Bloglikes - Diabetes https://www.bloglikes.com/c/diabetes en-US Thu, 15 Apr 2021 17:21:35 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter 7 Easy Ways to Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally https://www.thefashionablehousewife.com/lower-blood-sugar-levels-naturally/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lower-blood-sugar-levels-naturally

Are you having a hard time keeping your blood sugar level under control? You are the only one, as millions around the world struggle to do every single day. For patients who have Diabetes, keeping blood sugar level under control can be cumbersome for various reasons. From the time you wake up in the morning until the moment you go to bed after a long and tiring day, you tend to think about blood sugar level – not anymore! It is time to drift away from your daily routine and do things that will let you keep a check on your blood sugar level. 

Remember to keep a functional blood sugar meter for monitoring your blood sugar level. Put your faith in top rated blood sugar meter providers like Contournext so you can keep a check on blood sugar level every day. Each time you feel dizzy and weak; know that it is time to check your blood sugar level. The following ways will help you live a healthy lifestyle keep your sugar level under control, so get started:

Change your daily routine

Start your efforts by waking and sleeping on time. Do you recall when the last time you slept and woke early was? If not, then you seriously need to rethink your routine and sleeping habits for the better. Pay attention to those small details and do the needful.

Check if your mattress is in good condition and if not, replace it with a nice and soft one. Maintaining a proper routine will help you live a healthy life and keep your blood sugar and cholesterol in check as well. Sleeping early gives your body enough time to digest the food properly. You will notice a reduction in your digestion-related troubles too. 

Hydrate your body

That old school trick of keeping your body hydrated works wonders for Diabetes patients as well. Drink more water than you usually do, as it will flush out contaminants and extra sugar from the body through urine. Similarly, drinking more water than usual lets your body flush out glucose as well. It is best to drink at least two dozen glasses of water in a day at least. 

Drink sugar-free juices

 Everybody likes to drink juices, but those who have diabetes cannot. Artificial juices contain very high quantities of sugar, which is harmful to patients who have diabetes. You can satisfy your thirst with sugar-free juices instead, as those will not add sugar and glucose to your body. 

Exercise and walk

Whether you like to walk and do exercise or not, doing both will significantly enhance your body’s ability to keep blood sugar in check. Take a walk in the morning and evening if possible. Doing so will let it maintain sensitivity to Insulin that is naturally produced in the Pancreas. Sensitivity to Insulin enhances the cell’s ability to utilize the extra sugar from your bloodstream. This will significantly reduce blood sugar levels in your body over a period. Keeping your body in motion and exercising daily will keep you fit and healthy. 

Keep an eye on the daily calorie count

Diabetes patients, consuming junk food and soda can be very harmful. Nothing adds more calories to your body than sweet dishes and junk food. They increase cholesterol, sugar levels and put your body in harm’s way. Avoid consuming both, make sure to lose weight, and keep an eye on your daily calorie count. Please do this by visiting your dietician and have him make you a proper diet plan. Know that calorie count before consuming food, so you know how much calories it will add to your body. Remember, more calories mean more weight, which you must avoid at all costs. Stay away from obesity and count the calories you consume every day. You will notice a drop in calorie count by rigorously following your diet plan. 

Reduce your Glycemic index

Those who do not know what Glycemic Index is measure how the body digests and absorbs food. Diabetics must consume food items with low Glycemic Index values that have fewer carbs. Consuming food items such as vegetables with low starch, beans, pasta, yogurt, oat, and lentils contain a low Glycemic Index. Add these and other natural food items to your list if you want to lower blood sugar levels naturally.

Stay free of stress

Did you know that stress is equally harmful to Diabetics? Your body triggers hormones like Cortisol and Glucagon when you are under stress. They raise the level of sugar in your bloodstream. Living a stress-free life is perhaps one of the best ways to keep your blood sugar in control. It is by no means difficult, and you can do this with ease. Keep your mind away from thoughts that trigger stress. You can stay free of stress by practicing Yoga and meditation. 

Doing the above will surely help you lower blood sugar levels naturally and live a healthy life without worrying about rising blood sugar level. 

The post 7 Easy Ways to Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally appeared first on The Fashionable Housewife.

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Thu, 08 Apr 2021 14:38:32 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Fashion Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Insulin Lose Weight Health & Fitness Type 1 Diabetes Blood Sugar Diabetic Easy Ways to Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally
No wonder patients detest our health care system, and doctors are leaving medicine in droves http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KevinMd-MedicalWeblog/~3/xcU0HVvxmEA/no-wonder-patients-detest-our-health-care-system-and-doctors-are-leaving-medicine-in-droves.html My patient is a brilliant, 30-something-year-old highly educated woman with type 1 diabetes. I’ve known her for many years, since she was a teenager.  She is sweet and fun, even though she can be fierce and fiery at times. She has type 1 diabetes. She has been living with this life-altering, life-threatening disease for many […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.comSearch thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


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Sun, 04 Apr 2021 15:00:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Diabetes Endocrinology Physician PA NP CRNA
Ghana’s Redbird raises $1.5M seed to expand access to rapid medical testing in sub-Saharan Africa http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/L21DttBAhks/ For patients and healthcare professionals to properly track and manage illnesses especially chronic ones, healthcare needs to be decentralized . It also needs to be more convenient, with a patient’s health information able to follow them wherever they go .

Redbird, a Ghanaian healthtech startup that allows easy access to convenient testing and ensures that doctors and patients can view the details of those test results at any time, announced today that it has raised a $1.5 million seed investment .  

Investors who participated in the round include Johnson & Johnson Foundation, Newton Partners (via the Imperial Venture Fund), and Founders Factory Africa . This brings the company’s total amount raised to date to $2.5 million.

The healthtech company was launched in 2018 by Patrick Beattie, Andrew Quao and Edward Grandstaff . As a founding scientist at a medical diagnostics startup in Boston, Beattie’s job was to develop new rapid diagnostic tests . During his time at Accra in 2016, he met Quao, a trained pharmacist in Ghana at a hackathon whereupon talking found out that their interests in medical testing overlapped.

Beattie says to TechCrunch that while he saw many exciting new tests in development in the US, he didn’t see the same in Ghana . Quao, who is familiar with how Ghanaians use pharmacies as their primary healthcare point, felt perturbed that these pharmacies weren’t doing more than transactional purchases .

They both settled that pharmacies in Ghana needed to imbibe the world of medical testing. Although both didn’t have a tech background, they realized technology was necessary to execute this . So, they enlisted the help of Grandstaff to be CTO of Redbird while Beattie and Quao became CEO and COO, respectively .

L-R: Patrick Beattie (CEO), Andrew Quao (COO), and Edward Grandstaff (CTO)

Redbird enables pharmacies in Ghana to add rapid diagnostic testing for 10 different health conditions to their pharmacy services . These tests include anaemia, blood sugar, blood pressure, BMI, cholesterol, Hepatitis B, malaria, typhoid, prostate cancer screening, and pregnancy .  

Also , Redbird provides pharmacies with the necessary equipment, supplies and software to make this possible . The software —  Redbird Health Monitoring — is networked across all partner pharmacies and enables patients to build medical testing records after going through 5-minute medical tests offered through these pharmacies.

Rather than employing a SaaS model that Beattie says is not well appreciated by its customers, Redbird’s revenue model is based on the supply of disposable test strips .

“Pharmacies who partner with Redbird gain access to the software and all the ways Redbird supports our partners for free as long as they purchase the consumables through us . This aligns our revenue with their success, which is aligned with patient usage,” said the CEO.

This model is being used with over over 360 pharmacies in Ghana, mainly in Accra and Kumasi. It was half this number in 2019, and Redbird was able to double this number despite the pandemic. These pharmacies have recorded over 125,000 tests in the past three years from more than 35,000 patients registered on the platform .

Redbird will use the seed investment to grow its operations within Ghana and expand to new markets that remain undisclosed .

In 2018, Redbird participated in the Alchemist Accelerator just a few months before launch . It was the second African startup after fellow Ghanaian startup mPharma to take part in the six-month-long program . The company also got into Founders Factory Africa last year April.

According to Beattie, most of the disease burden Africans might experience in the future will be chronic diseases. For instance, diabetes is projected to grow by 156% over the next 25 years . This is why he sees decentralized, digitized healthcare as the next leapfrog opportunity for sub-Saharan Africa .

“Chronic disease is exploding and with it, patients require much more frequent interaction with the healthcare system . The burden of chronic disease will make a health system that is highly centralized impossible,” he said. “ Like previous leapfrog events, this momentum is happening all over the world, not just in Africa. Still, the state of the current infrastructure means that healthcare systems here will be forced to innovate and adapt before health systems elsewhere are forced to, and therein lies the opportunity,” he said .

But while the promise of technology and data is exciting, it’s important to realize that healthtech only provides value if it matches patient behaviors and preferences . It doesn’t really matter what amazing improvements you can realize with data if you can’t build the data asset and offer a service that patients actually value .

Beattie knows this all too well and says Redbird respects these preferences. For him, the next course of action will be to play a larger role in the world’s developing ecosystem where healthcare systems build decentralised networks and move closer to the average patient .

Healthcare by 2028 will be doctor-directed, patient-owned and powered by visual technologies

This decentralised approach is what attracted U.S. and South African early-stage VC firm Newtown Partners to cut a check. Speaking on behalf of the firm, Llew Claasen, the managing partner, had this to say .

“We’re excited about Redbird’s decentralised business model that enables rapid diagnostic testing at the point of primary care in local community pharmacies . Redbird’s digital health record platform has the potential to drive significant value to the broader healthcare value chain and is a vital step toward improving healthcare outcomes in Africa . We look forward to supporting the team as they prove out their  business model and scale across the African continent .”

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Tue, 23 Mar 2021 08:00:58 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Startups TC Enterprise Boston Funding Africa US Tech Diabetes Healthcare Biotech Ghana Cto Accra Kumasi Saharan Africa Founders Factory Beattie Chronic Disease Health Systems Newtown Partners Llew Claasen Redbird Johnson Johnson Foundation Newton Partners Imperial Venture Fund and Founders Factory Africa Patrick Beattie Andrew Quao Edward Grandstaff Quao Ghana Quao Grandstaff Patrick Beattie Andrew Quao COO CTO Redbird Founders Factory Africa Saharan Africa Chronic
Ro raises $500M to grow its remote and in-home primary care platform http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/jaTVdrbT9GA/ Healthcare tech startup Ro has raised $500 million to help fuel continued growth of its hybrid telehealth/in-home primary care platform, which also includes a growing pharmacy business as the company pursues a strategy of vertical integration to optimize delivery and reduce costs for clients. The company’s latest raise is a Series D round, and means it has now raised over $876 million since its 2017 founding.

That may seem like a lot of money, but as Ro co-founder and CEO Zachariah Reitano told me in an interview, it’s actually “peanuts” when it comes to the healthcare industry – which is part of why they founded the company in the first place.

“Sometimes people talk about how great it is to be in the healthcare arena, in tech circles,” Reitano said. “They say, ‘Oh, healthcare is a $4 trillion market – it’s so massive.’  But that’s the worst thing in the entire world; it’s awful how large it is. And I think what we have the opportunity to cut it in half with technology.”

That’s what Reitano says will be the primary focus of this round of funding: Fueling its efforts around vertical integration of healthcare services and technology, to further the eventual end goal of reducing costs to patients through the efficiencies realized in that process.

“To me, what I’m really excited about is being able to continue to invest in that infrastructure and add even more,” Reitano told me. “We’ll continue to invest in telemedicine, we’ll continue to invest in our logistics and pharmacy, and continue to invest in in-home care, as well as the connection between the three, and then we’ll also invest in additional diagnostics, remote patient monitoring – so collecting and distributing devices to patients to go from reactive to proactive care.”

Ro’s model focuses on primary care delivered direct to consumer, without involving any payer or employer-funded and guided care programs. The idea is to reduce costs through vertical integration and other efficiency engineering efforts in order to get them to the point where they’re effectively on par with your out-of-pocket expense with co-pays anyway. Reitano explained that the insurance system as it exists in the U.S. now only effectively masks individual costs, making it less clear that much of what a person pays out in healthcare costs comes out of their pocket anyway, whether it’s through taxation, or employers allocating more of the funds they have available for compensation to healthcare, vs. take-home pay.

Image Credits: Ro

That’s what’s behind Ro’s recent push into operating its own pharmacies, and growing that footprint to include more all the time. Reitano told me that the company will have 10 pharmacies by the end o this year, and 15 by the end of next, all placed strategically around the country to ensure that it can provide next-day shipping to patients at ground shipping rates pretty much anywhere in the U.S.

Doing that kind of vertical optimization has enabled Ro to offer 500 common drugs at $5 per month, including treatments for heart disease, anxiety, depression and diabetes — with a plan to ramp it to 1,000 drugs available at that price by year’s end. That’s roughly equal to the co-pay required for many insurers for the same treatments.

Meanwhile, Reitano says Ro has seen big changes in the healthcare system generally that favor its model and accelerate its hybrid care plans owing to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I would say that there are two most profound impacts of the pandemic on the healthcare system,” he said. “One is that it simultaneously shed light on all of the inequities for the entire country to see, right at the same time where we all cared about it. So those things were sort of known for the people impacted day to day — the geographic inequity, the financial inequity, the racial inequity. If someone felt that that inequity, then they would talk about it, but it wasn’t something everyone cared about at the same time. So this massive spotlight was shed on the healthcare system. And the second was that everyone’s healthcare journey now starts online, even if it is going to end in person, it will still start online.”

Ro’s model all along has espoused this time of healthcare delivery, with remote care and telehealth appointments handling most day-to-day needs, and follow-up in person care delivered to the home when required. That obviously generate a lot of efficiencies, while ensuring that older patients and those with mobility issues also don’t need to leave the house and make a regular trip into their physician’s office for what amounts to a 15-minute visit that could’ve been handled over video.

Ro co-founders Rob Schutz, Zachariah Reitano and Saman Rahmanian (left to right)

According to most industry observers, Reitano is likely right that healthcare probably won’t go back to the old, inefficient model of favoring primarily in-person care after the pandemic ends. One of the positive outcomes of the COVID-19 situation has been proving that telehealth is more than capable of handling a lot of the primary care needs of a lot of people, particularly when supplemented with remote monitoring and ongoing proactive health measures, too.

While Ro doesn’t work with insurance currently, Reitano points out that he’s not against the concept entirely – he just says that health insurance as it exists now doesn’t actual work as intended, since it’s meant to pool risk against an, expensive, uncertain and rare outcome. Eventually, he believes there’s a place for insurance in the overall healthcare mix, but first the industry needs to face a reckoning wherein its incentive structure is realigned to its actual core customer – patients themselves.

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Mon, 22 Mar 2021 18:57:12 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health TC Technology Funding Articles Tech Ceo Depression Diabetes United States Healthcare Healthcare Industry Health Insurance Telemedicine Pharmacy Physician Ro Telehealth Saman Rahmanian Reitano Zachariah Reitano Rob Schutz Zachariah Reitano
Doctors suggest link between Covid-19 and diabetes https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/mar/19/doctors-suggest-link-between-covid-19-and-diabetes More than 350 clinicians report suspicions of Covid-induced diabetes, both type 1 and type 2

A cohort of scientists from across the world believe that there is a growing body of evidence that Covid-19 can cause diabetes in some patients.

Prof Francesco Rubino, from King’s College London, is leading the call for a full investigation into a possible link between the two diseases. Having seen a rise in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people who have caught coronavirus, some doctors are even considering the possibility that the virus ‒ by disrupting sugar metabolism ‒ could be inducing an entirely new form of diabetes.

Continue reading...]]>
Fri, 19 Mar 2021 04:15:27 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Science Society UK News World news Diabetes Medical Research Infectious Diseases Doctors King 's College London Coronavirus COVID Francesco Rubino
Doctors suggest Covid-19 could cause diabetes https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/mar/19/doctors-suggest-link-between-covid-19-and-diabetes More than 350 clinicians report suspicions of Covid-induced diabetes, both type 1 and type 2

A cohort of scientists from across the world believe that there is a growing body of evidence that Covid-19 can cause diabetes in some patients.

Prof Francesco Rubino, from King’s College London, is leading the call for a full investigation into a possible link between the two diseases. Having seen a rise in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people who have caught coronavirus, some doctors are even considering the possibility that the virus ‒ by disrupting sugar metabolism ‒ could be inducing an entirely new form of diabetes.

Continue reading...]]>
Fri, 19 Mar 2021 04:15:27 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Science Society UK News World news Diabetes Medical Research Infectious Diseases Doctors King 's College London Coronavirus COVID Francesco Rubino
How Rani Therapeutics’ robotic pill could change subcutaneous injection treament http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/zF7qPh4i8Cc/ A new auto-injecting pill might soon become a replacement for subcutaneous injection treatments.

The idea for this so-called robotic pill came out of a research project around eight years ago from InCube Labs—a life sciences lab operated by Rani Therapeutics Chairman and CEO Mir Imran, who has degrees in electrical and biomedical engineering from Rutgers University. A prominent figure in life sciences innovation, Imran has founded over 20 medical device companies and helped develop the world’s first implantable cardiac defibrillator.

In working on the technology behind San Jose-based Rani Therapeutics, Imran and his team wanted to find a way to relieve some of the painful side effects of subcutaneous (or under-the-skin) injections, while also improving the treatment’s efficacy. “The technology itself started with a very simple thesis,” said Imran in an interview. “We thought, why can’t we create a pill that contains a biologic drug that you swallow, and once it gets to the intestine, it transforms itself and delivers a pain-free injection?”

Rani Therapeutics’ approach is based on inherent properties of the gastrointestinal tract. An injecting mechanism in their pill is surrounded by a pH-sensitive coating that dissolves as the capsule moves from a patient’s stomach to the small intestine. This helps ensure that the pill starts injecting the medicine in the right place at the right time. Once there, the reactants mix and produce carbon dioxide, which in turn inflates a small balloon that helps create a pressure difference to help inject the drug-loaded needles into the intestinal wall. “So it’s a really well-timed cascade of events that results in the delivery of this needle,” said Imran.

Synthetic biology startups are giving investors an appetite

Despite its somewhat mechanical procedure, the pill itself contains no metal or springs, reducing the chance of an inflammatory response in the body. The needles and other components are instead made of injectable-grade polymers, that Imran said has been used in other medical devices as well. Delivering the injections to the upper part of the small intestine also carries little risk of infection, as the prevalence of stomach acid and bile from the liver prevent bacteria from readily growing there.

One of Imran’s priorities for the pill was to eliminate the painful side effects of subcutaneous injections. “It wouldn’t make sense to replace them with another painful injection,” he said. “But biology was on our side, because your intestines don’t have the kind of pain sensors your skin does.” What’s more, administering the injection into the highly vascularized wall of the small intestine actually allows the treatment to work more efficiently than when applied through subcutaneous injection, which typically deposits the treatment into fatty tissue.

Imran and his team have plans to use the pill for a variety of indications, including the growth hormone disorder acromegaly, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In January 2020, their acromegaly treatment, Octreotide, demonstrated both safety and sustained bioavailability in primary clinical trials. They hope to pursue future clinical trials for other indications, but chose to prioritize acromegaly initially because of its well-established treatment drug but “very painful injection,” Imran said.

At the end of last year, Rani Therapeutics raised $69 million in new funding to help further develop and test their platform. “This will finance us for the next several years,” said Imran. “Our approach to the business is to make the technology very robust and manufacturable.”

Next-gen skincare, silk without spiders and pollution for lunch: Meet the biotech startups pitching at IndieBio’s Demo Day

]]> Fri, 05 Mar 2021 13:21:51 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Startups Science Tech Diabetes San Jose Biotech Robotics Pain Infection Medical Devices Rutgers University Rani Therapeutics Imran Therapeutics InCube Labs Mir Imran Recent Funding Rani Therapeutics Imran Imran Synthetic How Rani Therapeutics’ robotic pill could change subcutaneous injection treatment http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/zF7qPh4i8Cc/ A new auto-injecting pill might soon become a replacement for subcutaneous injection treatments.

The idea for this so-called robotic pill came out of a research project around eight years ago from InCube Labs—a life sciences lab operated by Rani Therapeutics Chairman and CEO Mir Imran, who has degrees in electrical and biomedical engineering from Rutgers University. A prominent figure in life sciences innovation, Imran has founded over 20 medical device companies and helped develop the world’s first implantable cardiac defibrillator.

In working on the technology behind San Jose-based Rani Therapeutics, Imran and his team wanted to find a way to relieve some of the painful side effects of subcutaneous (or under-the-skin) injections, while also improving the treatment’s efficacy. “The technology itself started with a very simple thesis,” said Imran in an interview. “We thought, why can’t we create a pill that contains a biologic drug that you swallow, and once it gets to the intestine, it transforms itself and delivers a pain-free injection?”

Rani Therapeutics’ approach is based on inherent properties of the gastrointestinal tract. An injecting mechanism in their pill is surrounded by a pH-sensitive coating that dissolves as the capsule moves from a patient’s stomach to the small intestine. This helps ensure that the pill starts injecting the medicine in the right place at the right time. Once there, the reactants mix and produce carbon dioxide, which in turn inflates a small balloon that helps create a pressure difference to help inject the drug-loaded needles into the intestinal wall. “So it’s a really well-timed cascade of events that results in the delivery of this needle,” said Imran.

Synthetic biology startups are giving investors an appetite

Despite its somewhat mechanical procedure, the pill itself contains no metal or springs, reducing the chance of an inflammatory response in the body. The needles and other components are instead made of injectable-grade polymers, that Imran said has been used in other medical devices as well. Delivering the injections to the upper part of the small intestine also carries little risk of infection, as the prevalence of stomach acid and bile from the liver prevent bacteria from readily growing there.

One of Imran’s priorities for the pill was to eliminate the painful side effects of subcutaneous injections. “It wouldn’t make sense to replace them with another painful injection,” he said. “But biology was on our side, because your intestines don’t have the kind of pain sensors your skin does.” What’s more, administering the injection into the highly vascularized wall of the small intestine actually allows the treatment to work more efficiently than when applied through subcutaneous injection, which typically deposits the treatment into fatty tissue.

Imran and his team have plans to use the pill for a variety of indications, including the growth hormone disorder acromegaly, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In January 2020, their acromegaly treatment, Octreotide, demonstrated both safety and sustained bioavailability in primary clinical trials. They hope to pursue future clinical trials for other indications, but chose to prioritize acromegaly initially because of its well-established treatment drug but “very painful injection,” Imran said.

At the end of last year, Rani Therapeutics raised $69 million in new funding to help further develop and test their platform. “This will finance us for the next several years,” said Imran. “Our approach to the business is to make the technology very robust and manufacturable.”

Next-gen skincare, silk without spiders and pollution for lunch: Meet the biotech startups pitching at IndieBio’s Demo Day

]]> Fri, 05 Mar 2021 13:21:51 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Startups Science Tech Diabetes San Jose Biotech Robotics Pain Infection Medical Devices Rutgers University Rani Therapeutics Imran InCube Labs Mir Imran Recent Funding Rani Therapeutics Imran Imran Synthetic We've been wrong about how insulin has to be stored, and a new approach could revolutionize diabetes treatment for millions of people http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/0VRxJG7yWMk/changing-insulins-storage-protocol-revolutionizes-diabetes-treatment-2021-2 Mohamed Hussein Bule, 27, who teaches science at a refugee camp in Kenya.

Paul Odongo for MSF

  • For people living with diabetes in the developing world, a lack of electricity can hamper access to insulin. 

  • But a project in Kenya has shown that insulin can be maintained in hot climates without refrigeration.
  • Researchers, calling it a breakthrough, are urging the World Health Organization to amend its guidelines. 
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

For people living with diabetes in the developing world, getting daily life-sustaining doses of insulin has gone hand in hand with access to electricity.

Once a vial is opened, manufacturers recommend storing it in a refrigerator until it expires, which is usually after four weeks. But an estimated 470 million people around the world who don't have access to electricity and fridges for food and medicine, making it difficult to store insulin at home.

But now, a new program could help revolutionize treatments around the world. 

It started at the Dadaab refugee camp in northern Kenya, where temperatures can reach up to 99 degrees Fahrenheit and many have no access to refrigeration. As a consequence, patients' lives have practically revolved around going to and from the hospital to receive insulin. Having diabetes could mean missing school, work, especially since the camp's curfew restricts when it's possible to make the trek.

When doctors working in the camp noticed more and more patients coming to the hospital with complications from their diabetes, they reached out to researchers at the University of Geneva and decided to monitor at-home insulin storage at the camp, which experienced much warmer temperatures than label recommendations. 

Researchers replicated the camp's daily temperature, which ranged from 77 to 99 degrees Fahrenheit, in the lab, and tested the insulin's effectiveness. They also studied leftover insulin from vials that patients had used after storing them in their homes.

They discovered that even without refrigeration, insulin kept at the camp's tropical temperatures was safe to use for four weeks - a revelation that could be life-changing for diabetes patients around the world. 

Following their investigation, the team adjusted the advice they were giving patients, teaching them how to self-inject, check their own blood sugar, and what danger symptoms to look out for. Most exciting of all, they showed patients how to store the insulin at home using a plastic container with a wet towel around it.  

What followed was a dramatic drop in the number of diabetic patients coming to hospital with acute complications. They were able to go to work and school and "not spend all day seeking out healthcare to stay alive," said Philippa Boulle, from the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF, also known as Doctors Without Borders).

Even though insulin can be damaged when it's stored at high temperatures, the researchers found that cooler temperatures overnight could keep the insulin safe.

Dadaab Somali refugees attend market in the sprawling Dadaab refugee camp in northern Kenya.

TONY KARUMBA/AFP via Getty Images

"Every protein goes towards degradation when it's heated, but there are proteins that can go back when you cool them down again, and insulin seems to be one of them," Leonardo Scapozza, a professor at the University of Geneva's School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and one of the researchers who worked with doctors in the Dagahaley camp, told Insider. 

At the moment, guidance says patients can store their insulin at an "'ambient temperature'," but Scapozza said "and hot settings" should be added for clarification. There only needs to be three words added to that: 'and hot settings', Scapozza says.  

He said the findings could also be applied to high-income countries such as the US, for example, when natural disasters and storms that cut off power supplies.

The researchers have done further studies to test insulin in different climates, and are helping supporting refugees in their South Sudan setting to take insulin home, too.  

Now, MSF is calling on pharmaceutical corporations to amend guidelines, and for the World Health Organization to endorse their findings.

While there have been many studies testing how stable insulin is at different temperatures, the oscillating temperature factor in this study is a "new twist," says Gojka Roglic, a medical officer at the WHO responsible for activities on diabetes management, told Insider.

WHO won't be making any recommendations based on this study alone, but Roglic  said it will be included in a review of all research later this year.  

Ali Bishar, who is in charge of MSF's insulin management program at the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya, said education on diabetes and insulin is "paramount" to the program working.

"After they're trained, the patients have to pass a competency test. Then they're given their insulin and care is provided on and outside the wards," Bashar said, adding that the program, which started in 2015, has grown from 35 to 45 patients in the last six years.

However, insulin storage is only the start of  managing diabetes in low-resource settings. Another major concern is how a poor diet can contribute to patients' symptoms. 

"You have to have food when you inject insulin. In some settings, patients are fearful of the injection if they haven't had a meal that day," Boulle says.

Rahmo, who was in the first cohort of patients to start the MSF programme in 2015, told Insider that she has challenges with getting enough food and having a good diet., But regardless of her diet, Rahmo said  her health has improved. 

"Before this, I was confused about how to continue my life and if I'd survive," she  told Insider through an interpreter.  "Today, I'm very happy to control my diabetes at home." 

Mohamed Hussein Bule, 27, a refugee from Somalia who works as a teacher at a primary school in Dagahaley, enrolled in the MSF program in 2015. 

He was diagnosed with diabetes in 2014 after his weight plummeted from 150 pounds to 82 pounds, but since joining the program his weight is back up to about 143 pounds.

"I was supposed to pick up insulin at the hospital early in the morning to take home, then go to work. I was missing a lot of classes. Now, I take a vial in the morning and record my glucose, and continue with the program as my day continues," he said. 

"I don't even feel like a patient with diabetes now. I'm very glad to be on the program."

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Jessica Brown)]

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Wed, 03 Mar 2021 08:52:59 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health News Africa US Trends Diabetes Healthcare South Sudan Who Kenya World Health Organization Somalia Msf Afp Bashar Dadaab University of Geneva Jessica Brown Medecins Sans Frontieres MSF Getty Images Every Boulle Roglic News-freelancer Mohamed Hussein Bule Paul Odongo Philippa Boulle Kenya TONY KARUMBA Leonardo Scapozza Dagahaley Scapozza Gojka Roglic Ali Bishar Rahmo
A new approach for handling insulin could revolutionize diabetes treatment for millions of people http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/0VRxJG7yWMk/changing-insulins-storage-protocol-revolutionizes-diabetes-treatment-2021-2 Mohamed Hussein Bule, 27, who teaches science at a refugee camp in Kenya.

Paul Odongo for MSF

  • For people living with diabetes in the developing world, a lack of electricity can hamper access to insulin. 

  • But a project in Kenya has shown that insulin can be maintained in hot climates without refrigeration.
  • Researchers, calling it a breakthrough, are urging the World Health Organization to amend its guidelines. 
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

For people living with diabetes in the developing world, getting daily life-sustaining doses of insulin has gone hand in hand with access to electricity.

Once a vial is opened, manufacturers recommend storing it in a refrigerator until it expires, which is usually after four weeks. But an estimated 470 million people around the world who don't have access to electricity and fridges for food and medicine, making it difficult to store insulin at home.

But now, a new program could help revolutionize treatments around the world. 

It started at the Dadaab refugee camp in northern Kenya, where temperatures can reach up to 99 degrees Fahrenheit and many have no access to refrigeration. As a consequence, patients' lives have practically revolved around going to and from the hospital to receive insulin. Having diabetes could mean missing school, work, especially since the camp's curfew restricts when it's possible to make the trek.

When doctors working in the camp noticed more and more patients coming to the hospital with complications from their diabetes, they reached out to researchers at the University of Geneva and decided to monitor at-home insulin storage at the camp, which experienced much warmer temperatures than label recommendations. 

Researchers replicated the camp's daily temperature, which ranged from 77 to 99 degrees Fahrenheit, in the lab, and tested the insulin's effectiveness. They also studied leftover insulin from vials that patients had used after storing them in their homes.

They discovered that even without refrigeration, insulin kept at the camp's tropical temperatures was safe to use for four weeks - a revelation that could be life-changing for diabetes patients around the world. 

Following their investigation, the team adjusted the advice they were giving patients, teaching them how to self-inject, check their own blood sugar, and what danger symptoms to look out for. Most exciting of all, they showed patients how to store the insulin at home using a plastic container with a wet towel around it.  

What followed was a dramatic drop in the number of diabetic patients coming to hospital with acute complications. They were able to go to work and school and "not spend all day seeking out healthcare to stay alive," said Philippa Boulle, from the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF, also known as Doctors Without Borders).

Even though insulin can be damaged when it's stored at high temperatures, the researchers found that cooler temperatures overnight could keep the insulin safe.

Dadaab Somali refugees attend market in the sprawling Dadaab refugee camp in northern Kenya.

TONY KARUMBA/AFP via Getty Images

"Every protein goes towards degradation when it's heated, but there are proteins that can go back when you cool them down again, and insulin seems to be one of them," Leonardo Scapozza, a professor at the University of Geneva's School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and one of the researchers who worked with doctors in the Dagahaley camp, told Insider. 

At the moment, guidance says patients can store their insulin at an "'ambient temperature'," but Scapozza said "and hot settings" should be added for clarification. There only needs to be three words added to that: 'and hot settings', Scapozza says.  

He said the findings could also be applied to high-income countries such as the US, for example, when natural disasters and storms that cut off power supplies.

The researchers have done further studies to test insulin in different climates, and are helping supporting refugees in their South Sudan setting to take insulin home, too.  

Now, MSF is calling on pharmaceutical corporations to amend guidelines, and for the World Health Organization to endorse their findings.

While there have been many studies testing how stable insulin is at different temperatures, the oscillating temperature factor in this study is a "new twist," says Gojka Roglic, a medical officer at the WHO responsible for activities on diabetes management, told Insider.

WHO won't be making any recommendations based on this study alone, but Roglic  said it will be included in a review of all research later this year.  

Ali Bishar, who is in charge of MSF's insulin management program at the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya, said education on diabetes and insulin is "paramount" to the program working.

"After they're trained, the patients have to pass a competency test. Then they're given their insulin and care is provided on and outside the wards," Bashar said, adding that the program, which started in 2015, has grown from 35 to 45 patients in the last six years.

However, insulin storage is only the start of  managing diabetes in low-resource settings. Another major concern is how a poor diet can contribute to patients' symptoms. 

"You have to have food when you inject insulin. In some settings, patients are fearful of the injection if they haven't had a meal that day," Boulle says.

Rahmo, who was in the first cohort of patients to start the MSF programme in 2015, told Insider that she has challenges with getting enough food and having a good diet., But regardless of her diet, Rahmo said  her health has improved. 

"Before this, I was confused about how to continue my life and if I'd survive," she  told Insider through an interpreter.  "Today, I'm very happy to control my diabetes at home." 

Mohamed Hussein Bule, 27, a refugee from Somalia who works as a teacher at a primary school in Dagahaley, enrolled in the MSF program in 2015. 

He was diagnosed with diabetes in 2014 after his weight plummeted from 150 pounds to 82 pounds, but since joining the program his weight is back up to about 143 pounds.

"I was supposed to pick up insulin at the hospital early in the morning to take home, then go to work. I was missing a lot of classes. Now, I take a vial in the morning and record my glucose, and continue with the program as my day continues," he said. 

"I don't even feel like a patient with diabetes now. I'm very glad to be on the program."

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Jessica Brown)]

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Sun, 28 Feb 2021 22:57:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health News Africa US Trends Diabetes Healthcare South Sudan Who Kenya World Health Organization Somalia Msf Afp Bashar Dadaab University of Geneva Jessica Brown Medecins Sans Frontieres MSF Getty Images Every Boulle Roglic News-freelancer Mohamed Hussein Bule Paul Odongo Philippa Boulle Kenya TONY KARUMBA Leonardo Scapozza Dagahaley Scapozza Gojka Roglic Ali Bishar Rahmo
4 Clear Signs That Prove You’re In Good Shape https://www.ahappyhippymom.com/2021/02/4-clear-signs-that-prove-youre-in-good-shape.html [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]]]> Tue, 16 Feb 2021 09:24:29 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Parenting Fitness Diabetes Exercise Workout Dental Tech for Change http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/digitaltrends/~3/xPMJIVq979w/ ]]> Thu, 11 Feb 2021 18:59:35 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Climate Change Cancer Environment Charity Trends Renewable Energy Green Diabetes Air Pollution Conservation Digital Divide Alzheimer's Disease Stem Cells Archaeology Recycling Dementia Greenpeace Health Tracking Solar Panels Solar Power Gender Equality Malaria Search And Rescue Disabilities Donations Sustainable Rural Broadband Health Tech Bionics Visually Impaired Eco-friendly Green Architecture Affordable Housing Green Energy Zev ECG Pet Health Pet Safety Paralysis Pacemaker Light Pollution Prostheses Sleep Tech Environmentally-friendly Parkinsons Disease Assistive Tech Smart Toothbrush Eldercare Artificial Muscles Women With Byte Tech For Change Smart Toothbrushes Ces Tech For Change 3d-printed Organs Prosthetics Expert Diabetes Drug Found to Substantially Improve Obesity Treatment in Large Clinical Trial https://gizmodo.com/diabetes-drug-found-to-substantially-improve-obesity-tr-1846253130

The findings from a new clinical trial released Wednesday may point the way to an elusive goal: a safe and effective drug that helps reduce obesity in people.

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Up to Half of New Diabetes Cases in U.S. Are Linked to Obesity, Study Finds https://gizmodo.com/up-to-half-of-new-diabetes-cases-in-u-s-are-linked-to-1846234247

New research released Wednesday underscores the role of obesity in type 2 diabetes. It suggests that obesity plays a major factor in up to half of new diabetes cases that occur annually in the U.S.

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Up to Half of New Type 2 Diabetes Cases in U.S. Are Linked to Obesity, Study Finds https://gizmodo.com/up-to-half-of-new-diabetes-cases-in-u-s-are-linked-to-1846234247

New research released Wednesday underscores the role of obesity in type 2 diabetes. It suggests that obesity plays a major factor in up to half of new diabetes cases that occur annually in the U.S.

Read more...

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Wed, 10 Feb 2021 05:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Science Obesity Diabetes Social Issues Type 2 Diabetes Body Mass Index Body Shape Clinical Medicine Amphetamine Branches Of Biology Hospitality Recreation Health Medical Pharma Medical Signs Obesity In The United States Epidemiology Of Obesity
The Fitbit App Now Supports Blood Glucose Tracking https://vitals.lifehacker.com/the-fitbit-app-now-supports-blood-glucose-tracking-1846231008

With its latest app update (rolling out throughout February), Fitbit now supports tracking your blood glucose readings within the app for users in the US. Your fitbit device still can’t measure blood glucose itself; it’s just the tracking in the app that is new.

Read more...

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Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Medicine Software Diabetes Fitbit Activity Trackers Lifehacks Glucose Medical Monitoring Technology Internet Health Medical Pharma Blood Sugar Level Blood Glucose Monitoring Health Software
Soon You'll Be Able to Track Your Blood Glucose Levels in the Fitbit App https://gizmodo.com/soon-youll-be-able-to-track-your-blood-glucose-levels-i-1846224559

Fitbit already gives you the ability to monitor your heart health, stress, and blood oxygen levels on some of its watches. Now the company is eyeing blood glucose-monitoring with a new feature in the Fitbit app.

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Mon, 08 Feb 2021 18:10:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Science Medicine Diabetes Fitbit Activity Trackers Glucose Samsung Health Medical Monitoring Clinical Medicine Medical Specialties Technology Internet Health Medical Pharma Blood Sugar Level Glucose Meter Blood Glucose Monitoring
8 Conditions Women Should Be Aware Of And Keep An Eye On https://www.thefashionablehousewife.com/8-conditions-women-should-be-aware-of-and-keep-an-eye-on/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=8-conditions-women-should-be-aware-of-and-keep-an-eye-on

Men and women can suffer from the same types of diseases. But certain health conditions are unique among women. There are also diseases that affect women differently than men. The good news is, most of the health problems affecting women are highly treatable.

The best way to fight diseases is through awareness. By educating yourself of the many conditions that affect women, you take an essential step in preventing them from happening. In all your health decisions, it’s always best to work with your doctor

Here are the top medical conditions that women should watch out for. 

1. Heart Disease 

Heart disease can affect both men and women. However, some factors can increase the risk among women. For instance, hormonal changes in menopausal women can cause higher blood pressure and increased cholesterol levels. When that happens, women become more susceptible to heart ailments, which may trigger heart attacks. Also, pregnancy complications can increase the likelihood of getting heart disease later in life.

Symptoms linked to heart problems include chest pains, abdominal discomfort, shortness of breath, and numbness in the arms and legs. Since heart disease is a serious health condition, it’s important to regularly visit your doctor so you can monitor your cardiovascular health. Also, living a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, and a healthy diet can help protect against heart disease. 

2. Breast Cancer

This is the most common cancer and one of the leading causes of death among women. Many factors can cause this disease. The major elements that determine a woman’s susceptibility include age, family history, and even racial profile. Obesity, drinking too much alcohol, and taking certain medications can also contribute to cancer development in the breasts. 

If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer, experts suggest to keep your emotions in check and not lose hope. Breast cancer is not a death sentence, especially since there are many treatments available now. 

Early detection is key to fighting breast cancer. A patient’s chance for complete recovery increases the earlier that the cancer is detected and treated. That’s the reason why doctors suggest regular Mammogram tests.

Women are encouraged to educate themselves about the risks of breast cancer. Awareness will allow you to make the right decisions and take the necessary actions to prevent this cancer from happening to you.

3. Cervical Cancer 

This cancer grows in the cervix, which is in the lower part of the uterus linked to the vagina. Cervical cancer can be triggered by a sexually transmitted infection called the human papillomavirus (HPV). The immune system does an excellent job at fighting this virus. However, in some women, the virus may survive and trigger some cervical cells to transform into cancer cells.

A pap smear can detect the presence of pre-cancerous cervical cells. Early detection and treatment are crucial to eliminate this type of cancer. Vaccination against HPV is also effective in preventing cervical cancer. 

4. Diabetes

Both sexes are susceptible to diabetes. However, diabetic women can suffer from serious complications. For one, women can experience gestational diabetes, where the glucose levels shoot up during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause complications during pregnancy. It can also turn into a full-blown Type 2 diabetes in the mother and negatively affect the baby’s health.

You’ll need treatment to prevent gestational diabetes from getting worse. Also, always keep your blood sugar level in check. Lastly, try to maintain a healthy weight during pregnancy through a healthy diet and pregnant-safe exercises.

5. Painful Or Heavy Menstruation

Painful sensations and heavy bleeding during your monthly cycle may indicate gynecological conditions. You need to consult with your physician when you have abnormal periods. 

Uterine fibroids are the usual causes of painful and heavy menstruation. These are non-cancerous tumors that can grow in women who have reached childbearing age. While uterine fibroids are usually benign, some of them can grow big enough to trigger excessive bleeding and pain during menstruation. 

6. Osteoporosis

This condition is characterized by the weakening of the bones. Thus, people who have osteoporosis are prone to bone fractures. Unfortunately, this condition can’t be readily detected. X-rays may show bone fractures already present, but they can’t tell if a person will have osteoporosis. Doctors often recommend bone density scans to determine the levels of minerals that keep your bones healthy. 

Compared to men, women have a higher risk for this disease because of the hormonal changes that negatively impact bone density. The female hormone, estrogen, plays a vital role in keeping bones healthy. But the level of estrogen in the body dramatically falls as women reach menopausal age. Hence, postmenopausal women are more susceptible to osteoporosis. 

To mitigate the risks, you can increase your calcium intake and other minerals to strengthen your bones. Regular exercise, a healthy lifestyle, and losing extra weight can enhance your bone health. 

7. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

Women have shorter urethra compared to men. As a result, infectious bacteria can easily reach the bladder and wreak havoc, making women prone to UTI. 

Patients suffering from UTI complain about frequent and painful urination as well as pelvic pain and cloudy urine. In many cases, the infection goes away without any treatment. That’s why it’s easy to overlook this condition.

Recurring infections require tests and consultation with your doctor. If left untreated, the condition could spread to the kidneys.

8. Alzheimer’s Disease

At first, scientists thought that Alzheimer’s was nothing more than a condition brought about by aging. Today, experts know that this disease is caused by changes in the brain cells that negatively affect memory and cognitive functions among patients. Alzheimer’s disease has a higher number of incidences among women than in men.

The factors that can increase your risk include menopause, hormonal replacement therapy, thyroid diseases, and hysterectomy. High blood pressure and cholesterol can also predict a person’s susceptibility to this condition. 

To avoid Alzheimer’s disease, you need to boost your brain’s health. Experts suggest living a healthy and active lifestyle to keep your brain functioning at optimum levels.

Conclusion

Certain health conditions are unique to women because of physiology or age. Women’s health conditions can make life miserable and costly if left unmanaged. 

As soon as you reach childbearing age all the way to your menopausal age, you’re susceptible to a host of diseases. Most of these conditions are not death sentences. In fact, many of them can be treated.

If you feel something is wrong with your body, the best thing to do is see a doctor. Remember, most women’s diseases can be prevented by early detection and treatment. Don’t wait for the symptoms to get worse. Like an ugly flower, you must nip the disease in the bud.

The post 8 Conditions Women Should Be Aware Of And Keep An Eye On appeared first on The Fashionable Housewife.

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Fri, 29 Jan 2021 23:58:39 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Fashion Breast Cancer Diabetes Heart Disease Type 2 Diabetes Alzheimers Menstruation Health & Fitness Cervical Cancer Don UTI Menstrual Cycle Osteoporosis
Gary Taubes: 'Obesity isn’t a calorie problem, it’s a hormone problem' https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/jan/17/gary-taubes-interview-obesity-calories-hormones-case-for-keto The author of The Case for Keto argues that conventional approaches to tackling obesity and diabetes aren’t working, and that low-carbohydrate diets could be the way forward

Over the past two decades, the UK’s rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes have spiralled, something that has invariably been blamed on our intake of saturated fat. Conventional nutrition science argues this leads to elevated cholesterol levels and a greater risk of heart disease, but journalist Gary Taubes believes we need to rethink this idea. Over the past 20 years, Taubes has suggested that fat has been unfairly demonised, and instead our excessive carbohydrate and sugar consumption is to blame for many of these societal health problems, a concept that has begun to interest increasing numbers of scientists. In his new book, The Case for Keto, Taubes discusses the potential benefits of the ketogenic diet, a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet that is being studied as a potential treatment for a range of diseases, from obesity and diabetes, to even cancer and Alzheimer’s.

You’ve long been one of the biggest advocates for the benefits of low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets. How did this all begin?
I did an investigative piece for the journal Science back in 2001 on dietary fat and heart disease. I interviewed around 140 researchers and administrators, and I concluded that there was never really compelling evidence for this low-fat diet we’d all been told to eat since the mid-1980s. When writing the story, I had a National Institute of Health administrator say to me: “When we told everyone to go on low-fat diets, we thought if nothing else they’d lose weight, because fat is the densest calorie in the diet. And instead they started eating more carbohydrates and everyone got fatter.” So I always had it my head that one of the main things that caused the obesity epidemic was this switch to a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet.

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Sun, 17 Jan 2021 09:00:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health UK Science Obesity Society Diabetes Diets and dieting Keto National Institute of Health Gary Taubes Taubes Keto Taubes
Why some patients refuse care http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KevinMd-MedicalWeblog/~3/hbC4zZ89XxI/why-some-patients-refuse-care.html Vince Hamilton has no legs. For that matter, he has lost the tips to most of his fingers as well.  It made opening soda cans almost impossible.  So when I saw him for the first time, my immediate reaction was one of sympathy. He had been admitted from a nursing home with a swollen red […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.comSearch thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


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Thu, 14 Jan 2021 09:00:01 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Diabetes Conditions Cardiology PA NP Hospital-Based Medicine CRNA Vince Hamilton
4 microbes may lead to new type 2 diabetes probiotics http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/EndlessInnovation/~3/KGxduDPt83g/diabetes-gut-microbes
  • Four out of trillions of gut microbes have been identified as being especially important for health.
  • The microbes may play a role in obesity that can result in type 2 diabetes.
  • Understanding the microbes' roles may lead to new probiotics for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes.


There are about a thousand different bacterial species living in the human gut, a population of about 10 trillion individual microbial cells. Ideally, together they help us maintain our health, but things don't always work out that way. According to a new study from Oregon State University (OSU), four microbes in particular are especially influential when it comes to whether or not we develop type 2 diabetes. The discovery of this important microbial quartet may lead to new probiotic approaches that prevent and treat the disease.

Type 2 diabetes

Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the level of glucose—a sugar found in many carbohydrates—by controlling its absorption into liver, fat, and skeletal muscle cells. If there's too much glucose in the blood, insulin stores away the extra sugar in the liver for later use when your blood sugar is low, or if you need a jolt of energy.

With type 2 diabetes, the body no longer responds sufficiently to insulin. As a result, in an attempt to compensate and keep blood sugar at acceptable levels, the body increases its production of insulin, and this, over time, wears out the pancreas' ability to produce the hormone. At that point, the person requires injections of supplemental insulin to maintain blood sugar levels.

The most significant risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes is being overweight, which is typically a product of insufficient exercise and diet. "Type 2 diabetes is in fact a global pandemic and the number of diagnoses is expected to keep rising over the next decade," study co-leader Andrey Morgun of OSU tells the university's Newsroom. Driving this is the rising percentage of people who are overweight. "The so-called 'western diet' — high in saturated fats and refined sugars," says Morgun, "is one of the primary factors. But gut bacteria have an important role to play in modulating the effects of diet."

Tracing dysbiosis

The OSU study explores the microbial mechanism behind "dysbiosis," or microbiome imbalance, and its role in type 2 diabetes.

Co-author OSU's Natalia Shulzhenko says, "Some studies suggest dysbiosis is caused by complex changes resulting from interactions of hundreds of different microbes. However, our study and other studies suggest that individual members of the microbial community, altered by diet, might have a significant impact on the host."

The researchers used transkingdom network analysis, a recently developed data-driven, systems-biology methodology, to examine host-microbe interactions, looking for specific microbe species that might be involved in dysbiosis.

In fact, they found some. "The analysis pointed to specific microbes that potentially would affect the way a person metabolizes glucose and lipids," explains Morgun. "Even more importantly, it allowed us to make inferences about whether those effects are harmful or beneficial to the host. And we found links between those microbes and obesity." The first step was identifying four groups of closely related species, or operational taxonomical units (OTUs), that appeared to be associated with glucose management, and that may play a role in obesity as a precursor of type 2 diabetes.

The OTUs pointed to four microbial species in particular: Lactobacillus johnsonii, Lactobacillus gasseri, Romboutsia ilealis, and Ruminococcus gnavus. As Shulzhenko explains, "The first two microbes are considered potential 'improvers' to glucose metabolism, the other two potential 'worseners.' The overall indication is that individual types of microbes and/or their interactions, and not community-level dysbiosis, are key players in type 2 diabetes." (Previous research has also associated Romboutsia ilealis, or "R. ilealis", with obesity.)

That Lactobacillus is an improver is encouraging, as it's a species often found in existing probiotic supplements, yogurts, fermented foods, and some dairy products. Shulzhenko says that in "looking at all of the metabolites, we found a few that explain a big part of probiotic effects caused by Lactobacilli treatments."

Of mice and men. And women.

To confirm their suspicions, the researchers performed an experiment with mice, putting them on the mouse equivalent of the Western diet, and then feeding them improver and worsener microbe species for eight weeks.

Mice that were fed the two Lactobacilli improvers proved healthier in two ways. Their liver health—specifically, the efficiency with which they metabolized lipids and glucose—was improved, and they wound up with a lower fat mass index rating.

Comparing the results of their mice experiment with data from previous research on humans, the pattern held. The presence of more improver microbes was correlated with a lower BMI, and a stronger presence of worsens was associated with a higher BMI. Says Shulzhenko, "We found R. ilealis to be present in more than 80% of obese patients, suggesting the microbe could be a prevalent pathobiont in overweight people."

The researchers hope that their findings can help lead to new prevention and treatment approaches for type 2 diabetes. Summarizes Morgun:

"Our study reveals potential probiotic strains for treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity as well as insights into the mechanisms of their action. That means an opportunity to develop targeted therapies rather than attempting to restore 'healthy' microbiota in general."


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Wed, 06 Jan 2021 15:34:50 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Discovery Diabetes Medical Research Microbiology Innovation Disease Osu Microbes Oregon State University OSU Andrey Morgun Newsroom Driving Morgun Natalia Shulzhenko Shulzhenko
Avoid using wood burning stoves if possible, warn health experts https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/01/avoid-using-wood-burning-stoves-if-possible-warn-health-experts Charity calls for people to use alternative, less polluting heating and cooking options if they can

Campaigners and health experts are calling on people who have alternative heating not to use their wood burning stoves this winter amid growing concern about their impact on public health.

The Guardian recently reported that wood burners triple the level of harmful particulates inside the home as well as creating dangerous levels of pollution in the surrounding neighbourhood.

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Boosie Badazz Begs Fans on Instagram for Emergency Diabetes Medication http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/gossiponthis/~3/LwXJLRVYWlk/

Lil Boosie can’t catch a break in 2020.

Just last month, the rapper was shot in the leg after attending a vigil for his artist Mo3 who was gunned down on a Dallas Highway.

Following the shooting, Boosie underwent a medical procedure to remove bullet fragments from his leg and has been in a wheelchair since.

Though he is currently confined to the wheelchair, Boosie has still been doing shows and has been in good spirits.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Boosie (@boosienewig)

However, now the rapper has a whole new problem and is in urgent need of diabetes medication.

Boosie took to IG to ask anyone in the Atlanta area who had the medicine to DM his business manager. Boosie also made it clear he is willing to pay for the meds.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CJI69qHjqo-/

Boosie was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as a child and has suffered from the disease since. He takes insulin to help treat the disease.

Prayers up for Boosie … much like everyone else, this year has been a real crazy one for him.

Boosie Badazz Begs Fans on Instagram for Emergency Diabetes Medication is a post from: Gossip On This - Pop Culture, News & Videos

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Thu, 24 Dec 2020 14:53:09 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Celebs Atlanta Diabetes Hip Hop Pop Culture Jazz Dallas Boosie Badazz Boosie Instagram for Emergency Diabetes Medication
Dogs and owners may share resemblance in diabetes risk https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/dec/10/dogs-owners-found-share-resemblance-diabetes-risk Research shows people who have a dog with type 2 diabetes are 38% more at risk of having disease themselves

It’s said that dogs resemble their owners, but the similarities may also extend to their risk of diabetes, research suggests. The same cannot be said of cat owners and their companions, however.

Previous studies had hinted that overweight owners tend to have porkier pets, possibly because of shared health behaviours such as overeating or not taking regular exercise. To investigate whether this extended to a shared risk of type 2 diabetes, Beatrice Kennedy, of Uppsala University in Sweden, and colleagues turned to insurance data from Sweden’s largest pet insurance company, using owners’ 10-digit national identification numbers to pull their anonymised health records.

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Thu, 10 Dec 2020 18:30:12 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Science Sweden Dogs Pets Society Diabetes Medical Research Uppsala University Beatrice Kennedy
Heart disease, cancer and diabetes were biggest killers of 2019, says WHO https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/dec/10/heart-disease-cancer-and-diabetes-were-biggest-killers-of-2019-says-who Seven noncommunicable diseases caused nearly half of deaths last year, with unhealthy lifestyles and environments partly to blame

Noncommunicable diseases such as cancer and diabetes are now the leading causes of death in the world, in a dramatic change from two decades ago.

They now make up seven of the Top 10 causes of death, an increase from four out of 10 in 2000, with heart disease the biggest killer – accounting for 16% of all deaths.

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Thu, 10 Dec 2020 02:15:41 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Nutrition Cancer Society World news Mental Health Diabetes Heart Disease Stroke Global development World Health Organization Dementia Alzheimer's Nutrition And Development
Virta Health’s behavioral diabetes treatment service is now worth over $1 billion http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/dUwwIYUH2DM/ A new $65 million investment led by the growth capital and public investment arm of Sequoia Capital will give Virta Health, a developer of a behavioral-focused diabetes treatment, a valuation of over $1 billion.

Virta’s approach, which uses a combination of approaches to change diet and exercise to reverse the presence of type 2 diabetes and other chronic metabolic conditions, has shown clinical success and attracted 100 health care payers to endorse the company’s treatments.

“We partnered with Virta for their ability to deliver unmatched health improvement and cost savings—two clear differentiators from other offerings on the market,” said William Ashmore, CEO of the State Employees’ Insurance Board of Alabama, in a statement. “Especially amid the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s vital that we provide our members the life-changing results Virta is known for delivering, through expert, virtual care delivered right to their home.”

The company said it would use the funding to expand sales and marketing efforts for its services as well as expand its research and development into other non-pharmaceutical therapies for metabolic conditions.

The financing came from Sequoia Capital Global Equities and Caffeinated Capital and brings the company’s total funding to over $230 million and gives it a $1.1 billion valuation, according to a statement.

Alongside Sequoia Capital Global Equities, Caffeinated Capital participated in the round, which brings total funding to more than $230 million and values Virta Health at over $1.1 billion.

Diabetes has long been an attractive condition for startups and has been the first target that companies focused on behavior changes to influence metabolic conditions aim to address. The reason why there are so many diabetes-focused businesses is because of the prevalence of the disease in the U.S. Almost half of adults in the U.S. suffer from obesity, pre-diabetes, or type 2 diabetes and the disease kills thirty people every hour. Diabetes also doubles the risk of death from COVID-19 infections.

Beyond the risks, the costs of treatment are skyrocketing. According to data from the American Diabetes Association released in March 2018, the total costs of treating diagnosed diabetes have risen to $327 billion in 2017 from $245 billion in 2012, when the cost was last examined.

“Given the scope of the metabolic crisis in the U.S. and globally, it cannot be understated how game-changing Virta’s results and care delivery are,” said Patrick Fu, managing partner at Sequoia Capital Global Equities, in a statement. “Virta’s technology-driven, non-pharmaceutical approach has fundamentally changed how diabetes is cared for, and our collective belief in what is possible for population health improvement. This is the future of chronic disease care.”

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Diabetes is not just about the sugar https://mg.co.za/opinion/2020-11-19-diabetes-is-not-just-about-the-sugar/

Newer drugs, which prevent costly complications, should be made much more affordable

The post Diabetes is not just about the sugar appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.

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Thu, 19 Nov 2020 14:00:45 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Opinion Diabetes Medication Heart Attacks Strokes Openaccess Cardiovascular Disease Kidney disease Amputation GLP1 analogues SLGT2 inhibitors
Cities need to embrace dark night skies https://mg.co.za/opinion/2020-11-19-cities-need-to-embrace-dark-night-skies/

Brightness harms people’s and other creatures’ health, disrupts ecosystems and changes climate

The post Cities need to embrace dark night skies appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.

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11 common health conditions that may increase risk of death from the coronavirus, including diabetes and heart disease http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/rvkN_qh6paM/hypertension-diabetes-conditions-that-make-coronavirus-more-deadly-2020-3

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  • According to a report on patient characteristics from Italy's National Institute of Health released on March 17, 99% of COVID-19 patients who have died in the country had at least one preexisting condition. 
  • Nearly 50% of the patients who died had three preexisting conditions.
  • In the US, COVID-19 patients with underlying health conditions were 12 times more likely to die compared to those with none reported, according to CDC data through May 2020.
  • Here's what we know about how much various conditions affect the coronavirus' severity. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Case studies on patients who have contracted the new coronavirus have found that older people and those with preexisting health conditions more commonly develop severe symptoms.

According to a report on patient characteristics from Italy's National Institute of Health released on March 17, at the beginning of the pandemic, 99% of COVID-19 patients who died had at least one preexisting condition. 

Different preexisting conditions — including heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and kidney disease — were found at varying rates among the patients who died.

More recently, data reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through May 30 showed heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes were among the most common comorbidities with COVID-19. Patients with underlying health conditions were 12 times more likely to die of COVID-19 compared to otherwise healthy patients.

Here's what we know about how various health issues may affect a patient's coronavirus prognosis. 

In the Italian study, 76.1% of patients who died from COVID-19 had hypertension, or high blood pressure. Blood pressure check

Joe Raedle/Getty

Nearly half of all Americans have some level of high blood pressure, meaning they may be more susceptible to some of the more dangerous effects of the coronavirus.

According to state data, 56.7% of patients who died of COVID-19 in New York also had high blood pressure. In Lousiana, that number was 59.8% as of April.

In a retrospective study of more than 2800 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, those with high blood pressure were twice as likely to die compared to patients with normal blood pressure.

One-third of COVID-19 patients who died in Italy had heart disease. Heart Disease A monitor showing a patient's heart function during a medical procedure.

sfam_photo/ Shutterstock

Any kind of cardiovascular condition can leave a patient more susceptible to severe disease from the virus.

While experts aren't confident about why people with poor cardiovascular health are at a higher risk of dying from the virus, doctors believe that the strain COVID-19 puts on the lungs may burden the heart as well. 

People with heart issues may also have weaker immune systems, and the virus could have a negative effect on those with plaque in their arteries, according to the American Heart Association.

 

About one-quarter of people who died from the coronavirus in Italy had atrial fibrillation. Heart monitor. Heart monitor.

Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/ Getty Images

At least 2.7 million Americans are living with atrial fibrillation. It's "a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure, and other heart-related complications," according to AHA.

Diabetes was the second most common condition among COVID-19 patients who died. Rachel Gillett Humalog insulin diabetes

Joey Hadden/Business Insider

Tom Hanks, who tested positive for COVID-19 along with his wife, Rita Wilson, has Type 2 diabetes. 

The condition may make COVID-19 worse because some viruses thrive on higher blood glucose levels, and people with diabetes also have compromised immune systems, according to Health.com.

In New York, 37.5% of patients who died of COVID-19 also had diabetes. People with diabetes made up 38.1% of COVID-19 deaths in Lousiana as of April.

Of those who died in Italy, 20.3% had active cancer in the past five years. Petri dishes are pictured in an unknown location in a Cancer Research UK laboratory on an unknown date. Cancer Research UK/Handout via REUTERS  Petri dishes are pictured in an unknown location in a Cancer Research UK laboratory on an unknown date

Reuters

Cancer and its treatments can impair the respiratory system and render a person immunocompromised.

The study found that 18% of people who died had chronic kidney disease. dialysis machine A nurse prepares a dialysis machine.

Radu Sigheti/Reuters

The National Kidney Foundation recommends that patients with kidney disease follow the same advice as the general population: Stay home when possible, be diligent about handwashing and sanitizing surfaces, and make sure you have enough necessary medical supplies. 

Dialysis patients should not miss their treatments, and those who feel sick should alert a member of their healthcare team.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease — or lung diseases such as chronic emphysema and bronchitis — was present in 13.2% of the people who died. CT scan coronavirus lungs A CT scan of the lungs of a patient with the coronavirus.

Fengxiang Song et al.

People with lung diseases like emphysema or bronchitis have lungs that are weaker when trying to fight off the infection.

When COVID-19 travels through the body, it can attack the lungs. 

The infection causes inflammation in the lungs' lining and irritation in the nerves around them. The virus can also cause inflammation in the air sacs at the bottom of lungs. That can lead to pneumonia — when the lungs fill up with fluid.

Inflamed air sacs also prevent lungs from getting enough oxygen into the bloodstream and removing the byproduct carbon dioxide, The Guardian reported, citing John Wilson, a respiratory physician. Such inflammation can cause vital organ failure and be fatal.

People who previously had a stroke made up 9.6% of COVID-19 patients who died in Italy. stroke_thumb_4

iStock

According to the Stroke Association, a stroke itself doesn't put a survivor in immediate danger of the coronavirus. However, many of those who experience strokes fall into other at-risk categories. 

"You're at greater risk of complications if you are an older person, or have a health condition like diabetes, heart disease, respiratory disease or chronic kidney disease," the Stroke Association wrote in a statement. "Having a suppressed immune system or being on some treatments like steroids and chemotherapy may also make you more at risk."

Chronic liver disease was the 10th most common underlying condition among COVID-19 patients who died. Liver transplant A piece of healthy liver before being transplanted.

AP

It's unclear how exactly COVID-19 affects the liver, but even people with healthy organs may be at risk for liver injury from the virus, according to The Hospitalist

People with liver transplants who are on immunosuppressing medications may be at great risk but should talk to their doctors before changing or stopping any drug regimen, according to the UK's Liver Trust.

Studies have identified extreme obesity as a risk factor for dying among COVID-19 patients who are male or relatively young. Obesity heart failure

Tony Talbot/AP

An analysis of thousands of patients treated at a Southern California health system identified extreme obesity as an independent risk factor for dying among COVID-19 patients. The association was strongest among adults 60 and younger, and particularly among men.

Studies from Columbia University and supported this finding, underscoring that obese people are more likely to require ventilation or die if they contract COVID-19.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: amiller@businessinsider.com (Anna Medaris Miller,Holly Secon,Canela López,Andrea Michelson)]

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Tue, 10 Nov 2020 17:37:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs UK New York Science Obesity Cdc US Trends Features Tom Hanks Blood Pressure Diabetes Heart Disease Hypertension Italy Columbia University Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Southern California Lousiana Rita Wilson American Heart Association National Institute of Health John Wilson Wuhan China Petri Stroke Association Joe Raedle Getty Lung Disease Reuters Cancer Coronavirus COVID Joey Hadden Fengxiang Song Tony Talbot
Thirty-year failure to tackle preventable disease fuelling global Covid pandemic https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/oct/15/thirty-year-failure-to-tackle-preventable-disease-fuelling-global-covid-pandemic Study reveals increase in high blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and obesity, all risk factors for disease

The failure of governments to tackle a three-decade rise in preventable diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes has fuelled the Covid-19 pandemic and is stalling life expectancy around the world, a comprehensive study has found.

The latest data from the Global Burden of Disease study, published in the Lancet medical journal, is from 2019, before Covid, but helps explain the world’s vulnerability to the virus.

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Thu, 15 Oct 2020 18:30:22 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Science Obesity Research Society UK News World news Diabetes Life Expectancy Lancet Global Burden of Disease High Blood Pressure Coronavirus