Bloglikes - Education https://www.bloglikes.com/c/education en-US Mon, 17 May 2021 16:26:58 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter LAUSD to launch vaccination campaign for students https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/17/lausd-to-launch-vaccination-campaign-for-students/ Convenience is the name of the game when it comes to encouraging students to get their COVID-19 vaccines, so starting next week, the Los Angeles Unified School District will deploy mobile vaccination teams to about 200 school sites — roughly 20 sites per day over two weeks — to get as many shots into students’ arms as possible, Superintendent Austin Beutner has announced.

The announcement comes a week after federal regulators authorized the Pfizer vaccine for use on children ages 12 to 15, a move which state and national officials believe will pave the way for schools across the country to fully reopen when the 2021-22 school year starts.

To encourage students and their families to make use of the mobile vaccination sites in the coming weeks, the district will have food trucks at these events and will reward schools with high enough participation rates.

Details are still being finalized, but the general idea would be that if a certain percentage of students at a school gets vaccinated, that school would be rewarded with money that could pay for items on a school’s wish list, such as a new garden or more library books. The money would come from COVID-19 relief dollars LAUSD is slated to receive from the government, Beutner said in an interview Sunday, May 16.

To accommodate working families, the vaccination teams would be available from about noon to 7 p.m. weekdays, with some Saturday hours offered as well. Additionally, LAUSD will offer district employees paid time off to take their children to get vaccinated, Beutner said, adding that he hopes other businesses will follow suit.

In California, minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian, who must give consent, for the child to receive the vaccine, while a handful of states allow some children younger than 18 to decide for themselves or allow vaccine providers to determine if parental consent is necessary.

Beutner said he believes a parent or guardian should give consent, but suggested there could be a “middle ground” where the adult would not need to be physically present for a minor to be vaccinated. A parent could sign a permission slip for their child to be inoculated, similar to when a student goes on a field trip, for example, he said.

This would benefit working parents who might otherwise have to take time off work to take their child to be vaccinated, thus creating another barrier to access, he said.

“(It’s) a real burden for a working family member to have to take time off to go with their 17-year- old” to get vaccinated, he said. “I would love to see California … allow the consent to be given remotely.”

On the issue of masks, Beutner noted that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recent guidance that individuals no longer need to wear masks in most indoor settings nor when they’re outdoors apply to fully vaccinated people.

About 90% of the people on school campuses are children, most of whom have not been vaccinated, he said, so at least for the time being, schools will continue to mandate mask wearing.

“Masking will likely continue until we have a greater portion of children vaccinated,” he said.

The president of the local teachers union also said Friday that masks will continue to be worn on campuses.

“Let me be clear: the CDC advice does not override mask orders issued by states, counties or our bargaining agreement with LAUSD,” union President Cecily Myart-Cruz said. “Masks are still required in L.A. schools, and they are a part of how we keep our communities safe.”

The state and county have not changed their masking guidelines, although LA County Supervisor Kathryn Barger urged Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday to immediately relax masking requirements.

Supporting college students

The superintendent also announced Monday a new partnership with Amazon aimed at helping graduating high school seniors who are experiencing financial hardships from having to postpone or give up their pursuit of a college education.

LAUSD graduates who enroll in a local community college full-time will be considered for one of several hundred Amazon jobs with flexible hours that work around students’ class schedules. Jobs could range from working in a distribution center to working at Whole Foods Market, Beutner said.

Related Articles

Beutner said he reached out to Amazon not long after a report came out several weeks ago showing that despite a record graduation rate in LAUSD in 2020, there was a 9% drop in the percentage of students who went on to enroll at a two-year college full-time, and that this most affected low-income students who had to deal with job losses, deaths of loved ones and other challenges during the pandemic that may have forced them to go directly into the workforce to support themselves or their families.

The jobs offered through this program will pay at least $15 per hour and include benefits, Beutner said.

Amazon will also work with teachers to create a cloud-based computing certification program which students in the class of 2022 will be able to take so that when they graduate, they would be eligible for higher-paying jobs, the superintendent said.

Details about the partnership will be discussed at a news conference later this morning.

]]>
Mon, 17 May 2021 11:00:02 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Amazon News Education California Cdc La Sport Soccer Higher Education Lausd Gavin Newsom San Pedro U S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention LA County Garcetti Los Angeles Unified School District Austin Beutner Danny Trejo Beutner Top Stories LADN Kathryn Barger Top Stories Breeze Top Stories LBPT Cecily Myart Cruz Coronavirus COVID Newsom Coronavirus
The Cicadas Return After 17 Years: Stunning Footage of the Brood X Cicadas http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OpenCulture/~3/FbPzrr_iKH0/the-cicadas-return-after-17-years-stunning-footage-of-the-brood-x-cicadas.html

Sing, fly, mate, die.

The periodical cicadas in Brood X are emerging from underground, where they have spent the last 17 years as nymphs. They are making the final climb of their lives, intent on escaping their carapaces in order to make more cicadas. And as always they are doing it en masse.

Once free, they must quickly get the hang of their brand new wings, and make for the trees, where the males will sing (some say scream) in a bid for females with whom to mate.

The pregnant females drill cavities into narrow branches to receive their eggs.

By the time the larva emerge, some six weeks later, their mothers and fathers are long dead.

Instinct propels these babies to drop to the ground and burrow in, thus beginning another 17 year cycle, a process Samuel Orr, a time lapse photographer and filmmaker specializing in nature documentary, documents in macro close up in Return of the Cicadas, above.

His adventures with Brood X date to their last emergence in 2004, when he was a student at Indiana University, working in a lab with a professor whose area of expertise was cicadas.

While waiting around for Brood X’s next appearance, he traveled around the country and as far as Australia, gathering over 200 hours of footage of other periodical cicadas for an hour long, Kickstarter-funded film that aired on PBS in 2012.

Brood X has a way of ensuring that we humans will also observe a 17 year cycle, at least those of us who live in the states the Great Eastern Brood calls home.

Some celebrate with commemorative merch. This year, that means face masks as well as an ever burgeoning assortment of t-shirts, mugs, and other paraphernalia.

Also new this year, Cicada Safari, entomologist Dr. Gene Kritsky’s smartphone app for citizen scientists eager to help map the 2021 emergence with photos and location.

There are some among us who complain about the males’ lusty chorus, which can rival garbage disposals, lawn mowers, and jackhammers in terms of decibels.

Those concerned with the planet’s health can use the data from this and past emergences to discuss the impact of climate change and deforestation. Brood X is listed as “Near Threatened” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List.

Some of us are moved to write poetry and songs, though we don’t always get the species right — witness Ogden Nash’s Locust-Lovers, Attention! (1936) and Bob Dylan’s Day of the Locusts (1970).

Inevitably, there will be articles about eating them. It’s true that they’re a hyperlocal source of sustainable protein, albeit one that’s rarely on the menu. (The Onondaga Nation celebrates — and ceremonially samples — Brood VII every 17 years, crediting the insects with saving their ancestors from starvation after the Continental Army destroyed their villages and food sources in 1779.)

Human nature is such that we can’t help but reflect on the twists and turns our lives have taken over the last 17 years.

A woman in Maryland planned a cicada themed wedding to coincide with Brood X’s 1987 emergence, having been born two emergences before, and graduated from Bryn Mawr during the 1970 emergence, as 50 miles away, Bob Dylan was having his fateful encounter on the campus of Princeton.

Most of us will find that our milestones have been a bit more accidental in nature.

Brood X’s emergence also serves as a lens through which to view 17 years in the life of our country. The Onion took this to the edge several years ago with an article from the point of view of Brood II, but it’ll be hard to top the 17-year chunk of recent history Brood X and the humans who have been living atop them since 2004 will have to digest.

Speaking of history, Brood X Mania has been around much longer than any of us have been alive, and probably predates a Philadelphia pastor’s description of the 1715 emergence in his journal (though we’ll give him FIRST!!! since no earlier accounts have surfaced).

Prior to the Internet, entomologist Charles L. Marlatt’s The Periodical Cicada: An Account of Cicada Septendecim, Its Natural Enemies and the Means of Preventing Its Injury (1907) was the go to source for all things cicada related, and it remains a fascinating read.

In addition to lots of nitty gritty on the insects’ anatomy, habits, diet, and habitat, he quotes liberally from other cicada experts, from both his own era and before. The anecdotal evidence suggests our obsession is far from new.

These days, anyone armed with a smartphone can make a recording of Brood X’s cacophony, but back then, experts in the field were tasked with trying to capture it in print.

Professor Charles Valentine Riley compared the sound early in the season, when the first males were emerging to the “whistling of a train passing through a short tunnel” and also, “the croaking of certain frogs.” (For those needing help with pronunciation, he rendered it phonetically as “Pha-r-r-r-aoh.”)

Professor Asa Fitch’s described high season in New York state, when a maximum of males sing simultaneously:

tsh-e-e-E-E-E-E-e-ou, uttered continuously and prolonged to a quarter or half minute in length, the middle note deafeningly shrill, loud and piercing to the ear

Marlatt himself worried, prematurely but not without reason, that the march of civilization would bring about extinction by over-clearing the densely wooded areas that are essential to the cicadas’ reproductive rituals while offering a bit of protection from predators.

Dr. Samuel P. Hildreth of Marietta, Ohio noted in 1830 that “hogs eat them in preference to any other food” and that birds were such fans “that very few birds were seen around our gardens during their continuance and our cherries, etc, remained unmolested.”

Dr. Leland Ossian Howard was erroneously credited with conducting “the first experiments of cicada as an article of human food” in early summer 1885. Marlatt reproduces the account of an eyewitness who seemed to fancy themselves a bit of a restaurant critic:

With the aid of the Doctor’s cook, he had prepared a plain stew, a milk stew, and a broil. The Cicadae were collected just as they emerged from pupae and were thrown into cold water, in which they remained overnight. They were cooked the next morning, and served at breakfast time. They imparted a distinct and not unpleasant flavor to the stew, but they were not at all palatable themselves, as they were reduced to nothing but bits of flabby skin. The broil lacked substance. The most palatable method of cooking is to fry in batter, when they remind one of shrimps. They will never prove a delicacy.

We leave you with the thoughts of Dr Gideon B. Smith of Baltimore, whose attempt to capture a mercurial month turns bittersweet, and all too relatable:

The music or song produced by the myriads of these insects in a warm day from about the 25th of May to the middle of June is wonderful. It is not deafening, as many describe it; even at its height it does not interrupt conversation. It seems like an atmosphere of wild, monotonous sound, in which all other sounds float with perfect distinctness. After a day or two this music becomes tiresome and doleful, and to many very disagreeable. To me, it was otherwise, and when I heard the last note on the 25th of June the melancholy reflection occurred. Shall I live to hear it yet again?

Related Content: 

Sounds of the Forest: A Free Audio Archive Gathers the Sounds of Forests from All Over the World

Tune Into Tree.fm: An Online Radio Station That Streams the Soothing Sounds of Forests from Around the World

How Sounds Are Faked For Nature Documentaries: Meet the Artists Who Create the Sounds of Fish, Spiders, Orangutans, Mushrooms & More

Ayun Halliday is an author, illustrator, theater maker and Chief Primatologist of the East Village Inky zine.  Welcome back, Brood X Overlords! Follow her @AyunHalliday.

The Cicadas Return After 17 Years: Stunning Footage of the Brood X Cicadas is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

]]>
Mon, 17 May 2021 04:00:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook New York Science Maryland Biology Australia College Environment Nature Bob Dylan Philadelphia Pbs Princeton Baltimore International Union For Conservation Of Nature Indiana University Bryn Mawr Marietta Ohio Continental Army Onondaga Nation Ogden Nash Ayun Halliday Marlatt Asa Fitch Brood X Great Eastern Brood Gene Kritsky Samuel Orr Brood VII Charles L Marlatt Charles Valentine Riley Samuel P Hildreth Leland Ossian Howard Gideon B Smith Brood X Cicadas
Mayor Garcetti extends hours to expand appointment-free vaccine access https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/16/mayor-garcetti-extends-hours-to-expand-appointment-free-vaccine-access/ LOS ANGELES >> Mayor Eric Garcetti on Sunday, May 16, announced a series of steps to expand vaccine access among Angelenos, including extending hours to 8 p.m. at nine fixed city-run site and offering appointment-free access for a choice of any of the three approved vaccines.

“We can end this pandemic, restore public health, and rebuild our economy, but only if we can put vaccines within reach of every Angeleno, regardless of income, ZIP code, or neighborhood,” said Garcetti. “With expanded hours and growing eligibility, we are doing everything we can to reach residents who have yet to get vaccinated — and make it as easy and safe as possible to deliver doses across our communities.”

To get the vaccines into more arms, the city eliminated the appointment requirement and piloted evening hours earlier this month. After a 200% increase in demand for evening vaccinations over the last two weeks, hours will be extended until 8 p.m. at all of its permanent locations, with the exception of Dodger Stadium, which will remain open until 4 p.m.

All fixed sites will operate from Monday to Saturday, with the exception of Dodger Stadium, which will permanently close on Thursday. Most mobile locations will operate between Tuesday and Saturday from the hours of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with the exception of two night clinics at South L.A. Wetlands Park and Sylmar Recreation Center, which will run until 9 p.m.

Residents who visit any fixed site with extended hours will be able to choose from any of the three vaccines currently available: Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. Pre-registration is not required, but those who wish to plan ahead can go to Coronavirus.LACity.org/GetVaccinated to sign up or find the locations.

Related Articles

City vaccination sites will have the capacity to administer roughly 250,000 doses to Angelenos across 10 permanent sites and each of the Mobile Outreach for Vaccine Equity (MOVE) clinics.

Equity remains a key focus of the city’s vaccination program. The MOVE initiative delivers doses directly to neighborhoods most impacted by the pandemic, administering 111,719 so far. Beginning Monday, the city will deploy 10 mobile teams, serving residents in South L.A., East L.A. and parts of the Valley, including the neighborhoods of South Park, Chesterfield Square/Harvard Park, Vermont Vista, Watts, Boyle Heights, Wilmington, Van Nuys and Sylmar, among others.

City sites will offer second dose appointments this week for residents who received their first Moderna shot between April 19 and April 24 or their first Pfizer shot between April 26 and May 1. Second dose patients should have received notifications with their appointment details recently by text and/or email. Patients should note that the date stamped on the CDC vaccination cards received after their first dose is not an appointment confirmation. Instead, everyone should use the appointment details provided by Carbon Health.

]]>
Sun, 16 May 2021 20:10:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Business News Education South Park Cdc La Government Los Angeles Sport Soccer Community Pfizer Eric Garcetti San Pedro Valley Johnson Johnson Garcetti Dignity Health Danny Trejo Sylmar Top Stories LADN Top Stories IVDB Top Stories Breeze Top Stories LBPT Top Stories WDN Top Stories SGVT Top Stories PSN Sylmar Recreation Center Coronavirus Pfizer Moderna South L A Wetlands Park Newsom Coronavirus Northridge Hospital Medical Center City
Coronavirus stats continue to decline as local officials await word on mask mandates from Newsom https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/16/coronavirus-stats-continue-to-decline-as-local-officials-await-word-on-mask-mandates-from-newsom/ While local agencies await action from Gov. Gavin Newsom on the future of mask mandates, coronavirus enforcement and workplace safety, the pandemic appeared to continuing to ease its grip on Southern California.

Los Angeles County reported 240 new cases of COVID-19 and seven additional deaths on Sunday, May 16, though health officials said the number of cases and deaths reported likely reflect reporting delays over the weekend.

Sunday’s figures brought the county’s totals to 1,237,411 cases and 24,094 fatalities since the pandemic began, according to the county Department of Public Health.

Newsom said his office has been talking with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, local health officers and other states since the CDC’s announcement Thursday calling for fully vaccinated people to skip face coverings and social distancing in most situations.

The agency’s guidelines still call for people to wear masks in crowded indoor settings, such as buses, planes, hospitals and prisons, and says residents should follow local rules.

But Newsom says he doesn’t know what the federal guidelines would look like in schools, where younger children are not yet able to get vaccinated, and what happens if businesses want to require masks. L.A. County public health officials said they were also reviewing the federal decision, and waiting for guidance from Sacramento.

According to state figures, there were 322 people hospitalized in L.A County due to COVID-19 as of Sunday, down from 325 the day before. Of those patients, 68 were in intensive care, down from 73.

More than 6,643,000 test results have been reported, with 17% of people testing positive. The daily positivity rate over a seven-day average was 0.4% as of Sunday, the department said.

“As more sectors and businesses open, and capacity increases at indoor activities, it’s very important that we continue to implement safety protocols to avoid transmission and outbreaks,” Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said Saturday.

“At this point in time, everyone needs to adhere to required Cal/OSHA distancing and masking at all workplaces. State and county directives require that everyone wear a mask when at businesses and in crowded venues. With just 40% of LA County residents fully vaccinated, public health safety measures, including masking, distancing, and hand washing, will help us avoid additional cases.”

Health officials said inspectors have been following up to ensure businesses are following the health safety protocols since the county entered the least restrictive yellow tier of the state’s economic reopening system. Last weekend, inspectors visited 304 restaurants and issued only one citation, they said.

Inspectors also visited 29 bars, 13 breweries, wineries, or tasting rooms, 27 retail sales establishments, 51 gyms and fitness centers, 77 hair salons or barbershops, 99 food markets, and 86 personal care businesses, and overall found very good compliance with the health officer order.

On Friday, breaking ranks with her county’s public health agency, County Supervisor Kathryn Barger has called on the governor to immediately relax COVID-19 mask-wearing requirements to align with eased guidelines announced by federal authorities for fully vaccinated people.

“Los Angeles County has made tremendous progress vaccinating residents, including those in our hard-hit communities,” Barger said in a statement. “Furthermore, our positivity rate is less than 1% and our case rate remains low. While we still want to keep our communities safe, I am encouraged by the new guidance from the CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and believe that the state and Los Angeles County should immediately align with the new federal recommendations.”

The CDC released guidance Thursday saying people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can largely stop wearing masks in most indoor and outdoor situations. The new CDC guidance does not completely drop mask recommendations for vaccinated people. Face coverings are still recommended in some settings — such as aboard planes and buses or in crowded settings such as hospitals.

The announcement, however, has set off confusion, since many states and local jurisdictions — including California and Los Angeles County — still have mask requirements in place. The CDC only releases general guidance, but individual jurisdictions can impose restrictions based on local virus circumstances.

Related Articles

L.A. County requirements allow fully vaccinated residents to shed masks while indoors with other fully vaccinated people. But mask mandates remain in place for everyone working at or patronizing businesses — such as grocery stores, restaurants or retail shops.

Ferrer said the state and county were reviewing the new CDC guidance, but changes in local regulations were unlikely to occur for at least another week. She stressed that mask mandates remain in place largely to protect workers and customers at worksites, and state occupational health and safety regulators need to set policy for masking and social distancing in the workplace.

Supermarket chains including Trader Joe’s, Costco and Walmart have dropped the mask requirement for fully vaccinated customers, though store officials said they will not be asking for proof of vaccination.

COVID-19 vaccinations efforts expanded last week to include youth aged 12-15. Most providers in the county began offering shots to that age group on Thursday, but the city of Los Angeles’ sites did not start until Friday.

Vaccinations are now available appointment-free at most sites in the county.

The Associated Press and City News Service contributed to this report. 

]]>
Sun, 16 May 2021 19:58:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Business News Education California Cdc La Government Sacramento Los Angeles Walmart Sport Public Health Soccer Costco Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Gavin Newsom San Pedro Los Angeles County Ferrer Barger LA County Dignity Health Cal OSHA City News Service Danny Trejo Newsom Barbara Ferrer Top Stories LADN Top Stories IVDB Kathryn Barger Top Stories Breeze Top Stories LBPT Top Stories WDN Top Stories SGVT Top Stories PSN Southern California Los Angeles County Coronavirus COVID CDC U S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Coronavirus Vaccine Northridge Hospital Medical Department of Public Health Newsom
Startup School: Take YCombinator’s Free Online Course for Current & Aspiring Entrepreneurs http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OpenCulture/~3/7tSVK0-qfVM/startup-school-a-free-online-course-for-entrepreneurs-from-ycombinator.html If you’re working on a startup, take note. YCombinator–a well-known Silicon Valley accelerator–has created Startup School, a free online program for entrepreneurs. The school has a track for current startup founders, and another one for aspiring/eventual founders. In each case, the school strives to offer the best lessons and advice on how to start a startup, while building “a community of entrepreneurs who can encourage, teach and support one another.” Startup School is completely free. You just need a device with access to the internet. View the curriculum here. (Topics include everything from “How to Get Start Up Ideas” and “How to Pitch a Startup,” to “How to Find the Right Co-Founder” and “How to Split Equity.”) And sign up here.

Related Content:

How to Start a Start-Up: A Free Online Course from Y Combinator Taught at Stanford

150 Free Online Business Courses

Entrepreneurship Through the Lens of Venture Capital: A Free Online Course from Stanford



Startup School: Take YCombinator’s Free Online Course for Current & Aspiring Entrepreneurs is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

]]>
Sun, 16 May 2021 14:29:59 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Business College Stanford Online Courses Silicon Valley Startup School Lens of Venture Capital Stanford Startup School
How to Have the Cutest College Bathroom: 15 Essential Items http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/collegefashion/~3/hhsgjxd68KY/ Relax and refresh with these affordable bathroom must-haves! ]]> Sun, 16 May 2021 10:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs College Bathroom College Life Dorm Room Shopping Dorm Life Dormspiration "By intent or blunder, the left and right are colluding to undermine the noble, elusive goal of giving American children the ability to think and argue and act together as citizens." http://althouse.blogspot.com/2021/05/by-intent-or-blunder-left-and-right-are.html Concludes George Packer in "Can Civics Save America?/Teaching civics could restore health to American democracy, or inflame our mutual antagonisms" (The Atlantic). 

Civics is at the heart of the struggle to define the meaning of the American idea. Think of the battle lines as 1619 versus 1776—The New York Times Magazine’s project to reframe American history around slavery and its legacy, and the Trump administration’s counterstrike in the form of a thin report on patriotic education....

[O]n April 19 the Department of Education published a proposed rule [citing] “the New York Times’ landmark ‘1619 Project,’” as evidence of a growing acknowledgment of the importance of teaching “both the consequences of slavery, and the significant contributions of Black Americans to our society.” The same discussion praises schools for “working to incorporate anti-racist practices into teaching and learning,” citing the historian and Atlantic contributing writer Ibram X. Kendi.

The rule states that grant applicants must “take into account systemic marginalization, biases, inequities, and discriminatory policy and practice in American history,” “support the creation of learning environments that validate and reflect the diversity, identity, and experiences of all students,” and “contribute to inclusive, supportive, and identity-safe learning environments.”...

Inclusion” is an uncontestable value, but “validation” and “identity safety” are not the proper goals of education—in certain contexts they might even be in opposition to it.... You don’t have to be Stanley Kurtz of National Review to see progressive orthodoxy in the new rule.

[Author: noreply@blogger.com (Ann Althouse)]

]]>
Sun, 16 May 2021 09:17:13 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Education Law America Atlantic The New York Times New York Times Magazine Department Of Education Trump George Packer Ann Althouse Ibram X Kendi Stanley Kurtz Atlantic Civics
Academic activism is key for democracy https://mg.co.za/education/2021-05-16-academic-activism-is-key-for-democracy/

South Africa’s universities have an important role to play as they overcome legacies of inequality

The post Academic activism is key for democracy appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.

]]>
Sun, 16 May 2021 08:54:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Students Education Democracy South Africa Higher Education Universities Transformation Social Justice South Africa (country Academic Activism
Disquiet in UK schools as easing of mask restrictions in classrooms nears https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/may/16/disquiet-in-uk-schools-as-easing-of-mask-restrictions-in-classrooms-nears Pupils’ relief at being free of face coverings is mixed with teachers’ and parents’ concerns over spread of Indian Covid variant

Teachers, pupils and parents have greeted the easing of coronavirus safety measures in schools from Monday with a mixture of relief and, in the light of concern over the Indian variant, dismay and confusion.

The government has announced that students will no longer need to wear face coverings in schools. But some areas in the north of England are being advised to continue measures, following rising numbers of cases of the new variant, known as B.1.617.2.

Continue reading...]]>
Sun, 16 May 2021 01:45:46 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs UK England Education UK News Infectious Diseases Schools Coronavirus
Coronavirus hospitalizations continue to drop in LA County https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/15/coronavirus-hospitalizations-continue-to-drop-in-la-county-2/ Los Angeles County reported 306 new cases of COVID-19 and 15 additional deaths on Saturday, May 15.

The figures brought the county’s totals to 1,237,235 cases and 24,088 fatalities since the pandemic began, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

According to state figures, there were 325 people hospitalized in the county due to COVID as of Saturday, down from 347 the day before. Of those patients, 73 were in intensive care, down from 78.

Nearly 6,634,000 test results have been reported, with 17% of people testing positive. Saturday’s daily test positivity rate was 0.4%, the department said.

“As more sectors and businesses open, and capacity increases at indoor activities, it’s very important that we continue to implement safety protocols to avoid transmission and outbreaks,” Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said.

“At this point in time, everyone needs to adhere to required Cal/OSHA distancing and masking at all workplaces. State and county directives require that everyone wear a mask when at businesses and in crowded venues. With just 40% of LA County residents fully vaccinated, public health safety measures, including masking, distancing, and hand washing, will help us avoid additional cases.”

Health officials said inspectors have been following up to ensure businesses are following the health safety protocols since the county entered the least restrictive yellow tier of the state’s economic reopening system. Last weekend, inspectors visited 304 restaurants and issued only one citation, they said.

Inspectors also visited 29 bars, 13 breweries, wineries, or tasting rooms, 27 retail sales establishments, 51 gyms and fitness centers, 77 hair salons or barbershops, 99 food markets, and 86 personal care businesses, and overall found very good compliance with the health officer order.

On Friday, breaking ranks with her county’s public health agency, County Supervisor Kathryn Barger has called on the governor to immediately relax COVID-19 mask-wearing requirements to align with eased guidelines announced by federal authorities for fully vaccinated people.

“Los Angeles County has made tremendous progress vaccinating residents, including those in our hard-hit communities,” Barger said in a statement. “Furthermore, our positivity rate is less than 1% and our case rate remains low. While we still want to keep our communities safe, I am encouraged by the new guidance from the CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and believe that the state and Los Angeles County should immediately align with the new federal recommendations.”

The CDC released guidance Thursday saying people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can largely stop wearing masks in most indoor and outdoor situations. The new CDC guidance does not completely drop mask recommendations for vaccinated people. Face coverings are still recommended in some settings — such as aboard planes and buses or in crowded settings such as hospitals.

The announcement, however, has set off confusion, since many states and local jurisdictions — including California and Los Angeles County — still have mask requirements in place. The CDC only releases general guidance, but individual jurisdictions can impose restrictions based on local virus circumstances.

Related Articles

L.A. County requirements allow fully vaccinated residents to shed masks while indoors with other fully vaccinated people. But mask mandates remain in place for everyone working at or patronizing businesses — such as grocery stores, restaurants or retail shops.

Ferrer said the state and county were reviewing the new CDC guidance, but changes in local regulations were unlikely to occur for at least another week. She stressed that mask mandates remain in place largely to protect workers and customers at worksites, and state occupational health and safety regulators need to set policy for masking and social distancing in the workplace.

COVID vaccinations efforts expanded this week to include youth aged 12-15. Most providers in the county began offering shots to that age group on Thursday, but the city of Los Angeles’ sites did not start until Friday.

Vaccinations are now available appointment-free at most sites in the county.

]]>
Sat, 15 May 2021 20:32:51 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Business News Education California Cdc Government Los Angeles Sport Soccer Community San Pedro Los Angeles County Ferrer Barger LA County Dignity Health Cal OSHA Danny Trejo Barbara Ferrer Top Stories LADN Top Stories IVDB Kathryn Barger Top Stories Breeze Top Stories LBPT Top Stories WDN Top Stories SGVT Top Stories PSN Pasadena Ice Skating Center Coronavirus COVID CDC U S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Northridge Hospital Medical
How to Set Up Your Own At-Home Spa http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/collegefashion/~3/9PDioPXhy3U/ Here's what you need to make your room into your personal oasis. ]]> Sat, 15 May 2021 10:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs College Relaxation Skincare Stress Relief Beauty & Hair University Of California Drops SAT, ACT Scores For Admission https://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2021/05/14/university-of-california-drops-sat-act-scores-for-admission/ SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The University of California won’t consider SAT and ACT scores that are submitted with admission and scholarship applications under a settlement of a student lawsuit that was announced Friday.

The 10-campus system, which has more than 280,000 students statewide, decided not to continue fighting a judge’s injunction issued last fall that barred it from considering the scores for admission even when they were submitted voluntarily, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Activists have long argued that standardized tests put minority and low-income students at a disadvantage. Critics say test questions often contain inherent bias that more privileged children are better equipped to answer. They also say wealthier students typically take expensive prep courses that help boost their scores, which many students can’t afford.

That was the argument in a 2019 lawsuit filed against the UC system on behalf of some high school students and nonprofit groups.

The settlement, reached earlier this month, “ensures that the university will not revert to its planned use of the SAT and ACT — which its own regents have admitted are racist metrics,” Amanda Savage, an attorney representing the students, said in a statement reported by the Chronicle.

The UC Board of Regents voted last year to drop the SAT and ACT tests as admission requirements through 2024 and eliminate them for California residents after that. Incoming students this fall didn’t submit SAT or ACT scores. However, regents had said applicants for fall 2021 and 2022 could submit the scores voluntarily.

The new settlement will “provide certainty for students and their families, counselors, and high schools,” the school said.

Under the agreement, SAT and ACT scores won’t be considered for admission for students applying for entry between fall 2021 and spring 2025. However, the scores that are submitted voluntarily can be used for course placement after a student is admitted.

FairTest, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit group that is generally opposed to standardized testing, announced last month that more than 1,400 accredited colleges and universities that grant bachelor’s degrees won’t require students applying for fall 2022 admission to submit test scores. That is more than 60% of the undergraduate institutions in the United States, the group said.

]]>
Sat, 15 May 2021 00:33:08 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Education California Massachusetts San Francisco Ap United States University Of California San Francisco Chronicle UC Board of Regents The University of California Standardized Testing FairTest University Of California Drops Amanda Savage
Supervisor Barger to Newsom: Ease state mask mandate immediately https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/14/supervisor-barger-to-newsom-ease-state-mask-mandate-immediately/ Breaking ranks with her county’s public health agency, Los Angeles County Supervisor Kathryn Barger on Friday, May 14, called on the governor to immediately relax COVID-19 mask-wearing requirements to align with eased guidelines announced by federal authorities for fully vaccinated people.

“Los Angeles County has made tremendous progress vaccinating residents, including those in our hard-hit communities,” Barger said in a statement. “Furthermore, our positivity rate is less than 1% and our case rate remains low. While we still want to keep our communities safe, I am encouraged by the new guidance from the CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and believe that the state and Los Angeles County should immediately align with the new federal recommendations.”

The CDC released guidance Thursday saying people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can largely stop wearing masks in most indoor and outdoor situations. The new CDC guidance does not completely drop mask recommendations for vaccinated people. Face coverings are still recommended in some settings — such as aboard planes and buses or in crowded settings such as hospitals.

The announcement, however, has set off confusion, since many states and local jurisdictions — including California and Los Angeles County — still have mask requirements in place. The CDC only releases general guidance, but individual jurisdictions can impose restrictions based on local virus circumstances.

L.A. County requirements allow fully vaccinated residents to shed masks while indoors with other fully vaccinated people. But mask mandates remain in place for everyone working at or patronizing businesses — such as grocery stores, restaurants or retail shops.

County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said the state and county were reviewing the new CDC guidance, but changes in local regulations were unlikely to occur for at least another week. She stressed that mask mandates remain in place largely to protect workers and customers at worksites, and state occupational health and safety regulators need to set policy for masking and social distancing in the workplace.

Ferrer said Cal-OSHA regulators are set to meet next Thursday to consider a set of recommended workplace requirements. And until that happens, people will still be required to wear masks in such indoor settings.

“I know people are going to be impatient now and they’re going to say, ‘No, time to get on this. Time to just eliminate all these requirements around masking,”‘ Ferrer said. “But that wasn’t the intent, I don’t think, of the CDC. I think CDC wrote in multiple places that people really do need to adhere to worker protections and state and local directives. It’s important for us to remember that we do need to protect workers, particularly those workers that are in essential work environments.”

In a letter sent to Gov. Gavin Newsom Friday, Barger noted that the county cannot ease its restrictions until the state takes action.

“As we return to normalcy and rapidly increase vaccinations, I believe it is appropriate for CDPH (California Department of Public Health) and Cal-OSHA to change the existing distancing and masking requirements in alignment with the CDC,” Barger wrote.

She added that the county “is committed to implementing safe, sensible directives that still protect our recovery and prevent regression to high positive case rates. We especially want to ensure protections for workers, particularly those who work indoors, including on public transportation and in schools, large venues and congregate housing such as jails, shelters and skilled nursing facilities.”

The masking issue is likely to become thornier in coming days, possibly putting merchants in the unenviable position of trying to determine which workers — and which customers — are fully vaccinated. Ferrer noted there is no standardized system for verifying vaccination status, opening the door for people who are not vaccinated to simply shed their masks, knowing there is no process for proving whether they’ve been inoculated.

Hoping to dispel any possible confusion among travelers, the Federal Aviation Administration issued a statement Friday noting that “at this time if you travel, you are still required to wear a mask on planes, buses, trains and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within or out of the United States, and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.”

COVID vaccinations efforts expanded this week to include youth aged 12-15. Most providers in the county began offering shots to that age group on Thursday, but the city of Los Angeles’ sites did not start until Friday.

Vaccinations are now available appointment-free at most sites in the county.

Ferrer said Thursday there are roughly 500,000 county residents aged 12 to 15.

“It is a key group of individuals for us to reach so that we can increase our coverage in terms of the county’s total population,” Ferrer said Thursday.

Related Articles

She noted that while younger residents have consistently had lower numbers of COVID infections during the pandemic, infections do happen. She said that during COVID surges experienced by the county, between 10% and 17% of cases were occurring in people under age 18.

“So as a reminder, it’s important to note that there are in fact cases among children and that children are particularly vulnerable whenever we see an increase in community transmission,” she said. “So they, just like us, benefit from keeping community transmission rates down very low.”

The county on Thursday confirmed another 17 COVID-19 deaths, lifting the death toll from throughout the pandemic to 24,074.

Another 583 COVID infections were also confirmed by the county, but health officials said about 300 of those cases actually dated back to January and were the result of a reporting backlog by a single provider. The cases raised the county’s total to 1,236,988.

Long Beach health officials reported 31 more cases Friday, while Pasadena reported two. Neither city reported any new deaths.

According to state figures, there were 347 people hospitalized in the county due to COVID as of Friday, down from 366 on Thursday, with 78 people in intensive care, down from 85 on Thursday.

]]>
Fri, 14 May 2021 20:12:15 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Business News Education California Cdc Government Los Angeles Sport Soccer United States Long Beach Community Pasadena Usc Federal Aviation Administration Gavin Newsom Los Angeles County Ferrer Barger Cal OSHA Newsom Barbara Ferrer Top Stories LADN Top Stories IVDB Kathryn Barger Top Stories Breeze Top Stories LBPT Top Stories WDN Top Stories SGVT Top Stories PSN County Public Health Coronavirus COVID CDC U S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Coronavirus Vaccine
‘Forged in the fire of history’: USC’s pandemic-tested 2020, 2021 classes graduate in person https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/14/forged-in-the-fire-of-history-uscs-pandemic-tested-2020-2021-classes-graduate-in-person/
  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Josephine Nwokedi receives her doctorate in medicine and her MBA during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • With her mother Isatu Timbo, Josephine Nwokedi’s family takes pictures after she graduated with a doctorate in medicine and a MBA during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Lawrence Rolle receives his doctorate and masters during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Carlisle Maney celebrates with her sister Brett after graduating with a BS in Global Health during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Tianna Shaw-Wakeman delivers the first Black valedictorian speech during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A graduate enters the field as USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC President Carol Folt speaks during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A graduate enters the field as USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • USC holds the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Victoria Mezack, 23, and Yvette Estrada celebrate receiving their Masters of Public Health degrees during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Show Caption of

    Expand

     

    The COVID-19 pandemic put a hold on sporting events, family vacations and commencement ceremonies – a postponement that left many students in the depths of despair.

    But with vaccination numbers on the rise and herd immunity on the horizon, graduation ceremonies, hybridized here and there, are returning in full force.

    USC began a string of more than a dozen ceremonies on Friday, May 14, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The university will hold a morning and afternoon graduation every day for the next seven days.

    Around 1,500 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral candidates received degrees from the 141-year-old institution at the first commencement. In addition to including students who received different types of degrees, commencements feature students from 2021 graduating class as well as the class of 2020, which did not receive an in-person ceremony last year.

    USC’s week of ceremonies puts it ahead of the curve when it comes to in-person commencement. Loyola Marymount University will hold an in-person event for the 2020 and 2021 classes on July 31 and UCLA will host multiple ceremonies for its 2021 graduates between Thursday, June 10, and Tuesday, June 15, according to the schools’ respective websites.

    With her mother Isatu Timbo, Josephine Nwokedi’s family takes pictures after she graduated with a doctorate in medicine and a MBA during USC’s first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

    While generally considered a special event in a typical year, some students said they definitely understood the significance of this year’s commencement. Radhika Agrawal, a 2021 graduate receiving her degree in computer engineering and computer science, said she’s thankful to have a commencement at all.

    “I had a lot of friends in the class of 2020 who weren’t able to have that in-person aspect to their graduation,” Agrawal said. “So for me it means a lot, and I know the value of it.”

    Agrawal also mentioned that, since every student can invite two guests to attend, her parents were eager to attend the ceremony — so they can watch as all the work they’ve put in to see her graduate pays off.

    The day shared many similarities to commencement’s in years past, but signs of the pandemic still permeated the event. USC moved the graduation to the Coliseum for the first time since 1950 in order to meet the social distancing requirements necessary to pull off the event.

    Students wore masks and sat in chairs placed six feet apart on the historic stadium’s grass.

    Tianna Shaw-Wakeman is the first Black valedictorian at USC. She spoke at the first of 14 socially-distant graduations for the classes of 2020 and 2021 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on Friday, May 14, 2021. It is the first time since 1950 that graduation ceremonies have been held at the Coliseum. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

    Social distancing at the 2021 graduation wasn’t the only first for USC. The university also anointed Tianna Shaw-Wakeman as class of 2021 valedictorian – a special moment as Shaw-Wakeman became the first Black valedictorian in the school’s history. Shaw-Wakeman said her achievement showed how far the United States has come, and yet how far it still has to go.

    “None of us chose to live in a world consumed by racial injustice, but we all do,” Shaw-Wakeman said. “Now, though, we can choose how we navigate in it.”

    Related Articles

    Many of the speakers spoke at length about how the graduating classes of 2020 and 2021 have faced obstacles along the road to degree conferral. Commencement speaker Bina Venkataraman, the editorial page editor at the Boston Globe and former senior advisor of climate change innovation in President Barack Obama’s White House, said told graduates that  these challenges would prove beneficial for the classes in years to come.

    “More than any generation in recent memory, you’ve overcome trauma and adversity to get to this moment,” Venkataraman said. “The trauma and adversity of recent events, the pandemic for one, but also the trauma and adversity in your inner worlds – the people you’ve lost and the time you’ve lost. You’ve been forged in the fire of history.”

    Despite all the unusual trappings, the commencement ended as all typical commencements do. Students walked up to receive a degree cover (the diplomas that will eventually fill them arrive later by mail).

    Graduates ascended the steps of the Coliseum bleachers and walked out of the stadium, eyes set on new heights.

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 18:20:52 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health News Education White House Barack Obama Sport Soccer United States Graduation Community Usc Ucla Boston Globe Caltech Brett Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Loyola Marymount University Global Health Los Angeles Daily News Carol Folt Venkataraman Agrawal Top Stories LADN Top Stories IVDB Los Angeles Daily News SCNG Top Stories Breeze Top Stories LBPT Top Stories WDN Top Stories SGVT Los Angeles Daily News SCNG USC Top Stories PSN Sarah Reingewirtz Yvette Estrada Bina Venkataraman Coronavirus Josephine Nwokedi Isatu Timbo Josephine Nwokedi Lawrence Rolle Carlisle Maney Los Angeles Daily News SCNG Tianna Shaw Wakeman Los Angeles Daily News SCNG Victoria Mezack Radhika Agrawal Tianna Shaw Wakeman Shaw Wakeman
    Archivists Want to Make Sci-Hub 'Un-Censorable' https://gizmodo.com/archivists-want-to-make-sci-hub-un-censorable-1846898276

    For roughly the past decade, Sci-Hub—aka, the “Pirate Bay of Science—has been giving researchers, reporters, and open-source advocates unfettered access to countless scientific papers across every discipline you can imagine. In return, it’s been hit with multiple lawsuits, a suspended Twitter account, and an

    Read more...

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 18:10:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Science Activism Education Articles The Pirate Bay Elsevier Sci Hub Elbakyan Alexandra Elbakyan Academic Publishing Archivist I2P Library Genesis
    The 4 best bean bag chairs in 2021 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/oOTYXdmeHPA/best-bean-bag-chair
  • The bean bag chair has been a mainstay of the college dorm and family den for years.
  • These anatomic seats conform to your body to give a unique blend of support and comfort.
  • The Big Joe Aloha Chair is our top pick because it combines softness and structure.
  • If you went to college any time in the last few decades, chances are you spent a good portion of your time nestled in a friend's bean bag chair while hanging out in his or her dorm room. And if that's not accurate, then you were the bean bag chair owner and it was to your room that friends flocked for the chance to flop in comfort.

    The first recognizable bean bag chair was created by a group of Italian designers in the late 1960s, and people have been enjoying them ever since.

    Although comfort is the primary reason for the popularity of the bean bag chair, there is also something to be said for the low price. Many bean bag chairs cost a fraction of the price of that textbook you need for a history seminar, so for college students or anyone else watching the budget, a cheap seat that's actually comfortable is a great find. They are also a great choice for the dorm room as one usually doesn't buy forever furniture for a space they will occupy for a couple of semesters at most.

    Our guide features several bean bag chairs that are perfect for the dorm or apartment. We also included a bean bag chair just for the kids as well as one perfect for the couple that wants to sit and snuggle or for the friends who want to lounge together while watching a show or playing a game. You'll surely find the perfect chair to settle yourself into. Just remember that getting up is a lot harder than sitting down.

    Here are the best bean bag chairs in 2021

    Updated 05/13/2021: Prices and links are up to date. We removed our previous top pick for best high end bean bag chair, the Tuft & Needle Pouch due to it being discontinued. We're planning to completely rewrite this guide with new picks soon.

    The best bean bag chair overall Big Joe bean Bag Chair

    Big Joe

    The Big Joe Aloha Chair lets you sink in and snuggle, yet it maintains a chair's shape, helping you sit upright without effort.

    Pros: Offers support and holds its shape, eco-friendly materials, built-in carrying handle

    Cons: Too small for larger adults

    Bean bag chairs are incredibly comfortable as long as you're OK with adopting an effectively recumbent position. If you want to sit upright on a bean bag chair, whether for typing or eating, to name two examples, you have to support yourself with your core as there is no appreciable backrest.

    That is, unless you have the chair-shaped Big Joe Aloha Chair. It's a soft, stuffed seat that maintains its chair configuration even while cradling your carriage with tens of thousands of beads of proprietary Ultimax filling.

    This is a great bean bag chair for the college kid who needs a place to relax when it's time to chill but can sit upright to use a laptop, read a book, or take part in a study session when it's time to get some work done. And thanks to that carrying handle built into the seatback, it's easy to move the Aloha bean bag chair around the room or down the hall to a buddy's room.

    If the chair ever loses some of its fluff, you can unzip it and add more filling. And the filling is made from 80% recycled materials and is 100% recyclable itself. As a former Big Joe bean bag chair owner, I never had any issue with the fill packing down too much.

    The best budget bean bag chair bean bag chair Bed_Bath_Beyond

    Bed bath & Beyond

    The Bed Bath & Beyond Microsuede Bean Bag Chair is soft and fluffy and large enough for an adult, yet its price tag is small enough to where you can let the kids treat it roughly.

    Pros: Great low price, comes in several colors, tear-resistant material

    Cons: Too small for some larger adults

    When you picture a bean bag chair, it probably looks just like the Bed Bath & Beyond Microsuede Bean Bag Chair. In other words, it's a big amorphous blob, a blob that in this case comes in five different colors and has a soft faux-suede exterior and is filled with little polystyrene beads. When you sit down on (or in, really) this bean bag chair, you'll be pleased to find that it feels just like you expect, too.

    And that's almost all there is to say about the Bed Bath & Beyond Microsuede Bean Bag Chair, really. It's soft and comfortable, it's big enough for an adult, and it comes in a few colors.

    Oh, right. The price. At less than $40, this is far and away the lowest cost adult-sized bean bag chair in our guide. In fact, it costs half as much as the next cheapest option. And that sits well with lots of shoppers, if you'll pardon my amazing pun.

    The best oversized bean bag chair Great_Deal_Furniture bean bag chair

    Great Deal Furniture

    The Great Deal Furniture David Bean Bag Lounger is so large it could replace your couch, and it's so comfortable that it just might do that.

    Pros: Suitable for multiple users, available in several sizes, eco-friendly recycled foam filling

    Cons: Zippers occasionally break

    The David Bean Bag Lounger is perfect for the couple looking for a unique seating arrangement they can share. It's also great for the family with three kids or the household where the children constantly have friends cycling through. And of course, this massive, soft, bean bag chair is a luxury when enjoyed by a single reclining adult.

    The microsuede cover resists tears and punctures while a double zipper design keeps the beads inside where they belong yet allows you to open the bag up to add more beads or remove some as needed for custom comfort.

    For the record, if eight feet is just more bean bag chair than you need, the company also makes a six-foot option that's still large enough for two as well as a five-footer that's perfect for one person who likes his or her space.

    The best bean bag chair for kids GoMoji bean bag chair

    GoMoji

    The GoMoji Emoji Kids Bean Bag chair is charming enough that you won't mind having it there in the living room and cheap enough that you won't mind if your kids are rough with it.

    Pros: Perfect size for elementary-aged kids, comes in several designs, good price point

    Cons: Some units arrive with spots and stains

    If you're looking to add some seating to your child's bedroom, the family den, or basically anywhere else in your house, the GoMoji Emoji Kids Bean Bag chair is a great choice for the smaller members of the family.

    As it weighs less than five pounds, you can easily move this bright and charming bean bag chair all around the house as needed. It's perfect for use while the family watches a movie or plays a game or while your kid does some reading for school or for fun.

    Most kids will love the bright yellow color and expressive face on the side of the GoMoji Emoji Kids Bean Bag seat, while many adults will have a more bemused reaction. But that's OK, because this one is for the little guys and gals. However, the chair, in fact, supports as much as 200 pounds, which is impressive for a bean bag chair that costs less than $35.

    Check out more furniture guides Best sofas and couches graphic

    Article; Benchmade Modern; Burrow; Crate and Barrel; West Elm; Alyssa Powell/Insider

    Read the original article on Business Insider

    [Author: stevenjohn23@gmail.com (Steven John)]

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 12:49:51 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Reviews Home Kids College Trends Features Buying Guide Joe Aloha Steven John Insider Picks Product Card Insider Picks Guides Best Guides Guide Update Home (Reviews IP Freelance Home Guides Alyssa Powell Insider Reviews 2021 Bean Bag Chair Big Joe Aloha Chair David Bean Bag LoungerBest David Bean Bag Lounger GoMoji Emoji Kids Bean Bag
    San Fernando student’s award-winning art captures a masked moment of joy during a rotten year https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/14/san-fernando-students-award-winning-art-captures-moment-of-joy-during-a-rotten-year/ Kathia Hernandez, 17, poses in Sylmar on Thursday, May 13, 2021 with her painting “Skating Summer Days,” a selfie with her friends, which is headed to the U.S. Capitol after she won a Congressional Art Competition. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

    Because the year 2020 wasn’t turning out to be the very best for 17-year-old Kathia Hernandez, she wanted to capture one of the happiest moments of the pandemic in an art piece that won first place in a local congressional art contest.

    Kathia, a senior at Cesar E Chavez Learning Academy in San Fernando, created “Skating Summer Days” of her skateboarding in a Sylmar neighborhood with her good friend and her friend’s sister in alcohol-based markers on thick white paper from a photo selfie in an annual competition sponsored by Rep. Tony Cardenas, D-Panorama City.

    Kathia, a Sylmar resident, drew herself and her longtime friend, Ysabel, and her friend’s sister, Madison, in cool and warm tones true to the actual photo of three masked brown-haired, brown-eyed girls in front of a two-story building apartment complex.

    When she took the selfie on Oct. 2, she had started thinking about making it into a significant art piece.

    • Congressman Tony Cárdenas (CA-29) announced the winner of this year’s Congressional Art Competition during a virtual art show. Above, First Place: Kathia Hernandez, “Skating Summer Days”

    • Congressman Tony Cárdenas (CA-29) announced the winner of this year’s Congressional Art Competition during a virtual art show. Above, Second Place: Rokshana Bushra, “Bauler Gaan” (Song of the Baul)

    • Congressman Tony Cárdenas (CA-29) announced the winner of this year’s Congressional Art Competition during a virtual art show. Above, Third Place: Noely Lopez, “Overwhelmed”

    • Congressman Tony Cárdenas (CA-29) announced the winner of this year’s Congressional Art Competition during a virtual art show. Above, Fourth Place: Geraldine Suniga, “Ideal Paradise”

    • Congressman Tony Cárdenas (CA-29) announced the winner of this year’s Congressional Art Competition during a virtual art show. Above, Fifth Place: Rainielle Santos, “Reminiscence”

    Show Caption of

    Expand

    “I like drawing my friend a lot because it’s a way to remember them, or it’s a way for them to remember my art and me and for me to remember them if I ever leave or if I ever stop talking to them,” said the teen with dreams of attending Los Angeles’ Otis College of Art and Design.

    The first-place prize for the congressional art competition is a free, round-trip ticket to Washington DC, along with hotel accommodations, a reception and a ceremony documenting her win side-by-side with other aspiring nationwide student artists.

    The artwork will be displayed in the tunnel that connects the House offices with the Capitol building once pandemic ramifications can be worked out.

    Locally, there were 45 submissions from nine different high schools judged by local artists, students, teachers and muralists.

    The Congressional Art Competition began in 1982 to provide an opportunity for Congress members to encourage and recognize the artistic talents of young constituents. Since then, hundreds of thousands of high school students have been involved.

    Cárdenas announced local winners Saturday during a virtual art show.

    “I think the reason why we see so much talent over and over (in my district) is because these young people have a heart, a want and will to express,” he said. “A lot of them are really shy in other ways but when it comes to their art, they shine and I love it and the pandemic or no pandemic I want to be sure people know no matter what is going on they are on our minds, we care about them, we love them and we love to see them express themselves and that’s one of the reasons why I love art is because it’s a form of expression.”

    Jess Perry-Martin has been Kathia’s visual arts teacher for the past four years and has seen her talent progress.

    “Kathia has the ability to express things from a very personal level and make them relate,” Perry-Martin said. “She often looks within herself for the stories she is telling and then because the stories are so uniquely personal to her, there’s something about them that makes them really easy to identify with.”

    Perry-Martin said Katia’s stories are about documenting particular moments in time and much of her artwork over the past four years have been about her experiences.

    “Her family is from Mexico and she has gone back and forth to Mexico many times with her family and has had some powerful experiences there,” Perry-Martin said. “A lot of her art documents her relationship with her parents and how hard they work for her and how much respect she has for them, which has been really beautiful to see.”

    Artwork by the other San Fernando Valley student runners-up will have their artwork displayed in Cárdenas’ Panorama office.

    Second place in his congressional art contest was awarded to Rokshana Bushra, an 18-year-old senior at Van Nuys High School’s medical magnet program headed to UC Berkeley this fall.

    Her piece called “Bauler Gaan” (Song of the Baul), created on a black scratch board known as scratch art, winning her a $300 Visa gift card.

    Related Articles

    Rokshana used an X-Acto knife and scratched the paper to reveal the white color on the bottom.

    “A bauler is a nomadic musician often times seen wearing white or yellow clothing,” Rokshana said. “I got this idea because I grew up in a village in Bangladesh. I remember these baulers would come to our homes sometimes and they would just play their music in a courtyard. And then when we moved to America, my father would listen to their music on You-Tube.”

    Rokshana wanted to do a piece related to the music of Bangladesh that became contest worthy.

    “I thought of doing a bauler, because I just love how their music feels so organic,” she said. “I have memories of listening to their songs and it’s very nostalgic which is why I wanted to create that memory in my art.”

    She came to America when she was four years old traveling from New York and eventually to California via a lottery system.

    This was her second art contest entry and last month she competed in the regional Muslin Interscholastic Tournament, the theme of which was community and healing, and she grabbed first prize for a digital art piece.

    Art, for her, is a hobby. In college she wants to major in integrated biology and she sees herself on the path toward solving humanitarian crises and uplifting social consciousness.

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 12:27:28 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Art New York News Education Congress California Mexico Government America Sport Soccer Washington Dc House Community Bangladesh UC Berkeley Madison Capitol San Fernando San Fernando Valley Katia U S Capitol Los Angeles Daily News Sylmar Cardenas Ysabel Tony Cárdenas Van Nuys High School Sarah Reingewirtz San Fernando Valley LA Perry Martin Coronavirus Los Angeles Things Kathia Hernandez Kathia Cesar E Chavez Learning Academy Panorama City Kathia Rokshana Bushra Bauler Gaan Song Geraldine Suniga Los Angeles ' Otis College of Art Jess Perry Martin Rokshana Bushra Bauler Gaan Song of the Baul Hollywood Palladium Things Rokshana
    Rick Steves Tells the Story of Fascism’s Rise & Fall in Germany http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OpenCulture/~3/NGcH8Ybb--4/rick-steves-tells-the-story-of-fascisms-rise-fall-in-germany.html

    “Healthy, vigorous, respectable: everyone’s favorite uncle.” How many of us hear these words and think of that most beloved of all American travel-television personalities, Rick Steves? Indeed, in the video above they’re spoken by Steves, though to describe a figure very different from himself: Adolf Hitler, who convinced his people not to tour Europe but to invade it, sparking the deadliest conflict of all time. How and why this happened has been a historical question written about perhaps more voluminously than any other. But the Stevesian method of understanding demands first-hand experience of Germany, the land in which the Nazi party came to power.

    Hence “Germany’s Fascist Story,” a 2020 episode of Rick Steves’ Europe whose itinerary includes such destinations as Nuremberg, site of the eponymous Nazi rallies; Hitler’s mountain retreat in Berchtesgaden; the Gestapo and SS headquarters in Berlin. We’re a long way indeed from Steves’ usual circuit of cathedrals, markets, and bed-and-breakfasts.

    Enriched with the historical footage and the reflections of German interviewees, this travelogue explains the rise in the 1930s and fall in the 1940s of a powerful European strain of fascism. This manifested in popular capitulation to race-based, nationalistic, and ultimately totalitarian state power, not just in Germany but other countries also once regarded as the center of European civilization.

    We all know how World War II ended, and the blue-jeaned Steves sums up the relevant chapter of the story while standing atop the underground bunker in which Hitler killed himself. But such a defeat can never truly be considered final, an idea that underlies the continuing encouragement of tourism to places like Berlin’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe and the concentration camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau, which figures briefly into this episode despite being located in Poland. As any dedicated “Ricknick” knows, the pursuit of any given cultural or historical interest inevitably leads the traveler through a variety of lands. Hence a project like The Story of Fascism, Steves’ hourlong documentary on that ideology’s traces as found all throughout his favorite continent. As he himself has put it, travel is a political act — and it’s one necessary to understanding both the politics you like and the politics you don’t.

    For those interested in how Steves built his travel empire, we’d recommend listening to Guy Raz’s lengthy interview with Steves, one episode in his How I Built This podcast.

    Related Content:

    The Story of Fascism: Rick Steves’ Documentary Helps Us Learn from the Hard Lessons of the 20th Century

    Rick Steves’ Europe: Binge Watch 9 Seasons of America’s Favorite Traveler Free Online

    20 Lessons from the 20th Century About How to Defend Democracy from Authoritarianism, According to Yale Historian Timothy Snyder

    How Did Hitler Rise to Power? : New TED-ED Animation Provides a Case Study in How Fascists Get Democratically Elected

    Umberto Eco Makes a List of the 14 Common Features of Fascism

    Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities, language, and culture. His projects include the Substack newsletter Books on Cities, the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

    Rick Steves Tells the Story of Fascism’s Rise & Fall in Germany is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 10:00:58 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Travel Facebook Europe Politics Television College Germany Berlin America History Poland Nuremberg Hitler Seoul Adolf Hitler Rick Steves Auschwitz Birkenau Steves Gestapo Guy Raz Colin Marshall Berchtesgaden 21st Century Los Angeles Favorite Traveler Free Online
    Watch a Masterpiece Emerge from a Solid Block of Stone http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OpenCulture/~3/z-Onh_iBCJ0/watch-a-masterpiece-emerge-from-a-solid-block-of-stone.html

    As a younger person, I became enthralled with the art-historical novels of Irving Stone, especially The Agony and the Ecstasy, his fictionalized biography of Michelangelo. Few books live up to their title so well — Stone’s Michelangelo is a tumult of passion and pain, a Romantic hero tailor-made for those who believe artistic creation transcends almost any other act. Stone describes Michelangelo’s sculpture emerging from the marble fully-formed in a creation imbued with so much sexual energy, some passages may need adult supervision:

    It was like penetrating deep into white marble with the pounding live thrust of his chisel beating upward through the warm living marble with one ”Go!”, his whole body behind the heavy hammer, penetrating through ever deeper and deeper furrows of soft yielding living substance until he had reached the explosive climax, and all of his fluid strength, love, passion, desire had been poured into the nascent form, and the marble block, made to love the hand of the true sculptor, and responded, giving of its inner heat and substance and fluid form, until at last the sculptor and the marble had totally coalesced, so deeply penetrating and infusing each other that they had become one, marble and man and organic unity, each fulfilling the other in the greatest act of art and love known to the human species. 

    Whether or not you’re moved by Stone’s prose, you have to admit, it does make sculpting sound enormously appealing. For a much less masculine take on what it’s like to carve a figure from a solid block of stone, see the National Geographic short film above, in which a three-dimensional portrait comes alive in the hands of stone carver Anna Rubincam.

    This is a labor of love, but it is also one of careful preparation. Rubincam “begins her process by measuring and sketching the features of a live model,” the film’s YouTube page notes. “From there, she creates a clay version before moving on to carefully chisel the piece out of stone.” The entire process took three weeks.

    Is there room for agony and ecstasy amidst the measurements? Indeed. “I always feel that you have to be a bit mad to become a stone carver,” says Rubincam, acknowledging that “this isn’t the Renaissance anymore. Stone isn’t a primary building material anymore. Why would anyone go into a profession” like this one? Rubincam’s answer — “there just wasn’t any other option” — cannot help but bring to mind the most popular quote from Stone’s novel: “One should not become an artist because he can, but because he must. It is only for those who would be miserable without it.”

    Related Content: 

    Brâncu?i Captures His Sculpture & Life on Film: Watch Rare Footage Shot Between 1923-1939

    Alexander Calder’s Archive Goes Online: Explore 1400 Works of Art by the Modernist Sculptor

    3D Print 18,000 Famous Sculptures, Statues & Artworks: Rodin’s Thinker, Michelangelo’s David & More

    Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

    Watch a Masterpiece Emerge from a Solid Block of Stone is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 10:00:47 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Art Facebook College Rodin Alexander Calder Michelangelo Stone Durham NC Follow Irving Stone Anna Rubincam David More Josh Jones Rubincam Solid Block of Stone
    Weekend Sales: 90% off Nasty Gal, 20% off Forever 21, 50% off ASOS, & More http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/collegefashion/~3/VIy-qbHI_hg/ Here's where to save on beauty and fashion this weekend. ]]> Fri, 14 May 2021 09:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Deals Shopping College Asos The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain’s Headbanging Cover of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OpenCulture/~3/kWcmuOna6jk/the-ukulele-orchestra-of-great-britains-headbanging-cover-of-nirvanas-smells-like-teen-spirit.html

    Smells Like Teen Spirit is an unusual anthem because it refuses the role of the anthem. It’s perfect for the generation it represented because this was a cohort that was so ambivalent about any traditional values [or] conventional success. — music critic Ann Powers 

    The screaming existential angst of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” ensured that Nirvana would define, transcend, and outlast the 90s grunge scene.

    The song was an instant hit. Here’s a description from someone who was present at the small Seattle club O.K Hotel for its first live performance:

    They started playing the new song and people erupted. We were being slimed on by shirtless guys, just moshing. My friend Susan started hyperventilating, she thought it was so good: ‘I can’t, gasp, believe what they just played!’ It was just instantaneous; it was crazy.

    “Smells Like Teen Spirit” was unreconstituted rock bliss to us…

    …and perhaps not the most natural fit for a ukulele cover?

    On the other hand, what better instrument for those “ambivalent about conventional success” than the ukulele?

    The Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain‘s cover is as intentionally silly as the band itself, but also manages to convey some of the original’s DGAF attitude.

    That’s quite an accomplishment for a seated row of formally dressed, middle aged musicians, strumming in unison on an instrument anyone can play… but few can play well.

    The ukulele has become cool in certain circles, but remains inextricably linked to Tiny Tim tiptoeing through the tulips, and a million fumbling summer camp recreations of Jake Shimabukuro’s gentle Hawaiian “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.”

    Orchestra founder Peter Brooke Turner‘s tribute to lead vocalist Kurt Cobain helps nudge the needle  past pure novelty into the realm of credibility, or at least a sophisticated understanding of all the ways in which the original works.

    Plus, his “yeah” at 1:52 transcends the era of flannels, harkening to a time when the unconflicted preening rock god reigned supreme. (We should note that he serves plenty of ham alongside that sausage.)

    Best of all is David Suich‘s enthusiastic headbanging. Clearly a fellow who enjoys putting his long hair in service of his art! (We refer you to the Ukulele Orchestra’s interpretation of AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell.” below…)

    Related Content: 

    The First Live Performance of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” (1991)

    Seriously Awesome Ukulele Covers of “Sultans of Swing,” “Sweet Child O’ Mine,” “Thunderstruck,” and “Smells Like Teen Spirit”

    How Nirvana’s Iconic “Smells Like Teen Spirit” Came to Be: An Animated Video Narrated by T-Bone Burnett Tells the True Story

    1,000 Musicians Play Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” Live, at the Same Time

    Ayun Halliday is an author, illustrator, theater maker and Chief Primatologist of the East Village Inky zine.  Follow her @AyunHalliday.

    The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain’s Headbanging Cover of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 04:00:28 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Music Comedy College Seattle Ac Dc Kurt Cobain Susan Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain Jake Shimabukuro Ann Powers Ayun Halliday Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain Peter Brooke Turner David Suich Ukulele Orchestra
    Discover Ibn Sina (Avicenna), a Missing Pixel in Your Image of Philosophy: Partially Examined Life Episode #267 Featuring Peter Adamson http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OpenCulture/~3/otDCTxczbZI/discover-ibn-sina-avicenna.html

    https://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/secure/partiallyexaminedlife/PEL_ep_267pt1_3-21-21.mp3

    Most American students in philosophy live on a diet of ancient Greek philosophy on the one hand, and then “modern” philosophy, which starts around the time of Descartes (the 17th century), with numerous schools and approaches spilling into the present day. If you get anything from between those ancient days and modernity, it’s probably some churchmen, i.e. Augustine (from the 4th century) and Thomas Aquinas (the 13th century), with perhaps a few Romans thrown in there and (if you’re Jewish) Maimonides (12th century).

    But a key part of this lineage was the Eastward turn that the great works of Greek and Roman philosophy took during the so-called Dark Ages, when they were preserved and copied in the Islamic world, and this period produced a wealth of philosophy including two figures who became influential enough in the West that their names were Latinized: Ibn S?n? (980-1037 C.E.) and Ibn Rushd, a.k.a. Averroes (1126-1198). Aquinas was very familiar with these figures and incorporated them into his influential works, and in the case of Ibn Sina, at least, important figures like John Locke had definitely known at least about his views, if not his actual works.

    On the Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast, which has been going for 13 years now, we range widely over the history of philosophy but had not actually cracked the Islamic world. Luckily, Ibn S?n? is one of the favorite philosophers of one of our favorite guests, Peter Adamson of King’s College London. Peter runs his own podcast, The History of Philosophy (Without Any Gaps), which as the name implies, covers Medieval philosophy with admirable thoroughness, covering not only Ibn S?n? and Ibn Rushd, but also figures like al-R?z?, al-F?r?b?, Al-Ghaz?l?, and many others.

    Peter was good enough to recommend some readings to introduce us and our listeners to this figure, some of which he actually wrote. Because of the volume, redundancy, and style of Ibn S?n?’s writings, some sort of guide to collect and to some degree explain passages is essential for getting a handle on this idiosyncratic and brilliant thinker. He wrote at least three different versions of his all-encompassing system, which was influenced by and meant to supplant Aristotle’s. In addition to philosophical/theological topics, it included mathematics, science, psychology, and more. So instead of trying to read a whole work covering all that, it makes more sense to pick individual topics and then look at the various formulations he gave about these.

    Our two topics for this discussion were a peculiar argument for the existence of God — with important implications for talking about metaphysics more generally — and an argument for the immateriality of the soul, which likewise tells us a lot about the way that Ibn S?n? thought about knowledge and its relation to the world.

    The argument for the existence of God was later called by Thomas Aquinas “the argument from contingency.” It posits that things in the world don’t simply exist, but that they require something else to support their existence. This isn’t a cause is the chronological sense that we talk about it: a prior event that gave rise to the thing. Rather, the material components of something in a certain arrangement make it continue to exist as that thing right now; for example, a house exists because its component wood parts exist, with nails and such holding them in place. And the wood in turn has its character because of its physical/chemical components, etc. If these component causes weren’t in place, the thing would not exist; the thing is thus “contingent,” meaning it might well not have existed were it not for those causes.

    This picture of the universe thus includes a giant network of causality, but does that network itself rest on anything? According to Ibn S?n?, there must be something that is not contingent that holds everything else up. But is this thing God (in the sense that a good Muslim of his time would recognize it)? Ibn S?n? then has a long series of arguments to show one by one that just by being “the necessary being,” this entity also must be unique, must be all-powerful, generous, and all the other things one would expect God to be.

    The argument for the immortality of the soul is perhaps Ibn S?n?’s most famous argument, often called the flying or floating man argument. It’s a thought experiment whereby you imagine you’ve just been created, but fully mature, so you can think, but with no memory, and your senses are inoperable. You can’t even feel gravity or the ground under your feet (thus the “flying” part). According to Ibn S?n?, you would still in such a situation know that you exist. Since your apprehension of self did not include any part of your body (you couldn’t feel your body at all), that is supposed to prove that your body is not an essential part of what you are.

    Ibn S?n? thought this argument definitive because of his theory of knowledge by which if you know anything at all, then you know about the essential components of that thing. If you know what a triangle is, you know that it’s an abstract geometrical figure with three straight sides. If you know what a horse is, you know that it’s a biological animal with a particular character that you can identify. And to know what you are essentially, you only need know that feeling of your own mind; anything else about that mind being associated with a particular body that lives in a particular part of the world and is just knowledge of contingent, relational facts about yourself.

    PEL hosts Mark Linsenmayer and Dylan Casey grapple in detail with Peter about these arguments, both on this recording and on a second part of the discussion for those that want to hear more. To read more about these arguments and get the citations to the texts we read for this discussion, see the essay for this episode at partiallyexaminedlife.com. The History of Philosophy podcast also features four monologues and an interview about Ibn S?n?. Don’t let this gap in your knowledge of major figures in intellectual history remain unfilled!

    Mark Linsenmayer is the host of the Partially Examined Life, Pretty Much Pop, and Nakedly Examined Music podcasts. He is a writer and musician working out of Madison, Wisconsin. Read more Open Culture posts about The Partially Examined Life.

    Image by Solomon Grundy.

    Discover Ibn Sina (Avicenna), a Missing Pixel in Your Image of Philosophy: Partially Examined Life Episode #267 Featuring Peter Adamson is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

    ]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 03:01:18 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Podcasts College Religion Philosophy Aristotle Peter King 's College Thomas Aquinas John Locke Ibn Rushd Augustine Aquinas Ibn Sina Peter Adamson Ibn Sina Avicenna Mark Linsenmayer Dylan Casey Jewish Maimonides London Peter Ibn S?n Solomon Grundy Discover Ibn Sina Avicenna
    ‘Hosnia had dreams’: grief in Kabul as girls’ school targeted https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/may/14/hazara-community-grief-kabul-girls-school-targeted-bombs Hazara community in mourning but defiant after more than 60 people killed in school bomb blasts


    Latifa and Hosnia had been sharing a wooden bench in their classroom at Kabul’s Sayed Al-Shuhada school for the past three years.

    When Latifa transferred to Sayed Al-Shuhada, the two girls were immediately drawn to each other and became best friends, always together in their free time, studying side by side, walking home together after school. They found comfort in each other’s presence; support in a place that has never been easy for girls and women.

    Continue reading...]]>
    Fri, 14 May 2021 02:00:50 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Education Islamic State Religion Women Life and style World news Afghanistan Taliban South and Central Asia Global development Kabul Latifa Women's rights and gender equality Hosnia Sayed Al Shuhada
    Group calls on LAUSD officials to adopt ‘racially just’ budget https://www.dailynews.com/2021/05/13/group-calls-on-lausd-officials-to-adopt-racially-just-budget/
  • Eloisa Galindo, A LAUSD parent speaks along with other parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A man holds up a sign as parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Eloisa Galindo, A LAUSD parent speaks along with other parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A man holds a sign as parents, students, teachers and community members speak during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Jan Williams a LAUSA parent and leader of Reclaim Our Schools LA speaks along with other parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Maleeyah Frazier, a sophomore at Hamilton High School speaks along with other parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A woman holds up a sign as parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAUSa parent Elizabeth Hernandez speaks along with other parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A large banner as parents, students, teachers and community members during a press conference and rally to call on the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund what they’re calling a “safe and racially just” pandemic recovery. With LAUSD set to receive more than $1.5B for pandemic recovery, speakers will outline their proposal for transforming public schools in front of the LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles on Thursday, May 13, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Show Caption of

    Expand

     

    LOS ANGELES >> About 30 parents, students, educators and community activists gathered outside the Los Angeles Unified School District’s headquarters on Thursday, May 13, demanding the school board adopt a “safe and racially just” budget for the 2021-22 school year and beyond to meet the needs of students of color who have historically been underserved.

    With the nation’s second-largest K-12 system poised to receive an estimated $5.2 billion in COVID-19 relief aid, members of Reclaim Our Schools LA — a group aligned with the teachers union — called on district officials to use the money to transform public education and to address the impacts wrought by decades of underfunding schools.

    Their demands come at a time when students and families are starting to emerge from the pandemic and as society faces a racial reckoning.

    It also comes just weeks before the school board is scheduled to adopt a budget for the upcoming fiscal year. Earlier this week, the board decided to more than double the amount of money the district will distribute to schools this coming year through an equity-based funding formula based on student needs.

    On Thursday, Reclaim Our Schools announced it was kicking off a budget campaign, as members called for an additional $200 million to be allocated to support the district’s Black Student Achievement Plan. The Board of Education had allocated $36.5 million to this initiative earlier this year, which will provide resources to 53 low-performing schools with high concentrations of Black students.

    “We know we need a transformation of our public schools,” Joseph Williams, director of operations and campaigns at Students Deserve, one of several groups that make up the Reclaim Our Schools coalition, said during a news conference.

    “We’re here advocating for a safe and racially just reopening (of schools) … and we are here demanding that they meet the needs of our students, of our parents, of our educators, of our community members,” he said.

    Coalition members are demanding the district set aside funds to:

    • Pay for social workers, counselors and special education and academic supports ($350 million);
    • Reduce class sizes ($250 million);
    • Invest in technology and Internet services to address the digital divide ($140 million);
    • Provide small-group tutoring, Saturday school, college and career readiness programs and other learning opportunities ($180 million); and
    • Invest in summer school, child care and enrichment activities ($120 million).

    Additionally, group members want the district to hire enough nurses so there is one at each campus and to continue to invest in community schools by adding 10 such schools each of the next three years. Community schools provide wraparound services such as health programs and other resources to students and families that go beyond meeting their academic needs.

    Furthermore, Reclaim Our Schools is calling on the district to convert vacant or underutilized district property into housing for low-income families.

    Group members also continued to push for the complete elimination of the district’s police department, following last year’s advocacy which resulted in the school board slashing $25 million from the department’s budget.

    Months later, the board voted to redirect the $25 million to support Black students in LAUSD and removed officers so that they’re no longer stationed permanently at schools. Their presence on campus made students of color feel targeted, say those who want the department completely defunded. Some students claim they have been the victim of or witness to random searches by school police or have seen officers use pepper spray.

    “We need care, not cops,” said Maleeyah Frazier, a 10th grader at Hamilton High. “Instead of police and handcuffs, Black students need counselors, mental health support and programs with our futures in mind.”

    Related Articles

    Rob Taylor, president of the Los Angeles School Police Management Association, on Thursday called the actions the board has taken to cut the police department’s budget and to reassign officers off-campus as a “tragic misstep.”

    He insisted that students who may have had traumatic run-ins with officers likely dealt with other law enforcement agencies, not school police, and that a school district has the responsibility to educate young people to understand the role of police rather than remove opportunities for students to engage with officers.

    “We should be teaching them how to interface with (an officer),” he said. “What better way to do that than to have your own police department?”

    ]]>
    Thu, 13 May 2021 22:45:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Budget News Education Cdc La Police Los Angeles Sport Soccer Coalition Long Beach Lausd Chatsworth Social Justice Black Board of Education St Mary LA County Dignity Health Los Angeles Unified School District LA City Council Rob Taylor Joseph Williams Hamilton High School Elizabeth Hernandez Top Stories LADN Keith Birmingham Pasadena Star News SCNG Keith Birmingham Pasadena Star News Keith Birmingham Pasadena Star Top Stories Breeze Hamilton High Law-enforcement Coronavirus Eloisa Galindo Keith Birmingham Pasadena Star News SCNG Parents LAUSA SCNG LAUSa Maleeyah Frazier Los Angeles School Police Management Association
    Who Has Potential? For Many White Men, It’s Often Other White Men https://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/who-has-potential-for-white-men-its-usually-other-white-men?cid=wk-rss [Author: by Dina Gerdeman]

    ]]>
    Thu, 13 May 2021 19:16:54 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs College Dina Gerdeman by Dina Gerdeman Robin Ely
    Three students sue coding bootcamp Lambda School alleging false advertising and financial shenanigans http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/cGIueg8scVo/ Lambda School has attracted a lot of attention, and raised some $130 million in venture funding from an impressive list of investors, for its novel approach to coding education: offering six-month virtual computer science courses for $30,000, with the option of paying for the courses in installments based on a sliding scale that only kicks in after you land a job that makes at least $50,000.

    But it turns out that the startup is attracting a a lot of controversy, too. In the latest development, three students have filed lawsuits against the company in California, claiming misleading financial and educational practices.

    The suits — which are being brought by the non-profit National Student Legal Defense Network on behalf of Linh Nguyen, Heather Nye and Jonathan Stickrod — go back to a period of between 2018 and 2020, and they focus on four basic claims.

    First, that Lambda School falsified and misrepresented job placement rates. Second, that Lambda School misrepresented the true nature of its financial interest in student success (specifically, there are question marks over how Lambda handles its ISA contracts and whether it benefits from those). Third, that it misrepresented and concealed a regulatory dispute in California that required the school to cease operations. And fourth, that it enrolled and provided educational services and signed ISA contracts in violation of that order.

    The filings for the three cases are embedded below.

    The three students are all currently on the hook for their Lambda tuitions, which they opted to pay back in installments by way of the school’s income share agreement (ISA) model. The suits do not disclose how much the three individuals are seeking in damages.

    For those who have been following news of Lambda School over the last several years, the claims detailed in the suit will sound familiar. The inflated job placement rates; and the fact that it wasn’t legally allowed to operate, yet was still accepting students, signing ISA deals, and teaching, for example, were all reported over that period of time, along with other criticisms about how CEO and founder Austen Allred, a self-proclaimed “growth hacker“, leveraged his and Lambda’s other Twitter accounts to hype up the school.

    Some of the issues that are raised in the lawsuits have also been resolved since then. For example, the prominent display of over 80% of students finding jobs can no longer be found on the Lambda site, and in California you no longer get an ISA but a retail installment contract (similar but different). But as is the way of litigation, lawsuits based on past issues from people who were impacted by them when they were still active, are, in many ways, the next logical, unsurprising step.

    There is also a specific strategy behind these three cases being filed the same time.

    Alex Elson, the co-founder of the National Student Legal Defense Network, told TechCrunch in an interview that the ISA contracts that students sign at Lambda have arbitration clauses that preclude students from arbitrating against Lambda in groups, ie class action suits. The idea is that by bringing three nearly identical individual cases simultaneously against the school, the defendants can both expose the widespread practices of Lambda, and pave the way for broader relief for others similarly impacted. (The Student Defense Network’s co-counsel in the case is CalebAndonian PLLC and Cotchett Pitre & McCarthy LLP.)

    Originally incubated at Y Combinator and backed by a long list of investors that include GV (Google Ventures), Gigafactory (ex-Founders Fund partners), GGV, and more, Lambda School has had a tough time of it in the last year, a period that has seen the Covid-19 pandemic have a disproportionate and impact on some parts of the economy but not others.

    Edtech has largely been seen as a huge growth area, but that may not have been the case for edtech startups specifically focused on vocational, technology jobs, given that the tech world has seen a lot of hiring freezes, and layoffs, as companies sought to keep down costs in the face of the unknown.

    Lambda went through two sets of layoffs in the space of a year, and it seems that in one of them it also changed its teaching model, doing away with TLs (team leads), paid mentors who helped assess students, and instead moved to a model where students mentored each other and assessed themselves. It has also changed the courses themselves, shortening them to six months from their original nine- and 18-month formats — but not reducing the prices for those courses.

    And it’s not quite past all of its regulatory issues, either.

    Just two weeks ago, California’s Department of Financial Protection and Innovation (DFPI) announced a settlement with the school over the language that it uses in financing contracts with students.

    Specifically, the DFPI took issue with how it said Lambda falsely described its financial arrangement with students as a “qualified educational loan… subject to the limitations on dischargeability contained in… the United States Bankruptcy Code.” (Educational loans are usually exempt from bankruptcy discharge — when a debtor is not required to pay a debt because that debtor is bankrupt, it’s a bankruptcy discharge; typically educational loans are not covered by this, so the issue here was the Lambda School was claiming that even if a student files for bankruptcy that student would still have to pay back Lambda.)

    “The language violates the new California Consumer Financial Protection Law (CCFPL), which took effect this year and prohibits companies from engaging in practices that are unlawful, unfair, deceptive, or abusive,” the DFPI noted.

    The settlement requires Lambda to notify students that the bankruptcy dischargeability provision language is not accurate; retain a third party to review the terms of the school’s finance contract to ensure that it complies with all applicable laws; and undergo a review of its marketing materials to ensure that the information is accurate and not likely to mislead consumers.

    You could say that all of these issues are the table stakes of being a startup and trying something new: the school is moving fast, breaking things, and iterating along the way to figure it all out. But for a service that can leave students liable for paying back $30,000, it’s a big price for others to pay when those things don’t quite work as advertised.

    Still, despite all that, Lambda also continues to have a lot of supporters and partners. Just last month, for example, it announced a new backend engineering program that it developed with Amazon. And while it doesn’t seem guaranteed taking the problem will get you an instant open door to a job with the tech giant, it’s a sign of where there remains interesting value in the idea.

    We have also reached out to the company’s CEO and founder Austen Allred, and the company itself, for a response and we will update this post as we learn more.

    Updated with Lambda’s response: with the following statement:

    Per policy, we don’t speak about individual student or alumni situations in detail publicly, but we’re of course happy to review matters directly and will review any cases that are filed. In general, though, for any student’s ISA payments to be activated, they would have first signed an ISA contract and subsequently landed a role leveraging skills learned at Lambda School that pays $50K or more in salary.

    Our mission is to de-risk education and expand access to higher paying jobs. For that reason, our ISAs (and RICs in California) are designed with policies that are as flexible and student-centric as possible. That includes our purposely generous proration refund and proration policy for students who decide to leave the program, regardless of tuition payment method. Additionally, if an alumnus loses their job, salary, or is making under $50K a year, their payments are immediately paused. ISAs expire completely after 24 payments or 60 deferred months, even if the total paid is less than $30,000.

    Our number one priority is student success. We stand behind the quality of our instructors and our proven student outcomes (which we go into more detail about here and in our outcomes reporting). While we will always strive for our students and alumni to have a positive experience and achieve their career goals, we’re also willing to work with individuals and review cases to come to a resolution.

    The suits are below:

    View this document on Scribd
    View this document on Scribd
    View this document on Scribd

    ]]>
    Thu, 13 May 2021 17:59:56 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Amazon Lawsuit Education Developer California Tech United States Lambda Isa Edtech Cotchett Pitre McCarthy Austen Allred Lambda School National Student Legal Defense Network DFPI California Consumer Financial Protection Law CCFPL Linh Nguyen Heather Nye Jonathan Stickrod Alex Elson CalebAndonian PLLC GV Google Ventures Gigafactory ex Founders Fund
    Hautelinks: Summer Outfit Ideas, Green Beauty Picks, Bennifer, & More http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/collegefashion/~3/f7w4xoomuS0/ Here's what we're reading on the internet right now.

    VIEW THE POST

    ]]>
    Thu, 13 May 2021 16:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News College
    The 13 best places to learn how to code online, including Codecademy, Udacity, and Coursera http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/5BUQKCrTyb4/where-to-learn-how-to-code-online If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

    Computer Science Generic 4x3

    iStock; Gilbert Espinoza/Business Insider

    Whether you're a beginner or an advanced coder, the internet has plenty of options to help you develop and deepen your skillsets - often completely for free.

    Below, you'll find 13 sites that offer flexible, affordable resources for learning how to code. You can take advantage of MIT's OpenCourseWare (which makes MIT course content available to the public), or earn a Google IT Automation with Python professional certificate for $49 a month.

    If you're just starting out in a field, it may be worth looking at affordable or free introductory courses to get a sense of what programming language you'd like to pursue before investing money and time into a degree or professional certificate. It's also worth looking into any scholarships or financial aid learning sites like Codecademy, edX or Coursera may offer.

    13 sites that will help you learn how to code online: Codecademy Codecademy Learn To Code 4x3

    Code Academy; Alyssa Powell/Business Insider

    Free for basic access, $20 a month for Pro

    Codecademy serves about 45 million students, most of them in the 18-36 age group and looking to build new career skills. Students can access interactive basic courses for free, or pay $20 per month for a Pro subscription that includes perks like step-by-step guidance, peer support, and real-world projects.

    Codecademy's content is built in-house by a small team with engagement in mind — learners earn badges and get real-time feedback as they interact with classes. You can browse its catalog of thousands of hours of instruction by subject, like programming and data science, or by language, like HTML & CSS and Python.

    Codecademy also has Career Paths, structured curriculum roadmaps, that teach in-demand core skills in subjects like computer science and web development. Additionally, students can try Skill Paths, which are focused on more specialized, shorter-term goals. You can take a quiz here if you're not sure where you should start. 

     

    freeCodeCamp Screen Shot 2020 05 07 at 5.26.30 PM

    freeCodeCamp/Mara Leighton

    Free

    freeCodeCamp is a non-profit designed to make learning web development 100% free and to teach students by building projects and completing challenges. It offers more than 6,000 tutorials and has a free 2,000-hour curriculum. Most of its certifications take around 300 hours to complete, according to the organization. 

    It may be especially useful for beginners and is sometimes incorporated into high school, college, and adult education coursework. Its LinkedIn alumni page counts more than 50,000 alumni working everywhere from Amazon to IBM and Microsoft.

     

    Coursera Coursera E Learning 4x3

    Coursera; Alyssa Powell/Business Insider

    Free to audit most courses, paid certificates, and advanced degrees

    Coursera has courses, MasterTracks, Specializations, professional certificates, and guided projects for coding offered from notable universities like Duke, Stanford, and Princeton and companies like IBM and Google

    There's something for both beginners and advanced learners, and while courses can typically be audited for free, certificates and graded work are usually behind a paywall. 

    Specializations and professional certificates typically have a free seven-day trial and are billed monthly once the trial ends — so the faster you complete the program, the cheaper it will be. (Note: they can take anywhere from a few months to more than a year to finish and start around $39/month). Coursera's MasterTrack options tend to be more costly — usually at least a few thousand dollars. 

    Coursera also has an annual $399 subscription, Coursera Plus, that includes access to 90% of the site and may end up being a cheaper option — just make sure your desired courses are included.  

    edX EDX E Learning 4x3

    edX; Alyssa Powell/Business Insider

    Free to audit most courses, paid certificates, and advanced degrees

    edX was founded by MIT and Harvard and offers free and affordable online classes, professional certificates, MicroMasters programs, and Master's degrees from top universities like Harvard and Dartmouth and institutions like Microsoft and IBM

    Most edX courses can be audited for free, with an optional certificate of completion costing anywhere from $39-$99. Professional certificates can run around a few hundred dollars, while MicroMasters and master's degrees tend to be a few thousand dollars. 

    MIT OpenCourseWare Screen Shot 2020 05 07 at 4.55.42 PM

    MIT OpenCourseWare/Mara Leighton

    Free

    MIT OpenCourseWare is MIT's initiative to publish virtually all MIT course content — from its graduate and undergraduate level courses — online for free to increase accessibility. While you can find video lectures and helpful simulations, the MIT OpenCourseWare is like many free online learning tools: best for the sake of learning, but not a degree-granting or credit-bearing program.

    Udemy Udemy E learning 4x3

    Udemy; Alyssa Powell/Insider

    Courses start at $10

    Udemy has thousands of affordable courses. You can enroll in coding courses for as little as $10-$12 during sales. The site has over 150,000 courses available in over 65 languages and runs frequent discounts. It also has over 500 free online courses, some of them related to coding.

    Udacity Udacity E Learning 4x3

    Udacity; Alyssa Powell/Insider

    Free 1-month trial; $399 per month after

    Udacity offers courses that cover data science, machine learning, AI, cloud computing, and autonomous systems that range in experience level and duration. It carries about 190 free courses that don't offer certification, as well as what it calls "Nanodegree programs" that are typically a few hundred dollars and include certificates, projects, mentor support, career services, and more. 

    Udacity was founded after Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig, two Stanford instructors, decided to offer their "Introduction to Artificial Intelligence" course for free online and saw a reported 160,000 enrollments in more than 90 countries.

    Khan Academy Screen Shot 2020 05 07 at 4.53.16 PM

    Khan Academy/Mara Leighton

    Free

    Khan Academy is entirely free. It has exercises and short video-based lessons created by experts that are typically geared towards K-12 through early college students, teachers, and parents.  

    It's also partnered with NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT on specialized content.

    Educative Screen Shot 2020 05 07 at 5.24.18 PM

    Educative/Mara Leighton

    Some free courses

    Educative has text-based courses and learning tracks with in-browser code playgrounds to practice as you go.

    You'll find some free courses, but most are paid, with individual courses typically going for $19-$79. Learning tracks, which combine courses on a topic to help you master a skillset like DevOps for Developers or Python for Programmers, are usually $39-$470. You can also subscribe and pay $199 for the year or $59/month for unlimited access. 

    LinkedIn Learning LinkedIn 4x3

    LinkedIn; Insider

    Free one-month trial, $29.99/month or $240/year after

    LinkedIn Learning offers over 16,000 courses that vary in price and length, but most take under four hours. Learners can search the site by industry-specific subjects, software, or learning paths that group related courses to master a skill. 

    It comes with a free one-month trial, with a subscription costing $29.99 a month or $240 a year after the trial ends. LinkedIn also frequently offers free courses around skills that are in high demand, such as Python or machine learning.

    Pluralsight Screen Shot 2020 05 07 at 5.18.21 PM

    Pluralsight/Mara Leighton

    Free trial, $29/month or $199/year for a basic subscription

    Pluralsight offers thousands of courses, paths (which contain multiple courses), and assessments that can help you determine gaps and strengths to make your learning plan more efficient. The courses are created by experts covering software development, IT ops, cybersecurity, Python, JavaScript, and web development, and students can enroll in path options covering JavaScript, Angular JS, and Java

    Pluralsight offers a free trial for 10-days or 200 minutes of content (whichever comes first), and it's $29/month or $199/year afterward for access to courses, paths, and skill assessments for individuals. But you'll need a premium subscription ($299/year) for access to exams, projects, and interactive courses. 

    Treehouse Screen Shot 2020 05 07 at 5.11.22 PM

    Treehouse/Mara Leighton

    Free seven-day trial, $20/month for a basic subscription

    Treehouse offers hundreds of courses, tracks that combine related courses to teach a skill, and some months-long TechDegree programs for beginners to create a portfolio in front-end web development, Fullstack JavaScript, Python, user experience design, and PHP with Laravel. Each Treehouse course should contain videos, quizzes, brief instructions, and code exercises. You can search by topic, difficulty level, course name, or even by the instructor. 

    The site offers a free seven-day trial for any membership, but it's $20/month after for its most popular basic membership and up to $199/month for its TechDegrees. 

    Skillshare Skillshare Review 4x3

    Skillshare; Alyssa Powell/Insider

    has more than 25,000 classes taught by creators, entrepreneurs, and professionals from around the world. Classes typically have short lessons and a hands-on project for students to work on, which can be shared in class for feedback and collaboration from the community. You can search for classes by desired skills such as , , , and more.

    With a free membership, you'll get access to free classes on both the web and mobile. But for full access to all classes and offline viewing, you'll need a premium membership which is $32 billed monthly, or $13.99 monthly for an annual membership.

    Read the original article on Business Insider

    [Author: insider@insider.com (Mara Leighton)]

    ]]>
    Thu, 13 May 2021 15:07:46 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Reviews Google Amazon Codecademy Education Microsoft Stanford Trends Css Php Nasa Features Mit Artificial Intelligence Harvard Dartmouth Ibm Princeton Coursera Udacity Online Learning E-learning Udemy Sebastian Thrun Online Classes Nanodegree Peter Norvig LinkedIn Learning Career Paths MIT OpenCourseWare MIT Mara Leighton Duke Stanford IP Graphics Insider Picks 2020 Education & Personal Development (Reviews Alyssa Powell IP Roundup Education & Personal Development Gilbert Espinoza Pro Codecademy Python Codecademy Mara Leighton Free Pluralsight Pluralsight Mara Leighton Free Codecademy Code Academy Alyssa Powell Business Insider Free Alyssa Powell Insider Free LinkedIn Learning LinkedIn Treehouse Treehouse Mara Leighton Free Alyssa Powell Insider
    Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Get Digitized: Where to Read the Renaissance Man’s Manuscripts Online http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/OpenCulture/~3/ygi4z41xayk/where-to-read-leonardo-da-vincis-notebooks-online.html

    From the hand of Leonardo da Vinci came the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, among other art objects of intense reverence and even worship. But to understand the mind of Leonardo da Vinci, one must immerse oneself in his notebooks. Totaling some 13,000 pages of notes and drawings, they record something of every aspect of the Renaissance man’s intellectual and daily life: studies for artworks, designs for elegant buildings and fantastical machines, observations of the world around him, lists of his groceries and his debtors. Intending their eventual publication, Leonardo left his notebooks to his pupil Francesco Melzi, by the time of whose own death half a century later little had been done with them.

    Absent a proper steward, Leonardo’s notebooks scattered across the world. Six centuries later, their surviving pages constitute a series of codices in the possession of such entities as the Biblioteca Ambrosiana, the British Museum, the Institut de France, and Bill Gates.

    In recent years, they and their collaborating organizations have made efforts to open Leonardo’s notebooks to the world, digitizing them, translating them, and organizing them for convenient browsing on the web. Here on Open Culture, we’ve previously featured the Codex Arundel as made available to the public by the British Library, Codex Atlanticus by the Visual Agency, and the three-part Codex Forster by the Victoria & Albert Museum.

    Other collections of Leonardo’s notebooks made available to view online include the Madrid Codices at the Biblioteca Nacional de España, the Codex Trivulzianus at the Archivo Storico Civico e Biblioteca Trivulziana, and the Codex on the Flight of Birds at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. (Published as a standalone book, his Treatise on Painting is available to download at Project Gutenberg.) Even so, many of the pages Leonardo wrote haven’t yet made it to the internet, and even when they do, generations of interpretive work — well beyond reversing his “mirror writing” — will surely remain. Much as humanity is only now putting some of his inventions to the test, the full publication of his notebooks remains a work in progress. Leonardo himself would surely understand: after all, one can’t cultivate a mind like his without patience.

    Related Content:

    The Elegant Mathematics of Vitruvian Man, Leonardo da Vinci’s Most Famous Drawing: An Animated Introduction

    Download the Sublime Anatomy Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci: Available Online, or in a Great iPad App

    Leonardo da Vinci’s Bizarre Caricatures & Monster Drawings

    Leonardo da Vinci’s Handwritten Resume (1482)

    Leonardo Da Vinci’s To Do List (Circa 1490) Is Much Cooler Than Yours

    Why Did Leonardo da Vinci Write Backwards? A Look Into the Ultimate Renaissance Man’s “Mirror Writing”

    Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities, language, and culture. His projects include the Substack newsletter Books on Cities, the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

    Leonardo da Vinci’s Notebooks Get Digitized: Where to Read the Renaissance Man’s Manuscripts Online is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

    ]]>
    Thu, 13 May 2021 15:00:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Art Facebook Science College History Bill Gates Archives Seoul Da Vinci Leonardo Leonardo da Vinci Colin Marshall Biblioteca Nacional de España 21st Century Los Angeles Codex Arundel Francesco Melzi App Leonardo da Vinci Codex Forster Visual Agency Biblioteca Ambrosiana British Museum the Institut de France British Library Codex Atlanticus Victoria Albert Museum Other Madrid Codices Codex Trivulzianus Archivo Storico Civico Biblioteca Trivulziana Project Gutenberg Even Facebook Leonardo
    Avethandwa Nokhangela drowned at an Equal Education camp, and her family wants answers https://mg.co.za/education/2021-05-13-avethandwa-nokhangela-drowned-at-an-equal-education-camp-and-her-family-wants-answers/

    The family of a drowned schoolgirl says NGO Equal Education must explain why it allowed learners to swim at a dangerous beach
    with no lifeguards

    The post Avethandwa Nokhangela drowned at an Equal Education camp, and her family wants answers appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.

    ]]>
    Thu, 13 May 2021 15:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Education East London Eastern Cape Equal Education Top Six Palm Springs Resort Noncedo Madubedube Equal Education Law Centre Avethandwa Nokhangela Qonce school drowning (South Africa Xolani High School NGO Equal Education