Sport Magazine Cycling Go Outside Black Mountains April 2021
    Cycling Tips for Women http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CyclingTrainingTips/~3/93E-qddj4Rs/ ]]> Tue, 13 Apr 2021 11:54:28 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Cycling Cycling Training Patent Patrol: What does a Shimano GRX hydro junction do? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/RHe5FGNOpu0/ My long-term review of Shimano GRX Di2 will be hitting the airwaves here at Bikerumor very soon. In it, I mention the notable braking power of the sub-levers that live on the bar tops. These levers now sit in line with the main brake levers and the hydraulic fluid from the master cylinder flows through […]

    The post Patent Patrol: What does a Shimano GRX hydro junction do? appeared first on Bikerumor.

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    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 11:06:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Cycling Brakes Shimano Gravel Bikes Gravel Bikerumor Drivetrain Prototypes & Concepts Hydraulic Brakes
    2021 Canyon Torque CF Fabio Wibmer LTD signature edition carbon enduro bike http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/cPr8jK4eiBQ/ Canyon’s long-travel do-it-all Torque CF enduro bike adds a new limited pro signature edition to bring you the same bike setup as trials-to-DH shredder Fabio Wibmer. Whether you call it an enduro bike, freeride, or a “fun-loving bikepark machine”, the Torque CF is a gravity-ready bike capable of anything you can dish out. And this […]

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    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 06:49:30 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Cycling Mountain Bike Canyon Torque CF Fabio Wibmer LTD
    Video Roundup: Shreds of inspiration from Cecile Ravanel, Thomas Vanderham & more http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/7X5pEXszbAU/ Hit a bit of a mid-week slump? Needing some inspiration for your upcoming weekend of shredding? Look no further. We have a selection of videos that will get you stoked for your next ride. Cecile Ravanel, Thomas Vanderham, Keegan Wright, Eliot Lapotre, Billy Meaclem and James Ontiveros bring the goods. Feature Image: Billy Meaclem riding […]

    The post Video Roundup: Shreds of inspiration from Cecile Ravanel, Thomas Vanderham & more appeared first on Bikerumor.

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    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 06:46:19 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Cycling Mountain Bike Cecile Ravanel Thomas Vanderham James Ontiveros Billy Meaclem
    Bikerumor Pic Of The Day: Balboa Park – San Diego, California http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/7e7dHhwqqbo/ Photo submitted by Alex Tapia, “Balboa Park is one of the most beautiful parts of San Diego City and being able to explore it on your bike makes it that much more special. If you are ever in San Diego, make sure you add Balboa Park to your must visit list.” We always love seeing […]

    The post Bikerumor Pic Of The Day: Balboa Park – San Diego, California appeared first on Bikerumor.

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    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 06:01:14 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Cycling San Diego San Diego California Balboa Park San Diego City Pic of the Day Alex Tapia Balboa Park Balboa Park San Diego California
    ProTaper Team Stem polishes your cockpit w/ 31.8mm clamp and 30-50mm reach http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikeRumor/~3/iYTQqk77rQc/ ProTaper have polished up a 31.8mm Team mountain bike stem, an item that will no doubt add a touch of class to most cockpits. It joins a lineup of racing-oriented carbon and aluminium handlebars, stems and grips for XC, Enduro and DH applications, from the Hayes Bicycle owned-brand. ProTaper Team Polished Stem Originally known as […]

    The post ProTaper Team Stem polishes your cockpit w/ 31.8mm clamp and 30-50mm reach appeared first on Bikerumor.

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    Tue, 13 Apr 2021 05:20:27 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Cycling Mountain Bike Hayes Bicycle
    How to Train for Gravel Racing and Riding http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ColumbusRides/~3/KVrxNNgjDo8/how-to-train-for-gravel-racing-and.html

    [Author: noreply@blogger.com (Columbus Rides Bikes)]

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    Mon, 12 Apr 2021 21:47:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Cycling
    Opposition to ODOT I-5 freeway project gains steam at Tubman School rally http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/AQe-QMotUuE/odot-i-5-freeway-project-critics-expand-opposition-at-major-rally-329913 (Click for captions. Photos by Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

    “We can literally see the smog in the air during recess… This freeway is constantly on our minds, and it is in our lungs, and it is a direct threat to the heart of the Tubman community.”
    — Malina Yuen, 9th grader and Tubman graduate

    Portland’s freeway fight spread its wings as it traded the confines of social media and online meeting testimony for a well-attended rally on Friday evening. Dozens of speakers and organizers joined with about 150 attendees at Harriet Tubman Middle School within earshot of the section of freeway the Oregon Department of Transportation wants to widen as part of their I-5 Rose Quarter project.

    A trio of nonprofits launched a lawsuit against the project on Monday, citing ODOT’s failure to fully examine environmental impacts and lack of willingness to consider other, less-polluting design options. The rally was billed as a celebration of the lawsuit, and it certainly was; but it also felt like a coordinated indictment of capitalism, the destructive impacts of freeways, and the state agency that loves widening them.

    The crowd was a diverse mix of ages, races, and styles. Toddlers doodled with chalk on the pavement at the school entrance, using it to embellish phrases like “Climate Leaders Don’t Widen Freeways” with rainbows and flowers.

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    Before a bevy of speakers riled up the crowd, volunteers with Sunrise PDX gathered hand-written postcards from attendees. The nonprofit No More Freeways, the lawsuit’s lead protagonist, had created the cards with custom messages to four key leaders: Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek, Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty, Oregon Governor Kate Brown, and US DOT Secretary Pete Buttigieg.

    With the pandemic still in effect, it was strange to attend an in-person event of this size. It was the largest gathering of transportation advocates for well over a year. Rally organizers took full advantage.

    Rally organizer Aaron Brown with No More Freeways.

    “I’m with an organization called No More Freeways and we just sued the federal government!” said lead rabble-rouser Aaron Brown triumphantly at the outset of the event.

    A person named Tad, who was introduced by Brown as an “indigenous climate justice warrior” started off a slate of speeches with an impassioned plea against capitalism and a return to the values of his tribal ancestors. “Where is our climate justice? Where’s our transportation justice? I’ll tell you where: There is no justice on stolen land!”

    The dire environmental impacts of the existing freeway and the potential of more damage from a wider one were a major theme.

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    Neighbors for Clean Air (NCA), another plaintiff in the lawsuit, explained that ODOT’s plans would bring freeway-using vehicles to within 30 feet of the school. “[Portland Public Schools] has been forced to spend $12 million [on a ventilation system] to reduce the health impacts of students and teachers,” said NCA’s Tori Heroux. “Children are most vulnerable to the long-term impacts from traffic because their lungs are still developing. And on average, children breathe about 50% more air per pound of bodyweight than adults do.”

    What has helped spur a grassroots insurrection against this project isn’t simply a big, dirty freeway. It’s the intentional and racist choices made over generations by state and local officials to build highways through north Portland at the expense of historically black neighborhoods.

    Joe Cortright, an economist and founding member of No More Freeways, told the crowd how a series of major highway projects starting in the 1950s decimated people’s homes and lives (he riffed off an article he recently published on City Observatory). “In 1950, 14,000 people lived in the Albina Neighborhood. In 1970, only 4,000 people lived here. This neighborhood was devastated by freeway construction and it’s ironic that ODOT is coming back and pretending that they’re offering restorative justice to the neighborhood by widening the freeway. Only a highway engineer would think you could fix the problem by making the freeway bigger.”

    Symbolic of the diversity of opposition to this project, Cortright’s speech was followed by someone one-third his age. 21-year-old Sharona Shnayder is a Portlander and environmental activist who leads a global effort to pick trash.

    “ODOT should be ashamed… for having the audacity to propose an action to expand this problem, to strangle these kids and their futures even further,” Shnayder said to rousing applause. “What’s frustrating about this situation is knowing that these children can’t even drive yet, yet they’re the ones who have to breathe the polluted air caused by all of those passing by just feet away from their classrooms… This is about a lack of morality. It’s about a lack of ethics. This is a lack of consciousness, knowing that we have a choice to do the right or the wrong thing, but are consistently choosing to do the latter.”

    I-5 on the right. Tubman school on the left.

    “There’s no room for compromise here. No freeway! No way! You’ll hear us! You’ll pay!”

    Gerald Scrutchions knows how the freeway impacts the school because he teaches there. Wary of the impacts of unfiltered diesel engines, one day he counted how many passed by his classroom. It was 15 in one minute. “By a conservative estimate, I came up with about 10,000 diesel trucks passing a day,” Scrutchions said.

    “We are in a school that claims to have the cleanest air quality in the city of Portland [due to a state-of-the-art ventilation system]. However, we seal the windows shut. Outside of the school is some of the worst air quality in the country.”

    One of Scrutchions’ former students is Malina Yuen. Now a 9th-grader, she’s graduated from Tubman Middle School, but she’s one of the leaders in the fight to protect it from the freeway. Yuen knows about those dirty trucks all too well. “We can literally see the smog in the air during recess. On bad days kids with asthma were afraid to even come outside,” she shard. “This freeway is constantly on our minds, and it is in our lungs, and it is a direct threat to the heart of the Tubman community.”

    Yuen’s friend and partner-in-activism is Adah Crandall. She was equally as forceful and effective in her words against ODOT. “It doesn’t take an expert to see that adding more lanes means more people driving, and more people driving means more pollution… Even the sixth graders at Tubman can understand this concept of induced demand; and for some reason, ODOT still cannot!”

    If you missed the rally, check the full recording below (provided by No More Freeways):

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
    — Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
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    Mon, 12 Apr 2021 18:31:10 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Oregon US Sport Front Page Cycling Portland NCA Brown Kate Brown Oregon House Yuen ODOT Tina Kotek Oregon Department of Transportation Portland Public Schools Aaron Brown Cortright Tubman Jonathan Maus Rides/Events Joe Cortright City Observatory Albina Pete Buttigieg Jo Ann Hardesty Harriet Tubman Middle School Tubman School I-5 Rose Quarter Project No More Freeways Tubman Middle School Gerald Scrutchions Scrutchions Malina Yuen Advertisement Neighbors for Clean Air NCA Tori Heroux Sharona Shnayder Shnayder Adah Crandall
    Analysis: Cycling World Championship event would lead to $80 million in direct spending http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/nydt8YYJGFY/analysis-says-road-cycling-world-championships-would-be-economic-boom-for-portland-region-329915

    A scene from 2015 UCI Road World Championships in Richmond, Virginia.
    (Photo: Geoff Alexander/ Flickr Creative Commons)

    “It’s safe to assume that overall impact will be somewhere north of $120 million.”
    — Kevin Hyland, PDX Cycling Worlds, Inc.

    A push to make Portland the host of the 2026 UCI Road Cycling World Championships received some good news last month when an independent analysis showed it could pump $80 million into the regional economy.

    That was one of the top findings just released in an analysis performed by Portland-based economic research firm Dean Runyan Associates.

    Kevin Hyland, executive director of the nonprofit PDX Cycling Worlds Inc., says that’s a very promising number that is likely to be much higher. “When you factor in all the indirect and induced spending, as well as the spending by the organizing committee, sponsors, the impact of all the ancillary events, and the incremental spending by the locals — it’s safe to assume that overall impact will be somewhere north of $120 million,” he shared in an email to BikePortland on Monday.

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    The 11-day event would draw participants, officials, sponsors, and spectators from around the world to see cycling’s best athletes compete in time trials (races against the clock) and a mass-start road race. Based on previous UCI Worlds held in the U.S. and Europe, Dean Runyan Associates estimates a total spectator count of 638,000 with 46% of them being local and 54% coming from outside the area.

    Here’s more from the analysis:

    342,000 visitor days: Projected visitor-days in the region as a result of UCI Champs amount to 342,600. Eighty percent of visitors are expected to spend the night in the Portland metro area.

    $80 million in direct spending: Projected direct spending as a result of UCI Champs amounts to $80.1 million. Seventy-one percent of spending originates from overnight visitors, while the remainder comes from day visitors (8%) and teams, officials, and media (21%). Total spending by visiting spectators amounts to about $63 million, with an additional $17 million attributable to racing teams, officials, and media.

    $30 million in earnings: Projected earnings as a result of UCI Champs amount to $30.5 million. This number includes earnings that flow to employees, as well as working proprietors.

    $5 million in tax revenue: Projected state and local taxes as a result of UCI Champs amount to approximately $5.4 million. Local taxes ($2.7m) include lodging taxes and local levies on sales, such as for auto rental. State taxes ($2.7m) include state fuel taxes and income taxes paid by employees.

    Hyland with PDX Cycling Worlds says Portland City Commissioner Mingus Mapps has officially signed on as a supporter of the event. Commissioner Carmen Rubio and Commissioner Dan Ryan have said positive things about it, Hyland said, but they are not official supporters yet. He’s scheduled to talk with Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty next week and is working on getting an appointment with Mayor Ted Wheeler.

    View the full report here or browse it below. Learn more about the event and the grassroots effort to bring it to Portland at PDXCyclingWorlds.com.

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
    — Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
    — Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

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    Mon, 12 Apr 2021 16:13:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Sport Front Page Racing Cycling Portland UCI Richmond Virginia Dan Ryan Hyland Portland City Ted Wheeler Jonathan Maus Rides/Events Kevin Hyland Jo Ann Hardesty UCI Road World Championships in Portland Carmen Rubio Mingus Mapps Geoff Alexander Flickr PDX Cycling Worlds Inc Dean Runyan Associates Kevin Hyland Europe Dean Runyan Associates UCI Champs PDX Cycling Worlds
    The 5 best bike lights for better visibility while cycling at night http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/FSDI-V2WCJQ/best-bike-light
  • Bike lights keep you visible in low-light conditions, alerting oncoming traffic or anyone else on the road.
  • The best should be easy to take off and put on and have a battery capable of lasting for hours of riding.
  • Our top pick, the Cygolite Streak 450 Hotshot SL, comes with a headlight and taillight and has several light modes.
  • Living in New York City means my go-to mode of transportation is my bike. Whether I need to run errands during the week or want to get some exercise on a long weekend ride, there aren't many days during the spring and summer that I don't spend at least a little bit of time pedaling around Brooklyn.

    But just as I'd never leave my apartment without a helmet, I always make sure to pack along a set of bike lights - no matter how long I plan on being out. Bike lights are an indispensable part of any cycling kit and one that can very well save your life.

    Throughout my years of cycling, I've learned firsthand the immense value of a quality set of bike lights (and how dangerous a poor set can be). I've also come across my fair share of bike light variety; there are some designed to be highly portable and easy to install, while others are intended for trail riding.

    Below, I've rounded up five of my favorites from brands like Malker and NiteRider. At the end of this guide, I've also included some tips on how to show for a bike light, as well as insight into the testing methodology used to decide which lights ultimately made the cut.

    Here are the best bike lights: Updated on 4/12/2021 by Rick Stella: Added the Malker Silicone LED Bike Lights as our pick of the best on a budget, added sections on how to shop for a bike light, as well as insight into our testing methodology, checked the availability of all recommended lights, and updated the pricing. The best overall cygolite

    Cygolite

    For a reasonable price, the Cygolite Streak 450 Hotshot SL Bike Light Combo Set includes a bright headlight and taillight to make your early morning or late night commutes safer.

    Pros: Incredibly bright, long battery life, easy to mount, several useful lighting modes

    Cons: Uses Mini USB (rather than the more common Micro USB)

    The Cygolite Streak 450 Hotshot SL Bike Light Combo Set comes with the Streak 450 Lumen headlight, which lasts for up to 100 hours on a single charge, and the Hotshot SL 50 Lumen taillight, which lasts for 200 hours on a single charge.

    The lights charge using a Mini USB cord that you can plug into your computer or a cube. Since many electronics these days rely on Micro USB (not mini), you may want to keep a Mini USB cord with you on your rides so you aren't stranded with dead lights. Or, if you see the low battery indicator turn on, be sure to charge the light before you go out.

    The headlight has seven lighting modes: boost, high, medium, low, steady pulse, walking, and daylighting, which consists of powerful flashes that make you stand out in broad daylight. The taillight also has a lightning mode as well as five other modes of varying flash tempo and brightness.

    The best easy install bike light

    TeamObsidian

    If you're looking for a light that's just as easy to install as it is to take off your bike, consider picking up the surprisingly well-built and bright TeamObsidian Bike Light Set.

    Pros: Affordable, adjustable beam width, lifetime guarantee

    Cons: Doesn't come with batteries, not designed for trail riding

    One of the benefits you sacrifice with the low cost of the TeamObsidian Bike Light Set is usability out of the box. Batteries aren't included. Despite having to buy five AAA batteries (I recommend getting rechargeable versions), there's a lot to like about this set.

    The headlamp produces 200 lumens of light. Both lights have three lighting modes — high, dimmed, and flashing — and are designed to withstand water, snow, heat, and dust. Installation is effortless and tool-free. And, the lights have quick-release mounts so you can take them with you and avoid potential thefts.

    TeamObsidian stands behind the quality of its bike lights by offering a "100% no-hassle lifetime guarantee." The company specifically states that it will refund your money if you're dissatisfied for any reason. And, if the lights break, it will send you new ones.

    The best on a budget MalkerLights1

    Amazon

    Malker's bike lights are a great budget buy for anyone looking for a set of easy-to-install front and taillights — they even have a variety of light settings which add to their versatility. 

    Pros: Easy to strap onto a bike's handlebars and seatpost, comes with front and rear lights, has multiple light settings including a strobe function

    Cons: Light modes can be hard to toggle, not robust enough for all riding conditions

    These LED lights from Malker have been a go-to of mine for several years, as they're extremely easy to put on and take off and incredibly cost-effective — I often see them on sale for under $10. The fact they come as a set of four (two standard, front-facing lights and two red, rear-facing lights) only adds to their utility, too. 

    Aside from their price and ease of use, what I like about these lights from Malker is how lightweight they are. I'm able to stash them in my backpack before I head out for a ride, but can also just leave them attached to my bike and they don't take up too much space or get in the way of anything while I bike.

    If I lock my bike up, their strap-on style makes it easy to just unhook them and put them back in my bag (or even a pant pocket), though it is worth noting to make sure the lights are completely off when stashing them. Several times I thought I've turned them off, only to find them still on but on a different light setting next time I go to use them (or the battery would just be completely sapped).  -- Rick Stella, fitness and health editor

    The best for trail riding niterider

    NiteRider

    If you prefer to take your mountain bike off-road at night and you have a little extra to spend, consider the NiteRider Pro 1800 Race Light.

    Pros: 1800 lumens output, long distance beam that maintains uniformity, excellent for trail riding at night

    Cons: Expensive, hard to remove

    What sets the NiteRider Pro 1800 Race Light apart from the other lights in our guide is that it gets brighter than your average car headlight. There are five modes: high, medium, low, walk, and flash.

    The light is designed to stand up to the elements with Dupont fiberglass reinforced nylon housings and a borosilicate glass lens, which is resistant to extreme temperature changes. The eight-step power gauge tells you how much battery power is left, and you can easily swap out batteries so you aren't left in the dark while you wait for your light to charge.

    The best side light urban bike light

    Light and Motion

    The Light and Motion Urban 500 Headlight keeps you visible from the front and sides with its powerful headlight and helpful sidelights.

    Pros: Has sidelights, 500 lumens, lightweight and compact, easy to remove, two-year warranty

    Cons: USB port cover falls off easily

    When mounted just right, the Light and Motion Urban 500 Headlight has two amber safety sidelights that make you visible to drivers on your sides. There are four light modes: high (500 lumens), medium, low, and pulse.

    On high, the battery lasts for about 90 minutes, and on pulse, it lasts for up to 12 hours. The light mounts right onto your handlebars and has a quick release feature so you can take your light with you. It charges using a Micro USB charging cable. And, Light and Motion backs the quality of this product with a two-year warranty.

    How to shop for a bike lights

    When choosing a bike light, look at the number of lumens it's capable of producing, as this tells you how bright the light is. Many models give you this number right in their name and, based on our testing, the advertised lumens rating is accurate for the best units, though the brightness may dwindle as the battery loses juice.

    For headlights, the number of lumens you need depends on where you'll be cycling. For riding trails at night, you need at least 1,000 lumens. For urban roads where there are streetlights, 200 lumens will do. And, taillights should produce between 40 and 100 lumens of output since they are mainly there so others can see you.

    Do be careful not to use extremely bright flashing headlights while cycling, too. This can disorient drivers and make it harder for them to see you.

    Also, anything above 300 lumens could potentially blind oncoming traffic. So, consider dropping down to a dimmer setting when cars are coming — much like you might use the high beams on your car. If you're concerned about drivers seeing you from behind, consider installing two rear lights: One that flashes and one that remains steady.

    How we test bike lights

    Each of the bike lights featured in this guide went through a series of tests to determine how well they compared across these four categories: Brightness, ease of use, versatility, and value. Here's how each category specifically factored into deciding which lights made this guide:

    Brightness: Judging a bike light's brightness isn't just about its lumen output or its actual brightness, but more so the quality of the light and what kind of settings it offers. As mentioned in the section on how to shop for a bike light, quality bike lights can vary in lumen output between 200 to 1,000 lumens, though this depends on where you plan on riding. To test for this, we looked at how effective the light was at making us visible without blinding oncoming traffic, while also providing some illumination of our surroundings. 

    Ease of use: A bike light that's hard to install, or even difficult to turn on and switch between its light settings, isn't one that's going to be particularly thrilling to use over and over again. If the light is easy to use, you'll be more inclined to use it. Plain and simple. It's also preferred that a light doesn't require much toggling while you're riding (or, at the very least, is easy to use).

    Versatility: Being able to use a single set of bike lights on multiple bikes isn't exactly a dealbreaker but it is nice to have that flexibility if need be. Additionally, a light that offers multiple brightness settings or a variety of light modes makes it far more valuable than just a standard, single beam light. 

    Value: A bike light's value isn't just what its sticker price says but more so a combination of the three categories above, and how that compares to what it costs. There are plenty of valuable lights in the $15-$40 range, capable of fitting a range of budgets without sacrificing much quality. 

    More Insider Reviews bike gear guides best bike helmet

    Shutterstock

    The best bike helmets
    The best bike locks

     

    Read the original article on Business Insider

    [Author: jbrains@insider.com (James Brains,Rick Stella)]

    ]]>
    Mon, 12 Apr 2021 15:05:59 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Reviews Outdoors New York City Trends Features Brooklyn Cycling Buying Guide DuPont AAA Bike Bike Accessories Rick Stella Insider Picks Guides Best Guides Guide Update Outdoors (Reviews Fitness (Reviews Insider Reviews 2021 Spring Forward 2021 Malker Amazon Malker
    The Monday Roundup: RIP Daunte Wright, MUTCD debate, freeway fighters go big, and more http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/BikePortland/~3/01eZyeDxYZw/the-monday-roundup-rip-daunte-wright-mutcd-debate-freeway-fighters-go-big-and-more-329906

    Happy Monday BikePortlanders.

    Here are the most notable items we came across in the past seven days…

    Routine traffic stop: A Black man named Daunte Wright died Sunday after he was shot by a Minnesota police officer. The man was pulled over for a minor traffic violation and was in the process of being arrested for an outstanding warrant prior to the the incident.

    MUTCD’s 15 minutes of fame: The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), which is the federal road engineering bible that dictates everything from sign design to speed limit rules is undergoing a major revision and the fight between advocates on the outside and inside over how much it should change has reached national political drama status.

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    Learn more and speak up: The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) has an excellent overview of the MUTCD issue and has all the links and info you need to comment to the federal government.

    Get inspired: A photo essay from a travel photographer who cycled across England and captured a series of “poetic self portraits” is sure to get your legs and tummy tingling for adventures.

    Freeway fight goes national: Dozens of activist groups across America have realized they have something in common: A strong dislike of freeway expansion projects and a sympathetic US DOT Secretary.

    Tragedy and a tweet: A man killed while bicycling in D.C. had tweeted about how dangerous road conditions are in the area just hours before the collision.

    USA Cycling on Arkansas: America’s governing body for competitive cycling has issued a statement that supports athletes who wish to boycott Arkansas events because of that state’s anti-transgender law.

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    Crash not accident: The City of Chicago is taking steps to remove the word “accident” from their municipal code on account of it being inaccurate and harmful to progress on traffic safety issues.

    Speeding Tiger: Color me shocked on two fronts to this sad story: Superstar icon Tiger Woods was speeding recklessly prior to his serious crash in California last month, and (of course) he won’t be cited.

    Sign of evolution: For the first time ever, the vaunted National Transportation Safety Board has put a priority on the safety of humans who exist outside of large motorized vehicles.

    Eff you-Vs: Just how screwed up is our infatuation with SUVs? According to Grist, “If all SUV drivers banded together to form their own country, it would rank as the seventh largest emitter in the world.”

    — Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org
    — Get our headlines delivered to your inbox.
    — Support this independent community media outlet with a one-time contribution or monthly subscription.

    E-Bike Store Black Friday Sale --> ]]>
    Mon, 12 Apr 2021 14:11:44 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs England Minnesota California America Sport Features Front Page Chicago Cycling Arkansas National Transportation Safety Board USA Cycling Jonathan Maus The Monday Roundup Daunte Wright