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Office rules: Work from home vs. corporate reality https://www.dailynews.com/2021/04/18/office-rules-work-from-home-vs-corporate-reality/ The grand revolution known as working from home in sweats with pets on your lap could be one of the pandemic era’s lasting employment legacies.

I might be old and jaded, but when I hear whispers of a workplace “revolution,” my antennae of skepticism tend to pop up.

Now, desperation is often fuel for the best inspiration, but I’ll argue there’s too much pull from the “corner office” to think “WFH” — a social-media acronym for work from home — will remain widespread in the long run.

Yes, studies claim workers and employers highly value remote work. But too often “what ifs” run afoul of the wall of corporate realities and humans’ overall dislike for change.

So, as a work-from-home veteran of two-decades-plus, let me share some of my skepticism …

Boss or bottleneck?

Most senior executives are control freaks, in an endearing way.

Command and control often is a necessary workplace evil — though I’ll leave wiggle room for those extraordinary leaders and their fungible corporate cultures that adapt quickly.

Home Stretch newsletter follows real estate trends. Subscribe here!

Also, WFH objections are simply about control. How can you remotely mentor a staff? And can you really nurture a corporate culture — especially for new workers — using virtual conferencing?

And there’s a worthwhile debate swirling over collaboration and innovation and how they could be stifled by remote work.

Innies or outies?

More workers than you think are quietly rooting for a return to the office.

Start with technophobes or those lacking ideal work-from-home arrangements. Others enjoy – even thrive – in face-to-face situations. Plus, old-school workers want to be “seen” by bosses to feel “valued “ as an employee.

And what of corporate travel and seeing a partner or customer — face to face? And don’t undervalue the “social life” part of the workplace equation.

New wave or novelty?

Two words: “Zoom fatigue.”

A year away from the traditional workplace settings created an odd nostalgia for often-maligned office work. It’s understandable when “return to normalcy” comes with a deep emotional tug after a chaotic pandemic year.

In addition, now that we’ve mastered many WFH tricks, the luster of new challenges (if there was any) is wearing off.

Fact: Virtual meetings are just as tedious as those in an office.

Prediction: The cuteness of the kid or pet interrupting a virtual presentation will soon be history.

Hybrid or hell?

The dream situation is painted as a worker having both the luxury of frequent work-from-home days and office time when needed.

This is about as plausible as healthy food that also tastes great.

Such “hybrid” arrangements will add work to the boss’s plate. That’s rarely good for any innovation.

Hybrid may also become a source of scheduling confusion (at a minimum) to severe workplace drama (at worst). I could imagine supervisors tiring of the “where is (your name here) working today?” questions.

Savings or slippery slope?

We know chief financial officers love WFH because they see cost savings — less office space.

That is far too simplistic. Many of these instant corporate savings prove to contain hidden costs.

Maintaining a secure remote network increases computing expenses. Paying to fully equip home offices also trims rent savings.

And more than a few companies project diminished productivity and will factor that expense into their cost-benefit analyses.

I am reminded of when penny-pinching companies thought everything could be made overseas. They often ignored the costs of shipping, quality control and delivery uncertainties.

Plus, you know at some point the government will weigh in on this foggy math.

Laws or leashes?

Workplace abuses on both sides of the boss/employee dynamic will come from work-from-home situations.

Eventually the legal system — courts or legislation — will weigh in and alter today’s free-form system.

It starts with a simple question: How many home office expenses can either be reimbursed by the employer or written off by a taxpayer? Those decisions will have a significant impact on WFH’s financial viability.

Then there are unanswered liability questions. How they are decided will help define WFH’s future.

Think of a simple question: Does personal home insurance cover work-from-home calamities?

History or hiccup?

It took a pandemic to turn WFH from novelty to near mandate.

One of the critical benefits to the worker — big-city pay while living in remote towns — seems to be too good to be true.

I recall when corporations felt forced to end the traditional corporate pension plan. At the time, bad investment returns made pensions feel like a company liability.

Many companies made loose promises that they would, to some degree, match a worker’s 401(k) investments as some kind of reimbursement for lost retirement pensions.

A couple of decades later, how many of us are still enjoying matching contributions?

Reality or rationalization?

Corporate life usually comes down to this: Does it pencil?

Looking beyond 2021, if less office space is required, landlords will eventually cut rents. Does that alter the WFH bottom line?

And how long will the typical boss pay big-city wages for a worker who lives in a low-cost, remote community? Even if current workers enjoy this perk, companies won’t pay many remote workers those big-city wages when hiring new employees. (Yes, this benefit will be offered by “flexible” companies!)

And what happens in the next economic downturn? Are remote workers more valued as they help keep office expenses low? Or are they the first let go, you know “out of sight, out of mind?”

We are very early in this “revolution,” so be wary of bold predictions of fantastical change ahead.

Jonathan Lansner is the business columnist for the Southern California News Group. He can be reached at jlansner@scng.com

]]>
Sun, 18 Apr 2021 10:35:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Housing News Coronavirus Economy Economy Jobs Top Stories Breeze Top Stories IVDB Top Stories LADN Top Stories LBPT Top Stories OCR Top Stories PE Top Stories PSN Top Stories RDF Top Stories SGVT Top Stories Sun Top Stories WDN
Back to the office: Work from home vs. corporate reality https://www.dailynews.com/2021/04/18/office-rules-work-from-home-vs-corporate-reality/ The grand revolution known as working from home in sweats with pets on your lap could be one of the pandemic era’s lasting employment legacies.

I might be old and jaded, but when I hear whispers of a workplace “revolution,” my antennae of skepticism tend to pop up.

Now, desperation is often fuel for the best inspiration, but I’ll argue there’s too much pull from the “corner office” to think “WFH” — a social-media acronym for work from home — will remain widespread in the long run.

Yes, studies claim workers and employers highly value remote work. But too often “what ifs” run afoul of the wall of corporate realities and humans’ overall dislike for change.

So, as a work-from-home veteran of two-decades-plus, let me share some of my skepticism …

Boss or bottleneck?

Most senior executives are control freaks, in an endearing way.

Command and control often is a necessary workplace evil — though I’ll leave wiggle room for those extraordinary leaders and their fungible corporate cultures that adapt quickly.

Home Stretch newsletter follows real estate trends. Subscribe here!

Also, WFH objections are simply about control. How can you remotely mentor a staff? And can you really nurture a corporate culture — especially for new workers — using virtual conferencing?

And there’s a worthwhile debate swirling over collaboration and innovation and how they could be stifled by remote work.

Innies or outies?

More workers than you think are quietly rooting for a return to the office.

Start with technophobes or those lacking ideal work-from-home arrangements. Others enjoy – even thrive – in face-to-face situations. Plus, old-school workers want to be “seen” by bosses to feel “valued “ as an employee.

And what of corporate travel and seeing a partner or customer — face to face? And don’t undervalue the “social life” part of the workplace equation.

New wave or novelty?

Two words: “Zoom fatigue.”

A year away from the traditional workplace settings created an odd nostalgia for often-maligned office work. It’s understandable when “return to normalcy” comes with a deep emotional tug after a chaotic pandemic year.

In addition, now that we’ve mastered many WFH tricks, the luster of new challenges (if there was any) is wearing off.

Fact: Virtual meetings are just as tedious as those in an office.

Prediction: The cuteness of the kid or pet interrupting a virtual presentation will soon be history.

Hybrid or hell?

The dream situation is painted as a worker having both the luxury of frequent work-from-home days and office time when needed.

This is about as plausible as healthy food that also tastes great.

Such “hybrid” arrangements will add work to the boss’s plate. That’s rarely good for any innovation.

Hybrid may also become a source of scheduling confusion (at a minimum) to severe workplace drama (at worst). I could imagine supervisors tiring of the “where is (your name here) working today?” questions.

Savings or slippery slope?

We know chief financial officers love WFH because they see cost savings — less office space.

That is far too simplistic. Many of these instant corporate savings prove to contain hidden costs.

Maintaining a secure remote network increases computing expenses. Paying to fully equip home offices also trims rent savings.

And more than a few companies project diminished productivity and will factor that expense into their cost-benefit analyses.

I am reminded of when penny-pinching companies thought everything could be made overseas. They often ignored the costs of shipping, quality control and delivery uncertainties.

Plus, you know at some point the government will weigh in on this foggy math.

Laws or leashes?

Workplace abuses on both sides of the boss/employee dynamic will come from work-from-home situations.

Eventually the legal system — courts or legislation — will weigh in and alter today’s free-form system.

It starts with a simple question: How many home office expenses can either be reimbursed by the employer or written off by a taxpayer? Those decisions will have a significant impact on WFH’s financial viability.

Then there are unanswered liability questions. How they are decided will help define WFH’s future.

Think of a simple question: Does personal home insurance cover work-from-home calamities?

History or hiccup?

It took a pandemic to turn WFH from novelty to near mandate.

One of the critical benefits to the worker — big-city pay while living in remote towns — seems to be too good to be true.

I recall when corporations felt forced to end the traditional corporate pension plan. At the time, bad investment returns made pensions feel like a company liability.

Many companies made loose promises that they would, to some degree, match a worker’s 401(k) investments as some kind of reimbursement for lost retirement pensions.

A couple of decades later, how many of us are still enjoying matching contributions?

Reality or rationalization?

Corporate life usually comes down to this: Does it pencil?

Looking beyond 2021, if less office space is required, landlords will eventually cut rents. Does that alter the WFH bottom line?

And how long will the typical boss pay big-city wages for a worker who lives in a low-cost, remote community? Even if current workers enjoy this perk, companies won’t pay many remote workers those big-city wages when hiring new employees. (Yes, this benefit will be offered by “flexible” companies!)

And what happens in the next economic downturn? Are remote workers more valued as they help keep office expenses low? Or are they the first let go, you know “out of sight, out of mind?”

We are very early in this “revolution,” so be wary of bold predictions of fantastical change ahead.

Jonathan Lansner is the business columnist for the Southern California News Group. He can be reached at jlansner@scng.com

]]>
Sun, 18 Apr 2021 10:35:49 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Housing News Coronavirus Economy Economy Jobs Top Stories Breeze Top Stories IVDB Top Stories LADN Top Stories LBPT Top Stories OCR Top Stories PE Top Stories PSN Top Stories RDF Top Stories SGVT Top Stories Sun Top Stories WDN
Priceless Pointers for Creating a Career with Your Talent http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/Lt4UKIDwWJM/ ]]> Sun, 18 Apr 2021 05:00:55 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Discover Career Opportunities Careers Talent Career Path Options for Education Majors http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/FSYmhlC0Vc4/ ]]> Sun, 18 Apr 2021 05:00:27 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Discover Career Opportunities Careers In Education Education Attending Graduate School to Win Your First Job in Healthcare Administration http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/1GYiYU1vh4g/ ]]> Sat, 17 Apr 2021 11:00:21 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Discover Career Opportunities Healthcare Careers FSSAI Officer Director Manager Vacancy Recruitment 2021 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/sarkari-naukri/~3/1rONdL_BydQ/fssai-officer-director-manager-vacancy.html Please Click on the Title to Read Full Details.

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Sat, 17 Apr 2021 10:19:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Administration Authority CA-ICWA-Finance Delhi Director Engineer FSSAI HotJob IT(Computer Journalist Manager Marketing MBA Officer Public Relations Technical
Highly Effective, Proven Methods To Motivate Your Employees http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/eCdFjdBuKJY/ ]]> Sat, 17 Apr 2021 09:37:32 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Discover Career Opportunities Motivate Advantages of Investing in Workforce Management http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/NMz5M_x6B_k/ ]]> Sat, 17 Apr 2021 09:19:20 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Career Advice Workforce Management Biden's infrastructure plan includes massive investments in care for children and the elderly. Here's how much workers in those jobs are paid. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/OG1ADgzTKlU/how-much-care-jobs-pay-personal-care-aide-childcare-2021-4

Hispanolistic/Getty Images

  • Biden's infrastructure spending plan includes $400 billion for elderly and disabled care.
  • Insider looked at the typical pay of five different caregiving jobs.
  • Home health and personal care aides made a median salary of $27,080 in May 2020.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Caregivers, like home health aides and personal care aides, are a big component of President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan.

But many of the people responsible for caring for America's most vulnerable make less than the median annual salary of all occupations. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics program provides May 2020 data for almost 800 different detailed occupations.

Insider decided to look at five different kinds of jobs that provide care to children, disabled Americans, and the elderly to see how much these jobs typically pay.

For our set of care jobs we looked at caregivers, childcare workers, and various nurses and medical professionals who may provide basic care in addition to other responsibilities. For instance, we included licensed practical nurses whose duties range from checking blood pressure to helping the elderly or other patients eat.

The following chart highlights the median annual salaries of five different kinds of caregiving jobs:

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Four of the five occupations in the chart made less than the median annual salary of all occupations in May 2020 of $41,950.

Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses made a median annual salary of $48,820, the highest pay among the selected caregiving occupations we looked at. There were 676,440 licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses in May 2020 with a large number of these workers in nursing care facilities.

There were over 3.2 million home health and personal care aides in May 2020 with a median annual salary of $27,080 per data from BLS. BLS notes that personal care aides are sometimes referred to as caregivers or personal attendants and a lot of these workers work at patients' homes to help assist them with daily tasks.

The American Jobs Plan includes $400 billion for "expanding access to quality, affordable home- or community-based care for aging relatives and people with disabilities," according to a White House press release about The American Jobs Plan.

The press release adds that this includes "offering caregiving workers a long-overdue raise," citing that home caregivers currently make a $12 hourly wage. Insider's Patricia Kelly Yeo wrote that the $12 rate refers to home care workers of home health aides, nursing assistants, and personal care aides.

Childcare workers typically make $25,460, and 494,360 were employed in May 2020. Biden's infrastructure plan includes investing $25 billion toward upgrading childcare facilities and adding more in places that need these services.

Politico notes that the American Jobs Plan, or the first part of the infrastructure proposal, doesn't include an increase in wages for childcare workers mentioned in his campaign, but that could be included in the second part. Insider's reported that this second plan is called the American Families Plan and will focus on social infrastructure, including childcare reform.

The billions of dollars in spending aimed at improving the care economy could add millions of jobs. Insider's Juliana Kaplan wrote that the combined $775 billion for childcare, home healthcare, and residential care could create 5.3 million jobs in 18 states over a decade according to research from University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Additionally, the billions in spending would be beneficial for women in the workplace; the White House press release notes caregivers are disproportionately made up of women of color.

"These investments will help hundreds of thousands of Americans finally obtain the long-term services and support they need, while creating new jobs and offering caregiving workers a long-overdue raise, stronger benefits, and an opportunity to organize or join a union and collectively bargain," the White House said in a press release about how this plan can benefit caregivers.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Madison Hoff)]

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Sat, 17 Apr 2021 08:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Careers Economy Jobs Pay Salaries BLS BI Graphics American Jobs Plan
How Can You Tell If Your Business Is Out of Your Depth? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/HLd-74Wp82I/ ]]> Sat, 17 Apr 2021 08:14:56 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Career Advice Business Advice How to Relieve Stress and Anxiety at Work http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/R3x-T6IKAQI/ ]]> Fri, 16 Apr 2021 22:33:44 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Career Advice Anxiety at Work Stress Metro in LA County is hiring 800 drivers, other transit agencies increasing staff https://www.dailynews.com/2021/04/16/metro-in-la-county-is-hiring-800-drivers-other-transit-agencies-increasing-staff/ The further reopening of stores, restaurants and other businesses in recent weeks has pushed up demand for mass transit in Southern California, leaving some transportation agencies scrambling to add bus drivers.

In Los Angeles County some agencies are in the midst of a hiring frenzy to accommodate increased ridership and expanded service, while elsewhere in the region staffing levels have held steady despite the coronavirus pandemic.

Bus agencies in the eastern part of L.A. County, and those in the Inland Empire and Orange County have weathered extreme drops in ridership and driver attrition since March 2020, when the pandemic began, and are in no rush to hire new drivers.

  • People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Blvd. at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Boulevard at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. Metro has increased service on April 12, 2021, as more businesses open up and bus ridership is the highest since the coronavirus pandemic began. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People wait for a bus on Vermont Ave at Wilshire Blvd., Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Boulevard at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. Metro has increased service on April 12, 2021, as more businesses open up and bus ridership is the highest since the coronavirus pandemic began. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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  • People ride on a bus on Vermont Ave at Wilshire Blvd. in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Boulevard at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. Metro has increased service on April 12, 2021, as more businesses open up and bus ridership is the highest since the coronavirus pandemic began. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A bus on Wilshire Blvd. at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Boulevard at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. Metro has increased service on April 12, 2021, as more businesses open up and bus ridership is the highest since the coronavirus pandemic began. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Blvd. at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Boulevard at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. Metro has increased service on April 12, 2021, as more businesses open up and bus ridership is the highest since the coronavirus pandemic began. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • People board and exit a bus on Vermont Ave at Wilshire Blvd., Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. People board and exit a bus on Wilshire Boulevard at Vermont Ave in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Apr. 14, 2021. Metro has increased service on April 12, 2021, as more businesses open up and bus ridership is the highest since the coronavirus pandemic began. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

Show Caption of

Expand Wanted: Bus drivers

The opposite is true for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, known as Metro, which like most bus agencies experienced a 60% to 70% drop in ridership when the stay-at-home orders went into effect in March 2020.

The third-largest transit agency in the country intends to hire hundreds of new operators by September, increasing the number of full-time drivers at the agency by about one-third.

“We are looking at hiring 800 bus operators,” said Patrice McElroy, interim chief human capital and development officer for Metro. “We want to make sure we are ready to get to full ridership in anticipation of having more people on our buses.”

While Metro buses run throughout the county, Long Beach Transit runs its own bus service in that city. Before the pandemic, it staffed about 480 drivers, but due to attrition, promotions, family leave and the ceasing of bus training from March 2020 until April 2021, it is down drivers.

“We are looking for around 100 bus operators,” spokesperson Mike Gold said Thursday, April 15. “We are conducting an aggressive (hiring) campaign.”

In San Bernardino County, Omnitrans laid off 153 bus operators last year due to a 60% drop in ridership and reduced service, spokesperson Nicole Ramos said earlier this month. In anticipation of a gradual ramp up in service, the agency has rehired 51 drivers, she said, and it plans on recalling another 55 bus operators into service by January 2022.

“We are thrilled to be able to bring operators back,” Ramos said. “It looks like there is a light at the end of the tunnel with people getting vaccinated (for COVID-19).”

Holding steady

In the San Gabriel Valley and western San Bernardino County, Foothill Transit runs local and express bus service. The agency has two yards run by separate contractors. In the Pomona yard, Keolis, an international corporation, hires personnel and runs operations.

Foothill Transit’s Pomona operations only reduced service by 5%, so no drivers were laid off. Instead, some were transferred into other temporary positions. Unlike Metro and Long Beach, Keolis continued holding bus training, practicing social distancing and abiding by safety protocols, said Erika Mazza, the company’s regional vice president of operations.

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The company set up tents and held training classes outdoors, keeping numbers small, she said.

Because it was able to maintain training and staffing levels, Keolis was able to retain all their positions for Foothill Transit in Pomona. “We did not want to lay off any of our personnel,” Mazza said this week.

The Keolis-run portion of Foothill Transit has about five bus operator openings, she said. Mazza expects to fill them by early May and reach 280 operators, its maximum number. Mitun Seguin, a spokesperson with Transdev, the contractor operating Foothill Transit’s Arcadia yard, said there are eight driver openings there. That brings the total bus driver openings at Foothill Transit to 13 as of April 16.

Other agencies have cut service but don’t have immediate plans to restart routes or reduce wait times between stops.

Orange County Transportation Authority cut 60% of service when ridership began falling last year. Ridership went from 125,000 to 35,000 shortly after the state’s first stay-home order, said Eric Carpenter, OCTA spokesman. Ridership increased to about an average of 57,000 riders per weekday in March 2021, he said.

Though it didn’t lay off its in-house drivers, OCTA cut back contracted services with First Transit, he said. It’s not known if that company plans to hire back drivers since First Transit spokesman Jay Brock could not be reached for comment.

OCTA used federal CARES Act money to keep its 655 drivers on the payroll while also covering for staff who are older or otherwise vulnerable to COVID-19, Carpenter said. The agency doesn’t have a shortage of drivers and isn’t actively recruiting on a large scale, but it continues to train recent hires.

Riverside Transit Agency has not laid off any of its 280 drivers but rather re-assigned some to other positions after service levels dropped, spokesman Brad Weaver said this week. The bus agency operates 38 routes in Riverside County and is taking a wait-and-see approach, he said.

The agency saw evidence of a small uptick in ridership last month but, Weaver said, “it is not a significant increase.”

Demand growing

As the number of coronavirus cases, case rates and those hospitalized reach the lowest levels since the pandemic began, counties in Southern California moved into the orange tier of the state’s coronavirus reopening plan. In this plan, retail stores don’t need to limit how many shoppers come in; movie theaters, museums and restaurants can operate at 50% indoors and bars not serving food can serve patrons outside.

Bart Reed, executive director of The Transit Coalition, a nonprofit that follows the industry in Los Angeles, said more people are waiting for buses at bus stops as businesses reopen. Most who ride buses in L.A. County are workers who don’t own a car and rely on buses and train service.

“Things are starting to open up again; people are going back to work. And people are back to riding buses and the bus service is overcrowded,” Reed said.

While Metro has not said how many drivers left in the past year, it is trying to add 800 more in six months. Part of the reason is to implement a gradual increase “to high demand lines on weekdays, Saturdays and Sundays to accommodate heavier passenger loads,” according to a recent Metro staff report. The service increase began April 12.

The last week of March, Metro saw an average weekday bus ridership of 477,816, the highest since the pandemic began in March 2020, according to a report released to the Metro board this month.

To add more buses, the agency needs to find more drivers. In March it received 506 applications and as of mid-April Metro had hired 146 bus operators. Two training classes were held last month and two more were added in April; two classes will be added every month through summer, the report said.

Related Articles

Metro suspended all bus operator recruitment and training during the past nine months, mostly due to safety protocols restricting class meetings, McElroy said. The agency already was experiencing a need for more drivers pre-pandemic.

“We did not have enough (bus operators) to help with attrition. We were not able to do that for nine months,” she said.

McElroy said the starting wage is $16.90 an hour, with pay increasing to $26.01 an hour, plus medical benefits, vacation time and retirement plan options.

Bus driver candidates are trained in a classroom and take driving practice in an enclosed yard, said Dave Sotero, Metro spokesman. It takes several weeks to train a new driver.

“You don’t sign up tomorrow and drive an $875,000 piece of equipment,” Reed said. “As a result of that, adding service is more of a gradual thing versus turning it on like a water faucet.”

Staff writer Alicia Robinson contributed to this report.

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Fri, 16 Apr 2021 17:21:23 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs News Coronavirus Foothill Cities Harbor Area High Desert Inland Empire Jobs San Fernando Valley San Gabriel Valley Top Stories Breeze Top Stories IVDB Top Stories LADN Top Stories LBPT Top Stories OCR Top Stories PE Top Stories PSN Top Stories SGVT Top Stories Sun Top Stories WDN Transit Transportation
California’s pandemic pain: 9th-slowest jobs recovery in U.S. https://www.dailynews.com/2021/04/16/californias-pandemic-pain-9th-slowest-jobs-recovery-in-u-s/ California’s pandemic-era jobs recovery is the ninth-slowest in the nation, according to March employment stats.

My trusty spreadsheet, filled with a federal tabulation of state-by-state hiring trends, shows California still has the nation’s No. 1 job market with 16 million workers last month. That’s followed by Texas at 12.4 million and New York at 8.8 million.

But when you compare these job counts with February 2020, before coronavirus throttled the economy, California in March was at just 92.7% of its pre-pandemic employment levels. Only eight states have recovered a smaller share of their jobs.

The slowest job recovery was seen in Hawaii with 84.2% of February 2020’s employment, followed by New York at 90.3% and Vermont at 91.3%. The best performing job markets are in Idaho with 103.2% of pre-pandemic employment, Utah at 101.6% and Montana at 99.8%.

As for unemployment rates, California ranked fourth-highest in the nation at 8.4% in March. No. 1 was New York at 9.6% followed by Connecticut and Hawaii at 8.5%. The lowest jobless rate was found in New Hampshire and Vermont at 3.3%, and then South Dakota at 3.4%.

Bubble Watch tracks housing risks. Read it here!

California suffered the sixth-largest jump in unemployment in a year — up 3.9 points to 8.4%. No. 1 was Hawaii at 6.4 points to 8.5%; New York at 5.5 points to 9.6%; and Connecticut at 4.2 points to 8.5%. Smallest gains? South Dakota, up 0.1 points to 3.4% then New Hampshire, up 0.2 points to 3.3%.

Of course, there’s political debate behind the numbers. In California, Gov. Gavin Newsom has been criticized for strict business limitations that throttled the state’s economy and its job market. He’s likely to face a recall election.

But please note that the “stay at home” mandates saved lives. Since the start of the pandemic, California’s per-capita rate of COVID-19 deaths was better than 29 other states.

PS: On a national basis, politically speaking, blue states — those with Democratic governors — are at 92% of pre-pandemic employment. “Red” states — those with Republican governors — are at 95%.

Jonathan Lansner is the business columnist for the Southern California News Group. He can be reached at jlansner@scng.com Related Articles

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Working from Home and Mental Health http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/unP0bjv1-5E/ ]]> Thu, 15 Apr 2021 22:27:04 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Career Advice Working From Home Low Stress Career Options http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/xrUOZlEjyL4/ ]]> Thu, 15 Apr 2021 22:03:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Discover Career Opportunities Career Opportunities Why Organization Can Be Good for Work and Mental Health http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/9NU_Qn_H560/ ]]> Thu, 15 Apr 2021 21:38:20 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Career Advice Organization 2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz Reveals Itself https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2021/04/2022-hyundai-santa-cruz-reveals-itself/ The 2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz has finally seen the light of day. It was about time, given all the fuzzy photos and hype prior to dropping today. More like a dull thud than a big bang, but here it is. Hyundai describes the Santa Cruz as groundbreaking, and that may be so. Tabbed a sport […]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 17:00:36 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Design Jobs Marketing Sales 2022 Korea Autos Awd Trucks Hyundai New Cars SUVs Branding Santa Cruz Product Planning Hyundai Santa Cruz 2.5-liter Turbo Peek-a-boo Headlights Sport Activity Vehicle Trucklike Hyundai Santa Cruz Reveals Itself
The 30 highest-paying jobs in California http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/hlfQFL0_lqY/the-30-highest-paying-jobs-in-california-2019-3 Airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers are one of the highest-paying jobs in California where they earn $229,110 a year.

David McNew/Getty Images

  • California has an economy bigger than that of most countries.
  • Using wage data from BLS, we found the occupations with the highest average salaries in California.
  • The following are the 30 highest-paying jobs in the Golden State.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.
30. Computer hardware engineers computer hardware

vm/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $153,730

Number of people employed in California: 15,140

What they do, according to O*NET: Research, design, develop, or test computer or computer-related equipment.

29. Human resources managers human resources

Hispanolistic/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $154,030

Number of people employed in California: 22,420

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate human resources activities and staff of an organization.

28. All other managers, personal service managers, and all other entertainment and recreation managers business meeting

Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $154,690

Number of people employed in California: 71,660

This is a catchall category on BLS for managers that combines 2018 Standard Occupational Classification codes of entertainment and recreation managers, all other personal service managers, and all other managers.

27. Compensation and benefits managers Spreadsheet and Calculator

ShutterStock / Wolfilser

Average annual salary: $155,130

Number of people employed in California: 1,940

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate compensation and benefits activities of an organization.

26. Advertising and promotions managers advertising agency advertising manager business meeting

Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $158,820

Number of people employed in California: 2,270

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate advertising policies and programs as well as create posters, contests, and other similar promotions for a product or service.

25. Nurse midwives nurse midwife and nurse at doctor's office

Diversity Photos/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $159,590

Number of people employed in California: 1,010

What they do, according to O*NET: Diagnose and coordinate all aspects of the birthing process, either independently or as part of a healthcare team.

24. Dentists dentist

Scott Olson/Getty

Average annual salary: $160,300

Number of people employed in California: 12,040

What they do, according to O*NET: Examine, diagnose, and treat diseases, injuries, and malformations of teeth and gums.

23. First-line supervisors of police and detectives police supervisor

Graham Taylor/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: $161,250

Number of people employed in California: 5,040

What they do, according to O*NET: Directly supervise and coordinate activities of members of police force.

22. Financial managers bank banker office

goodluz/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: $162,650

Number of people employed in California: 92,670

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.

21. Marketing managers marketing manager

kate_sept2004/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $176,940

Number of people employed in California: 42,140

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate marketing policies and programs, such as determining the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors, and identify potential customers.

20. Lawyers lawyers

Minerva Studio/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: $179,470

Number of people employed in California: 84,160

What they do, according to O*NET: Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, or manage or advise clients on legal transactions.

19. Astronomers astronomy Los Angeles, California on 04/01/2018 crowd of people outside of Griffith Observatory Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles.

Christian Horz/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $181,360

Number of people employed in California: 340

What they do, according to O*NET: Observe, research, and interpret astronomical phenomena to increase basic knowledge or apply such information to practical problems.

18. Architectural and engineering managers architectural engineer

YP_photographer/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: $188,940

Number of people employed in California: 36,100

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as architecture and engineering, or carry out research and development in these fields.

17. Judges, magistrate judges, and magistrates Inyo county California courthouse

John Elk/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $195,700

Number of people employed in California: 1,650

What they do, according to O*NET: Arbitrate, advise, adjudicate, or administer justice in a court of law.

16. Orthodontists dentist dental

Master Video/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: $197,710

Number of people employed in California: N/A

What they do, according to O*NET: Examine, diagnose, and treat dental malocclusions and oral cavity anomalies. 

15. Computer and information systems managers computer servers

Jetta Productions Inc/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $198,210

Number of people employed in California: 81,760

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming.

14. Natural sciences managers mars rover

Damian Dovarganes/AP

Average annual salary: $202,570

Number of people employed in California: N/A

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, and statistics, and carry out research and development in these fields.

13. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons dentist oral surgery surgeon

Mikhail Olykainen/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: $204,920

Number of people employed in California: 560

What they do, according to O*NET: Perform surgery and related procedures on the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial regions to treat diseases, injuries, or defects.

12. Nurse anesthetists Anesthesiologist Anesthesiology patient hospital surgery doctor physician

MindStorm/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: $205,360

Number of people employed in California: 1,710

What they do, according to O*NET: Administer anesthesia, monitor patient's vital signs, and oversee patient recovery from anesthesia.

11. Dentists, all other specialists A dentist performs a dental examination. A dentist performs a dental examination.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $205,860

Number of people employed in California: 440

What they do, according to O*NET: This is a catchall category for dentists not listed in some other occupational group.

10. Anesthesiologists anesthesiologist

ChaNaWiT/Shutterstock

Average annual salary: At least $208,000*

Number of people employed in California: 3,500

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who administer anesthetics prior to, during, or after surgery or other medical procedures.

*BLS does not have an exact wage estimate for this occupation.

9. General internal medicine physicians internist doctor physician

Rick Bowmer/AP Images

Average annual salary: $210,620

Number of people employed in California: 3,000

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who diagnose and provide non-surgical treatment of diseases and injuries of internal organ systems.

8. Pediatricians pediatrician baby doctor family

Rogelio V. Solis/AP Images

Average annual salary: $212,990

Number of people employed in California: 3,250

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent children's diseases and injuries.

7. Family medicine physicians PANORAMA CITY, CA - JANUARY 28: Dr. Jason Greenspan (L) and emergency room nurse Junizar Manansala care for a patient in the ER of Mission Community Hospital where doctors held a press conference outside on a class action lawsuit against the state of California by a coalition of emergency room physicians claiming that without additional funding, the entire emergency healthcare system is on the verge of collapse on January 28, 2009 in Panorama City, California. According to the coalition, the cost of providing emergency room treatment has nearly doubled over the past decade and patient load increased by more than 28 percent while Medi-Cal reimbursements have remained largely unchanged. During that time, 85 California hospitals in California have closed and an additional 55 facilities have shut down their emergency rooms. California now reportedly ranks worst in the nation for access emergency care and last in emergency rooms per capita. California has seven emergency rooms per million people while the national average is 20 emergency rooms per million people. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images) Doctors performing on a patient.

David McNew/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $215,860

Number of people employed in California: 10,920

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases and injuries that commonly occur in the general population.

6. Chief executives Sundar Pichai

Getty

Average annual salary: $218,700

Number of people employed in California: 30,150

What they do, according to O*NET: Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body.

5. Physicians, all other, and ophthalmologists dermatologist Dermatologist Dr. Deanne M. Robinson and a patient.

Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $226,200

Number of people employed in California: 30,800

What they do, according to O*NET: This is a catchall category for specialized doctors not listed in some other occupational group. Some specialties include dermatologists, hospitalists, ophthalmologists, and urologists.

4. Airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers Airport LAX busy airplane Airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers are one of the highest-paying jobs in California where they earn $229,110 a year.

David McNew/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $229,110

Number of people employed in California: 10,170

What they do, according to O*NET: Pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-wing, multi-engine aircraft, usually on scheduled air carrier routes, for the transport of passengers and cargo.

3. Surgeons Surgery

HRAUN/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $229,430

Number of people employed in California: 4,790

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who treat diseases, injuries, and deformities by invasive, minimally invasive, or non-invasive surgical methods.

2. Obstetricians and gynecologists Obstetrician gynecologist

Orlin Wagner/AP Images

Average annual salary: $235,610

Number of people employed in California: 1,440

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who provide medical care related to pregnancy or childbirth and those who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases of women, particularly those affecting the reproductive system.

1. Psychiatrists Psychiatrist

Zinkevych/Getty Images

Average annual salary: $245,000

Number of people employed in California: 3,970

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent disorders of the mind.

Method and data source

California is one of the largest economies in the world, with a gross domestic product bigger than that of most countries.

Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates program, we found the 30 jobs with the highest average annual salaries in California. To do this, we looked at the 765 detailed occupations that had average annual wage data available for the state in May 2020, the most recently available data.

Similarly to our recently published list of the highest-paying jobs in the US, medical occupations were top earners. Eight of the top 10 highest-paying jobs in the state are various medical and dental specializations.

Average annual salaries and number of people employed in each occupation are from BLS' May 2020 estimates. Where available, we also included a brief description of what workers in the occupation do, from the Department of Labor's O*NET Online occupational database.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: akiersz@businessinsider.com (Andy Kiersz,Madison Hoff)]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 13:14:48 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Jobs California US Careers Los Angeles Trends Features David Bureau of Labor Statistics Salaries Airline Rick Bowmer Justin Sullivan Getty Department of Labor BLS David McNew Getty Orlin Wagner Dave Kotinsky Getty Luis Alvarez Getty Jetta Productions Inc John Elk Getty Andy Kiersz Madison Hoff Solis AP David McNew Getty Images California Golden State See Dentists Scott Olson Getty Average Graham Taylor Shutterstock Astronomers Griffith Observatory Mikhail Olykainen Shutterstock Deanne M Robinson
Chinese agencies are charging students more than $12,000 to land coveted Wall Street banking internships http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/aAPkXQUpEWU/chinese-agencies-charge-students-thousands-for-wall-street-internships-2021-4 Chinese career agencies promise to help students land top-tier internships.

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  • Career coaching firms are helping Chinese students secure coveted Wall Street internships and graduate jobs, Bloomberg reported.
  • Third-party agencies charge $12,000 or more for access to industry mentors and internal referrals.
  • Revenue for career counseling services in the US was valued at $16 billion in 2020.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Chinese students looking to land prestigious internships at investment banks and consulting firms are paying $12,000 or more for services offered by career coaching agencies, according to a Bloomberg report.

Companies typically pair students with finance professionals to provide support with cover letter drafting, networking and, in some cases, internal referrals at top-tier firms such as Goldman Sachs. However the bank denied any relationship with agencies, to Bloomberg.

Beijing-based agency Breadoffer said it charges students $12,000 to land a job at Goldman and $9,000 for a shot at Chinese investment bank Citic Securities.

Chengdu-based DreambigCareer has more than 3,000 finance and consulting professionals on its books and said it has helped Chinese students studying overseas secure more than 6000 coveted roles. The agency charges up to $10,000.

This comes at a time when the pandemic has contracted the Chinese job market. Finance vacancies declined 12% in the country in 2020, according to recruitment website Zhaopin.com. The programs can give ambitious students a leg up when competing against their peers, raising ethical concerns for students, agencies, and the bankers enlisted to provide their services.

Sean Wang, banker and author of "How to Make it as an Investment Banker" told Bloomberg the number of career consultancy programs has ballooned in recent years.

"It opens wide the question of fairness," he told the publication. "If you pay to have someone else write your cover letter, or get a first round interview, is it fair to those job seekers who don't have or can't afford such packages?"

China is expected to produce 9.1 million graduates this year. The annual number of graduates from Chinese colleges has increased by one-third since 2012, a result of the country's education drive, and more are expected to return from overseas as the pandemic continues to overwhelm many nations.

In an already competitive job market, rocketing numbers of young job-seekers will likely only increase the demand for third-party agencies.

The practice is not specific to China; revenue for US job training and career consultancy firms, such as Wall Street Oasis, was valued at $16 billion in 2020, according to market research firm IBISWorld.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: acooban@businessinsider.com (Anna Cooban)]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 08:56:48 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Jobs News Finance Wall Street China US Careers Trends Bloomberg Banking Goldman Sachs Goldman Sean Wang Kena Betancur Getty Bloomberg Beijing Breadoffer Citic Securities Chengdu DreambigCareer Anna Cooban
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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 02:18:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Health Jobs Medical University Officer Punjab Manisha MBBS
What to Do for Job Interview Anxiety http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/jkzcd-rIwFc/ ]]> Wed, 14 Apr 2021 22:05:41 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Jobs Nail the Interview Job Interview Anxiety Find Your Dream Job With These Tips http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/wI5zOBTDkxM/ ]]> Wed, 14 Apr 2021 21:18:37 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Jobs Dream Job Discover Career Opportunities The All-in-One Guide to Getting Another Source of Income http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Careeralley/~3/jWSyc5MVXno/ ]]> Wed, 14 Apr 2021 19:00:32 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Jobs Income Career Advice Einstein Maximize You Income Here's how much workers are paid at America's amusement parks http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/F4nuX9TxQI0/how-much-do-workers-at-amusement-parks-make-per-year-2019-8 Visitors attend the Universal Studios theme park first day of reopening from the coronavirus pandemic, on June 05, 2020 in Orlando, Florida.

Gerardo Mora/Getty Images

17. Waiters and waitresses make an annual salary of $22,940. restaurant waiter

Associated Press

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 2,110

What they do, according to O*NET: Waiters and waitresses take orders from customers and serve food and drinks at restaurants or cafes.

16. Lifeguards, ski patrol, and other recreational protective service workers make an annual salary of $23,550. lifeguard A lifeguard runs into the water to rescue a youth that was calling for help in heavy surf due to being caught in a rip current on the Windward side of Oahu, Hawaii.

Reuters/Carlo Allegri

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 5,330

What they do, according to O*NET: Lifeguards, ski patrol, and other recreational protective service workers make sure people are safe in amusement parks, whether they're in the pool or on the slopes.

15. Fast food and counter attendants make an annual salary of $24,060. cafeteria

zoranm/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 11,980

What they do, according to O*NET: Counter attendants serve food to customers from counters or steam tables. This job category includes cafe servers, cafeteria workers, and snack bar attendants.

14. Amusement and recreation attendants make an annual salary of $24,310. Universal Studios in Orlando, Florida Visitors attend the Universal Studios theme park first day of reopening from the coronavirus pandemic, on June 05, 2020 in Orlando, Florida.

Gerardo Mora/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 28,640

What they do, according to O*NET: Amusement and recreation attendants operate amusement concessions, kiosks, or rides, and maintain amusement park supplies and equipment.

13. Recreation workers make an annual salary of $24,320. amusement theme park worker

Dale Sparks/AP

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 1,410

What they do, according to O*NET: Recreation workers organize and promote activities, including arts and crafts, sports, games, music, and other social activities.

12. Maids and housekeeping cleaners make an annual salary of $24,340. housekeeping

andresr/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 2,580

What they do, according to O*NET: Maids and housekeeping cleaners' duties may include cleaning rooms, making beds, and vacuuming.

11. Cashiers make an annual salary of $25,110. Walt Disney World Resort

Kent Phillips/Walt Disney World Resort/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 4,990

What they do, according to O*NET: Cashiers handle customers' money using cash registers or scanners. 

10. Janitors and cleaners make an annual salary of $25,350. janitor

Matilde Campodonico/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 3,620

What they do, according to O*NET: Janitors and cleaners keep buildings clean and orderly using equipment ranging from brooms and mops to carpet cleaners and floor waxers.

9. Concierges make an annual salary of $28,110. hotel reception

Space_Cat/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 1,040

What they do, according to O*NET: Concierges assist patrons with personal services, such as business services.

8. Restaurant, lounge, and coffee shop hosts and hostesses make an annual salary of $28,820. restaurant host hostess

Ronnie Kaufman/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 1,300

What they do, according to O*NET: Host and hostesses welcome patrons, seat them at tables or in lounge, and help ensure quality of facilities and service.

7. Security guards make an annual salary of $30,440. security guard black friday

Phil McCarten/Reuters

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 2,790

What they do, according to O*NET: Security guards monitor premises to prevent people from breaking the rules.

6. Transit and intercity bus drivers make an annual salary of $30,530. bus driver

Monty Rakusen/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 1,000

What they do, according to O*NETThey drive buses and may assist passengers.

5. Customer service representatives make an annual salary of $31,040. customer service representative

DigitalVision/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 1,760

What they do, according to O*NET: Customer service representatives assist customers with questions or complaints, either in person or over the phone.

4. Landscaping and groundskeeping workers make an annual salary of $32,280. Gardener A gardener irrigates a facility with imperial crowns on the grounds of the Brandenburg State Garden Show.

Jens Büttner/picture alliance via Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 1,470

What they do, according to O*NET: Landscaping and groundskeeping workers take care of lawns, plants, and trees. Their duties include sod laying, mowing, trimming, planting, and watering, along with keeping the area free of general trash and debris.

3. First-line supervisors of personal service and entertainment and recreation workers make an annual salary of $39,900. hotel maid

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 2,650

What they do, according to O*NET: First-line supervisors of personal service workers coordinate personal service workers like make-up artists, caddies, or maids.

2. Maintenance and repair workers make an annual salary of $40,200. amusement theme park worker

JD Pooley/AP

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 2,440

What they do, according to O*NET: Maintenance and repair workers make sure mechanical equipment is running smoothly. This includes pipe fitting, boiler repairs, welding, carpentry, and other general building repairs.

1. First-line supervisors of food preparation and serving workers make an annual salary of $41,540. how much to tip waiter

Jasper Juinen/Getty Images

Total employed in US amusement parks and arcades: 1,240

What they do, according to O*NET: First-line supervisors of food preparation and serving workers coordinate workers to ensure efficient customer service.

Method and data source

The salaries of amusement park workers in the US vary widely. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics program offers data on employment and wages across different occupations and industries.

According to BLS, the amusement parks and arcades industry employed about 125,250 people in May 2020, the most recent period for which data is available. The typical annual wage for all occupations in this industry is lower than the median for all occupations regardless of industry. The median annual wage in the amusement parks and arcades industry was $27,300, far below the median across all industries of $41,950.

For our analysis, we looked at the occupations with at least 1,000 employees in the amusement parks and arcades industry in May 2020. We then ranked this set of occupations from the lowest to highest median annual wage. We excluded sales representatives of services because although they had at least 1,000 employees, no median annual salary estimate was available for May 2020. 

In addition to the annual salaries, the above slides also include the number of people employed in each occupation in this industry.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: akiersz@businessinsider.com (Andy Kiersz,Madison Hoff)]

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 12:36:23 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Jobs US Careers America Trends Features Salaries Amusement Parks Disneyland Resort Universal Studios Orlando Florida BLS Reuters Total Andy Kiersz Phil McCarten Getty Images Total Andy Kiersz Madison Hoff Associated Press Total Oahu Hawaii Reuters Carlo Allegri Total Matilde Campodonico Getty Images Total Ronnie Kaufman Getty Images Total Brandenburg State Garden Show Jens Büttner DigitalVision Getty Images Total JD Pooley AP Total Jasper Juinen Getty Images Total Gerardo Mora Getty Images Total Dale Sparks AP Total Monty Rakusen Getty Images Total
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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 01:29:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Jobs Engineer MCA Noida Manisha CDAC CDAC Noida IT(Computer HotJob Sarkari Naukri in Uttar Pradesh (UP Computer-Engineer-Job IT Computer Professional Vacancy Recruitment