Bloglikes - Leadership https://www.bloglikes.com/c/leadership en-US Thu, 15 Apr 2021 16:20:03 +0000 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 +0000 FeedWriter The 33 most innovative HR leaders who steered employees through a global crisis - and the plans they're using to create more flexible, equitable workplaces http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/tQ0S1udF8dE/most-innovative-human-resources-leaders-2021-4

Insider

innovative HR leaders 2x1 From left: Marissa Andrada, Naveen Bhateja, Bernard C. Coleman III, and Gianna Driver are some of this year's most innovative HR leaders.

Marianne Ayala/Insider

  • The pandemic and resulting recession put talent leaders in the global spotlight.
  • Insider asked readers to share the names of high achievers in HR. We chose the 33 most impressive.
  • Our list of top innovators includes HR executives from Chipotle, Zoom, and Glassdoor.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Talent leaders have had their hands full.

A global pandemic upended traditional models of work as employers across industries sent staff home from the office. Leaders in human resources were tasked with figuring out how to make long-term remote work effective and maintain company culture virtually.

Meanwhile, anti-racism protests following the police killing of George Floyd left many employees feeling frustrated and unsettled. It was HR's job to create space for those employees to share their experiences. The most successful HR leaders listened closely to employees and used their ideas to build more effective diversity, equity, and inclusion programs.

Insider wanted to know which HR executives had done the most impressive work on these fronts. We asked our readers to tell us about innovators in the HR space, and then we picked 33 outstanding leaders across industries. Some were nominated by their colleagues. The list includes executives from startups, small companies, and large companies such as Chipotle, Glassdoor, and Zoom.

These executives have transitioned a staff of thousands to flexible work, partnered with an academic institution to educate their employees about racial issues, and modernized performance-management systems. As one nominee, OJO Labs' chief operating officer, Angela Dunham, said, "The lessons we learned this year will serve as a playbook for how HR can better serve our teams into the future."

Here are the top 33 innovators in HR (in alphabetical order by last name) and their exclusive insights on building the future of work.

Marissa Andrada, the chief diversity, inclusion, and people officer at Chipotle Marissa Andrada   Stefani Green Marissa Andrada is the chief diversity, inclusion, and people officer at Chipotle.

Chipotle

Andrada helped waive the 15-hour minimum requirement for employees to qualify for Chipotle's education programs. The company now has a debt-free college-degree program and tuition assistance for GED and ESL classes.

She also made sure the company's executive leadership held listening sessions for all employees to discuss how the company can be more equitable. The 88,000-person company managed to grow its annual revenue by 7.1% while opening 161 new locations in 2020, despite the pandemic.

"2020 reinforced my belief that the role of HR is to help an organization grow through its people," she said.

Andrada also helped launch a new employee resource group focused on multicultural, companywide mentorship programs. Andrada hosted virtual sessions on DEI that featured guest speakers such as athletes and musicians, and she oversaw a new partnership with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund and the National Urban League as part of a $1 million pledge to address systemic racism.

"HR leaders need to have clarity on values, with a deep understanding of who the company is and what it stands for as an organization," she said.

Naveen Bhateja, the chief human resources officer at Medidata Naveen BHATEJA Naveen Bhateja is the CHRO at Medidata.

Medidata

Medidata played a role in the coronavirus response. Moderna used the 2,800-person company's clinical-trial platform to create its coronavirus vaccine. During this time, Bhateja and his team hired and onboarded more than 800 new employees virtually.

Bhateja led a swift internal pandemic response called Medidata C.A.R.E.S. (COVID-actioned resources enabling support), an initiative that provides additional tools, support, and events for everyone. Medidata also offered training around critical skills such as resiliency, empathy, compassion, and allyship for leaders and employees.

"While HR leaders have always played a critical role, today, more than ever, CHRO leaders are on the front lines due to the COVID crisis and all the other events that took place last year," Bhateja said.

Going forward, Bhateja plans to continue to support employees through times of volatility and change. 

"I view 2021 as a year of transition and healing," Bhateja said. "I will continue to seek to strike the right balance between employee safety and business needs." 

Ayesha Blackwell-Hawkins, the global head of talent mobility at Johnson & Johnson Ayesha Blackwell Ayesha Blackwell-Hawkins is the global head of talent mobility at Johnson & Johnson.

Johnson & Johnson

Blackwell-Hawkins prioritized flexibility and increased the access of Johnson & Johnson's 130,000 employees to services such as mental-health care and financial planning.

"The last year has shown me that HR has a very important role to play in caring for a company's most precious resource, its people," she said. "I believe this role will continue to expand, and we will be called to support our businesses and talent in new, more innovative ways."

Aliza Goldstein, a leader for talent mobility at J&J, said Blackwell-Hawkins is an "incredible advocate and ally" for diversity, equity, and inclusion at the pharmaceutical company.

Blackwell-Hawkins was an immigration attorney before spending five years in a talent-management role at Amazon. She joined Johnson & Johnson in 2018 and has helped the company earn numerous awards and recognition — it was highly rated for gender and racial diversity and named the No. 1 employer for working moms by Working Mother.

"I have consistently focused on cultivating a digital mindset, data and analytical acumen, and agility as core competencies required to be successful in HR," Blackwell-Hawkins said. "I stand by these, but added resilience to the list after 2020."

Sheri Bronstein, the chief human resources officer at Bank of America Sheri Bronstein Sheri Bronstein is the CHRO at Bank of America.

Bank of America

Bronstein oversees a team of more than 2,600 HR professionals that are responsible for supporting Bank of America's 200,000 employees across 35 countries.

Bronstein and her team worked to reskill and reassign more than 23,000 employees to serve in new capacities during the pandemic, including helping with the Paycheck Protection Program.

Bank of America provided support for its staff by adding unlimited sick leave and childcare benefits.

Bronstein also worked with the company's chief diversity and inclusion officer to create an analytics tracker for workforce diversity. It measures representation in all levels of leadership and helps keep senior leaders accountable for progress on their teams. The company also committed to improving pay equity by measuring its gender pay gap and raising its minimum wage to $20.

"Throughout the coronavirus and subsequent racial injustices, the past year has presented a completely new set of obstacles," Bronstein said. "From the imperative to keep our teammates safe and healthy, to recognizing the need and value for more diversity throughout our company, 2020 led to more discussions and immediate actions among myself and fellow C-suite executives than ever before."

Vincent Chee, the director of people and culture at Bevel Vincent Chee Vincent Chee is the director of people and culture at Bevel.

Daniela Aguilar

Bevel was three years old when the pandemic hit.

The strategic-communications consultancy represents startups such as Acorns and venture-capital firms such as Greycroft. Chee helped the firm grow 111% during the pandemic. Today, it employs about 20 people and is hiring another 15 to work on communications for special-purpose-acquisition deals.

Chee has also invested heavily in learning and development, giving employees a stipend to take courses and attend conferences. He's established a professional-development committee that runs workshops to help employees hone their job skills and achieve their career goals.

"The past year," Chee said, "really magnified the importance of HR." Chee saw recent events — a global pandemic, social unrest — as an opportunity to strengthen the hiring practices at Bevel, and for the firm to become an ongoing advocate for mental-health and wellness initiatives.

Bernard C. Coleman III, the chief diversity and engagement officer at Gusto bernard coleman Bernard C. Coleman III is the chief diversity and engagement officer at Gusto.

Bernard C. Coleman III

Coleman's career has been defined by firsts. He was the first chief diversity and HR officer for a US presidential campaign with Hillary for America and Uber's first global head of diversity and inclusion.

At HR tech company Gusto, which employs more than 1,400 people and is valued at almost $4 billion, Coleman introduced the company's first diversity and inclusion training program: RISE, or representation, inclusion, social impact, equity. Employees have weekly RISE Bites, in which they discuss social-justice issues in a safe space. Coleman's team at Gusto has trained hundreds of managers and individual contributors on how to build an inclusive and equitable workplace.

"An effective DEI program," Coleman said, "needs to be comprehensive in nature and interwoven into every aspect of your business."

Carina Cortez, the chief people officer at Glassdoor Carina Cortez Carina Cortez is the chief people officer at Glassdoor.

Glassdoor

Cortez was instrumental in advocating for Glassdoor rankings to include diversity and inclusion ratings.

Internally, she helped the company publish its first diversity and inclusion report and pay-equity analysis. Cortez is also enrolled in a master's program for diversity and inclusion at Tufts University.

Cortez added a policy called "Work Where You Want" that allowed employees to move around and live wherever they want. Glassdoor also recommended that employees take at least one day off per month.

"This past year's events — from the pandemic to social injustice to politics and more — have only reaffirmed my belief that HR is at the forefront of business success," Cortez said. "People are at the center of every decision a company must make. I enjoy having a role that requires an intersection of data and empathy."

Glassdoor has more than 1,000 employees and is owned by Recruit Holdings, which also owns Indeed. Last year, the companies teamed up to get more jobs in front of unemployed Americans.

Cortez encouraged her peers to reflect on how much has changed and how much may continue to change.

"I've had to 'unlearn' my 20-plus-year history of how to do HR," she said. "Empathy, flexibility, stepping into very difficult conversations seem to be stronger leadership requirements than prior to events of the last year."

Delida Costin, the chief legal and people officer at Grove Collaborative delida costin Delida Costin is the chief legal and people officer at Grove Collaborative.

Grove Collaborative

When Costin joined the people-experience team at Grove a year ago, she wanted to empower people. And since the start of the pandemic, she's made a number of meaningful changes for employees.

Most people at this eco-friendly home-goods manufacturer are essential workers. Costin and her team had to develop new policies for its fulfillment centers during the pandemic. They also relaxed absence and leave policies, and offered workers the flexibility to change their shifts. Costin eliminated full performance reviews in 2020 and instead focused on upward feedback for managers.

Costin also created an employee-led DEI group presented to senior leadership to raise awareness of issues and offer prescriptive advice for improving the company.

"It is more clear than ever that companies cannot ask employees to check their nonwork lives at the door when they report to work," Costin said. "Our job is to continue to keep watch to understand what shifts are occurring and to meet our employees where and how they need us to meet them."

Gianna Driver, the chief people officer at BlueVine Gianna Driver   HeadShot Gianna Driver is the chief people officer at BlueVine.

BlueVine

Since 2020, BlueVine has facilitated almost $7 billion in Paycheck Protection Program loans. The fintech has raised a total of $242.5 million from investors such as Citi Ventures and Menlo Ventures, though it's never publicly disclosed a valuation.

Mental-health benefits, days off, financial-literacy counseling, motivational meetings with senior leaders, virtual social events, and regular care packages were the primary thrust of Driver's COVID-19 response efforts as the chief people officer at BlueVine, a 400-person financial-services company for small businesses.

BlueVine also created an employee-led diversity and inclusion council that regularly reviews diversity data and recommends items for improvement to senior leadership. It also expanded its manager training to cover unconscious bias in the hiring and promotion processes.

"HR has always been a bridge between employees and organizations," Driver said. "Last year magnified the important strategic role we play in helping companies lead through change, and I believe this awareness will help our function continue to partner in new ways to help organizations create amazing employee experiences."

Angela Dunham, the chief operating officer at OJO Labs Angela Dunham Angela Dunham is the chief operating officer at OJO Labs.

Abigail Baxter

It was a tumultuous year for OJO Labs, which uses artificial intelligence to help people buy homes. But under Dunham's leadership, the company put its 200 employees first.

During last summer's protests following George Floyd's death, the company shuttered US operations for a week to give staff time to process the events. OJO Labs, which has headquarters in Austin, Texas, also partnered with the University of Texas at Austin's Center for the Study of Race and Democracy to help educate employees on issues around race.

In February, Texas went through a storm that left many people without power or water, and Dunham's team created forums in which employees could ask for help or volunteer to help others who were struggling.

"The lessons we learned this year will serve as a playbook for how HR can better serve our teams into the future," Dunham said. "I know my team found their roles more rewarding this year than ever before."

Lindsay Grenawalt, the chief people officer at Cockroach Labs Lindsay Grenawalt Lindsay Grenawalt is the chief people officer at Cockroach Labs.

Molly Concannon

After its latest round of funding, Cockroach Labs was valued at $2.16 billion.

Grenawalt and her team have grown Cockroach Labs' staff by 63% since the pandemic hit the US, onboarding 85 full-time employees and about a dozen interns. Grenawalt's team revamped the hiring and onboarding process to be entirely virtual, but still welcoming.

Even as she ramped up recruiting, Grenawalt made sure the hiring process was fair and inclusive. Cloud-software company Cockroach recruits engineers from historically Black colleges and public state universities — not just from elite computer-science schools, Grenawalt said. And only hiring managers review résumés. "This enables the broader interviewer slate to challenge their own biases and leads to a fairer hiring process," Grenawalt said.

With an end to the pandemic perhaps in sight, Grenawalt said she's "hopeful that businesses realize how imperative the HR function is."

Natalia Harris, the vice president of people operations at Eko natalia harris Natalia Harris is the VP of people operations at Eko.

Skylar Smith

At media startup Eko, Harris is holding herself accountable for cultivating DEI among its 200 employees. Eko has raised $61 million to date, Crunchbase showed.

Last year, Harris hosted a listening tour with an outside moderator, in which she asked employees to share any challenges they faced at work. More recently, Harris developed a DEI plan called "Stand Up," where she delivers a weekly report to the entire company on the progress she's made and the issues she's encountered.

Harris called HR the organizational "glue," adding that throughout the past year, HR was critical to keeping businesses functioning. She said HR has been "owning and driving change-management strategies that have helped to do more than keep the lights on, but also kept people safe, supported, and self-motivated."

Jeffrey Housman, the chief people and services officer at Restaurant Brands International Jeff Housman Jeff Housman is the chief people and services officer at Restaurant Brands International.

Restaurant Brands International

About two years ago, Housman led Restaurant Brands International in doubling down on its commitment to DEI. The 6,300-person company, whose brands include Burger King, Tim Hortons, and Popeyes, ultimately decided that at least 50% of candidates in every final interview round must be from groups that are "demonstrably diverse." For all members of the leadership team, bonuses are tied to this particular goal.

During the pandemic, sales declined at Burger King and Tim Hortons. Employees at the roughly 100 RBI-owned restaurants (most restaurants within RBI brands are owned by franchisees) were given an hourly raise and up to 14 days of paid sick leave if diagnosed with COVID-19. Corporate workers in North America were given a bonus in April 2020.

Housman said the pandemic deepened his "appreciation for the important leadership role HR can play in supporting people and helping an organization navigate through a crisis."

Jane Jaxon, the vice president of people at Wistia Jane Jaxon Jane Jaxon is the vice president of people at Wistia.

Wistia

Privately owned video-software company Wistia employs more than 100 people. And the 500,000 or so businesses that use its products include Starbucks, Tiffany & Co., and Mailchimp.

The company formed a COVID-19 task force in February 2020 and went fully remote in early March. Jaxon's team quickly got to work revamping the virtual employee experience at the video-software company.

Her team added stipends for home offices, offered virtual company events, provided masks for employees and their families, and encouraged workers to take time off.

Jaxon also created a DEI task force to develop a three-year plan for improving representation and inclusion. The task force made a number of changes, such as making Juneteenth a company holiday, offering more support for ERGs, and ensuring public transparency around diversity data.

"This is a hard role involving a lot of emotional labor," Jaxon said. "2020 really hammered that home, but I think it also really cemented the value of investing in the function and the outsize impact the role can have on a business."

Cheryl Johnson, the chief human resources officer at Paylocity Cheryl Johnson Cheryl Johnson is the CHRO at Paylocity.

Paylocity

As a mother to three children, Johnson understood the challenges facing working parents at the 3,600-person payroll-software company Paylocity, which saw a 20% revenue growth in fiscal year 2020.

So Johnson added a "matchmaking" service for tutoring so that employees' children could access a network for help with their schoolwork. The company allowed flexibility for parents in the form of split schedules, four-day workweeks, reduced hours, and the option to swap weekdays with weekend time.

Paylocity hired a chief diversity officer in June and focused on a few key areas in its DEI strategy: improving representation at all levels in the organization, workforce training, resources for clients to train their workforces, and greater transparency around people processes.

"There is no playbook for any of this," Johnson said. "I think the best thing that has come of and should come of this year is that HR is being humanized again instead of just focusing on policies and procedures."

Kristina Johnson, the chief people officer at Okta Kristina Johnson Kristina Johnson is the chief people officer at Okta.

Chad Bramlett

Johnson was ahead of the game at Okta, the $30 billion identity-security company.

In 2019, she and her team started piloting a more flexible model of work, which meant many employees could choose when and where they got stuff done. More recently, Johnson hired a head of dynamic work to make sure the success of the pilot program continued post-pandemic.

Okta employs more than 2,800 people. And to date, 60% of its hires don't live near an Okta office. The company expects 85% of its workforce to be remote once the transition to dynamic work is complete. It also made job interviews 100% virtual.

Under Johnson's leadership, Okta made DEI a priority and released its first "State of Inclusion" report in 2020. Outside its own walls, Okta made a $3 million, three-year commitment to racial justice and economic opportunity. Already, the company has donated tens of thousands of dollars to funds, including Black Lives Matter and the American Civil Liberties Union.

Now, Johnson is "working to better understand how the company can improve culture and experiences for employees at all times, whether they're in the office a few days a week, a few days a month, or rarely."

Sung Hae Kim, the chief people person at Rippleworks Sung Hae Kim Sung Hae Kim is the chief people person at Rippleworks.

Rippleworks

At Rippleworks, a nonprofit with around 50 employees that supports social-impact entrepreneurs, Kim has been prioritizing flexibility, such as allowing people to work in the office if they choose. Kim also made sure to encourage employees to take time off and provided a monthly cash allowance to use for health services.

"I have known Sung Hae for over 10 years. She was my rotation manager when I was in the HR Leadership Program at HP," said Amy Nguyen, a career coach who nominated Kim for this list. "This was among the best experiences I had in my HR career. We've been in touch since then."

Rippleworks, the foundation of cryptocurrency Ripple, also implemented a new hiring process designed to be more equitable. The company committed to having 50% of every candidate short list come from an underrepresented group. It also trained interviewers on new interview processes and set up a "Tiger Team" task force in order to "maintain the DEI drumbeat," Kim said. This team also helped create new DEI objectives for the company.

"I feel that HR leaders have played a key role in ensuring that company's pay attention to all forms of wellness for their employees, including psychological safety," Kim said.

April Kyrkos, the chief operating officer at Brighton Jones April Kyrkos April Kyrkos is the chief operating officer at Brighton Jones.

Brighton Jones

Kyrkos focused on communication, psychological safety, and personal well-being in leading the wealth-management company's COVID-19 response effort. Brighton Jones, which has 195 employees, gave workers a $1,000 stipend to improve their home offices. It also built out a training program focused on mindfulness and social intelligence.

With the support of its CEO, Kyrkos amped up the company's DEI efforts: It pledged to be an anti-racist organization, made donations, hired outside help to develop a DEI playbook, and created an internal program called JEDI (justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion) to measure progress on DEI goals.

"The people team has always aimed to service our team members just like they service our clients. We strive for a thoughtful, personalized experience," Kyrkos said. "Our goal remains to be supporting each individual in their pursuit of happiness."

Jonathan Lucus, the head of NSITE Jonathan Lucus Jonathan Lucus is the head of NSITE.

Courtesy of NSITE

NSITE connects people who are blind, visually impaired, or veterans with job opportunities. Lucus helped launch the now seven-person organization in January, once he saw how the pandemic had exacerbated under- and unemployment among this community.

Lucus said his goal as the head of NSITE is to "find innovative ways to strengthen the workforce of US companies through DEI" and accessibility, focusing specifically on visually impaired workers. For employees to excel at their jobs, he added, employers must provide different types of flexibility.

Even within NSITE, Lucus prioritized flexibility: "By empowering your employees to strike a personal and professional balance that works for them, without fear of reprisal, we have established trust and fostered support for one another."

Sundar Narayanan, the chief people officer at Virtusa Sundararajan Narayanan Sundar Narayanan is the chief people officer at Virtusa.

Virtusa

Virtusa is a 25,000-person IT-services company that works with tech giants such as Amazon Web Services, Google, and Salesforce. When the pandemic began, Narayanan set up an internal task force to monitor updates and communicate with Virtusa's teams around the world as working conditions changed.

Narayanan helped most of Virtusa's staff transition to remote work. He set about making sure employees were able to do their work and take care of themselves outside of work. So the company offered a 24/7 help line, well-being programs, and a COVID-19 care plan that included "screening, testing, home quarantine and isolation assistance, and ambulance services," Narayanan said.

"HR played an extremely strategic role in ensuring business continuity was not compromised due to the pandemic. We were very quick to go digital on all our people platforms and frameworks," he said.

Virtusa has also worked to improve gender equity in technology. It hosts "hackathons," apprenticeship and mentorship programs, and the Women of Virtusa group, which provides career-development opportunities for employees. Virtusa also allows employees to "initiate a new career" after taking a few years off for family reasons, which Narayanan said has helped with the retention of female employees.

Lynne Oldham, the chief people officer at Zoom Lynne Oldham Lynne Oldham is the chief people officer at Zoom.

Zoom

Before the pandemic, Zoom was about 15% remote as a company. As usage of its platform skyrocketed, those remaining employees were experiencing the same challenges as the rest of the world — balancing work and increased family obligations while trying to stay healthy and sane during a public-health crisis.

For Oldham, the pandemic response required a two-pronged approach: The company needed to address the skyrocketing demand and step up to support more than 4,400 employees. One of its first investments was in a mental-health platform and physical-health benefits to cover gym memberships, grocery and food delivery, office furniture, and more.

Oldham helped launch meetings to discuss diversity and a series of events for the children of employees. She also forged a partnership with an HBCU, Claflin University, and has participated in Next Chapter, an initiative to help formerly incarcerated people learn to code.

Oldham said that about a third of the company's total workforce was hired after the pandemic began. So they have less familiarity with coworkers and the overall company culture.

"The workplace has forever changed, and employers need to support flexibility in the workplace," Oldham said. "I'm currently working to be sure employees return to a safe office designed around employee needs, in a hybrid model geared toward enhancing collaboration and productivity while allowing space for employees to be humans first."

Jeff Ostermann, the chief people officer at Sweetwater Jeff Ostermann Jeff Ostermann is the chief people officer at Sweetwater.

Sweetwater

Ostermann had barely been in his seat for a month as the chief people officer at audio-equipment manufacturer Sweetwater when the pandemic hit the US. The company had around 1,500 employees at the start of 2020 and added 400 more over the course of the year as it crossed $1 billion in annual revenue and grew its customer base by 50%.

Ostermann made sure to communicate with employees frequently and as accurately as possible about changes occurring in the workplace. Ostermann started sending regular emails to employees, something the company had never done before, to inform them of the rollout of new services and safety measures.

Ostermann also worked with the company's CEO to develop an updated DEI strategy. He met with dozens of employees individually to create this strategy, which ended up with a new online diversity training program for all employees, guest speakers to discuss inclusion, and the hiring of a vice president of employee well-being who is also responsible for DEI.

"In moments of crisis, I believe that those organizations that had already implemented a proactive approach to caring for employees found themselves better situated than most to weather the storm," Ostermann said. "I've told our team repeatedly that who our HR group is today will determine what our company is, not just tomorrow but three, five, and 10 years from now."

Cynthia Ring, the chief people officer at Tufts Health Plan and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Cynthia Ring Cynthia Ring is the chief people officer at Tufts Health Plan and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care.

Leighton Thompson

Ring is a 25-year HR veteran and a champion for diverse voices across the newly combined Tufts Health Plan and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care. The organization now employs 4,467 people and is expected to serve 2.4 million members.

She's focused in particular on supporting the LGBTQ+ community, and Harvard Pilgrim received a perfect score in the 2020 Corporate Equality Index, which evaluates companies based on best practices for LGBTQ inclusion. Ring also spearheaded a mentorship program tied to executive compensation: Executives must mentor someone who is different from them in terms of gender, race, or age. (The program is on pause now that the two organizations have merged, but Ring is working on developing similar initiatives.)

Ring said one of the most important takeaways from the pandemic is the importance of empathy. "This greater understanding has allowed Harvard Pilgrim to increase its focus on its employees as individuals," she said, "and to think about the company's support systems beyond traditional HR benefits."

Paul Rubenstein, the chief people officer at Visier paul rubenstein Paul Rubenstein is the chief people officer at Visier.

Visier

As the chief people officer at Visier, a Vancouver HR analytics company, Rubenstein said he learned that "data can help build empathy for the things you can't physically observe" during the pandemic.

Visier was named one of Canada's best small and medium employers three years in a row. To get a sense of how Visier's more than 400 workers were feeling during the pandemic, Rubenstein and his team conducted pulse surveys to gain an understanding of where employees needed the most support.

In the interest of promoting DEI, Rubenstein increased transparency around recruiting and promotion processes, and also emphasized the role of leadership in prioritizing inclusion.

The company also gave workers $1,000 to set up their home offices and added an "MTV Cribs"-style segment that allowed employees to share their home-office setups, pets, and families.

"The events of the past year really showed the importance of having a culture where people are connected with intention rather than just cohabitating an office," Rubenstein said. "HR has a role in measuring and protecting culture — through communications, creating rituals and celebrations, and holding up a mirror to how we all show up at work."

Michelle Sitzman, the chief people officer at Talend Michelle Sitzman Michelle Sitzman is the chief people officer at Talend.

Michelle Newburgh

Sitzman admits that her plans for 2020 went out the window. Instead, she had to adapt to what 1,400 employees needed at the data company Talend, where annual recurring cloud revenue grew 150% between the first quarter of 2019 and the same period in 2020.

One critical change Sitzman initiated was adjusting the performance-review format. "This helped alleviate some of the heavy lifting typically associated with employees and managers at the end of the fiscal year," she said, "and sustain a mechanism to drive meaningful conversations." Sitzman's team also worked with Talend's CEO to address mental-health concerns among the staff, and they're in the process of introducing Headspace memberships for all employees.

"I believe it's essential to create an organization and culture that makes a deep sense of belonging and allows us to do the best work of our careers," Sitzman said.

Lenke Taylor, the chief people officer at Twitch Lenke Taylor headshot Lenke Taylor is the chief people officer at Twitch.

Twitch

Amazon's Twitch hosts 91% of all video-game streaming and experienced rocket-ship user growth during the pandemic.

Taylor invested heavily in virtual Twitch events, including guided workouts and interactive cooking classes for more than 11,000 employees. The company also improved onboarding to help workers joining the remote-only environment acclimate to the company culture.

Employees also received a number of surprises, including a box of "famous Twitch Kitchen cookies," which Taylor called "a delicious nod" to the company's in-office culture, as the cookies were normally available before the pandemic.

"The pandemic has been an incredibly difficult time to lead a people function, but also a very rewarding one," Taylor said. "As CPO in such a turbulent time, I've learned how important it is to encourage the best of each individual's capabilities and ensure they are collaborating as a team."

Twitch has focused on data and accountability for leaders to reach DEI goals across hiring, training, employee support, and people programs, Taylor said. It also expanded its employee-led guilds and further empowered them to advocate for inclusion across the company. For example, the company has a new apprenticeship program to bring in employees from nontraditional or underrepresented backgrounds.

Laurie Tennant, the vice president of people at Norwest Venture Partners Laurie Tennant Laurie Tennant is the vice president of people at Norwest Venture Partners.

Norwest Venture Partners

A venture-capital company with over 130 employees, Norwest Ventures also had the interests of over 150 portfolio companies in mind with its pandemic response. This included adding access to telehealth benefits, informal talks, guest-speaker events, and free online courses from Udemy, in addition to participation in an HR roundtable for the investment community.

"While I have always known that HR is important, this year really drove home the unique contributions that HR leaders make," Tennant said. "It was stimulating, rewarding, and terrifying to be the one to whom others were looking for solutions that didn't yet exist. I think this year gave HR an opportunity to shine as strategic partners to the business."

Norwest Ventures also responded to the increased responsibility to drive equality in the startup world, forging a partnership with the Black student group at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and making donations to local schools and colleges to support access to information on the world of entrepreneurship.

Janet Van Huysse, the chief people officer at Cloudflare Janet Van Huysse Janet Van Huysse is the chief people officer at Cloudflare.

Claudia Traverso

Cybersecurity company Cloudflare more than doubled its market cap during the pandemic. And it's hungry for new talent beyond the 1,700 people it employs.

As a working mother at Cloudflare, Van Huysse has focused especially on supporting employees who are parents during the pandemic. The "Cloudfarents" employee resource group meets regularly and generates ideas around benefits and programs for parents. And Van Huysse led Cloudflare in joining the Invest in Parents pledge, which publicly encourages companies to support working parents through this crisis.

Van Huysse, who was once the VP of HR at Twitter, is still reflecting on the positive changes to come out of the pandemic — in particular the ability to craft your workday around your lifestyle. "There's no going back to the way things were," she said. "The future is flexible, and that's a good thing."

Sean Vanderelzen, the chief human resources officer at Lineage Logistics Sean Vanderelzen Sean Vanderelzen is the CHRO at Lineage Logistics.

Rachael Collins

It was a big year for cold-storage company Lineage Logistics, which employs about 18,000 people.

The company acquired more than 39 businesses, and Vanderelzen led the employee-integration process, revamping Lineage's culture to accommodate so many new additions.

Vanderelzen also made sure Lineage put employees first during the pandemic. He successfully encouraged the company to reduce executive compensation and reallocate those funds toward bonuses for frontline workers. The company brought on a physician to consult on employee safety, and it built custom medical trailers, which provided COVID-19 testing and antibody testing, in the parking lots of some of its busiest facilities.

The past year reminded Vanderelzen why he pursued an HR career in the first place: "I saw the impact that great people practices could have on an organization. No matter what you do, people are the absolute backbone of it."

Pat Wadors, the global talent officer and chief human resources officer at Procore Pat Wadors Pat Wadors is the global talent officer and CHRO at Procore.

Sharon Kane

Wadors has spent 35 years in HR, with stints at Yahoo and LinkedIn.

In HR, she said, "uniqueness and authenticity are celebrated," and she wants to bring that feeling to others. At LinkedIn, Wadors, a self-described introvert, brought the Quiet Ambassador Program to life in order to help employees learn that introversion doesn't have to preclude professional success.

Wadors joined Procore, which creates cloud-based software for construction projects and employs about 2,000 people, in November. Before that, she worked at software company ServiceNow, which is where she helped launch People+Work Connect, a platform that helps companies find job candidates who may have been laid off from other employers. (Chief human resources officers at Accenture, Lincoln Financial Group, and Verizon are cofounders.)

"I'm living my best life in this role," Wadors said of being a CHRO. "It's the most comfortable I've ever felt."

Cassie Whitlock, the director of HR at BambooHR Cassie Whitlock Cassie Whitlock is the director of HR at BambooHR.

Cassie Whitlock

More than two decades ago, Whitlock started her career in accounting. "Over time, I recognized that I was more passionate about the work around people," she said.

That passion was on display during the pandemic.

At BambooHR, the HR-software provider in Utah that employs 600 people in the US, Whitlock and her team were able to prevent layoffs. To help workers who had lost their jobs, they created the Utah Layoffs page, which helped laid-off employees find new roles in tech. Whitlock's team even volunteered to coach people who'd been let go from other companies on their job applications.

Whitlock has made DEI a priority at BambooHR. All interviewers go through training that covers hiring discrimination and unconscious bias, and they're required to use scorecards to keep the interview process as consistent as possible.

In 2021, BambooHR was named one of the best workplaces in technology by Great Place to Work. 

It's critical, Whitlock said, that talent leaders "embody the 'human' in human resources." She added, "Yes, there are HR tasks to do, but your real job is to help the people of your organization be successful."

Dantaya Williams, the chief human resources officer at Raytheon Technologies Dantaya Williams Dantaya Williams is the EVP and CHRO at Raytheon Technologies.

Meredith Wilshere

Raytheon outperformed earnings expectations last year, with $1.4 billion in cash from operations in the fourth quarter of 2020. But the aviation and aerospace industry was hit hard by the pandemic, and Raytheon cut about 21,000 workers (it has a staff of nearly 180,000 people).

Williams led Raytheon in supporting employees. Most notably, she helped expand Raytheon's dependent-care benefit to all US employees. If your routine care falls through, the company works with care provider Bright Horizons to provide subsidized backup care.

Williams has also focused on both gender and racial equity, and Raytheon is committed to achieving gender parity across senior leadership roles by 2030.

To keep Raytheon staff engaged, Williams helped introduce the Employee Scholar Program, which allows employees to pursue any work-related degree that interests them. The company helps fund the tuition.

Williams said that through the challenges of the past year, she "saw endless examples of courage, resiliency, and authenticity." She added, "We shifted long-standing beliefs and thought differently about how work gets done."

Denise Williams, the chief people officer at FIS Denise Williams Denise Williams is the chief people officer at FIS.

Helena Bertrand

FIS took a unique approach to the pandemic. Instead of conducting layoffs or cutting salaries, the fintech gave employees raises and paid bonuses to its essential staff around the world. The company employs over 55,000 people and grew annual revenue by 21% in 2020.

Amid the protests that unfolded after the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Williams displayed empathetic and authentic leadership.

"These events deeply impacted many within our company, including me as a Black woman," Williams said, "a fact that I did not shy away from sharing with our colleagues." Williams' team created forums where employees shared thoughts on how FIS could better drive social change.

Williams said a company's performance depends heavily on the strength of its talent team. "It's become crystal clear that companies that have HR at the center of their strategy and approach," she said, "are the ones that will thrive in this new, uncertain, and complex world."

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: slebowitz@businessinsider.com (Shana Lebowitz,Aman Kidwai)]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 11:03:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Careers Nordic Features BI Graphics Marianne Ayala HR Insider HR executive HR Human Resources Talent Management DEI Diversity Leadership Remote Work Flexible Work Ultimate-kronos-most-innovative Edit Series Most Innovative HR Leaders
How to increase your influence as thought leader in your industry http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/Re8Gp4w6yOE/thought-leader-careers-industry-position-influence-2021-4 Being recognized as a thought leader can invite opportunities for panels, conferences, and even TV appearances.

Nick David/Getty Images

  • To become a thought leader, founder Jennifer Spencer suggests focusing on a niche you're already familiar with.
  • She says your thought leadership should reflect who you are, so stick to what you're passionate about.
  • Having an influential voice will increase your credibility and boost exposure for your brand and advocacy.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

As the online ecosystem for thought leadership has continued to populate, many have turned their attention away from social media numbers, worrying it's too competitive. And while it's true that the battle for an online footprint has never been more fierce, it's also never been more important to claim your unique stake on the Internet and create content that proves that you're an expert in your field.

The importance of building internet thought leadership cannot be understated. This can be done via guest-posting for credible publications, building out a watch series on video-compatible social media sites (like IGTV or YouTube) or posting regularly on Medium or LinkedIn. The following are the core reasons why building thought leadership through these means can be the boost you've been looking for in your career.

It denotes credibility

Nowadays, a byline for a major publication or a considerable social media following is the near-equivalent of a degree from a top-tier university. From a social perspective, it suggests that you have something to say that people want to listen to - large groups of people, specifically. Well-known publications only choose top writers and thought leaders to contribute, and while many call your social media following a vanity metric, it still says something about your credibility to onlookers.

This credibility matters for opportunities you may have your eye on. This could include speaking engagements at events or conferences, new career opportunities or even impressing key stakeholders like investors. Thought leadership entails that you stand behind a cutting-edge idea or concept in your respective industry, and that others look to you as a leader within it. Bylines and follower count prove this leadership, which means you'll be at the top of the list for TV appearances, panels, and conferences where your opinion and research can offer value.

It creates exposure

The powerful part about a large audience is that it creates exposure for you, your brand, and what you can speak to. Every reader who finds an article you wrote for a publication is another set of eyeballs that can keep you top of mind for opportunities. Every social media follower who consistently tunes in for what you say is another set of eyeballs that can go to bat for you when their boss or a friend asks for a recommendation for a podcast guest or expert.

And they fold into one another. For every article you write that does well, more readers learn who you are and are likely to follow you on your social accounts. When you share your latest piece on your social accounts, you'll get more readers.

Exposure also matters for marketing. Everyone who consumes the thought leadership content that you create is a potential customer, a potential investo or a potential repeat customer (and you're proving your credibility to all of them).

Choosing your thought leadership niche

All of this sounds great; so how does one get started? Begin where you already have a significant amount of expertise. If you've started a business, what do you know that is critically important for other founders to know? If you've successfully raised money or invested, what have you learned? My top suggestion is to niche down. The best thought leaders have a clear and concise mission statement that helps them stand out amongst the noise of these admittedly competitive fields.

For example, rather than saying you're a thought leader in "starting a business and raising your first round of funding," perhaps you could tailor your content more specifically to address "how to find your first round of investors who share your company's core values." Then, add to this specific thought leadership niche with research about why a full startup team having shared values leads to explosive business growth, and how companies should create their pitch decks with this in mind. The more niche your content is, the more memorable you will be.

Don't be in a rush to find something that sounds particularly enticing just for the sake of it. It's important to let your genuine passion shine through. What do you genuinely want to research and talk about over the course of your career? Of course, you can pivot as your research and experience takes you down different paths, but for the most part, your thought leadership should reflect who you are, what your experience is and what you hope to continue to build.

Get started

The first step is to begin creating content. Many top publications expect to see a portfolio when you apply to be a contributor or submit a guest post, but this isn't an "always" rule. A portfolio could consist of blog posts, articles for smaller publications, TV appearances, or a strong audience base on a platform like Instagram or Twitter where you specialize in sharing research and expertise around a niche topic.

Just ask social media thought leader Gary Vaynerchuk, who is a vocal advocate for thought leadership on social media. As he shared with CNBC, "Become a practitioner. Please don't underestimate the social network ecosystem … it's ccommunication. It's not social media. Communication is fundamentally how the world turns; and I implore this audience to triple down on their efforts of being a written, audio or video communicator on the platforms."

At the heart of it, communication is what thought leadership is really all about. The more you can take to writing, speaking, and sharing your message - backed by research, experience, and expertise - the more you can make a true difference in this world and attract compelling opportunities for your own career while doing so.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Jennifer Spencer)]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 09:19:14 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Nordic Entrepreneur Thought Leadership Leadership Personal Branding Contributor Contributor 2019
How entrepreneurs can bolster their company and emerge from the pandemic as new market leaders http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/mTJ82Ibf5Ps/entrepreneurs-emerge-pandemic-new-market-leaders-2021-4 Prepared leaders can make decisions by seeing market opportunities that are invisible to the untrained eye.

Getty Images

  • Tough economic times are opportunities for leaders to evaluate their company's trajectory and reach.
  • To survive market uncertainty, leverage your unique advantages and stay competitive.
  • Start with a flexible framework, allow room for failure, and keep your leadership team in sync.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

No one ever said it was going to be all smooth sailing. We've all been in a boat that's gotten a little rocky, and some of us have even experienced a full-on capsize. In my experience of weathering the storm, there are one of two things that happen to your company: You either go out of business or you stay in business. If you are leading a team, you need to figure out which of those two positions your company is headed towards. Chances are, it won't be difficult as a lot has already happened and shaken out in the marketplace. That's good news for entrepreneurs, and even better news for leaders. The companies that weren't strong enough to survive have already failed. And while we mourn their loss, we also have to recognize that it's leveled the playing field. This is also a good time to take stock of where competitors have landed and where you currently rank in the pack.

The difference between those who survive and those who thrive

The companies that will win are those who learn how to leverage market uncertainty for their unique competitive advantages and leapfrog their competition with a period of rapid growth. On the surface, this sounds like a brilliant strategy, but there are thousands of ways it can fail if not executed well. A bad bet could take a company down, just as quickly as a good bet could pull it to the front of the line. This is where we'll see a second round of companies fail, which will set the stage for the winners to double down once again and secure their seats at the top.

Competition is about to get fierce as companies start to position themselves for market dominance. We can expect market sectors to start to shake up and shake out over the next two to three years as the full market impact of the pandemic unfolds.

At the same time, the potential gains are big. With market sectors in flux, the potential to take on the market leader spot has never been greater. This is the kind of opportunity that only comes around once in a lifetime, so I recommend paying attention to your industry competition, closely. Technology is accelerating faster than Corporate America can adopt it, creating a fertile ground for start-up and mid-sized companies to innovate their way into the top seat. However, all bets are not created equal and entrepreneurs need to understand how to weigh bets and when to push the accelerator.

Creating a framework for success

Framework is important. It should be flexible and allow for rapid failure. The best way to win is to fail faster and in smaller chunks. It should also empower winners to make their way to the top faster. Oftentimes, winners lose because they can't even see they are there. The framework must prevent that from happening, and should allow for rapid experimentation. We never know which idea is a winner until it has a chance to win. So often our strategies are mired in complexity and complicated execution plans. That isn't going to fly if you want to take the top seat. Instead, you'll need a space for ideas to be planted, to grow and to reproduce. In execution, this often looks like an idea lab with a budget and a team who knows how to get stuff done at the helm.

So how can leaders understand the chessboard so they can call checkmate on their competition? They have to settle into discomfort. Prepared leaders will be able to make clear-headed decisions while seeing market opportunities that are invisible to the untrained eye. And they will be prepared to move even when it isn't comfortable to do so.

The road to the top is rather arduous and requires massive levels of organizational flexibility that can't be taught overnight. The leadership team must be in sync and know how to make the right decisions that are right for the business and its people, even if they are tough or risky. Employees need to feel appreciated, valued for their contributions, and celebrated every step of the way. Customers also need to feel satisfied and delighted by their entire experience. That's a tall order for a company of any size, but especially challenging for industry behemoths. That's why it's a market ripe for the market leaders to fail and the market innovators to succeed.

Taking advantage of future innovation gaps

These are evolutionary times. We've never seen a combination of events with such a broad brush of impact. Every industry is primed for rapid transformation and realignment as the full market impact of 2020 continues to unfold. Technology is accelerating faster than it can be adopted by industry leaders, which is opening the door for innovation gaps. These gaps create an opening for new startups to come through and disrupt entire markets.

There's no telling what innovations will pop up and be the next market leader, but this market is ready. We'll get excited about the innovation, and before you know it, it will become the new norm. This won't be the first time we've seen industry leaders fail and get overtaken by an unnamed competitor and it won't be the last. As markets have it, there's always a play that can win. Will it be yours?

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Nichole Kelly)]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 09:09:08 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Nordic Entrepreneur Market and Economy Leadership Pandemic Economy Leaders Innovation Success Contributor Contributor 2019
“You’re not that good” http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/EzDY28MNdrA/ These are the three problems with creative work.

The first is that when we begin, we’re not that good. This is a fact. The breakthrough for anyone on this journey is adding the word “yet.”

It doesn’t pay to pretend that we’ve figured it out before we have. It’s counterproductive to adopt a brittle attitude in the face of criticism. In fact, during this stage, “you’re not that good,” is precisely what we need to hear, because it might be followed with insight on how to get better.

The second is that once we start to build skills and offer something of value, some people are going to persist in believing that we’re not that good. Fine. They’ve told us something about themselves and what they want and need. This is a clue to offer our leadership and contribution to someone else, someone who gets what we’re doing and wants it. The smallest viable audience isn’t a compromise, it’s a path forward. Find the folks who are enrolled and open and eager. Serve them instead.

The danger is that when you hear rejection during this stage, you might come to believe that you’ve accomplished nothing, as opposed to realizing that you might simply be talking to the wrong people.

And the third comes full circle. Because it’s possible that in fact, we’re not that good yet, and there aren’t enough people who want what we’ve got. We’re simply not good enough for this part of the market. So we embrace that truth and begin at the beginning. We’re not good enough yet. We haven’t practiced enough, found enough empathy, understood the genre well enough and figured out how to contribute. Yet. At least for this audience.

And then we get better.

Sooner or later, these three problems become three milestones on the road to making a difference and doing work we’re proud of.


PS today’s the best day to sign up for the Freelancer’s Workshop offered by Akimbo. I hope you’ll join in…

[Author: Seth Godin]

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 03:36:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Uncategorized Seth Godin
Can you see it? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/TVv3EiBSF4s/ Do you notice that you’re dressed dramatically differently than everyone else at the event?

That you’re driving at a different pace than everyone else?

That your question at the end of the talk lasted four times longer than anyone else’s?

That your band’s new single is half the volume of everything else that’s being pitched to this program director?

That your code isn’t commented and everyone else’s is?

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with being different from the crowd. In fact, it might be the ideal path forward. The problem begins when you don’t see what’s not matching up.

The best way to transform the path is to see the path first.

History doesn’t always repeat itself, but it usually rhymes.

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Thu, 15 Apr 2021 03:36:17 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Uncategorized
Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. His latest challenge: convincing the world to suffer on purpose. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/_kCDsWl6Vns/david-goggins-navy-seal-business-toughness-books-speaking-2021-4

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Brandon Rogers/US Navy; @davidgoggins/Twitter; Marianne Ayala/Insider

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins' thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of "Can't Hurt Me," Goggins' memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to "Stay hard!" And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand - inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: "David Goggins is in my head daily."

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers - his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits - is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren't a runner, you exercised. If you weren't a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he's found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

"It's just really empowering," said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins' list of accomplishments. Petersen - a runner and triathlete - was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. "People are starting to embrace that it's OK if you suffer, and that you're tougher than you think."

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins' calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he's offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins' fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest - through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored - could carve out a lucrative "business of toughness" over the coming years.

"I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don't even know about," Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. "It's my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, 'Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.' And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story." (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins' cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

"She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze," Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, "Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds." "And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they'd give me pain killers and I didn't want to mask this pain. I'd just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life."

brent gleeson & david goggins Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

Brent Gleeson

david goggins Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

Brent Gleeson

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

Brent Gleeson

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he'd once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He's completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins' core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into "going the distance," not winning the race. He speaks often of the "40% rule," which says that when people typically give up, they're really only 40% depleted.

"The reason it's so powerful," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me," "is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success."

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins' first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

"I damn sure wasn't going to get into college based on academics," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me." "All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana." He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And "when that glory faded," about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

"He's always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage," said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including "Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life." "It's that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people."

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

US Navy Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Brandon Rogers/US Navy

Not just transformation - multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

"I try to be as real as I can," Goggins said, "because we're all fucking suffering in this world. We're all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That's why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person."

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word "influencer," staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success - and sometimes his stress.

"My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that's not real," he told Rogan. "I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can't mass-produce something, man."

Instead, he's started giving talks. He's spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as "Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great" and "Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable."

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, "Can't Hurt Me." He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down "at the last minute" and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins' press representative did not respond to Insider's request to confirm these figures.)

"It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life," Goggins said in the event, "because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand."

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline's Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times' bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

"That's spectacular for any book," said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn't what gets him up in the morning. "I'm not driven by the business," he told Rogan. "I'm a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I'm fucking straight."

To be sure, Goggins isn't the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including "Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win." Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: "WARPATH."

Many of Goggins' followers also find strength in Jocko, as he's better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. "I've never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint," Gleeson said. "Never seen it before."

david goggins moab 240 Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

David Goggins/Instagram

david goggins moab 240 Goggins' finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

David Goggins/Instagram

Goggins isn't for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins' appeal has been the mythic quality that's followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published "Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet." Itzler never used the SEAL's name in the book, but word soon got out that the "toughest man" was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins' Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who's ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, "Wow, this guy is absolutely wild" - in a good way, she said. "I've never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable." She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. "Our society promotes pure extreme," said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. "We're fanatic about crazy shit. We're big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits."

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. "People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you're lazy, you're lazy. You're not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that."

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he's motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying "Can't Hurt Me" and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn't seem so bad.

"There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small," he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. "I'm, like, 'Honestly? I read David Goggins' book.'"

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Chris Weller)]

]]>
Wed, 14 Apr 2021 10:03:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Influencer David Goggins Navy SEAL Leadership Motivation Social Media Marianne Ayala BI Graphics Enhanced
Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. His latest challenge: persuading the world to suffer on purpose. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/_kCDsWl6Vns/david-goggins-navy-seal-business-toughness-books-speaking-2021-4

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Brandon Rogers/US Navy; @davidgoggins/Twitter; Marianne Ayala/Insider

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins' thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of "Can't Hurt Me," Goggins' memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to "Stay hard!" And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand - inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: "David Goggins is in my head daily."

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers - his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits - is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren't a runner, you exercised. If you weren't a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he's found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

"It's just really empowering," said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins' list of accomplishments. Petersen - a runner and triathlete - was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. "People are starting to embrace that it's OK if you suffer, and that you're tougher than you think."

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins' calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he's offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins' fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest - through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored - could carve out a lucrative "business of toughness" over the coming years.

"I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don't even know about," Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. "It's my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, 'Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.' And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story." (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins' cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

"She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze," Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, "Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds." "And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they'd give me pain killers and I didn't want to mask this pain. I'd just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life."

brent gleeson & david goggins Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

Brent Gleeson

david goggins Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

Brent Gleeson

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

Brent Gleeson

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he'd once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He's completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins' core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into "going the distance," not winning the race. He speaks often of the "40% rule," which says that when people typically give up, they're really only 40% depleted.

"The reason it's so powerful," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me," "is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success."

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins' first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

"I damn sure wasn't going to get into college based on academics," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me." "All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana." He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And "when that glory faded," about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

"He's always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage," said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including "Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life." "It's that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people."

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

US Navy Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Brandon Rogers/US Navy

Not just transformation - multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

"I try to be as real as I can," Goggins said, "because we're all fucking suffering in this world. We're all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That's why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person."

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word "influencer," staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success - and sometimes his stress.

"My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that's not real," he told Rogan. "I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can't mass-produce something, man."

Instead, he's started giving talks. He's spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as "Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great" and "Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable."

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, "Can't Hurt Me." He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down "at the last minute" and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins' press representative did not respond to Insider's request to confirm these figures.)

"It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life," Goggins said in the event, "because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand."

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline's Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times' bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

"That's spectacular for any book," said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn't what gets him up in the morning. "I'm not driven by the business," he told Rogan. "I'm a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I'm fucking straight."

To be sure, Goggins isn't the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including "Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win." Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: "WARPATH."

Many of Goggins' followers also find strength in Jocko, as he's better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. "I've never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint," Gleeson said. "Never seen it before."

david goggins moab 240 Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

David Goggins/Instagram

david goggins moab 240 Goggins' finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

David Goggins/Instagram

Goggins isn't for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins' appeal has been the mythic quality that's followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published "Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet." Itzler never used the SEAL's name in the book, but word soon got out that the "toughest man" was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins' Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who's ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, "Wow, this guy is absolutely wild" - in a good way, she said. "I've never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable." She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. "Our society promotes pure extreme," said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. "We're fanatic about crazy shit. We're big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits."

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. "People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you're lazy, you're lazy. You're not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that."

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he's motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying "Can't Hurt Me" and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn't seem so bad.

"There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small," he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. "I'm, like, 'Honestly? I read David Goggins' book.'"

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Chris Weller)]

]]>
Wed, 14 Apr 2021 10:03:40 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Influencer David Goggins Navy SEAL Leadership Motivation Social Media Marianne Ayala BI Graphics Enhanced
Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. He wants you to love suffering as much as he does. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/_kCDsWl6Vns/david-goggins-navy-seal-business-toughness-books-speaking-2021-4

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Brandon Rogers/US Navy; @davidgoggins/Twitter; Marianne Ayala/Insider

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins' thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of "Can't Hurt Me," Goggins' memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to "Stay hard!" And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand - inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: "David Goggins is in my head daily."

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers - his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits - is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren't a runner, you exercised. If you weren't a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he's found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

"It's just really empowering," said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins' list of accomplishments. Petersen - a runner and triathlete - was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. "People are starting to embrace that it's OK if you suffer, and that you're tougher than you think."

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins' calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he's offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins' fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest - through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored - could carve out a lucrative "business of toughness" over the coming years.

"I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don't even know about," Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. "It's my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, 'Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.' And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story." (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins' cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

"She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze," Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, "Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds." "And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they'd give me pain killers and I didn't want to mask this pain. I'd just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life."

brent gleeson & david goggins Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

Brent Gleeson

david goggins Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

Brent Gleeson

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

Brent Gleeson

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he'd once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He's completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins' core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into "going the distance," not winning the race. He speaks often of the "40% rule," which says that when people typically give up, they're really only 40% depleted.

"The reason it's so powerful," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me," "is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success."

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins' first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

"I damn sure wasn't going to get into college based on academics," Goggins wrote in "Can't Hurt Me." "All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana." He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And "when that glory faded," about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

"He's always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage," said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including "Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life." "It's that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people."

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

US Navy Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Brandon Rogers/US Navy

Not just transformation - multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

"I try to be as real as I can," Goggins said, "because we're all fucking suffering in this world. We're all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That's why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person."

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word "influencer," staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success - and sometimes his stress.

"My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that's not real," he told Rogan. "I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can't mass-produce something, man."

Instead, he's started giving talks. He's spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as "Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great" and "Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable."

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, "Can't Hurt Me." He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down "at the last minute" and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins' press representative did not respond to Insider's request to confirm these figures.)

"It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life," Goggins said in the event, "because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand."

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline's Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times' bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

"That's spectacular for any book," said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn't what gets him up in the morning. "I'm not driven by the business," he told Rogan. "I'm a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I'm fucking straight."

To be sure, Goggins isn't the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including "Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win." Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: "WARPATH."

Many of Goggins' followers also find strength in Jocko, as he's better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. "I've never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint," Gleeson said. "Never seen it before."

david goggins moab 240 Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

David Goggins/Instagram

david goggins moab 240 Goggins' finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

David Goggins/Instagram

Goggins isn't for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins' appeal has been the mythic quality that's followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published "Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet." Itzler never used the SEAL's name in the book, but word soon got out that the "toughest man" was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins' Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who's ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, "Wow, this guy is absolutely wild" - in a good way, she said. "I've never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable." She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. "Our society promotes pure extreme," said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. "We're fanatic about crazy shit. We're big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits."

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. "People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you're lazy, you're lazy. You're not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that."

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he's motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying "Can't Hurt Me" and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn't seem so bad.

"There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small," he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. "I'm, like, 'Honestly? I read David Goggins' book.'"

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Chris Weller)]

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:30:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Strategy Influencer David Goggins Navy SEAL Leadership Motivation Social Media Marianne Ayala BI Graphics Enhanced
Outward Bound Lessons to Live a Life of Leadership https://leadchangegroup.com/outward-bound-lessons-to-live-a-life-of-leadership/ For nearly six decades Outward Bound USA’s education programs have shaped the lives of tens of thousands of participants. Strangers are put in an unfamiliar and unpredictable setting, where to succeed they must develop a sense of teamwork, resilience, self-confidence, and a focus on the greater good.

But, Mark Brown asks, isn’t the modern world just as unpredictable and challenging as any mountain or desert? He shows how the same principles that bind people together in the natural world work just as well in cities, companies, and communities.

Listen in as Mark Brown, author of Outward Bound Lessons to Live a Life of Leadership, explores the concept of Expeditionary Leadership through stories of individuals who have used their Outward Bound experiences to transform themselves into dynamic leaders.

 

Join us on Tuesday, April 27th at 12 PM (ET) as we sit down with Jon Lokhorst, author of Mission-Critical Leadership: How Smart Managers Lead Well in All Directions, as he explains what it means to lead well in all directions, and why doing so will have an impact on your leadership journey and those you influence with it. Register for this free event here.

The post Outward Bound Lessons to Live a Life of Leadership appeared first on Lead Change.

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Wed, 14 Apr 2021 06:00:38 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Webinars Dynamic Leaders Expeditionary Leadership Leadership Outward Bound Resilience Self-confidence Teamwork Video Webinar
What One Leadership Concept Is Overlooked Too Often? https://www.ttmitchellconsulting.com/Mitchblog/what-one-leadership-concept-is-overlooked-too-often/ Tue, 13 Apr 2021 21:40:41 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Empathy It’s Past Time to Rethink the Role (and Label) of Manager http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/artpetty/management_excellence/~3/kuRGboteTh0/ http://artpetty.com/feed/rss/

Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 09:55:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Art of Managing Just One Thing Leadership Leadership Caffeine Leading Change Management Innovation Strategy Think Differently Collaboration Digital World Execution Industrial Revolution Manager as Middleware Rethinking the Role of Manager
Identity is often used against us http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/oYUPwXzL1Gs/ Identity feels permanent, powerful, emotional and fragile.

Identity has been used to unite college alumni (“we are!”), political factions and groups of all kinds.

Criticism is not in short supply, especially lately, and criticism aimed at us, at our core self, is particularly hurtful.

“I don’t like you,” is hard to wrestle with.

That’s why ad hominem attacks on appearance and other permanent attributes we all have are so difficult to live with.

But “you” is not the car you drive, the kind of wine you drink or how you feel about a certain issue in our society. Those are choices. Those are tastes. Those can be changed.

When I say I don’t like your idea, I’m not saying that I don’t like you. And if we’ve been persuaded by marketers and politicians that everything we do and say is our identity, then it gets very difficult to learn, to accept useful feedback and to change.

Evolving our choices and our tastes is part of being human. Establishing your identity as someone who is not static, open to change and eager for better makes it far easier to engage in a world where some would prefer us to do precisely the opposite.

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 03:36:54 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Uncategorized
The plan for day 100 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/RmJ6zdTbVNM/ What do you want to be doing 100 days from now?

What change do you seek to be making? With which skills? Surrounded by which people?

For that to happen, day 99 will need to be different from today.

And so will day 98.

In fact, so will tomorrow.

If we keep focusing on ‘what’s next’ we might never get around to doing the work we need to do to get us to day 100.

PS happy day 100 of 2021.

[Author: Seth Godin]

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 03:36:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Uncategorized Seth Godin
All things being equal http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/T0wTrTM-hDU/ Those are four words that are often overlooked when we focus on the rest on the sentence instead.

“All things being equal, pick the cheapest option.” Or, “All things being equal, go with the one that creates new opportunities.” Or perhaps, “All things being equal, stick with what you’ve got.”

The thing is, all things are rarely equal.

We rush over the equal part and race to the second part of the clause, going for the cheaper one or whatever the organizational default is.

It’s worth a cycle or two to realize that we might be missing nuances in our decision making.

All things are rarely equal.

[Author: Seth Godin]

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Tue, 13 Apr 2021 03:36:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Uncategorized Seth Godin
6 New Rules for the Digital Age https://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2021/04/6_new_rules_for_the_digital_ag.html

EVERY NOW AND THEN, a book comes along to give you the insights you need to see and understand the world you live in and how to thrive in it. Rethinking Competitive Advantage: New Rules for the Digital Age by Ram Charan is one of those books. The ideas and terminology you’ve heard and read about come together here to give you a holistic view of where you need to go next.

Charan has taken years of observation and distilled it into six practical rules to guide you into this digital age.

To begin:

In the digital age, competitive advantage is the ability to win the ultimate prize—the consumer’s preference—repeatedly, through continuous innovation on behalf of the consumer, and to create immense value for the shareholders at the same time.

As opposed to:

Until recently, the greatest competitive advantage went to companies that controlled distribution channels, had hard assets on the largest scale, or had established brands or patents.

In other words, it’s more about what a company does than what it has.

Digitization defines the playing field. “The old adage ‘stick to your knitting,’ for example, a colloquial version of ‘build on your core competence,’ tends to narrow a company’s imagination. Yet a bold imagination is a requirement for leaders today.”

Digital companies like Netflix, Amazon, Google, and Alibaba, have certain elements—or approaches—in common:

• They imagine a 100x market space that doesn’t yet exist.
• They have a digital platform at their core.
• They have an ecosystem that acerates their growth.
• Their moneymaking is tied to cash and exponential growth.
• Their decision-making is designed for innovation and speed.
And,
• Their leaders drive learning, reinvention, and execution.

These elements lead to six rules that a leader must work with if they are going to thrive in the digital age. The way forward is understanding the new rules of competition and playing a different game. Charan explains several roadblocks like—an overreliance on outdated theories—to moving forward in the digital age that insightful. The first four rules represent building blocks for building a competitive advantage. The last two relate to the human side of bringing this all together.

Rule #1. A personalized consumer experience is key to exponential growth.

The digital companies connect with the end-user and creating a customized experience. They work from the end-user backward. The customer is not the retailer but the end-user. “The key is to identify an experience that can both be personalized and appeal to a very large number of people, regardless of national or cultural boundaries.” Most traditional companies don’t think big enough.

Rule #2. Algorithms and data are essential weapons.

Algorithms and data must become central to your business. Charan distinguishes digital capability and digital platform. Digital capability usually means that the company has utilized algorithms to improve internal processes. In contrast, a digital platform is “a set of algorithms that collect and analyze data. Combining and refining algorithms over time helps a company build a competitive advantage.”

Converting to a digital platform should be done incrementally. Leaders must understand what technology can do for them and have good judgment about how to use it. A digital platform can personalize the consumer experience, create market spaces of 100x, eliminate intermediaries, utilize dynamic pricing, and use data to uncover opportunities for exponential growth.

Rule #3. A company does not compete. Its ecosystem does.

The ecosystem is the arrangement between partners that can be created. “Moving forward requires seamless systems and technology platforms, taking advantage of the latest technical developments, meeting a range of consumer preferences, and processing massive amounts of data to improve the outcome of things.”

Conceiving these ecosystems takes imagination and a specific set of leadership skills. Fundamentally, “it’s about building relationships with people from other cultures and with different incentives.”

The predominant challenge is to conceive of the ecosystem in its entirety, how it will deliver a great experience for the consumer, how the partners will enhance each other capabilities, and how success will be measured and shared.

Rule #4. Moneymaking is geared for huge cash generation, not earnings per share, and the new law of increasing returns. Funders understand the difference.

When it comes to digital companies, earnings per share is not the focus. Revenue growth and cash gross margin is.

Moneymaking is different in the digital age. Of course the components of moneymaking—things like revenues, cash, gross margin, cost structure, and funding—are the same as ever. But the emphasis, the patterns, the timing, and the relationships among them are different.

In digital companies, as revenues grow, so does gross margin because of the law of increasing returns.

As digital companies grow revenues and improve percentage gross margin, they exponentially increase their gross margin in cash. In essence, they become a cash-generation machine.

The gross margins of born-digital companies are generally higher than those of their conventional counterparts.

The digital connection that digital companies have with their customer base makes it easier for them to keep them engaged and gather more data. “Algorithms can then help detect the causes of certain behaviors, including customer defections, and test ways to improve the customer experience.”

Rule #5. People, culture, and work design form a “social engine” that drives innovation and execution personalized for each customer.

The social engine, a company’s culture and way of organizing work, helps drive the growth of the big digital companies.

Most of these digital giants operate with only three or four layers below the CEO. Organizing into functionally focused teams makes for better and faster decisions and implementation. Important too is who is on those teams. Who you choose to lead those teams speaks volumes about the values of the company. Beyond just plain competency, you need people who want to learn, grow, and get things done. Laslo Bock said that at Google, they “disqualified anyone who gave even a small signal that they might not be collaborative or intellectually humble.”

Once established, the culture becomes a magnet for others who share those values and behave that way.

Rule #6. Leaders continuously learn, imagine, and break through obstacles to create the change that other companies must contend with.

Speaking of intellectual humbleness, leaders must be at the forefront of curiosity and learning—continuously growing. “Any company that is or wants to be digital must have leaders who match up against the criteria a digital company requires.” The main difference Charan sees between traditional leaders of legacy companies versus leaders of digital companies has to do with their “cognition, skills, and psychological orientation.” Among these traits are:

They have the mental capacity to think in terms of 10x or 100x, to imagine a future space that doesn’t exist, and the confidence that they will overcome whatever obstacles they might encounter.

They have a facility for and are comfortable with data-based analysis. Facts and knowledge—not predictable outcomes—give them the courage to act.

There is fluidity to their thinking. They welcome change and even seek it.

They are hungry for what’s next and are willing to create and destroy. Their psychology is geared toward high speed, urgency, and continuous experimentation.

They are literate in the application of algorithmic science and value fact-based reasoning.

They are willing to reconceptualize the organizational structure so that decision-making takes place closer to the customer to improve the speed and quality of decisions.

This insightful and very accessible book is one of Charan’s best. It should be widely read. Even if you do not want to join the current reality and perhaps go down with the ship, at least you’ll know why.

Here are a few more thoughts from the book:

Dissatisfaction with the status quo and a search for what’s next is a universal human endeavor. It does not reside in one person, department, or organizational layer. The flow of ideas cannot be blocked by bureaucratic layers. Do the people at traditional companies welcome change? What happens to the good ideas that emerge? How quickly do they get converted into action?

Today transformational change is the norm. Every company has to be able to perceive what will make their best-laid plans obsolete tomorrow and change direction quickly.

Trying to build on your core competence can be a liability in the digital age. Why? Because it tends to promote an inside-out perspective and narrow a leader’s peripheral vision and constrain imagination.

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Mon, 12 Apr 2021 12:52:53 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Google Facebook Leadership Instagram Entrepreneurship Alibaba Netflix Amazon Google Laslo Bock
Important Leadership Lessons from Steve Jobs https://leadchangegroup.com/important-leadership-lessons-from-steve-jobs/ Steve Jobs had a profound impact on the computer, television, music, telecom, and publishing sectors. Successful leaders are always prepared for unforeseen challenges and can fix them. And yet, at the end of the day, they know what truly matters—their people skills and ability to innovate. These are much more critical for leaders than rigid procedures or ideals. Steve Jobs embodied this.

Apple is an industry-defining entrepreneurial achievement championed by Jobs and his inspirational leadership style. His artistic vision, his “attention to detail,” was undeniably critical to Apple‘s growth. Apple’s versatility – a brainchild of Jobs and his creative flair –is what set it apart in a world of fast-growing technology firms.

Steve Jobs was not only renowned for his creative prowess. He was also a people person, a thorough professional, and a truly in love thinker with his work. He was a visionary leader who continues to inspire future generations of entrepreneurs even after his death.

1.     Have a Vision

A primary reason for Apple’s success is that Jobs had a clear vision of where he wanted to take the company. This vision was shared across the organization so that everyone knew how Jobs envisioned Apple in the future. The company’s leaders still use Apple’s vision to inspire and motivate employees to innovate and perform their best.

2.     Empower Your Employees

Have you ever been told to be decisive and authoritative in your approach? Steve Jobs did not believe in that. Authoritative or autocratic leaders feel they have all the answers, and employees are expected to accept their decisions. Additionally, they expect subordinates or followers to obey rules without questioning.

Steve Jobs was nothing like this. Instead, he would treat his subordinates as equals and would always be open to suggestions from them. He empowered all his employees and allowed them to cut through red tape to fulfill their true potential, benefiting Apple in the process.

3.     Challenge Your Employees

Leaders are responsible for encouraging employees to set goals for themselves and be more innovative and productive. Jobs adopted this approach, which enabled his employees to challenge themselves and fulfill their true potential.

4.     Take Responsibility

Leaders take charge of everything. They go above and beyond what they are required to do. They do this not because they want recognition or praise but because they believe it is the right thing. Jobs had this approach. He double-checked every aspect of every activity that required his oversight or leadership. He never depended on people to get things done. If there were something he could do himself, he would do it without any fuss.

5.     Keep the Creative and Critics Apart

Steve Jobs saw critical analysis, explication, and imagination are critical components of the creation process. However, he also believed that these components should be kept separate till the end. If critics and creatives are brought together into the same room, the critics would only enrage the creatives, hindering their ability to innovate.

However, creatives can easily miss the mark and struggle to achieve organizational goals if they don’t get objective input from critics. Both are required, but they must be kept apart throughout the creative process. It would be best to build diverse spaces for sub-teams to prosper without being inhibited by others for creativity to flourish.

6.     Aim for Perfection

Steve Jobs was unyielding in his quest for perfection. Jobs got the headphone jacks wholly replaced before the introduction of the iPod. Jobs’ model of perfection strongly indicates that he did not accept anything less than the best. He aimed for perfection and expected the same from his employees.

Final Word

Steve Jobs and his desire to foster an innovative culture within the organization helped Apple reach the heights that it did. Jobs had an out-of-the-box approach to leadership and reflected in everything that he did. The life of Steve Jobs should serve as a blueprint for corporate leaders who want to excel in their roles and help their companies aim for the moon.

The post Important Leadership Lessons from Steve Jobs appeared first on Lead Change.

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Mon, 12 Apr 2021 06:00:33 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Apple Leadership Steve Jobs Creativity Innovation Vision Encouraging Leadership Lessons Employee Motivation
How a 23-year-old UN rep, manager at billion-dollar beauty brand Deciem, and nonprofit founder spends her day http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/ollU4b9tISE/day-in-life-activist-beauty-manager-harjas-kaur-grewal-2021-4 Harjas Kaur Grewal

Harjas Kaur Grewal

Harjas Kaur Grewal is always busy.

As an activist, writer, and UN youth ambassador, her days are filled with researching social issues and implementing strategies to help solve the political tensions ever-plaguing the world. She ran her first petition at 13, became a Youth Ambassador for the United Nations Youth Assembly at 19, and is currently a Young Innovator for UN Global Compact. Last year, Grewal won the Diana Award for her humanitarianism, which inspired her to start her own volunteer organization, United Women.

During the day, however, Grewal works for the billion-dollar beauty company Deciem where she helps create and run its corporate activism initiatives. Deciem is known for its cult-favorite brand The Ordinary and Grewal started working there in February.

To Insider, Grewal maps out her typical day, including smoothie lunch breaks, meetings with Deciem CEO, and late-night United Women Slack meetings. "I've learned that routine is important," she said. "But it's okay to have every day look different and become comfortable with imperfection."

Her first alarm goes off at 7 a.m.

Grewal's first alarm goes off at 7 a.m., but if she's too tired, she'll press the snooze button and stay in bed for another two minutes. "I open my blinds and window to get some fresh air first thing in the morning," she said. "It always makes me feel refreshed, light, and ready for the day."

Moving back home during the pandemic was "hard" she said, but there have been perks. "Waking up to the warmth of the sun, sounds of birds chirping, and smelling spiced chai (tea) is refreshing," she continued. "Finding gratitude in the small things is always important."

Around 7:30 a.m., she starts her skincare routine

She always starts her day with a skincare routine. She became a "skincare lover" when she was just 13 after discovering Korean skincare routines. "Over the years, I would always tell my friends and family to take care of their skin because it's a form of self-care," Grewal said.

Harjas Kaur Grewal "The art in the background with my name on it was created by my good friend, Zsofia, and the flowers represent my resiliency because they grow in winter," Grewal told Insider.

Harjas Kaur Grewal

She starts off with a gentle cleanser before putting mist on damp skin. She follows up with a rosewater toner, before, of course, using The Ordinary's Niacinamide 10% + Zinc 1% as a serum. After that, she puts an eye contour serum to cover hereditary dark circles.

"And as every good skincare routine ends, I use a moisturizer to lock in my skin and soothe," she said. "I also spritz some perfume on because it's a habit that's comforting and helps normalize working from home for me."

At 8:00 a.m., she starts to journal

Shortly before the workday begins, she journals her thoughts, "whether it be poetry, emotions, memories, or things to be grateful for," Grewal said.

She's been a writer and poet since she was a child and has been spending more time [during the pandemic] writing new work. She recently launched an Instagram page to showcase some of her writing. "Many people don't know that I used to be a child actor, loved the theatre, started writing by the age of seven, and by the time I graduated high school I was a published playwright and won the provincial Young Authors Award," she told Insider.

"Writing and poetry is a hobby I try to make time for because it is a true passion of mine and I believe everyone needs to make time for what makes the heart and mind content."

The work day begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m.

The Deciem office was previously featured in Vogue, highlighting its 70,000 square foot office in Toronto, Canada. Sadly, since the pandemic, Grewal has been working from home and has only been able to go into the office a few times.

"A colleague has the cutest black lab mix, Matthew, who greets us at the door and provides the best company someone could ask for," she said.

Harjas Kaur Grewal

Harjas Kaur Grewal

On this day, she reviewed the social impact and activism strategies and campaigns to prepare for an internal listening session she was co-moderating. The company is prepping to kick off its "We Are Eight" unconference, which is a participate-driven meeting without a set agenda.

She starts her day with a new hire call with executives including the CEO and COO. "We got to personally introduce ourselves and learn more about the senior leadership team," she said. Each week, she connects with the company's director of sustainability and social impact Jacquelyn Kankam, to whom she reports.

"She has a unique, inclusive, and liberating leadership style that I am thankful for because I am constantly learning as well as executing," Grewal said.

Harjas Kaur Grewal Meeting with Jackie Kankam

Harjas Kaur Grewal

Grewal contacted Jackie last summer on LinkedIn for a virtual coffee after noticing her extensive sustainability experience as a fellow woman of color. "I found her inspiring because she paved her own path and career," Grewal added. "When we spoke during our initial meeting, she mentioned opening a Social Impact, Activism role one day but wasn't sure when this role would open or the details."

After that meeting, Grewal said she made it her goal to become Deciem's top pick and created a 13-page visual proposal outlining ideas she had for the role if it ever opened up. Four months later, Grewal found herself interviewing for the role and she was hired.

"When Harjas contacted me, I could tell her passion and dedication to activism and social impact was unmatched," Jacquelyn Kankam told Insider. "One of our goals at Deciem is to build growth to power good, we needed someone who is agile, smart, and creative and Harjas fit the bill to a tee."

"This role meant I had achieved a goal to make my passion for social impact and activism into a career," Grewal added. "Moments like that prove that resiliency opens doors. "

Lunch is usually from 12 to 1 p.m.

She aims to eat a quick meal and has her daily fruit smooth for a boost of energy. Every day she picks up a book to read, and typically alternates between two at once.

"Currently, I am reading 'Faith, Gender, and Activism in The Punjab Conflict' by Mallika Kaur to learn more about the events leading up to the violence against Sikhs in Punjab in the 1980-90s," she said. "I have written about Partition of India, conflicts in Punjab, and violence against Sikhs extensively throughout my undergraduate degree, and as a Sikh, I am constantly pursuing knowledge about my community and history."

Harjas Kaur Grewal

Harjas Kaur Grewal


She is also reading "Greenlights" by Matthew McConaughey, the first book she picked up to read for "pleasure" after University ended. "My favorite quote from Greenlights, which is now my lock screen on my phone is: 'Less impressed, More involved,'" she said.

At the end of the workday, she takes a walk with her family

After her workday, she makes sure to spend time with her family before starting her work with United Women, the organization she founded. "My younger brother, Jujhar, is rocking a t-shirt in support of the farmers protesting at the Delhi border in India right now in this photo," she said, referencing the picture below. "My entire family is passionate about social justice and we often talk at length about world issues, philosophy, and activism."

Harjas Kaur Grewal

Harjas Kaur Grewal

Around 6 p.m., she logs in to work at her nonprofit

After a break, she logs into Slack and starts working on United Women, her platform seeking to amplify young BIPOC voices, provide mentorship to youth in women's shelters and community housing, and platform human rights issues. She is managing a team of about 17 volunteers, alongside her co-founder Aimée Lister, who is based in the United Kingdom.

Harjas Kaur Grewal

Harjas Kaur Grewal



"We just wrapped up a human rights campaign and are working on expanding our partnerships, finalizing the mentorship program, and responding to the youth who are interested in joining the organization to make an impact," Grewal said.

She also attended the United Nations Generation Equality Forum last week on behalf of United Women to create an alignment with the 17 SDGs, which include eradicating poverty, combatting climate change, and fighting for quality education.

Around 11 p.m., it's bedtime

After she's done working on United Women, she takes the time to wind down and turns on some old Bollywood music. Right before bed, she might even FaceTime her friends. "My friends are the best support system I could ask for."

Then, she goes to sleep and does it all over again the next day.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: ddavis@businessinsider.com (Dominic-Madori Davis)]

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Sun, 11 Apr 2021 10:15:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Matthew Mcconaughey India Trends Strategy University Vogue United Nations Un Prince Harry Delhi Facetime Jackie Matthew Punjab Toronto Canada Grewal Zinc Gen Z Niacinamide Deciem United Nations Youth Assembly Dominic Madori Davis BI Select Harjas Kaur Grewal United Women During United Women Slack Zsofia Jacquelyn Kankam Jackie Kankam Harjas Kaur Grewal Grewal Harjas Mallika Kaur United Women the organization Jujhar United Women Aimée Lister United Kingdom Harjas Kaur Grewal United Nations Generation Equality Forum
Exploring Bihar: Meet The 25YO Entrepreneur Revolutionizing The Rural Bihar! http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/pluggd/~3/ZT8k1WqZPAA/ “Although, it’s one of the toughest questions for me; still I would love to introduce myself as a Bihari, who is entirely dedicated to developing Bihar in most possible way,” says Ranjan Mistry, the 25YO social entrepreneur who also considers himself an educationist, journalist, researcher and thinker! Staying in Bihar, working for it and contributing to its development is one of the best things he says he’s doing, which he loves to flaunt.

Over the last one year, Ranjan worked with different organisations, entrepreneurship cells and incubation centres to develop innovation, covid-19 related activities, and enhance women-oriented jobs across the country. He worked with startups and community enablers like Hanuman, Medishala, Karekeba Ventures, etc., from idea to execution phase and supported startups in reviving their dead business. 

An optimist and a strong believer in dynamic smart work, Ranjan believes that moral support and entrepreneurial spirit is something that keeps the business going. NextBigWhat interviewed this young entrepreneur and discussed what the future for startups and the development sector looks like. Here’s a quick glimpse of our conversation and the insights Ranjan brought to the table.

You never really did a formal college, yet are known to so many coding languages, several skills and course curriculums. What kept you going?

It entirely depends on your passion for learning something new; if you stop learning, then your knowledge and growth will also stop at some point over time. Being from a lower-middle-class family, I always faced a financial crisis, and somehow my learning helped me in executing my startups & ventures at zero cost.

You started Campus Varta at a very young age. What was the vision behind that? How many people have you reached so far?

The vision was to connect rural schools, colleges and universities on a digital platform, and enable students to explore the outer world with the right information at the right time, especially in states like Bihar, Jharkhand, UP, West Bengal, Assam and so on. Till now, we have directly and indirectly reached more than 3.5 million students with more than 1800+ College, 150+ Universities in more than 22 States. We have done more than 2000+ partnerships in the last four years, including several Bollywood movies.

Tell us about your other initiatives –  Patna University Incubation Hub, Womenia Chakra, Hunar Didi, & Womenia Story.

I have been working toward developing the Entrepreneurship Cell and Incubation Center at University in Bihar for the last three years. So, In 2019 Patna University finally decided to bring their own Incubation centre to their campus after doing more than 750+ meetings with students, professor, VC, etc. Patna University Incubation Hub is the first Incubation Center at any University level in Bihar. 

Womenia Chakra is a platform to empower rural women via online and offline mode by providing opportunities to influence the status of women, both economically and socially- through employment practices, sourcing, product and service development, partnerships, supplier relationships, and marketing campaigns. It has several subsidiary organisations like Hunar Didi and Women School of Entrepreneurship.

Womenia Story is a digital platform covering women stories from rural India to inspire and empower women and enable them in their branding. 

What is your idea behind WSE? How are rural women entrepreneurs taking it?

Women School of Entrepreneurship (WSE) is a section 8 non-profit company registered as Womenia Chakra Foundation, which aims to create, leverage and nurture the last mile girls and women entrepreneurial leadership talent in India’s social, entrepreneurial, and startups sector by educating them about entrepreneurship.

WSE is a non-profit learning and entrepreneurship development organisation that aims to build and strengthen last mile girls and women entrepreneurial leadership talent in India’s social and startups sector. We enable girls and women leaders from various sectors—such as schools, colleges, corporates, and government services— to make a meaningful contribution to the social and startup sector; we also offer capacity building opportunities for leaders in the social sector. We endeavour to build critical entrepreneurial and leadership skills that will allow us as a sector to create better, more innovative and sustainable solutions for greater impact at scale.

It was set up on 14th March 2020 with the aim of creating a learning and entrepreneurial leadership development organisation that will help build and strengthen last mile girls and women entrepreneurial leadership capacity for India’s social and startup sector.In November 2020, Deepti Kiran,Juhi Smita, Md. Amanullah joined it as a co-founder.

Meet The 25YO Entrepreneur Revolutionizing The Rural Bihar!

It has namely three programs, i.e., Kanyapreneurship, Herpreneurship and Didipreneurship.

Kanyapreneurship is a Nine Days Certificate Program in Entrepreneurship for school going girls offered by Women School of Entrepreneurship. It has been designed as a Womenia Chakra Foundation initiative to fuel entrepreneurial leadership spirit among kidopreneur girls. We will cover almost 27 modules under this program in vernacular language.

Herpreneurship is a Nine Days Certificate Program in Entrepreneurship for College, University going girls and women or Women’s Founder offered by Women School of Entrepreneurship. It has been designed as a Womenia Chakra Foundation initiative to fuel entrepreneurial leadership spirit among girls and women. We will cover almost 27 modules under this program in vernacular language.

Didipreneurship is a Nine Days Certificate Program in Entrepreneurship for College, University going girls and women or Women’s Founder offered by Women School of Entrepreneurship. It has been designed as a Womenia Chakra Foundation initiative to fuel entrepreneurial leadership spirit among girls and women. We will cover almost 27 modules under this program in vernacular language.

It has three fellowships, i.e., WSE Fellowship, Womenia Fellowship, Women Innovation Fellowship.

WSE Fellowship is a 2 Month extensive fellowship for girls and women to understand the journey of startup founders and their enterprises by researching them and preparing case studies, which will be published and used as study material. It’s an opportunity for young, dynamic individuals to contribute to enhancing skill and promote entrepreneurship.

Womenia Fellowship is a one-year extensive fellowship for girls and women to learn and understand an organisation’s work culture by working in different partner organisations such as startups, small women-led ventures & enterprises, and NGOs. It’s an opportunity for young, dynamic individuals to contribute to enhancing skill and promote entrepreneurship.

Women Innovation Fellowship is a one-year extensive fellowship for girls and women to learn and understand innovation in entrepreneurship for empowering women by directly working on the Womenia Chakra Foundation Program. It’s an opportunity for young, dynamic individuals to contribute to enhancing skill and promote entrepreneurship.

Meet The 25YO Entrepreneur Revolutionizing The Rural Bihar!

It has three campaigns, i.e., Stri, Antrik and Sarthi.

Stri: Women Entrepreneurship Awareness Program: It’s a regular campaign to make entrepreneurship awareness among last-mile girls and women through articles, audio, video and several modes in collaboration with startups, government, NGOs and organisations.

Antrik: Intrapreneurship Awareness Program: It’s a regular campaign to make Intrapreneurship awareness among last-mile girls and women through articles, audio, video and several modes in collaboration with startups, government, NGO and organisation to support their founder in the best possible way.

Sarthi: Entrepreneurship Enabler Awareness Program: It’s a regular campaign to make entrepreneurship awareness among last-mile girls’ and women’s family, friends and colleagues through articles, audio, video and several modes in collaboration with startups, government, NGO and organisation to support them in their entrepreneurial journey.

Ranjan, you’ve worked with people from rural areas on a grassroots level & have brought education to Naxal affected areas. Please share your experience and thoughts regarding the present condition of women & children in rural India.

Somehow, after running several government programs and after several decades, the conditions of women and children in Rural India are the same, as we all knew that it’s huge, so we need more organisation in this field for upgrading the conditions of rural women and children. Of the approximately 432 million working-age women in India, about 343 million are not in paid formal work, and 324 million of these women are not in the labour forces, and another 19 million are in the labour force but not employed. Despite being the third-largest startup nation and having over 27,000 startups, India still has only 5% of women startups founders. Gender disparity across the Indian startups’ ecosystem increased in 2020, with nearly 77% of firms having less than 20 % women in leadership roles, compared to 69 % in 2019.

Let me tell you another hidden story of an Indian women-owned business, and it will give you clear pictures of women’s conditions. India has 13.5-15.7 million women-owned enterprises, representing 20% of all enterprises. These are overwhelmingly single-person enterprises, which provides direct employment for an estimated 22 to 27 million people. 

Further, a number of enterprises reported as women-owned are not in fact controlled or run by women. A combination of financial and administrative reasons leads to women being “On Paper” owners with a little role to play. I hope you have watched the recent web series Panchayat; the condition of the Lady Mukhiya portrayed is similar across rural India.

Similarly, rural children have the same case as accessing education in the lack of financial help and accessibility.

Please share your working process – how do you identify the pain points and how exactly the work gets started? How many people/organisations/ villages have you worked with so far?

As I always believed to stay grounded for identifying the pain points, no one can pick the pain points within a day; it takes time to understand that’s why we need to be among the people and somehow be part of that community. Once we identify the pain point, then we start thinking to bring the solution, and after that, we execute it. Let’s take the example of Women School of Entrepreneurship; I have been working on this for three years as a pilot project silently to identify the real problem and solutions, and I have executed several things with rural women. Till now, I have worked with more than 20K women across Bihar and Jharkhand.

Meet The 25YO Entrepreneur Revolutionizing The Rural Bihar! Given the time you have been operating till now, what are the drawbacks or fallbacks you have found in the startup ecosystem & development sector?

The biggest drawback of the startup ecosystem & development sector is the ignorance of Bureaucrats. We can’t develop a healthy ecosystem without government support, and government schemes, plans, programs have been implemented and run by Bureaucrats, and somehow they didn’t support the startup ecosystem. Let’s take an example of Jeevika, one of the biggest organisations of Govt. of Bihar, several startups write down mails for support or new ideas for collaboration, but they didn’t get any response in the last two years, even they didn’t get any receiving mail. Similarly, the condition of Industry Dept. The Government of Bihar is worse if I talk about support. Somehow, We need to solve it rather than hiding things.

The rural sector is still unexplored; what are your further plans to help the people from the remotest areas?

Yeah! It’s true, and I have been trying to bring more startups that will focus on rural India, and I always believe that bringing startups focused on rural issues is the fastest and best way to help the people from the remotest areas.

What would you suggest to entrepreneurs thinking to enter this domain? 

Getting satisfaction after completing the work is the real success, whether you are awarded for the work or not; each & every time you will get some learning &, most importantly, internal satisfaction with peace in mind and heart. Entrepreneurship is just like engineering; it’s not about spoon-feeding; if you have the guts, then you only become an entrepreneur; similarly, if you have the passion, then you only become a true engineer by heart.

Stay tuned with NextBigWhat for more such inspiring and informative stories! #TowardsABetterWorld

The post Exploring Bihar: Meet The 25YO Entrepreneur Revolutionizing The Rural Bihar! appeared first on nextbigwhat.

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Sat, 10 Apr 2021 04:16:21 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Leadership Education Entrepreneurship India University Social Enterprise Social Impact West Bengal Assam Bihar Naxal Bureaucrats Rural India Ranjan Sarthi Ranjan Mistry Hanuman Medishala Karekeba Ventures Campus Varta Patna University Incubation Hub Patna University Bihar Womenia Chakra Women School of Entrepreneurship WSE Womenia Chakra Foundation Deepti Kiran Juhi Smita Md Amanullah Kanyapreneurship Herpreneurship Didipreneurship Kanyapreneurship Nine Days Certificate Program Women School Women 's Founder Womenia Fellowship Womenia Chakra Foundation Program It Stri Antrik Sarthi Stri Antrik Mukhiya Jeevika
Perfect is not the same as perfectionism http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/EVFL3EM5tns/ Perfectionism is a cudgel and a way to hide.

Perfect is the often-attainable outcome of meeting spec. “That’s perfect!” says the delighted patron.

Modern perfect: A plane that doesn’t crash, a bus that leaves on time. Surgery that fixes a broken valve and a computer program that doesn’t cause a kernel panic. These are the building blocks of our built world.

Perfectionism is a way to berate others for not meeting imaginary standards. Or berating ourself as a way to avoid shipping the work.

The perfectionist desires an outcome that can never be achieved. That’s why they’re a perfectionist–to hide behind the impossible.

Few things outside of mathematics are ever truly perfect. But our definition of spec gives us room to do the work. The bus that comes early does no one any favors.

Making promises and keeping them is the path of someone who seeks to contribute. We need better specs, usefully functioning systems and more reliable promises.

Holding back for too long because it could be somehow better than spec, though, is a way to avoid contributing. And using power or privilege to insist that others meet our ever-increasing but ever-less-useful standards is unhelpful.

Better? Sure. Work for that.

But perfectionism is a defect.

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Sat, 10 Apr 2021 03:36:07 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Uncategorized
Mayday! Mayday! How to Build Trust in a Crisis https://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2021/04/mayday_mayday_how_to_build_tru.html

NOTHING reveals an organization’s limits more than a sudden crisis. And after 2020, we’ve all become more familiar with what that looks like. Crisis situations test what you have built — your culture, your relationships, your resilience. But at the root of all of these challenges is one capacity that means the difference between success and failure: trust.

Trust is your most important asset amidst crisis and change. A team with high levels of trust will have the agility necessary to make decisions and react quickly to fluctuating situations.

Building Trust Instantly

The beautiful thing about trust is that it will help you through a crisis even if you start to build it the day things go off the rails. In fact, your quickest opportunity to build trust is in a crisis. On 9-11, complete strangers trusted each other in an instant if they were running in the same direction.

To some degree, trust is built up over time, but your ability to build trust multiplies in a crisis. Building trust consists of strengthening eight traits (also called pillars) that came out of research on what makes the most effective leaders and organizations.

Take a look at the pillar of clarity for example. Clarity increases trust instantly. It’s almost impossible to trust a leader who is vague or who gives insufficient information. But be crystal clear in your words and your actions, and trust will immediately increase — especially in the middle of a crisis.

This three-point strategy prioritizes clarity and provides a roadmap that you can use over and over in any crisis.

1. Narrow your focus to a single priority. When the unexpected hits, everything feels like a priority. But it’s actually the opposite; in a crisis, it’s essential to address only one priority at a time. Ask yourself these two questions to help guide your actions: first, ask “What can I control?” It’s tempting to focus on barriers, but the only thing that matters in a crisis is what you can control, not what you can’t.

The second question to ask yourself is “What is the one, most important thing that I can do, right now?” That’s your priority. Designating only one priority means your team will be able to follow through. There’s nothing that builds clarity more effectively than aligning a team around a single, achievable priority. When your team knows exactly where to focus its efforts, trust in your leadership will grow.

2. Compress your plan into short blocks. In a conversation with Gen. McChrystal (best known for his leadership of the US Army Joint Special Operations Command), he shared that when the war in Afghanistan took a turn for the worse, they weren’t able to quickly get the intel they needed. So instead of planning weeks ahead, they set 30-minute daily meetings to define a daily priority. What could this look like in business? Often leaders set a one-year priority, but in a crisis the pace of change means you may need to set a one-month, one-week, or even a one-day priority for your people to follow.

In any crisis, task completion is a crucial benchmark because momentum builds momentum. Narrow your priority to something that can be completed in this short timeframe, or shorter! After a week, the situation may have completely transformed. A doable goal also facilitates engagement and optimism. When people know absolutely that their efforts are aligned with a larger plan, they won’t have to waste precious time second guessing or asking for approval. Nothing solidifies trust like a reliable pattern of completion. And the more trust increases, the more smoothly and quickly your operation can run.

3. Maintain agility. Responding to a crisis requires speed, but it also requires flexibility and agility. The situation will change constantly and on a massively accelerated timeframe. The ability to take in information, adjust, and pivot to a new direction is crucial. Once you’ve completed one priority, you need to be able to identify and shift to the next one. The ability to reassess a situation and pivot quickly is just as important as narrowing to a single focus. Leaders must be actively engaged in this process, taking their teams from start to finish, then circling back around to repeat the process.

Making it through a crisis unscathed requires organizations to be able to identify, complete, and move on from tasks at a rapid clip. A high trust organization will always be able to move more quickly and maintain solid footing. And nothing facilitates trust better than crystal clear communication.

Once you start, clarity builds on itself, and as clarity increases, trust grows exponentially in your leadership and in your business.

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Leading Forum David Horsager, MA, CSP, CPAE, is the CEO of Trust Edge Leadership Institute, Trust Expert in Residence at High Point University, and Wall Street Journal bestselling author of The Trust Edge. David has advised leaders and delivered life-changing presentations on six continents, with audiences ranging from FedEx, Toyota, MIT and global governments to the New York Yankees and the Department of Homeland Security. His new book, Trusted Leader: 8 Pillars that Drive Results describes how to create a companywide foundation of trust. Learn more at TrustEdge.com or davidhorsager.com.

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Fri, 09 Apr 2021 16:52:19 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Leadership Instagram Afghanistan David Department Of Homeland Security Wall Street Journal New York Yankees Gen McChrystal US Army Joint Special Operations Command David Horsager MA FedEx Toyota MIT
Enabling everyone to have the ability to understand the hidden stories in their data – Interview with Dr Derek Wang of Stratifyd https://www.adrianswinscoe.com/2021/04/enabling-everyone-to-have-the-ability-to-understand-the-hidden-stories-in-their-data-interview-with-dr-derek-wang-of-stratifyd/ Today’s interview is with Dr. Derek Wang, the founder and CEO of the AI-driven experience analytics platform Stratifyd. Derek joins me today to talk about empowering […]

The post Enabling everyone to have the ability to understand the hidden stories in their data – Interview with Dr Derek Wang of Stratifyd first appeared on Adrian Swinscoe.]]>
Fri, 09 Apr 2021 11:36:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Business Technology Leadership Interviews Customer Experience Customer Service Employee Engagement Change Artificial Intelligence Culture Innovation Machine Learning Team Ai Data Analytics Employee Experience Customer focus Proactive Customer Service Derek Wang Stratifyd Stratifyd Derek
Career Reinvention Journal—Solving Your Career Pivot Puzzle http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/artpetty/management_excellence/~3/TwaJCb9sN6A/ http://artpetty.com/feed/rss/

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Fri, 09 Apr 2021 09:14:32 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Career Leadership Self-development Options Career Reinvention Career Reinvention Journal Think Differently Career Puzzle Think Differently About Yourself
6 unique culture traits of big tech companies like Google and Apple that small businesses can adopt http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/oh6VJPSU7h8/apple-google-big-tech-culture-for-small-business-2021-4 Companies like Google fosters creativity among employees thereby empowering them to develop impressive creative solutions.

Courtesy of Comparably

  • Big Tech companies nurture innovation to bring their visions to life through unique culture traits.
  • Microsoft promotes a growth mindset and Google encourages their employees to fail freely and think outside the box.
  • It is important to groom a workforce that is passionate about the company's mission.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

The most successful Big Tech companies are impacting the world in major ways. Behind every action and decision lies a clear vision for success. That vision is propelled by a company culture that inspires workers to strive for excellence. Through unique culture traits, Big Tech companies help nurture the innovation and flexibility needed to bring their visions to life. This secures their position as industry leaders and role models for companies across the world.

Company culture is important to every business, no matter their industry or size. Here are six unique Big Tech corporate culture traits that can also help small businesses to succeed.

Six unique corporate culture traits scalable for small business:

1. Hacker culture: finding creative ways to overcome limitations

Big Tech companies are faced with the unusual challenge of finding creative ways to overcome software limitations. This hacker culture requires flexibility and boldness, encouraging workers to quickly solve problems on their own before the issues escalate to upper management. It demands open communication channels and creates a freedom among employees to share ideas and brainstorm solutions to find the best outcome for the company and their customers.

Facebook thrives on hacker culture for creative problem-solving in devising social networking and cyber security solutions that keep up internet and technological advancements that are constantly changing.

2. Employee engagement: creating a flexible, fun environment

Employee engagement is a must in getting buy-in to your company's mission. Google creates a flexible, fun environment founded on trust that enables employees to think outside the box and make decisions for themselves. Workers gather in informal spaces to collaborate and share ideas. Failure is rewarded, which eliminates the fear of making mistakes. People feel free to brainstorm, innovate, and think outside the box without hesitation.

By fostering this kind of creativity, Google empowers its employees, gains their trust and loyalty, and develops incredibly creative solutions in the process.

3. Growth mindset: encouraging employees to individually practice this one

Inevitably, every company hits a roadblock. When this happens, a growth mindset encourages employees to learn more about the problem at hand to find a possible solution. Microsoft relies on growth mindset to instill a desire in its staff to be continual learners who have an insatiable curiosity to constantly seek information and gain knowledge. The company encourages their staff to experiment and think creatively, and, like Google, provides an environment where it's okay to make mistakes.

Trial and error is often the way valuable solutions are discovered, and a growth mindset allows that to happen.

4. No degree needed, learn our program instead: adopt tech giants' training systems

More and more, technological giants are realizing that not every tech-oriented skill is learned in school. Companies like Apple, Google, and IBM are focusing less on four-year degrees and more on hiring top notch excellence. They're looking for people who excel in their abilities and creativity, and who can maintain the secrecy needed to protect proprietary ideas and help the company get ahead of the competition.

As for the tech know-how needed to perform the job, these organizations offer in-house training to provide the instruction employees didn't receive in college. By emphasizing the importance of skill rather than education, Big Tech challenges conventional standards and paves the way for innovation.

5. Innovation-centric: never letting great ideas go to waste

A company that puts innovation first is more likely to develop state-of-the-art products that improve our everyday life and society as a whole. We see that with Samsung, who prides itself on instilling an innovation-centric culture by emphasizing its employees' knowledge, abilities, and skill for developing superior products.

In doing so, the company creates opportunities for continual development in more than just its product and service line. It promotes personal and professional employee growth, encouraging employees to support each other in achieving their individual goals.

This lays the foundation for a workplace of integrity and ongoing change that strives for excellence.

6. Treat staff like family: you'll have them for life

People who feel they have equity in the company they work for are more inspired to work toward its overall success. Alibaba empowers its employees by encouraging them to give candid feedback, make valuable suggestions and (respectfully) criticize the company's leadership.

It promotes an environment of transparency, are open to new ideas, and include employee feedback in major decisions about the company and its products. In this way, Alibaba makes their staff feel valued, which builds a loyal workforce who stays with the company longer and continues to suggest new ideas.

Staff members who are treated like family have more buy-in to the company's goals and achievements.

Stand apart from the competition with a unique company culture

Businesses large and small all have one thing in common: a company culture can make or break their success.

By implementing these unique strategies, you can build a workforce that is passionate about your mission, loyal to your company, and free to brainstorm creative ideas that set your company ahead of the competition.

Read the original article on Business Insider

[Author: insider@insider.com (Julia McCoy)]

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Fri, 09 Apr 2021 09:13:01 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Apple Google Facebook Leadership Microsoft Samsung Entrepreneur Trends Strategy Company Culture Alibaba Ibm Nordic Tech Companies Julia McCoy Apple Google Contributor Growth Mindset Big Tech Contributor 2019
Use the Right Scorecard https://leadchangegroup.com/use-the-right-scorecard/ “Honey, you really need to start dusting every day. If the neighbors drop-in, they’ll think you’re a bad housekeeper.”

Mom had moved in about a month earlier, and this wasn’t the first time she’d commented on my inferior housekeeping skills.

Growing up, we lived in the cleanest and best-maintained home on the street. Mom’s daily chore list included dusting, vacuuming, and doing laundry. Once a week, she’d wash all the windows inside and out, disinfect the bathrooms, mow the lawn, hose and sweep out the garage, edge, trim and snatch off any dead or dying flowers. Nothing was dirty or out of place at our home. Ever. Mom took great pride in her reputation as an excellent housekeeper.

I never aspired to be a great housekeeper and didn’t see as not being one as any sign of weakness or being lacking. My goal was clean and tidy, not immaculate—a mindset Mom didn’t understand. She was horrified every time I told her if someone was interested in seeing the dirt around my home that I’d happily show them where to look. Someone’s assessment of my cleaning skills wasn’t a factor in how I measured my worth.

Warren Buffett, business tycoon and the chairperson and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, says, “The big question about how people behave is whether they’ve got an inner scorecard or an outer scorecard. It helps if you can be satisfied with an inner scorecard.”

Our self-concept boils down to how we see ourselves and that self-picture is based on two primary factors:

  • Self-esteem—the positivity or negativity of our evaluation of our self, our traits, and our features. Broadly speaking, do we give ourselves an “A,” a “F,” or somewhere in-between in how we evaluate ourselves.
  • Social comparison—how we compare ourselves to others in terms of traits, skills, abilities, appearance, opinions, net worth, career, material goods, connections, and achievements.

“Self-esteem is what we think and feel and believe about ourselves. Self-worth is recognizing ‘I am greater than all of those things.’ It is a deep knowing that I am of value, that I am lovable, necessary to this life, and of incomprehensible worth.” ~Dr. Christina Hibbert, clinical psychologist, and author

In today’s in-your-face world of social media, culture wars, celebrity influencers, and shaming or canceling this-or-that, it’s easy to lose the deep knowing about ourselves and get swept up in comparing ourselves to others and measuring our self-worth by an outer scorecard.

When our self-assessment tilts too heavily toward being concerned with what others think, our sense of self-worth and value can get out of whack. We rely too much on the outer scorecard at the expense of the inner one. Thinking about both of them, inner and outer assessment, is what we want to do.

Maintaining a healthy balance between looking inside and outside as we determine our value requires self-awareness—and some effort, like training ourselves to:

  • Focus on both our being and our doing. Don’t be mesmerized by impressive job titles or material possession and forget about character, fairness, trustworthiness, and compassion.
  • Give ourselves and others unconditional positive regard.
  • Remind ourselves that the size of our social media following, bank account, etc., has nothing to do with being worthy.
  • Challenge, not blindly accept, the critical words of our inner critic.
  • Accept that someone loving us isn’t the only thing that makes us worthy of love.
  • Avoid linking our job with our personal values. A good person can be a janitor just as easily as a CEO.
  • Accept that everyone has personal elements that are good, bad, and ugly. Perfection is a mirage.
  • Remind ourselves that our real value comes mostly from the inside.

“It can be frustrating and even frightening to observe the success which sometimes comes to outlaws and rogues who seem to refute notions of universal justice. Every time we see a villain enjoying the fruits of dishonorable acts, we find ourselves doubting the value of character and the validity of the virtues we have been taught. Thus, it takes character to believe in character, but that belief is always rewarded, often by material success, but always by the esteem it earns from those who matter.” ~Michael Josephson, law professor and founder, Joseph and Edna Josephson Institute of Ethics

The post Use the Right Scorecard appeared first on Lead Change.

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Fri, 09 Apr 2021 06:00:04 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Value Values Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett Self-awareness Self Worth Character Mom Self-assessment Self Esteem Joseph Scorecard Michael Josephson Healthy Balance Christina Hibbert Edna Josephson Institute
“What’s the hard part?” http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/h7CjJiUnZR0/ A useful way to get in sync.

“What’s the hard part” is a question that everyone on the team should be able to answer. But you won’t find out unless you ask the question.

You might discover that many people think the hard part is directly related to what they do all day. And you might discover that some people insist that the hard part has nothing to do with what they do all day–even if it does.

What is the difficult work that, if it went well, would transform the impact of this project? Where are the projects worth focusing on, the things that would be difficult to outsource in a productive way?

When we roll all of this up to the enterprise, it’s up to the CEO to be clear about what the hard part really is – the solvable problem that if it were solved would make a significant difference for the enterprise.

Almost all the cycles involved in creating and building something aren’t particularly difficult. They’re important, certainly, we can’t ride the bike unless it has wheels. But wheels aren’t hard to find and purchase at a fair price.

A team’s awareness and focus on the hard parts dramatically shifts the prospects for the project.

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Fri, 09 Apr 2021 03:36:11 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Uncategorized
Fixing Zoom calls: Looking better and feeling better http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/locVKoP48k4/ It’s time to get serious about how we show up in remote meetings.

For a year, we slogged through it, but it was exhausting. Not only did we feel lousy at the end of the day, but other people rarely saw us at our best.

Now that it’s clear that the nature of work and meetings has changed forever, perhaps this is a good moment to embrace what’s possible.

I’ve put together a rig in my office that is noteworthy for two reasons:

  1. I can be present in meetings with far less fatigue.
  2. My Zoom presence is significantly enhanced, which makes it easier to get my point across.

Here’s a short sample.

And here’s a photo of what it looks like from my side.

Here’s how to do it.

First! It’s free, it takes about one minute and will change the way you feel at the end of the day. In Zoom, find the button for HIDE SELF VIEW. (Here’s a link). What this means is that as in real life, you won’t be able to see yourself. It turns out that looking in the mirror all day wears us out. You’ll have to change the setting at the start of every meeting (this should be high on their list of things to fix) but it’s pretty easy.

By hiding your face from your screen, you can focus more on everyone else in the meeting.

Second, also free: rearrange your workspace so that light is not coming from behind you.

The next steps cost more in setup and money, and I’ll cover them from easiest to most involved. Part of the magic of video meetings is that without a commute or fancy equipment beyond a phone or a laptop, people could join. But it’s become clear that it’s possible to deliver more fidelity and impact by investing in some tech.

Just as we don’t hesitate to buy a new outfit for a big meeting, or pay $500 for a plane ticket, these are investments, and in the scheme of your career, they’re pretty reasonable–and your boss should pay for them:

Get some LED lights. They’re incredibly cheap now (here’s a sample, but shop around.) Set them up to the left and right of your screen, a few feet behind it.

Get an external DSLR camera and hook it up to your Mac or PC. This is a much bigger commitment, but the difference it makes is startling.

You’ll need a camera, a tripod, and a capture box. Again, all three have alternatives, feel free to shop around. I use this capture box, but your mileage may vary. (And scroll down to the end of this post for a camera alternative)

How it works: The camera goes on a tripod and sits just above and slightly behind your computer screen. The HDMI output goes to your capture box and then into your computer. In Zoom, change the camera from your computer to the camera. Done. It also pays to get a power cable for your camera so it doesn’t run out on you. (You can add a microphone while you’re at it).

And then, there’s one last step, which has been the biggest leap for me since the self-view insight.

When you look at the camera in a zoom call, you’re not looking at the person you’re talking with. You’re staring over their head if you’re looking at the camera, or, possibly, you’re looking at them, but it appears to them that you’re looking at your keyboard. Either way, there’s no eye to eye connection.

This is unnatural. You’d freak out if you had a real life meeting with someone who never made eye contact. And it’s really tiring, because you end up spending your time not doing something humans evolved to do, which is look at each other.

The alternative? A beam splitter.

These are used for teleprompters. It’s basically a piece of fancy glass, at an angle, on top of a monitor or screen. Behind the glass is the camera.

You can look directly at the glass, and the camera behind it, but instead of looking at the glass and the camera, what you’re actually looking at is the teleprompter or the stuff that’s on the screen.

It’s magical.

This setup is now far cheaper than I expected. Here’s a typical beamsplitter with hood and mount, and here’s a monitor that should fit with it. Total cost under $300.

[or if you’ve already got a late-model iPhone or iPad along with a Mac, there’s a new app called Reincubate Camo, which is a much better product than the name implies. It allows you to skip buying an external camera and use the device tethered to your Mac instead. You’ll still need a tripod, still and you can probably make it work with the beamsplitter…]

The entire setup, all of the things that I’ve listed above, comes to less than $1,000–less than half of that if you already have a camera or use Camo. If you go to a meeting a day, that’s a few dollars a meeting over the course of a year.

It’s not for everyone, but if you are looking for the tools to be more productive, I hope it helps.

[Author: Seth Godin]

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Thu, 08 Apr 2021 21:37:31 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Mac Uncategorized Dslr Seth Godin
Leading Thoughts for April 8, 2021 https://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/2021/04/leading_thoughts_for_april_8_2.html

IDEAS shared have the power to expand perspectives, change thinking, and move lives. Here are two ideas for the curious mind to engage with:

I.

The late economic historian professor at the University of California, Berkeley, Carlo M. Cipolla on the five laws of human stupidity:

1. Everyone underestimates the number of stupid individuals among us.
2. The probability that a certain person is stupid is independent of any other characteristic of that person.
3. A stupid person is a person who causes losses to another person while deriving no gain and even possibly incurring losses themselves.
4. Non-stupid people always underestimate the damaging power of stupid individuals.
5. A stupid person is the most dangerous type of person.

Source: The Basic Laws of Human Stupidity

II.

Watts Wacker and Jim Taylor on vision:

“The only way to succeed in the marketplace today—the marketplace of individuals or products or services or ideas—is to know your own story and to follow it into the future. Define yourself by someone else’s benchmarks, immerse yourself in someone else’s possibilities, and you become the thing you define yourself by and immerse yourself in. Measure yourself against your own rate of change and you stay inside your own story. That way, when the other side ceases to exist, you still have a reason to go on. External and lateral competition is the distraction. Internal and vertical competition is the game. The real battle is against yourself.”

Source: The Visionary's Handbook: Ten Paradoxes That Will Shape the Future of Your Business

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Look for these ideas every Thursday on the Leading Blog. Find more ideas on the LeadingThoughts index.

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Thu, 08 Apr 2021 15:44:25 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Facebook Leadership Instagram Jim Taylor Watts Wacker Leading Thoughts University of California Berkeley Carlo M Cipolla
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Thu, 08 Apr 2021 10:11:05 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Career Leadership Self-development Career Reinvention Career Reinvent Boot Camp Career Reinvent Cohort Career Reinvent Framework Latest Career Reinvent Boot Camp
Protecting Your Company From Misinformation via Behavioral Science https://leadchangegroup.com/protecting-your-company-from-misinformation-via-behavioral-science/ If you listen to something repeated, it really feels a lot more accurate when you hear it repeated. To put it simply, repetition makes any kind of statement seem truer. In other words, anything you hear will feel a lot more true each time you hear it once again. Cognitive neuroscientists like myself call this the “illusory truth effect.”

Recall your experience when you read the first sentence of this article. It probably felt strange and disconcerting, perhaps with a tone of outrage, as in “I don’t believe things more if they’re repeated!”

Reading the second sentence did not inspire such a strong reaction. Your reaction to the third sentence was tame by comparison.

Why? Because of a phenomenon called “cognitive fluency,” meaning how easily we process information. Much of our vulnerability to deception in all areas of life – including misinformation – revolves around cognitive fluency in one way or another.

Now think about how rumors spread in your organization’s grapevine. It works on the same principle. Employees hear a rumor – say about a proposed headquarters move. It feeds into their fears, which is a very cognitively fluid part of our minds. They repeat the rumor, and it goes around, and then they keep hearing it from others. It begins to seem more and more true, regardless of reality. Before you know it, those who want to stay where they are looking for another job, even though you might never have intended to move your headquarters!

Fortunately, we can learn about these mental errors, which helps us address misinformation and make our workplaces more truthful.

The Lazy Brain

Our brains are lazy. The more effort it takes to process information, the more uncomfortable we feel about it and the more we dislike and distrust it.

By contrast, the more we like certain data and are comfortable with it, the more we feel that it’s accurate. This intuitive feeling in our gut is what we use to judge what’s true and false.

Yet no matter how often you heard that you should trust your gut and follow your intuition, that advice is wrong. You should not trust your gut when evaluating information where you don’t have expert-level knowledge, at least when you don’t want to screw up. Structured information gathering and decision-making processes help us avoid the numerous errors we make when we follow our intuition. And even experts can make serious errors when they don’t rely on such decision aids.

These mistakes happen due to mental errors that scholars call “cognitive biases.” The illusory truth effect is one of these mental blindspots; there are over 100 altogether. These mental blindspots impact all areas of our life, from health and politics to relationships and even shopping.

Besides illusory truth, what are some other cognitive biases you need to beware of to protect your organization from misinformation? If you’ve heard of any cognitive biases, you’ve likely heard of the “confirmation bias.” That refers to our tendency to look for and interpret information in ways that conform to our prior beliefs, intuitions, feelings, desires, and preferences, as opposed to the facts.

Again, cognitive fluency deserves blame. It’s much easier to build neural pathways to information that we already possess, especially that around which we have strong emotions; it’s much more difficult to break well-established neural pathways if we need to change our mind based on new information. Consequently, we instead look for information that’s easy to accept, that which fits our prior beliefs. In turn, we ignore and even actively reject information that doesn’t fit our beliefs.

Fixing Our Brains

Unfortunately, knowledge only weakly protects us from cognitive biases; it’s important, but far from sufficient.

What can we do? You can use decision aid strategies to address cognitive biases to defend your organization from misinformation.

One of the most effective strategies is to help your employees and yourself build up a habit of automatically considering alternative possibilities to any claim you hear, especially claims that feel comfortable to you. Since our lazy brain’s default setting is to avoid questioning claims, which requires hard thinking, it really helps to develop a mental practice of going against this default. Be especially suspicious of repeated claims that make you feel comfortable without any additional evidence, which play on the illusory truth effect and the confirmation bias combined.

Another effective strategy involves cultivating a mental habit of questioning stories in particular. Whenever you hear a story, the brain goes into listening and accepting mode. Remember that it’s very easy to cherry-pick stories to support whatever position the narrator wants to advance. Instead, look for thorough hard numbers, statistical evidence, and peer-reviewed research to support claims.

More broadly, you can encourage employees to make a personal commitment to the twelve truth-oriented behaviors of the Pro-Truth Pledge by signing the pledge at ProTruthPledge.org. All of these behaviors stem from cognitive neuroscience and behavioral economics research in the field called debiasing, which refers to counterintuitive, uncomfortable, but effective strategies to protect yourself from cognitive biases. Peer-reviewed research has shown that taking the Pro-Truth Pledge is effective for changing people’s behavior to be more truthful, both in their own statements and in interactions with others.

These quick mental habits will address the most fundamentally flawed aspects of our mind’s tendency to accept misinformation.

The post Protecting Your Company From Misinformation via Behavioral Science appeared first on Lead Change.

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Thu, 08 Apr 2021 06:00:47 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Strategy Data Misinformation Cognitive Biases Behavioral Science Blind Spots Cognitive Fluency Mental Blindspots Process Information ProTruthPledge
Managers Need To Have A Plan To Deal With An Active Shooter http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ItStaffingMotivation/~3/f1c4Au3jBYY/managers-need-to-have-a-plan-to-deal-with-an-active-shooter Nobody wants to think about it, but you do need to have a plan
Image Credit: COD Newsroom

I really wish that we did not have to have this discussion. No matter how much manager training you’ve had or how sharp you think that your manager skills are, none of us is ready to deal with a life & death situation that having someone in our office with a gun creates. In the past this never seemed to be a problem. The office was seen as being a safe place where everyone could get along. Sure people might argue, but the worst thing that would happen is that there would be a fight in the parking lot. That has all changed. Are you ready to deal with this new world?


Preparing For The Worst

The issue of having someone with a gun in your office is clearly an issue that none of us really wants to spend any time thinking about. If this situation actually happened where you work, what would you do – outside of running from the building screaming?

The issue of having a person with a gun come into your place of work is an increasing problem. The statistics show that active shooters and workplace violence are increasing year on year. What managers need to realize is that every institution, every entity needs to be concerned with guarding against an active shooter situation. We need to understand that it can happen anywhere and it does happen anywhere. What makes all of this even worse is that it seems to happen in the most vulnerable places, places that are ‘soft targets’ and don’t have great security in place.

Managers are not going to be able to solve a complex problem like this by ourselves. We’re going to have to find outside firms that can provide us with the products that we’re going to need in order to protect our teams if an event like this was ever to happen. The ideal solution would be a key-less, fob-less access control system for businesses. What managers are going to need is some form of a lockdown solution that is designed to make your company’s safety planning less daunting.

An active shooter solution should allow a manager to limit access to their workplace in the event of a shooter. It should also enable exits in the event of a natural disaster, or deal with any scenario your company may experience. Solutions like this don’t come cheap. What a manager has to realize is that the cost will depend on the number of doors covered and the size of the organization. However, generally speaking the cost should be in the tens of dollars per door, per month


Having A Solution In Place

Managers know that they need access control. In the past we only had keys. The problem with a solution like this is that keys are difficult. It can be all too easy to make copies of key, easy to never get keys back. Managers need a solution that can allow them to change someone’s access in seconds as well as lockdown their workplace from anywhere. Your goal has to be to find a way to make your workplace a welcoming a place and a safe place.

Safety is an essential component for any company but in recent years, the worst-case scenarios have become a lot worse. The good news for managers is that there are many access control systems from companies like ADT, Honeywell, Kisi, and others that offer an array of solutions for the security concerns of their clients, What managers are going to want to get is a smart building platform that is able to integrate with third-party apps and hardware.

Managers need to realize that no single tool is the ultimate fix. We need to realize that if any of us thinks technology is a panacea or a wholesale substitute for the human element, that’s a mistake. There’s more involved here – teams still need to be trained as a part of our team building, they need to be on guard, they have to be skeptical. After a solution has been implemented, managers will have to hope that the solution will never be used.


What All Of This Means For You

Managers have a lot on our plates already. We are responsible for creating effective teams and helping them to be productive. However, it turns out that that there is something else that we have to be on the lookout for in the modern workplace – an active shooter. We have a responsibility to our team to have taken proactive actions before any such event ever occurs.

Although the possibility of someone coming into your workplace with a gun may seem a bit farfetched, the statistics show us that this is something that is happening more and more often. What is even worse is that these events seem to happen at sites that are least able to defend themselves. Managers need to create solutions that can allow them to limit access to their workplace. These same systems can provide support in the case of some form of a natural disaster. Solutions are not cheap; however, the cost is based on the size of the area that you are securing. What managers need is a form of access control. The goal is to get a smart building platform that can be integrated with other applications. Managers also have to realize that technology is not the complete solution – teams will still need to be trained on how to react in these types of situations.

It is my most sincere hope that you never find yourself in a situation where you have to deal with a person in your workplace who has a gun. Nobody should ever have to deal with a situation like this. However, as we read the newspapers and watch TV, we see that this is happening more and more often. As a manager it is your responsibility to make sure that you are prepared just in case the very worst ever happens. Take the time to create and implement a solution so that if something very bad ever happens, you’ll be ready.


– Dr. Jim Anderson Blue Elephant Consulting –
Your Source For Real World IT Management Skills™


Question For You: What do you think that you need to tell your team in order to help them to prepare for an active shooter?


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What We’ll Be Talking About Next Time

Managers know that technology has given us more flexibility in how we work than ever before, and for that, our mental well-being has definitely improved. They know that the human brain can only tolerate so much stimulation before reaching overload. Managers try to combat this by changing the work environment to avoid burning out, giving teams a fresh atmosphere in which to thrive. This helps them stay in the “flow,” that state of mind where employees not only do their best work, but enjoy it the most. The good news is that technology has untethered us from the static workstation. However, there’s a dark side to that bright screen when it comes to team member’s well-being.

The post Managers Need To Have A Plan To Deal With An Active Shooter appeared first on The Accidental IT Leader.

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Thu, 08 Apr 2021 05:00:00 +0000 BlogLikes - Find Most Popular Blogs Leadership Safety Careers It Manager Active Shooter Jim Anderson COD Newsroom Control System Team training Time Managers IT manager skills IT manager training IT team building Access Control System Proactive Actions Soft Targets ADT Honeywell Kisi